Skip to main content
SHOW DETAILS
up-solid down-solid
eye
Title
Date Archived
Creator
Jury Instructions
Jan 19, 2023 Public Resource
texts

eye 0

favorite 0

comment 0

Topics: New York, Letters
Multicasting! The Voice of Public Resource
Jan 19, 2023 Public Resource
movies

eye 0

favorite 0

comment 0

An 8-foot high public domain fence features public domain images from the Smithsonian Institution and the Library of Congress. The images are printed on 6mm thick plastic, good for 10 years in the sun and rain. A QR code accompanies each image so the viewer can see the metadata or download the image. Videography by Keith Thompson. Audio by Barry Snaith. Fency by Gregory Velez and Jason Wilcox.
Topic: public domain
Internet Jukebox
Jan 18, 2023 Johann Sebastian Bach; Arranged and Edited by Sara Heinze
audio

eye 0

favorite 1

comment 0

This Internet Archive item consists of pieces of music derived from the book Bach Album for Piano (Heinze). The derivations are created using the Soundslice Optical Music Recognition facility with subsequent post-processing by Martin R. Lucas of Public Resource. The following items are available, the item number corresponds to the position of the piece in the original book: Item 01: Gavotte (From the Fifth French Suite) ( pdf ; musicxml ; midi ; braille ; wav ; mp3 ; soundslice ; soundcloud )...
Topics: Bach, OMR
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 21

favorite 0

comment 0

For the 1914 gambol of the celebrated Lambs Club of New York, Sousa composed this march and “The Lambs’ Gambol” overture. He also accompanied a group of club members on a fund-raising tour of the major eastern cities. In each city he led a parade and apparently acted as musical director for their stage presentations. Once again Sousa lived up to his reputation of not letting his music go to waste; much of “The Lambs’ March” was taken from his unsuccessful 1882 operetta, The...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 1

comment 0

This march grew from Sousa’s 1890 song, “Nail the Flag to the Mast,” the lyrics being a poem by William Russell Frisbe. Sousa deleted the words, modified the melody and rhythm, added a change of key, and shortened it. The result was a march for piano called “Columbia’s Pride,” which he apparently never arranged for band or orchestra. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 17

favorite 0

comment 0

The Sesquicentennial Exposition of 1926 was held in Philadelphia, the occasion being the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of American independence. Sousa composed this march at the request of exposition officials and dedicated it to the mayor of Philadelphia, W. Freeland Kendrick. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 83. Used by permission. *PLEASE NOTE: Only six marches from Volume 6 are in the public domain and presently have Marine Band...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

Mayor John W. Smith of Detroit publicly requested this march at a Sousa Band concert in that city in 1925. Sousa responded by composing this, one of his most vigorous marches, and dedicating it to Mayor Smith and the people of Detroit. It was later declared the official march of Detroit at a brief concert in the Detroit council chambers given by the Cass Technical High School Band, directed by former Sousa Band clarinetist Roy Miller. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

In 1926, patriotic citizens noted the deterioration of the historic old frigate Constitution, better known as “Old Ironsides,” and waged a vigorous campaign to have it restored. At a rally held in Madison Square Garden, enough money was raised to insure success of the movement. For that occasion, Sousa composed this march. He led the massed bands of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Army, but whether or not the new march was played is not certain. Oddly, the march was never published, and...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 23

favorite 0

comment 0

The piano score of a march called “Universal Peace” was discovered among old papers at Sousaʼs Sands Point estate in 1965. The title “National Defense” had been crossed out. Sections are almost identical to sections of the march now known as “The Gridiron Club,” the march Sousa apparently composed shortly thereafter and dedicated to the Gridiron Club, the celebrated organization of journalists in Washington, D.C. He did almost the same thing with still another march, one bearing no...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, baseballʼs high commissioner, asked Sousa to compose this march on the occasion of the National Leagueʼs fiftieth anniversary. Earlier the two had met in Havana. No doubt Sousa told him of his enthusiasm for the game and of the Sousa Bandʼs own team. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 73. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 20

favorite 0

comment 0

On November 16, 1923, in recognition of what Sousa had done for his country in both peace and war, Marquette University bestowed upon him an honorary Doctor of Music degree. It was the first such degree given by that university. Sousa composed this march as an expression of his appreciation and presented the piano manuscript to the university. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 71. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa’s love for horses is reflected in this march dedicated to the mounted troops of a Cleveland National Guard unit. Their exclusive use of black horses was the inspiration for the title. Troop A, once known as the First City Troop of Cleveland, was originally an independent militia group and has had a long, distinguished history since its formation in 1877. Sousa’s most noteworthy association with the troop came in 1898. The Sousa Band, having arrived in Cleveland just as the troop was...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

“I have always found a great deal of inspiration in these old songs. … We cannot improve simple straightforward melodies, but we can give them a more adequate, full-throated expression….” Sousa made this statement to a newspaper reporter in discussing the new march he had just build around “Auld Lang Syne.” “Auld Lang Syne” happened to be the marching song of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, the oldest military organization in the United States. When the...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa became a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine in Washington in April, 1922, and was promptly named the first honorary director of the Almas Temple Shrine Band. His nephew, A. R. Varela, who sponsored him, asked him to compose this march. The new march saluted Shriners in general but was dedicated specifically to the Almas Temple and Imperial Council, A. A. O. N. M. S. The Shrinersʼ national convention was held in Washington in June, 1923, and Sousa was called...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 21

favorite 0

comment 0

Thomas E. Mitten was top executive of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, whose trolleys transported throngs of visitors to and from Willow Grove Park. This march was dedicated to both Mitten and his employees; hence the title. Mitten’s favorite hymn, “Onward Christian Soldiers,” is the basis of the march’s trio. The title was changed from “March of the Mitten Men” to “Power and Glory” for a second edition, and the heading “A fraternal march” was added. This came by...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 16

favorite 0

comment 0

>Future President Warren G. Harding and bandmaster John Philip Sousa—two Americans who were serving their country in totally different capacities were awarded honorary doctorates by the Pennsylvania Military College in Chester on February 7, 1920. Sousa saluted the cadets in his own inimitable way, by composing a march in their honor. The band score was dedicated “To Col. Hyatt, the Faculty and Cadets of the Pennsylvania Military College” and was entitled “The Pennsylvania Military...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 17

favorite 0

comment 0

It is amazing that this march, regarded as one of Sousa’s finest and certainly one of his most vigorous, was composed while he was recuperating from a broken neck. The march takes its title from the 7th Regiment, 107th Infantry, of the New York National Guard, whose history may be traced back to the Civil War. The conductor of the famous 7th Regiment Band was Major Francis Sutherland, a former Sousa Band cornetist. Upon America’s entry into World War I, Sutherland left his position with...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 16

favorite 0

comment 0

The inspiration for this march probably came from an 1855 address by the American congressman and raconteur Rufus Choate. This excerpt from the address is printed on the sheet music: “We join ourselves to no party that does not carry the flag and keep step to the music of the Union.” The composition was dedicated to Mrs. Warren G. Harding, wife of the President, and Sousa added his own patriotic verses. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press,...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

It is not often that a composer dedicates music to a wooden Indian. Sousa did just that by dedicating this march to Tecumseh, whose stern figurehead adorns Bancroft Hall at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. Until a cache of old letters was recently discovered among Sousa family holdings in 1975, there was no proof of a request for this march coming from the student body of the U.S. Naval Academy. From the letters it was learned that a request had been made by Midshipman W. A. Ingram,...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa’s daughter, Helen Sousa Abert, stated that her father had written this march at the request of the publisher. It was dedicated “To collegians, past, present, and future.” One of two sets of words Mrs. Abert wrote for the march appeared on the sheet music, and she was of the opinion that the rejected version was not as “corny” as the printed version. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 76. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

Immediately after World War I, Sousa was besieged by such a flood of requests for new marches that he could scarcely have fulfilled them all. One, however, took top priority—a solicitation from the executive staff of the newly formed American Legion. The request was filled promptly. Sousa was enthusiastic about the American Legion because it promoted 100 percent Americanism and because it was a veteran’s group. Little could have appealed to him more. On the first piano manuscript was this...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 20

favorite 0

comment 0

On the front cover of this World War I dirge is the following inscription: “Dedicated to Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt In memory of the brave who gave their lives That liberty shall not perish.” Specifically, the march was composed in memory of Theodore Roosevelt and his son Quentin Roosevelt, who was killed in France. Sousa summed up his sentiments in an interview. “It will not be a monetary success. One cannot write from his heart and write for rewards. I was thinking of those fine young boys...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

During World War I, when anti-German feelings were high, representatives of the American Relief Legion asked Sousa to compose a wedding march to replace the music of Wagner and Mendelssohn for American weddings. Sousa fulfilled their request, but his march was forgotten soon after the war ended. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 96. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 19

favorite 0

comment 0

The man who asked Sousa to compose this march (Robert D. Heinl, chief of the Department of Patriotic Service) also requested that he include sounds characteristic of a shipyard. Sousa thought this unusual for a march, but he complied. Sections of the march were named “The Call to March,” “Getting Busy,” and “Laying the Keel Blocks,” and the score called for sirens, anvils, and a riveting machine. The march was given a stirring première at the New York Hippodrome on March 3, 1918,...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

Volunteers of the U.S. Army Ambulance Corps, 80 percent of whom were decorated for bravery in World War I, quickly won Sousa’s admiration. As president of the American Amateur Trapshooters’ Association, Sousa persuaded members of that organization to donate twenty-four ambulances and other vehicles to the corps. When he paid an informal visit to the USAAC camp at Allentown, Pennsylvania, Colonel C. P. Franklin, the commanding officer, asked him to compose a march for them. Sousa was pleased...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 8

favorite 0

comment 0

Although this World War I march has not been as popular as several other Sousa compositions of that era, it is regarded by scholars as one of his better efforts. The title first appeared on the manuscript of the march known as “Wisconsin Forward Forever” but was subsequently used for this march. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 84. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

According to the inscription on the sheet music and on both of Sousa’s known manuscripts, this was to be the “March of the American Cavalry.” It was dedicated to the officers and men of the 311th Cavalry, commanded by Colonel George W. K. Kirkpatrick. It is another of Sousa’s World War I efforts which retained its popularity after the war. Today it may seem amusing that a scroll of appreciation designated Sousa “honorary life member of the Officers’ Mess of the 311th Cavalry.” But...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa composed this march at the request of Joseph W. Gannon, Division of Associated Flags chairman of the Fourth Liberty Loan drive of World War I. Gannon asked Sousa to incorporate national airs of the twenty-one nations at war with Germany, but Sousa thought this impractical and decided upon five. The countries represented were Belgium, Italy, France, Great Britain, and America, in that order. In a letter to Gannon dated August 25, 1918, Sousa suggested that the march be royalty free. This...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 9

favorite 0

comment 0

After enlisting in the U.S. Navy in 1917, Sousa made a study of sea chanteys and then wrote an article for The Great Lakes Recruit entitled “Songs of the Sea.” He made further use of the study while on a brief leave from the navy the following spring by composing one of his medley-type marches and calling it The Chantymanʼs March. The march incorporates eight chanteys, in this order: “Knock a Man Down,” “Away for Rio,” “Haul the Bowline,” “The Ballad of Billy Taylor,”...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

More than many of Sousa’s other marches, this World War I composition has a distinctly military character. In studying the music, Sousa’s apparent inspiration by visions of battlefield glory is not difficult to imagine. But perhaps its war-like title accounted for the relative lack of popularity. There is no record of solicitation by a specific regiment, but the march was dedicated “To the officers and men of the U.S. Infantry.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

While leading the U.S. Navy Battalion Band at Great Lakes Naval Training Center during World War I, Sousa composed this march and dedicated it “To the U.S. Navy.” It is often compared with “Semper Fidelis” because it bears a resemblance in construction, rhythm, key, and contrapuntal devices. Just as “Globe and Eagle” was named after the U.S. Marine Corps emblem, this march was named after the U.S. Navy emblem. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio:...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa crossed out the title “Solid Men to the Front” on his manuscript of this march and substituted the present title. It may originally have been intended to salute Wisconsin’s contribution to the war effort, because in press reports it was also referred to as “Wisconsin to the Front” and “Wisconsin at the Front.” “Forward” apparently took precedence as a title word, because that was the Wisconsin state motto. Words to the march were written by the poet Berton Braley, a...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

At a concert by the Sousa Band in York, Pennsylvania, a civic committee requested this Sousa march. The march was to be used at the York Flower Festival, commemorating White Rose Day. The white rose is the emblem of the House of York, in England, from which York, Pennsylvania, took its name. The White Rose Day celebration was canceled, owing to priorities of World War I. Nevertheless, Sousa’s march was played at a public concert by combined bands and given some measure of publicity in a...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 19

favorite 0

comment 0

During Sousa’s brief wartime service in the Navy, he was invited to a luncheon meeting in New York with Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and Army Lieutenant George Friedlander. Friedlander, of the 306th Field Artillery, asked Sousa to compose a march for that regiment, suggesting that the march be built around an artillery song then known by such names as “The Caisson Song,” “The Caissons Go Rolling Along,” and “The Field Artillery Song.” The song was believed to be quite...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

“The Boys in Navy Blue” and “Great Lakes” were alternate titles Sousa used for this march, which he wrote while in charge of the Navy band program at Great Lakes during World War I. It was dedicated to the officers and men of the Naval Reserve. The second half of the march was based on his then current song, “Blue Ridge, I’m Coming Back to You.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 73. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa received three silver loving cups for his sixty-second birthday on November 6, 1916, when the Sousa Band was engaged for the Hip Hop Hooray show in Philadelphia. One cup was presented by members of his band, another by the 1,200 employees of the show, and the third by the Boy Scouts of America, for whom he had just written this march. For the première of the march on that date, the scouts sent representatives from several cities. Dr. Charles D. Hart, president of the Philadelphia scout...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

The inspiration for this march came from the text of a 1915 speech by President Woodrow Wilson given at the twenty-fifth anniversary convention of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Washington, D.C.: “Our whole duty for the present is summed up in the motto ‘America First.’” At the suggestion of Col. George E. Richards of the U.S. Marine Corps, the march was dedicated to Mrs. William Cumming Story, President of the D.A.R. Sousa needed no prodding to compose a piece for the...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

One of twelve marches Sousa composed for various expositions or fairs, “The Pathfinder of Panama” was dedicated to the Panama Canal and the Panama-Pacific Exposition held in San Francisco in 1915. Sousa’s Band played a nine-week engagement at the exposition. The march was composed at the request of Walter Anthony, a reporter for the San Francisco Call . The Panama Canal was the pathfinder of Sousa’s title; it shortened the ocean voyage between San Francisco and New York by 8,000 miles....
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

The Sousa Band’s longest single engagement, from September 30, 1915, to June 4, 1916, was when it was featured in the Hip Hip Hooray extravaganza at the New York Hippodrome. Sousa wrote this march in commemoration of that engagement, and it was dedicated to Charles B. Dillingham, manager of the famous old theater. In a salute to Sousa on his sixty-first birthday, Dillingham arranged to have over two hundred theater orchestras around the country play the march at precisely the same time. Paul...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

For the 1914 gambol of the celebrated Lambs Club of New York, Sousa composed this march and “The Lambs’ Gambol” overture. He also accompanied a group of club members on a fund-raising tour of the major eastern cities. In each city he led a parade and apparently acted as musical director for their stage presentations. Once again Sousa lived up to his reputation of not letting his music go to waste; much of “The Lambs’ March” was taken from his unsuccessful 1882 operetta, The...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousaʼs “All American” operetta, The American Maid ( The Glass Blowers ), contains one recurring march theme, the title of which does not appear in the list of songs. Perhaps the publishers made this arrangement so that “reprise” would not appear so many times. The theme is the nucleus around which Sousa built the march “From Maine to Oregon.” The march, like the operetta, met with only limited success. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

Just before embarking on his world tour of 1910–11, Sousa composed this march in honor of the people of Australia and New Zealand, including both in his dedication, “to the Australasians.” The title was to have been “The Land of the Golden Fleece,” but “The Federal” was suggested to Sousa by Sir George Reid, the High Commissioner for Australia, who heard it in London at the beginning of the tour. The original title was not wasted; Sousa used “In the Land of the Golden Fleece”...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

The musical comedy The Yankee Girl was in need of a spirited march, so Sousa was prevailed upon to provide one. The march, one of Sousa’s most interesting musically, was dedicated to the star of the show, Blanche Ring. Lyrics were provided by Kenneth S. Clark. The title underwent a process of evolution. The earliest known manuscript was labeled “Uncle Sam’s Navy.” Prior to the opening, newspapers referred to the march as “The Honor of the Yankee Navy.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

“The Fairest of the Fair” is generally regarded as one of Sousa’s finest and most melodic marches, and its inspirations came from the sight of a pretty girl with whom he was not even acquainted. It was an immediate success and has remained one of his most popular compositions. It stands out as one of the finest examples of the application of pleasing melodies to the restrictive framework of a military march. The Boston Food Fair was an annual exposition and music jubilee held by the...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

This was the march that first endeared Sousa to the Indians of America. It was a salute to Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, and was written for the Jamestown Exposition of 1907. This exposition marked the three hundredth anniversary of the first English settlement in America. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 8

favorite 0

comment 0

“The Free Lance” march, taken from Sousa’s operetta of the same name, has a lengthy and unorthodox construction when compared with most other Sousa marches. There were so many spirited march tunes in the operetta that perhaps Sousa felt obligated to include most of them when piecing together the march. Actually, there were enough for two separate marches. The “free lance” of the operetta was Sigmund Lump, a clever goatherd who hired himself out as a mercenary leader to two opposing...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

What is the inspiration for many of the suites and arrangements, for which Lieutenant Commander John Philip Sousa, the famous bandmaster, who comes to Bangor, Wednesday, September 19th, would have won a place in the American musical history, had he never written a single march? “A good tenderloin steak, German fried potatoes and plenty of bread and butter,” answers the March King.I remember that one of my best marches, from the standpoint of lasting popularity, was written with the best...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 9

favorite 0

comment 0

When composing this march, which was originally to be called “British Tars,” Sousa had hoped that it would be to naval men what “The Stars and Stripes Forever” was to army men. This ambition was not realized, however. The format of the march is slightly different from the usual Sousa march and contains traces of “Sailor’s Hornpipe.” The introduction and first two strains were taken from his operetta Chris and the Wonderful Lamp (1899). Royalties from the sale of sheet music in...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

On December 1, 1901, while on a tour of England, the Sousa Band played a command performance at Sandringham. In a conversation with the royal family after the concert Sousa requested and received permission to dedicate a march to His Majesty the King. The first draft was completed the following April while Sousa was vacationing at Hot Springs, Virginia, and the new march was premiered by the Sousa Band in Montreal on May 21, 1902. A beautiful illuminated manuscript was made by the John Church...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 17

favorite 0

comment 0

The title of this composition was selected in a contest sponsored by Pittsburgh newspapers, but inasmuch as the march was never published Sousa subsequently used at least three other titles when programming it with the Sousa Band. These were “The Belle of Pittsburgh,” “Homage to Pittsburgh,” and “Homage to Nevin and Foster.” The march was written for the dedication of Music Hall at the Western Pennsylvania Exposition (Pittsburgh Exposition) and included melodies by two Pittsburgh...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

Blanche Duffield, soprano of the Sousa Band in 1901, witnessed the creation of this march, and she provided this rare description of Sousa composing: It was [on] a train between Buffalo and New York. Outside the coach the lights of towns along the route flashed by like ghosts fluttering at the window panes.The night was dark and the few stars above twinkled fitfully. Mr. Sousa sat in his chair in the dimly lit Pullman. At the further end of the car a porter diligently brushed cushions. At...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 6

favorite 0

comment 0

It was with great pride that Sousa and his band represented the United States at the Paris Exposition of 1900. This was the first overseas tour of the band, and it was received throughout Europe with enthusiasm. The band displayed the finest American musicianship Europe had seen and helped dispel the notion that the United States was an artistic void. A statue of George Washington was unveiled on July 2, but the highlight of the Paris engagement was the unveiling of the Lafayette Monument on...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

In telling a reporter how this march was inspired, Sousa also gave his explanation of why his marches have been more successful than those of the master composers: A composition in march tempo must have the military instinct, and that is one reason why so few of the great composers have written successful marches. They lived in an atmosphere of peace. The roll of musketry had no meaning for them, so that quality is entirely absent from their work. The Spanish War was an inspiration to me....
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

When played for the first time by Sousa’s Band in Philadelphia’s Academy of Music on April 21, 1899, “many feet were beating a tattoo.” The band was obliged to repeat it three times. “Hands Across the Sea” was off to a good start, and it has since remained a standard in band literature. The march was addressed to no particular nation, but to all of America’s friends abroad. It has been suggested that Sousa was inspired by an incident in the Spanish-American War, in which Captain...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

It would seem that a march taken from one of Sousaʼs most musically interesting operettas would rank among his better efforts, but such was not the case with this march. It was extracted from Acts II and III of The Charlatan , and despite a wealth of published editions it was soon all but forgotten. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

After the widespread success of his operetta El Capitan, Sousa regrettably declined an offer of $100,000 for The Bride Elect, from which this march was extracted. The operetta soon passed from the musical scene, but the march was a favorite of bandsmen for many years to come. The march was pieced together from various sections of the operetta. The principal theme was developed from the song, “Unchain the Dogs of War,” which ended Act II. The march was sometimes programmed by the Sousa Band...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 25

favorite 0

comment 0

With the possible exception of “The Star Spangled Banner,” no musical composition has done more to arouse the patriotic spirit of America than this, John Philip Sousaʼs most beloved composition. … Symbolic of flag-waving in general, it has been used with considerable effectiveness to generate patriotic feeling ever since its introduction in Philadelphia on May 14, 1897, when the staid Public Ledger reported: “It is stirring enough to rouse the American eagle from his crag, and set him...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 18

favorite 0

comment 0

One of the perennial Sousa favorites, this march has enjoyed exceptional popularity with bands since it first appeared. It was extracted from the most successful of the Sousa operettas, El Capitan . El Capitan of the operetta was the comical and cowardly Don Medigua, the early seventeenth-century viceroy of Peru. Some of the themes appear in more than one act, and the closing theme of the march is the same rousing theme which ends the operetta. This was the march played by the Sousa Band,...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

It is a curious fact of the music world that marches written for fairs and expositions almost always fade into oblivion. Two notable exceptions are Sousaʼs “King Cotton” and “The Fairest of the Fair.” The former was written for the Cotton States and International Exposition of 1895, and the latter for the Boston Food Fair of 1908. Sousa and his band had great drawing power at fairs and expositions and were much sought after. But officials of the Cotton States and International...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

Not dedicated to band directors, as the title might imply, this march was written in appreciation of an honor bestowed upon Sousa by the Board of Directors of the 1893 St. Louis Exposition. The Sousa Band had been in existence for less than a year at that time but had created such a sensation at the exposition that the directorate held a held a special ceremony in his honor during the final week. In the brief ceremony, the governor of Missouri presented “The March King” with an elaborate...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Following in the footsteps of Patrick Gilmore, Sousa became a popular figure at Manhattan Beach, the famous New York summer resort. One of his most lavish medals was presented to him in 1894 by the proprietor, Austin Corbin, and other shareholders. The previous season, Sousa had dedicated this march to Corbin, and one of his manuscripts is inscribed to him. Sousa once told a reporter that the march had been derived from an earlier composition, probably “The Phoenix March” (1875): “I wrote...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 18

favorite 0

comment 0

For $500 more, this march probably would have been named “The Devilʼs Deputy.” Sousa was composing music for an operetta of that name at the request of the celebrated comedian Francis Wilson. Sousa asked $1,500 for the work, but Wilson offered $1,000. When they could not come to an agreement, Sousa withdrew with his partially completed manuscript, which included a lively march. Sousa and George Frederick Hinton, one of the bandʼs managers, were in Chicago witnessing a spectacle called...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

“Sousa is the joy of the masses, the beautiful musician.” The expression “beau ideal” was used in the early 1890ʼs to describe anything that had caught the public fancy. An inscription on the original sheet music indicates that the “beau ideal” in the title was a newly formed organization called The National League of Musicians of the United States. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

The musical revisions and the abundance of titles given to this composition have resulted in music confusion. In spite of all efforts to make it popular, it was a multiple flop. Included in Evening Pastime, the 1879 collection of solos arranged by Sousa for violin and piano, was a short march by J. Molloy called “The Triton.” This was published by J. F. Shaw of Philadelphia. The composition grew from a simple arrangement to a march in 1892 when a second Philadelphia publisher, J. W. Pepper,...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa inserted this original march when he orchestrated Goodwin and Stahlʼs operetta, The Lion Tamer. The march was later published as a separate composition under two titles, “On Parade” and “The Lion Tamer.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

Six Egyptian trumpets, nearly five feet long, were used by the Sousa Band in featuring this composition on the first tour in 1892. There is no record of the piece being performed by the band after that season. However, in 1904 Sousa appropriated some of the themes for “Her Majesty the Queen,” a movement of his At the King’s Court suite. Band parts of the original “March of the Royal Trumpets” found their way to the Detroit Concert Band in 1966, and the piece was revived for a radio...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa was soundly criticized for this march, which he composed as a salute to the ladies of Chicago. Among the protests made by Chicago newsmen were these: “Mr. Sousa evidently regards the Chicago belle as a powerful creature, with the swinging stride of a giant, a voice like a foghorn, and feet like sugar-cured hams.” “The maiden who inspired it would seem to be...a giantess...whose motto...might have been ‘I will make a noise.ʼ” “Mr. Sousa has made his Chicago belle a strappling...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 16

favorite 0

comment 0

The only clue to the existence of this unpublished march was a mention in the list of compositions given in Sousaʼs autobiography, Marching Along, until manuscripts turned up in a trunk in the basement archives of the Sands Point home in 1965. Several copyistʼs manuscripts for band bearing the names of U.S. Marine Band musicians were found. Marine Corps enlistment records of these men are incomplete, so establishing an exact date for the composition is improbable unless other manuscripts are...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

This march was written to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, an organization composed primarily of American Civil War officers and their descendants. The anniversary celebration was held in Philadelphia on April 15 and 16, 1890, and the U.S. Marine Band was ordered by the secretary of the navy to participate. The piece is seldom played today, but the Loyal Legion uses it occasionally at its meetings. Much of the march...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

The mutual admiration which existed between John Philip Sousa and the school bands of America has caused many musicians and writers to conclude that this march was composed as a salute to the school band movement. However, it was written twenty years before that movement had begun. It was composed at the solicitation of the marching cadet corps of the one and only Washington, D.C, high school in 1890 (later called Central High School) and was dedicated to the teachers and pupils. The High...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

The Corcoran Cadets drill team was the pet of Washington, D.C., being the most notable of the drill teams which flourished there after the Civil War. Their average age was sixteen, and they presented a snappy picture with their colorful uniforms, wooden rifles, and youthful enthusiasm. They competed vigorously with units from Washington and other towns and were the first company of cadets to be mustered into the National Guard. Their esprit de corps was high, and the Corcoran Cadets Veteransʼ...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

During the 1880s, several Washington, D.C., newspapers competed vigorously for public favor. One of these, the Washington Post , organized what was known as the Washington Post Amateur Authorsʼ Association and sponsored an essay contest for school children. Frank Hatton and Beriah Wilkins, owners of the newspaper, asked Sousa, then leader of the Marine Band, to compose a march for the award ceremony. The ceremony was held on the Smithsonian grounds on June 15, 1889. President Harrison and...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 7

favorite 0

comment 0

Other than the fact that Sousaʼs “thunderer” was undoubtedly a Mason, his identity may never be revealed. “The Thunderer” march was dedicated to Columbia Commandery No. 2, Knights Templar, of Washington, D.C., and it was composed on the occasion of the Twenty-fourth Triennial Conclave of the Grand Encampment. The conclave was held in October 1889 and was sponsored by Columbia Commandery No. 2. Sousa had been “knighted” in that organization three years earlier. “The Thunderer”...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

“The Quilting Party,” or “Aunt Dinahʼs Quilting Party,” was a popular song in the United States in the late 1880s. Sousa capitalized on its popularity by using it as the trio of this march. The first section includes a musical quote of “When a Wooer Goes a-Wooing” from Gilbert and Sullivanʼs Yeomen of the Guard. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission. Sousa Scholar Jonathan Elkus further notes that “The...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 17

favorite 0

comment 0

“The Picador” was one of several marches sold outright to the publisher, Harry Coleman, for $35 each. That sum included arrangements for band, orchestra, and piano. The frontispiece of the original sheet music depicts a bullfight scene with a picador in action. If the mild mannered Sousa had seen a bullfight before composing this march, he would surely have chosen another title. After witnessing a bullfight while on vacation in Mexico, he was shocked by what he had seen and thereafter...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

It is unfortunate that President Chester A. Arthur, the man responsible for this march, did not live to hear it. In a conversation with Sousa, then leader of the U.S. Marine Band, he expressed his displeasure at the official use of the song “Hail to the Chief.” When Sousa stated that it was actually an old Scottish boating song, the President suggested that he compose more appropriate music. Sousa responded with two pieces, not one. First he composed “Presidential Polonaise” (1886)....
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

The National Fencibles of this marchʼs title were a popular drill team in Washington, D.C. The words to the trio of the march reflect their esprit de corps: “Forward to the battle, the trumpet is sounding; ‘Come if you dare!ʼ We loudly sing. Shoulder to shoulder, with hearts rebounding; Onward we march with the Fenciblesʼ swing.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 72. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 16

favorite 0

comment 0

Only those who receive certain degrees in Masonry may fully appreciate the meaning of this composition, which was written shortly after Sousa was “knighted” in Columbia Commandery No. 2, Knights Templar, Washington, D.C. The Knights Templar is theoretically derived from the Crusades, and a number of their secret rituals and ceremonies relate to the period when the Crusaders were battling the Turks. Thus the Knight Templar organization itself is probably the “Crusader,” unless Sousa had...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

Public acceptance of the Sousa marches which were entirely of his own creation was almost always greater than those in which he incorporated melodies of others. “Ben Bolt,” which was constructed around a popular song of the same name, is practically unknown today. It included several songs of the day: “The Daisy,” “Go Down Moses,” “Sally in Our Alley,” “O Fair Dove, O Fond Dove,” and “Ben Bolt” (“Sweet Alice Ben Bolt”). Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

With important manuscripts unaccounted for, no dedication specified on the printed music, and no mention in Sousaʼs memoirs, it is not known why this piece was given its name. One possibility which must not be overlooked is that Occidental College, in Los Angeles, was founded in the year that Sousa composed this march. “The Occidental” was not published until four years after it was written. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 75....
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

According to an inscription on the printed music, this march was dedicated to the officers and men of the 3rd U.S. Infantry. Although different from Sousaʼs other marches in musical format, it is regarded as one of his better efforts. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 80. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 17

favorite 0

comment 0

Nothing among Sousaʼs memoirs reveals the identity of the “gladiator,” but the first printing of the sheet music carried a dedication to Charles F. Towle of Boston. Towle was a journalist who was editor of the Boston Traveller at the time this march was written, but the nature of his association with Sousa is not known. Sousaʼs daughter Helen conjectured that her father might have been inspired by a literary account of some particular gladiator. It is unlikely that he would have dedicated...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Since Sousa did not discuss this march in any of his writings, the origin of the title must be left to speculation. Although the music was copyrighted in six different years, Time did indeed triumph over it–it was never popular. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 91. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

As leader of the U.S. Marine Band, Sousa came under the command of Major George Porter Houston. In Sousaʼs eyes, Houston was a stern but fair officer, and this march was dedicated to him. As in the case of “Guide Right,” “Right Forward,” and “Right-Left,” the title was derived from a marching command. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 84. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

A companion piece to “Mother Goose,” this medley march was also based on nursery rhymes. Included are “Three Blind Mice,” “Thus the Farmer Sows His Seed,” “Old Mother Hubbard,” “Hey Diddle Diddle,” “Little Redbird in the Tree,” “London Bridge Is Falling Down,” and “The Minstrel Boy.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 72. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

The popularity of Sousaʼs medley marches, which were based on themes of other composers, never approached that of his original compositions. Such was the case with the “Mikado March,” which utilized themes from the celebrated Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 71. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa and Edward M. Taber collaborated on a song called “Weʼll Follow Where the White Plume Waves” to support the presidential election campaign of James Gillespie Blaine, affectionately known as the “plumed knight.” Sousa rearranged the song as a military march, added new sections, and called it “The White Plume.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 96. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 13

favorite 0

comment 0

It is not known whether or not Sousa witnessed either of the two transits of Venus that occurred in his lifetime, but the phenomenon was the basis for the title of this march and also for one of his three novels. The march received its première at a concert of the U.S. Marine Band on April 19, 1883, with Sousa conducting. The occasion was the unveiling of a statue of Joseph Henry, first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, who had died in 1878. Henry, as president of the National Academy...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 16

favorite 0

comment 0

This unusual march calls for shouts of “Right! Left!” at regular intervals in the trio. Perhaps it was used in this manner by the Marine Band on the drill field. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 81. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

Discussions of this obscure composition are not to be found among Sousaʼs writings. The printed music offers no clue to the origin of the title. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 77. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

One of the seldom-used marches in the Sousa Band repertoire was this medley of nursery tunes. Reflecting his sense of humor, Sousa used it in a sly manner. On one occasion, a matinee audience seemed unresponsive. He quietly uttered to the band, “If theyʼre going to act like children, weʼll give them childrenʼs music! Get up ‘Mother Goose,ʼ gentlemen.” This got to be a joke with the bandsmen, and when Sousa appeared to be perturbed with a matinee audience, they would nudge one another...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa often remarked that the old Scottish ballad “Annie Laurie” was the most beautiful of all folk songs. He wrote this march around it in 1883, but in spite of several printings it was soon forgotten. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 43. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

Congress Hall is the name of a historic inn at Cape May, New Jersey. Cape May was and is today a popular east coast resort area, and in 1882 the U.S. Marine Band made its first appearance there under Sousaʼs direction. The band had created little interest outside Washington until Sousa assumed leadership in 1880. News of its surprising excellence spread, and it was invited to play this engagement at Cape May from August 20 to 26, 1882. Sousa returned the compliment by composing this march and...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 14

favorite 0

comment 0

The Yorktown (Virginia) Centennial was held to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the last important battle of the Revolutionary War: the surrender at Yorktown. Sousa, then leader of the U. S. Marine Band, composed this march for the event and dedicated it to Colonel H. C. Corbin, master of ceremonies of the centennial. Another printing of the same march was issued in 1900 as “Sen Sen.” This was part of a promotion scheme of the T. B. Dunn Company of Rochester, New York, a subsidiary...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

Little is known about the circumstances which gave rise to the composition of this march. It was “Respectfully dedicated to His Excellency Hon. David H. Jerome, Governor of Michigan, and Staff.” According to an inscription on the sheet music, it was first performed by the U. S. Marine Band at a reception given by the Michigan State Association in Washington on March 2, 1881. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 97. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 10

favorite 0

comment 0

“Guide Right” and “Right Forward,” a pair of parade marches composed in 1881, have marching commands for their titles. Both were dedicated to a Marine Captain R. S. Collum, presumably a friend of Sousaʼs in Washington, D.C. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 81. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 14, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 15

favorite 0

comment 0

(In Memoriam: Garfield’s Funeral March) Washington’s best-known Mason in 1881 was President James A. Garfield, who was a member of Columbia Commandery No. 2, Knights Templar. Sousa was also to belong to this same organization five years later, but during Garfield’s presidency he was being worked in the lower degrees of Masonry. Sousa was not well acquainted with the President, but he was greatly shaken at the news of his assassination. In the autobiography he tells of hearing paperboys...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 13, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 12

favorite 0

comment 0

The only two marches Sousa dedicated to presidents of the United States were composed for James A. Garfield, and they marked the beginning and end of his short tenure of office. The first was the stately President Garfieldʼs Inauguration March, which bears the inscription Opus 131. It was first performed by the U. S. Marine Band, with Sousa conducting, at the inauguration ceremonies on March 4, 1881. The second march honoring President Garfield was “In Memoriam.” Paul E. Bierley, The Works...
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 13, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 11

favorite 0

comment 0

Sousa marches had a banner year in 1881. Sousa had just reached his stride as leader of the U. S. Marine Band and wrote six that year. Two of these, “Guide Right” and “Right Forward,” were written for parade use, and their names were derived from marching commands. Both were dedicated to a Captain R. S. Collum of the Marine Corps. Paul E. Bierley, The Works of John Philip Sousa (Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press, 1984), 59. Used by permission.
Topics: Sousa, Marches
Internet Jukebox
Jan 13, 2023 John Philip Sousa
audio

eye 20

favorite 0

comment 0

For many years the only suggestion of this compositionʼs existence was an eleven-measure excerpt which constituted the January 17 entry in Sousaʼs musical almanac of 1910, Through the Year with Sousa. Then in 1970, when Sousaʼs heirs presented the Library of Congress with manuscripts they had held in storage since 1932, one of the surprises was the discovery of a full set of band parts of an untitled Sousa march. Comparison with the excerpt from Through the Year with Sousa showed the march...
Topics: Sousa, Marches