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tv   News  Al Jazeera  September 30, 2013 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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>> the final countdown to a shutdown lawmakers in washington have 17 hours to strike a deal to fund the federal government. hopes for a last minute compromise are looking grim. president obama welcomed israeli prime minister to the white house. why when it comes to iran the talks may be tense. >> back to court, b.p. faces the prospect of a penalty in the next legal phase from the 2010 gulf of mexico oil spill. >> love and life and now elevated for posterity, the late pope john paul ii soon to be
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declared a saint. >> good morning. this is aljazeera america, and i'm morgan radford. 17 hours, that's how much time congress has to avoid a government shutdown. the gop has tied the bill to a one year delay of the affordable care act, also known as obamacare. the democratic controlled senate is promising to scrap that provision. >> the american people overwhelmingly reject obamacare. the only people not listening to the argument are the career politicians in washington. >> there's a time and place to debate obamacare but not at a time when millions of innocent people are held hostage if we don't fund the government. >> some have come out against the gop strategy and senator susan collins of maine is the
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latest. the bill was sent to the senate this morning and they are expected to send a simple spending measure back to the house, then putting the legislative hot potato back in the lap of john boehner. lib ewe is live in washington, d.c. there's been no progress at all between the parties, is there any reason at all to believe that a compromise could happen before shutdown? >> well, as you said, the senate gets this legislative hot potato today. they are not expected to pass or approve what the house has done, so it will get kicked back to the house and really the countdown is on. it's looking less and less likely that anything will happen. congress was pretty quiet yesterday. we saw so much activity saturday, but the house and senate were out yesterday. it was more of a talking points moment yesterday on capitol hill. nothing was going on. even though we're getting so close, not a lot of action, so
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there's really like only one thing that can happen to put this all on hold, and that would be for the house to come up with another proposal that the senate could sign off on. house speaker john boehner has not indicated that that is likely. >> libby, you said a countdown is on. republicans seem to be divided over the fact that the spending bill was coupled with obamacare. why the division. >> we have this new batch of republicans. they've only been in congress for some as little as nine months or so, senator ted cruz, the one who created that fake filibuster of sort last week is a freshman senator. they have a very different mindset than old guard of republicans. the senate has been a body where compromise had to rule. in order to get your projects through, you had to join with folks on the other side of the i'll. the new guard of republicans say we're not interested in
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compromise. we want to shake down washington, shut things down if we have to and get rid of the health care law. john boehner has to come to some sort of agreement in his caucus. we are seeing a real shift in his way of going about things. he is now listening to those tea party members in a more active way and giving them the floor and saying ok, this is how you want to do things, we'll give it oh try. >> if they give it a try and it doesn't work, what's at take if a shutdown goes into effect. >> that's the question everyone is asking. so not everything completely shuts down. some things do keep going. entitlement programs, social security, medicare, medicaid continue to function. also at airports, t.s.a. screeners will be on the job and border patrol agents will still be working, but here's what is jeopardized. 800,000 federal workers could get furloughed. they're not just here in washington. they are all across the country. that will start to get felt in
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states across the nation. we see things like veteran benefits that could be jeopardized. one point of irony, the federal health care law, major date tomorrow, october 1, the exchanges, these on line and marketplaces that you can also find locally in your communities. the way to get health insurance, those keep going. they don't get put on hold, even if the federal government shuts down, because the white house has jurisdiction over that. they're continuing to put those forward. the very thing the republicans are fighting over will still keep happening. >> reporting live from capitol hill, thanks for being with us this morning, libby. stay with aljazeera for continuing coverage of the looming government shutdown. you can always get the latest on line at aljazeera.com. >> this morning, president obama will welcome israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu to the white house. we have a look at exactly what's at stake for all sides.
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>> this sense photo op seemed to sum up president obama's relationship with the prime minister. threats made by the u.s. flat out ignored or rebuked by netanyahu. in his second term, the white house has been trying a different tact, smiles and tributes by the u.s. president in israel, his first foreign trip after reelection was meant to smooth over the rough relationship. the president's recent speech at the united nations might have made that tougher. he appears to be pressuring israel on his top two foreign policy priorities. >> real breakthroughs on these two issues, iran's nuclear program and dialy-palestinian peace would have a profound impact on the entire middle east and north africa. >> the president isn't talking about attacking, but talking, putting the focus on a diplomatic solution.
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mr. netanyahu literally drew everyone a picture at the u.n. last year. he wants a red line drawn, a convincing threat to the u.s. military will bomb iran's nuclear facilities. >> israelis are very fearful that he will almost taking off the table the threat of a military strike. if all else fails, trust the united states to take care of it. >> the media blitz by iran's new president rouhani seems to have made that an easier sell at least for the american people as he is consistently described as a moderate unlike his predecessor. >> they don't have ahmadinejad anymore, the gift that kept on giving for extreme -- for the iran haters and chest thumpers around the world. the joke in tehran and i don't
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know if it maybe is not even a joke is that with the departure of ahmadinejad, the israelis lost their best agent. >> the israelis may fear they are losing their biggest backer for a military strike. he will push for tough words from the president and a definitive time line. if he doesn't get it, the relationship might look a lot less like this, but this once again. aljazeera, washington. >> on sunday, netanyahu spoke, vowing to "tell the truth in the face of sweet talk," saying that truth is vital for security and peace in israel. >> a team of weapons inspectors is expected to arrive in syria very soon. their mission, to destroy syria's chemical arsenal, something that has never been done during a civil war. they have until 2014 to get rid
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of weapons. we are joined now live in beirut. what exactly are the inspectors up against when they try to dismantle syria's chemical weapons this week? >> well, this disarmament operation is described as one of the biggest and most dangerous. in the words of the u.n. secretary general, it will be a down thing task. the inspectors will be facing security, as well as logistical problems. it will be very different to operate on the ground. it is not just that. they are working under a very aggressive deadline. according to the international deal, the chemical weapons stockpile should be dismantled by mid 2014 and the u.n., they are looking for more inspectors. they are going to need more money, but in the international community, they are seeing this as a break through. the syrian opposition will say
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this deal doesn't change much for us, because it doesn't stop the war and the syrian government is continuing to use conventional arms against the people of syria. >> a separate group has been sent by the u.n. to investigate new attacks just last month. what new information does their investigation show that we really didn't already see last month? >> there is a u.n. chemical weapons inspection team on the ground, completing their mission today. they visited seven sites. both the government and rebels have accused each other of using chemical weapons in attacks in various locations across the country. this team's mandate is limited. they go go to the site. they can determine whether or not chemical weapons were used, but they cannot apportion any blame. this is really not going to change much on the ground, but verify whether or not chemical weapons were used in the seven reported attacks. >> thanks so much.
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>> attorney general eric holder is expected to announce a lawsuit against the state of north carolina later this morning. the justice department is suing the state for alleged racial did you say continual nation over its new voting laws. under the new law, residents are required to show a photo i.d. at polling places. republicans insist the rules prevent voter fraud, but departments say the tougher laws are intended to make voting more difficult for minorities. >> the second of two huge storms is now pounding the pacific northwest. near hurricane force winds and heavy rains are moving into the area. the first of this weekend's storms that already brought a month's worth of rain. the northwest is finally getting a break today. for more, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> it's been a rough go over the last week with the two storm systems you were just talking about. today, some of the rain winds down a little, moves more interior, but it's still a very
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wet go of it as we set out this morning. you can see all that moisture that's just been funneling into washington and oregon, more moisture getting into that mountainous terrain. the winds as we're just talking about has been one of the significant features with this. some of these, i looked at the reports this morning, the actual reporting sites, easily sustained winds, 20 miles per hour in a lot of cases, gusting to 30, but especially when you get to higher elevations, the mountainous at her rape and things funnel as we get more towards the cascade with the flow behind the front, what we definitely had some winds that have been, you know, up around the 50-mile per hour range. in the rookies, some could be in the 70-80-mile per hour range. we have winter storm advise are yous, watch for the higher elevations, about 500 feet and above is where we'll get the more significant amounts, a couple of inches, not a huge snow, but more problems. more rain today, even though it
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starts to a little bit taper off. as we continue interior, watching for more of that spreading to parts of the northern rockies, temperatures are going to stay on the cool side, watch for 50's, 60's, even cooler higher. >> thanks so much, nicole. meanwhile, the clock continues to particular down to a potential government shut down. what that could mean for military families. >> today's the last day before potentially u.s. government shutdown. how global financial markets are responding. that story, coming up. >> the investigation into the deadly mall attack in kenya is now looking into security lapses. who knew about the plot beforehand. >> the retrial of amanda knox begins today. what she is saying about the latest chapter in her legal drama.
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hi, my name is jonathan betz,
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>> we can just have a private, closed door meeting. we're the top leaders of congress, but they scrapped the meeting because harry reid said you should go public. why? >> they didn't want a horse and pony show and the impression something is getting done when they knew it wasn't getting done. there is a significant amount of
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anxiety over this bill in the country and for those districts that the republicans represent, complete anger and frustration over the bill. what harry reid didn't want to do and he's been strong on this, he didn't want the president going into a room and looking weaker than he may have otherwise. this is then drawing the line in the sand. >> a show of strength. >> it's a show of strength now. whether that works in the long run is another story. at least for the moment, what the democrats look united on this issue and that was important for them. >> also important is president obama. i mean, in his image of this, can he stand to gain politically if we go into a shutdown by making it look that congress is the one that's unflexible. >> tuesday, you're going to see a juxtaposition of sorts. there's going to be a somber mood should the shutdown occur
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and celebrating obamacare. the money is already there. parts are going to be implemented. he can look stronger and say look, we're unveiling this bill, we've got these plans in place and americans that didn't have health care now do. that's an important talking point for him. >> saturday, things got pretty heated and they got pretty personal. you had people like david scott saying the vitriol from this congress is so particular. why is that? >> you have some of it could be race based, some is the fact they just have power for the first time in a long time and want to push their agenda in the house. they're looking forward to both 2014 next year and 2016 when
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they have a new president, when we have an open seat for the presidency. this is an opportunity, really, to push their agenda. we have tomorrow that the tea party has pulled a lot of the moderate republicans to the right and there's fear, even from those republicans that they're going to be meeting primary challenges. in a way, their hands are tied, as well. >> you say their hands are tied. where does the buck top. who is holding the cards right now. >> right how to, there is blame on both sides, democrats saying we're going to draw a line in the sand. the president shouldn't be budging on this. the debt ceiling negotiation is coming up and these appropriation bills, all of this is mandatory, has to be done by law. he's right drawing a line in the sand. you've got the senators in the democratic senate not meeting right now. they're not meeting until 2:00 this afternoon. one wonders where they've been all weekend in trying to work out this deal. on the other hand, you've got
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republicans who are digging their heels in on a bill that's already been passed. this is not like the immigration about him where rand paul was filibustering a bill that has not formed yet. the bill is passed, the money is being spent. there's plenty of blame to go on the republican shoulders, as well. >> thanks so much. more americans will become eligible next for medicaid when the affordable care act goes into effect tuesday. we explain how counties and hospitals throughout the state of illinois are preparing for thousands of applicants. >> we have things for some meals, deodorant, for women, shampoo. >> from this mobile lynn nick, the nurse hands out personal hygiene products. >> there you are. >> for many homeless and poor in champagne county, illinois, this is the closest they come to
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preventative medicine. >> what do you do if you get sick? >> go to the emergency room. >> that could change at illinois uses government funds to increase medicaid based services. >> currently just under 2 million illinois residents have no health care insurance. the kaiser foundation which has been tracking the impact of the affordable care act estimates that number could shrink by half. >> 12,000 residents could be eligible after october 1. local health care providers are bracing for a flood of new patients as more patients get coverage. champagne county's largest provider is recruiting more than 100 new doctors, 40 will be primary care physicians. the non-profit francis nelson health center is adding a doctor to the five it already has, doubling the number of nurse practitioners and expanded services. >> we'll have to expand
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locations, maybe add satellites, we will fill this place up pretty quick. >> 2,000 new patients could be seen the first year. uninsured patients move into medicate, where the reimbursements more in line with the actual cost. >> we'll get $100 per patient visit instead of $10, so that will help us recruit more providers. >> there is more coverage with the expansion of medicaid. >> i wasn't able to get my mammogram this year or pap, because i can't afford it. it's very important for me to get insurance. >> getting patients enrolled means getting them screened first. the mobile clinic is spreading the word about the affordable care act and additional computers are in this lobby. it is called a massive undertaking. >> we are going to see a lot of people and we are restructuring
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how we do things to try to accommodate that. in the long run, it's going to be wonderful. when people have preventative health care, it helps public health. >> it could bring down the overall health care costs if minor health problems are treated before they become major problems. aljazeera, champaign, illinois. >> supporters of obamacare hope providing some level of health coverage could mean less expensive e.r. visits. the grid lock in d.c. is keeping wall street on edge and here is the latest business news. tell us what's going on. >> we are only hours away from that potential government shutdown. wall street is very skittish about it. right now, the futures are down sharply and major asian markers seeing red. tokes nikkei is down 2%.
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the dow stands at 15, the nasdaq was the only winner last week, at 37.81. all this uncertainty means millions of people invested in the stock market may be getting nervous, but one market analyst is cautions stay calm. >> if you're an average investors and doing your homework, you're not going to have to worry, because you're focused on companies that are doing their homework, global earnings, strong brands, good presence. you'll have to be concerned about the knee reaction of traders. >> twitter reportedly is a step closer to its public stock debut. the news website is reporting twitter plans to make the filing public this week. twitter hopes to be trading by
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thanksgiving. the social media company is expected to be valid at up to $15 billion. the companies are reported towards leaning toward the new york stock exchange over nasdaq for its highly anticipated public offering. >> the securities and exchange commission have charged mark cuban with insider trading, dumping his stock just before shares fell in 2004. cuban denies the charge. >> b.p. back in court today. it's the second phase of its trial over the 2010 deep horizon oil spill, focusing on exactly how much was spilled and whether the company could have done more to cap the leak more quickly. there could be fines up to $18 billion under the clean water act. >> as we approach a possible
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government shutdown, a new pew analysis shows current job recovery is the slowest since truman was president. >> if the government shut down, what is the exact trigger that will impact the market. >> the key date you want to look out for is october 17. if the debt limit is not raised -- if the government does not agree to borrow more money, it will not be able to make payments on its outstanding bonds. if you don't pay your bills on times, your credit score goes down. people who loan you money will consider you a more risky investment. u.s. treasury bonds are considered the safest investment in the world. if it's suddenly viewed as less reliable, markets will start to shake. >> how has the government respond the before? >> shaky. congress managed to reach an
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agreement at the last moment and avoided the so-called fiscal cliff. budget cuts would have automatically kick in. stocks fell quite a bit in the days just before the agreement, but he rebounded. still, there's a lot of tension out there and many people just don't know what's going to happen. >> thank you for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> new questions this morning about moo knew what before the deadly kenyan mall attacks. who is on the hot seat today as the investigation continues. >> the day is set when pope john paul ii will be sainted.
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>> welcome back.
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i'm morgan radford. these are our top stories at this hour. we're 16 and a half hours away from a possible government shutdown. the house passed a spending bill that would avoid the shutdown. >> prime minister netanyahu is meeting with president obama today. >> >> a judge did not charge monsori. israel intelligence officials say he used a belgian passport to enter the country and then had photos of the u.s. embassy in tel aviv at the time of his arrest. >> opening a direct dialogue
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between iran and the u.s. has broken a 30 year freeze, not everyone is feeling optimistic, including israel. joining us is joel rubin. thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> good morning, morgan. >> now, there are reports this morning that prime minister netanyahu will ask for a stiffening of sanctions. can there be meaningful iranian negotiations under those conditions? >> well, right now, we're witnessing a significant change. we're at the hinge of history here. last week was unique where on friday, president obama spoke with iranian president rouhani. a thaw has begun. the sanctions that are in place are tough and strong and certainly have played to role in bringing iran to the table.
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a key question now is how much further do they need to go. certainly in congress, there's debate about that. the president believes he has the authority currently to waive sanctions if need be at the negotiating table. that will become part of the very vigorous debate about what this opening means hering washington. >> is netanyahu right in a no deal is better than a bad deal and the is the u.n. being played by it arrannens. >> the u.s. has its eyes wide open. the united states and iran have been talking for years intermitt edge through the p5 plus one process. that means the united states and the other world powers from the u.s. security council plus germany. this is the first time we've actually seen the iranians saying they are willing to make a peaceful arrangement on the nuclear program and they will not make a nuclear weapon and
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the americans at the same time saying that they will support a peaceful nuclear energy program in iran. these two need to be verified. these types of suggestions have to be tested, and there's no reason to believe that they won't be tested, so it's important right now to let the process go forward and not after one day of good discussions declare that nothing -- that the whole situation is now going to fall apart. that's not the case. >> you mentioned the nuclear program, but israeli military officials have expressed great concern about how close iran is to having a nuclear weapon. i mean, are they right to ask the u.s. to demand for an immediate and total stop to iranian nuclear development project? >> the united states and israel have been working very closely on this issue. the united states intelligence community assesses and maintains the assessment that iran has not made the decision to make a
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nuclear weapon. israel shares that assessment. if the international community can get an agreement with iran that caps their enrichment at levels for civilian purposes and deals with the already on hand enriched uranium, that will calm the fears. there is no perfect deal. the idea that iran can no longer enrichure rain yes, ma'am has long passed. they have the know how, the technology. the key is to assure that it's for peaceful purposes and that's verified so they will not have a nuclear weapon. >> thank you so much for joining us this morning. >> new pictures emerged that show the death and devastation of last week's mall attack in nairobi. rescue workers are still looking for dozens of missing victims.
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we know i can't's parliament is preparing to question the countries security chief. there are reports that the government had been warned about such an attack. andrew simmons is in nairobi for us. >> this joint parliamentary committee wants to visit the site before opening questions to security and intelligence chiefs on tuesday. what will be achieved by this visit is open to question, because they don't have forensic scientists with them, but this is what they want to do. as far as kenyans are concerned, the biggest problem now is the confusing information flow from the government. the government insists that it is restricted by legal problems and releasing information and will not discuss intelligence report leaked to a number of organizations, including aljazeera. what is of biggest concern is the number of bodies that could still be in the rubble of the collapsed three floors of the mall. the red cross say the that 39
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bodies were still missing. the government insists there are no bodies of hostages there. now, how it has actually established this is open to question. it also denies that any of the attackers could have escaped, even though there is a tunnel which is connected to the building, which we understand security forces were not aware of, and the interior ministry insists that they had the whole building surrounded and they couldn't have gotten out of the tunnel, impossible. however, the kenyan interior minister said that as far as he was concerned, the map for the believe was acquired by the security forces on monday, so it doesn't take much working out that something seems to be wrong here. >> an attack on a college in nigeria leaves up to 50 students dead. islamists gunmen are suspected of shooting the students while they slept in their dorms.
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there is a fight to overthrow the government to create an islamic state and attacks on schools have been launched. >> the second phase of the b.p. trial is set to begin in new orleans this morning. the company is trying to avoid as much as $18 billion in fines after a rig explosion in 2010 killed 11 people and poured millions of barrels of oil into the gulf of mexico. who exactly is responsible and for how much of the damage is turning into a huge fight. aljazeera is live outside the new orleans federal courthouse. the first leg of the trial focused on what led to the explosion. what can we expect in the second part of the trial this morning? >> the second part of the trial will determine two things, did b.p. and the people it worked with back in april, 2010 do enough to control the flow of the oil into the gulf of mexico, and how many barrels of oil
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actually spilled into the gulf of mexico. the first part of the trial lasted nearly eight weeks and wrapped up back in april. the judge has yet to rule on that phase of the trial. it was focused on what led to the explosion and caused the ship to blow up after the blowout of the well. phase two of the trial will determine did b.p. do enough to control the flow of that oil and how many barrels of oil spilled. b.p. says 2.45 million-barrels of oil, the government says 4.2 million. those numbers are crucial, because ultimately, it will determine the amount of the clean water act fines b.p. will pay, anywhere from $2.7 billion to $18 billion. that ultimately won't be decided until the judge rules in this trial. legal analysts say probably not until sometime next year.
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morgan. >> dawn live in new orleans, thanks so much for joining us this morning. attorneys for colorado theater shooting suspect james homes filed a motion to keep information about the case classified. the court's website posts copies of case documents on line and homes' attorneys say they're concerned too much media attention on the case could prevent a fair trial. holmes pled not guilty by reason of insanity to murder and attempted murder. he's accused of killing 12 and injuring 70 others when he opened fire inside of a denver movie theater in july of 2012. >> the retrial of american student amanda knox is underway in florence, italy. italy's highest court ordered the new trial for her and her boyfriend. the court said the acquittal was full of deficiencies and contributions and knox served four years in an italian prison
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for the crime. neither knox or her exboyfriend were present in court. >> two more popes are entering saint hood. they will be cannonnized on april 27 next year. the announcement was made by pope francis after a meeting with cardinals. for more on the sainthood, we're joined by phil ittner live in rome. why will two pops be cannonnized together? >> one of the main reasons is these two pops were such pillars of the catholic church. pope john paul started the beat if i occasion process for john
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paul xxiii. >> pope francis went against vatican rules when he said john xxiii didn't require a miracle. why not? >> there are a lot of reasons that may be, as well. first and foremost, pope john xxiii was just a huge figure in the catholic church and there was a strong push to get him cannonnized. unlike john paul ii, he did go through a lengthy process. he passed away in 1962, 1963, so there's been quite some time. it's not like he's been fast
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tracked quite the way pope john paul ii has been. overall, when i speak to officials within the catholic church that the one miracle that is attributed to john xxiii was just so significant and profound, a nun witnessing him speaking to her on the day the very day of his death, as she was watching the announcement, so i think there are a number of reasons why he's been fast tracked in that way and then the second miracle wasn't necessary, but overall, i think there's just these two huge pillars of the catholic church both being cannonnized at the same time, modern saints for a modern world. >> phil, thanks so much for being with us this morning. >> it's a beautiful fall day across most of the country. for more on the morning national forecast, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell.
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>> we've been talking about the system in the northwest and certainly significant. i'll have more coming up in the next half hour. overall, it's been a really beautiful pattern. a lot of people enjoyed that past weekend of september that we've just gone over. here's the broad look across the country. look how much of the country is covered in sunshine with hardly a cloud in the sky. we have a little bit of an exception with the testimony in the northwest. there's enough of a disturbance to bring in a couple clouds, but it's still mostly dry out here and really those temperatures have been pretty exceptional recently, and the last system that pulled out of the northwest is now anywhere from the ohio valley southward. a few disturbances along the southeast, even that has dried out significantly is a moved along. i mentioned a little disturbance in the northwest. you can see patches of sun around that. ahead of this system, where we haven't had a little bit more wind mixed in, anywhere from detroit down to illinois and
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indiana, there has been a little fog this morning. the temperatures have really been phenomenal. more of those 70's and 80's again today, so it feels still like summer than fall. tar go and bismarck will be in the 70's today. chicago the next couple days even getting into the 80's tomorrow and then our next chance for really decent chance for a shower or storm isn't in my the later part of the week. it's been quiet out here, too. we get to the northeast, more of the same, beautiful day after beautiful day recently, not great chances for rain and more of those temperatures. once again today, we're going to stay into the 70's. across the country, that's the pattern, warm air across the south, as well. the one exception is where we've had those systems come in as we get into the northwest, temperatures in the 50's and 60's, maybe cooler in the higher elevations. where that last front is going to drape across the south, here at least we have the moisture
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source with the gulf of mexico. a little hit and miss, especially in the afternoon hours, a couple of places get into the downpours, but not too widespread, right along interstate 10 is where we see later into today. is a mentioned, system in the northwest, we'll have rain in washington and oregon. the winds have been a significant problem out here. morgan. >> thanks so much, nicole. >> the government shutdown s just about numbers, it's about the real people who will be impacted by the cuts. >> they're doing stuff for the country, why don't they get out there and see what it's like and have it taken away from them. >> military families could be struggling if the bill isn't passed. who is stepping up to help them survive a possible shutdown. >> we're looking on nfl action later in sports. >> checking in on the clock,
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we're just over 16 hours away from a possible government shutdown. right now, the house and senate appear divided on a solution to avoid it. on inside story, we bring together unexpected voices closest to the story, invite hard-hitting debate and desenting views and always explore issues relevant to you. millions who need assistance now. we appreciate you spending time with us tonight. up next is the golden age of hollywood going golden but elsewhere. why l.a.'s mayor has declared a state of emergency for the entertainment industry there. next. s2úq@eñsy$x
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>> if the government shuts down, military personnel would still receive paychecks only if the stipulation passes. so far, that's not a guarantee. >> didi shops at a thrift store. she is worried about how her daughter's family will get through a government shutdown. she is worried about the soldiers. >> they are fighting for the country. why don't the government do it and see what it's like and have everything taken away from them. >> without a congressional
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resolution, soldiers will report to duty on tuesday and work without pay until a spending bill gets the president's signature. only then will soldiers be compensated retroactively. >> nothing i can do, like totally helpless. >> this woman works at the thrift store to help make ends meet. if her husband loses his paycheck, their family of six would be unable to meet their basic needs. >> our rent, our utilities, you know what i mean? necessities, survival. >> if the shutdown happens, the first missed military paycheck would be october 15. that applies even to soldiers who are deployed. usaa offers banking services said they can take out no interest advance pay loans.
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>> it's unfortunate they have to deal with this uncertainty. >> it will continue until congress decide to say fund the government. >> everybody needs to man and woman up there in washington, d.c. >> these military families say that's exactly what they're doing. they're looking for second jobs, and tightening their budgets in preparation for tough times ahead. >> military personnel would remain on duty in the event of the shutdown, half of the defense department civilian employees will be officer allowed without pay. >> a milwaukee company recalled thousands of pounds of food because of possible listeria contamination. it involves meat, including chicken and ham salads sold under popular brands. so far, there is no report of
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anyone getting sick. >> 30 were rescued after a boat caught fire in london. marges jumped into the water to escape the flames. thankfully, everyone got out and there were no serious injuries. >> the load could soon become lighter for astronauts headed into space. nasa is preparing to launch a 3-d printer that would printout spare parts and supplies during missions. there's a plan to print small satellites. nasa plan to say send the printer to space sometime next year. >> here is a look at week four in football. >> the nfl could lead to print themselves some wins. the patriots was 3-0 coming in,
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and have the best road record in the league since bill belichick took over. that's the year tom brady was chosen in the draft. 7-3 pats, brady has had to wait for his rookie receivers to get up to speed. good things come to those who wait. staying inbounds, blowing a close game open. atlanta rallied. matt ryan's second t.d. hookup of the night. after a recovered on-side kick, pats had the ball up seven, but brady fumbled the ball, giving the falcons one more shot. matt ryan on fourth and seven from the 10 throws it into the end zone. pats win 30-23. now out of denver, where the
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quarterback most measured by brady is treating the nfl like that he most answered to. manning had thrown for 12 touchdowns in his first three games and would add to that total against the eagles in week four. once again, manning unstoppable, going 28-34 for 327 yards. he has 16 touchdown passes this season. he still hasn't thrown and interception. denver improves to 4-0, beating the eagles 52-20. >> on the film, there's always things you can improve on. there's things we're doing well that we need to continue to do. second half, we made good adjustments. coaches tightened up some things in our execution of the second half was good. we were disappointed that first drive, that last drive of the first half, not gettings points.
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to have no points there was disappointing, but second half, execution was good once again. >> kansas city was a matchup of two teams surprising for different seasons. the chiefs looking to start the season 4-0 for the first time since 2003. the giants hadn't start a season zero" four since 1987. eli manning tried to keep it that way. other than a 69-yard touchdown on victor cruz, finishing 18-37 and and interception. offense, defense, special teams, the chiefs remained on fire. mccluster weaving his way for an yea nine punt return touchdown. the giants remain winless.
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>> the vikings and steelers went to london to renew their rivalry. the steelers within three. peterson gets a 60-yard second quarter score. up 17-7. two touchdowns for a.p. on the day. steelers at the viking six with a chance to tie. call scotland yard, taking down big ben. roethlisberger, that is. >> we're going to focus on getting better. that's what's going to change the outcome of those football gales. those that don't aren't going to be a part of us. i have great patience, we'll continue to get better as long as i see improvement in detail.
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>> what has happened to the giants and steelers? two of the most study nfl franchisers are a bind 0-8 to start the season. when they weren't winning superbowls, they were competitive at least. >> here's what we're following this morning. we're just over 16 hours away from the deadline for a government shutdown. the senate appears unlikely to approve the latest spending bill passed by the house. >> the israeli prime minister meets the president at the white house today and warns the u.s. not to be fooled by iran. >> the civil trial against b.p. enters phase two.
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b.p. could face the largest environmental penalty in u.s. history for the deep water horizon spill in the gulf of mexico. >> baseball teams usually pay 162 games, but the rangers and rays will play game three, loser go home. >> it seems like we can't catch a break in the northwest forecast. i'll have the details on the current storm and who will feel those impacts today. >> aljazeera continues and i'm back with you in just two and a half minutes.
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>> obama administration officials said they need to enrol 2.7 u.s. redents between the ages of 18 and 35 in exchange plans to balance risks and hold down costs. will they enrol come 1 october - should they pay the face. >> joining me now is jen mishory, deputy director of young invincibles, she's in washington d.c. and yevgeniy feyman, a research assistant at the manhattan institute.
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thank you for being with us. i want to start with you yevgeniy feyman. the young people are crucial to the success of obamacare. >> absolutely. they'll balance out the risk pool, they'll keep premiums that need the insurance, and the administration is reaching out to them. >> jen, the young invincibles are in the 18-34 group.
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>> the final countdown to a shutdown. lawmakers in washington have just 16 hours to strike a deal to fund the federal government. hopes for a last minute compromise, though are looking grim. president obama welcomes israeli prime minister to the white house. when it comes to iran, the talks may be tense. >> b.p. faces the prospect of a mammoth penalty from the 2010 gulf of mexico spill. >> a car collection fit for a king. the tribute to jordan's late king whose sane and his very expensive hobby.
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>> good morning. this is aljazeera, and i'm morgan radford. less than 16 hours is how much time congress has to pass a spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. the gop has tied the bill to a one year delay of the affordable care act. the democratic controlled senate is promising to scrap that provision. >> the american people overwhelmingly reject obamacare. they understand it's not working. the only people not listening to the argument are the career politicians. >> there's a time and place to debate obamacare, but not at a time when millions of american people are held hostage if we don't fund the government. >> some republicans have come out against the strategy.
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the latest is susan collins of maine. the senate will reconvene this afternoon and expected to send a simple spending measure back to the house, putting the hot potato back into the laugh of john boehner. we are tracking developments. republicans seem to be divided over the fact that the spending bill was coupled with obamacare. why the division? >> that's right. we really have two factions at the republican party. we have the tea party conservatives, a new group that has come in in the last few years and have come to washington than a different mandate than their elder statesman colleagues. they believe that get ingrid of the federal health care will you, stopping the president's agenda in its tracks, really shutting the government down, even is more important than keeping things functioning. it's about idealogy, really changing and shaking up washington. republicans who have been around
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longer, those who were here 18 years ago, when the federal government did shut down remember how that played out. they ended up losing the public relations battle. president clinton came out on top of that. the longer term republicans have that perspective that comes with experience on the hill, but they also are used to making compromises and bar against. nothing really gets done around here on capitol hill unless both sides compromise. a big ideological split. the republicans who are drawing lines in the sand are the ones winning the battle in the republican ranks. >> if they can't compromise, what's at stake if a shutdown does go into effect. >> this is going to happen tonight midnight when the clock strikes, we will wake up to a different to really. some things are not affected. entitlement programs, medicare,
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medicaid, social security, those programs keep functioning. we also see other things continue, like t.s.a. agents at airports, screeners will still be on the job. also border patrol, they keep working. but here's what changes. 800,000 federal workers throughout the country could get furloughs. they still keep their jobs, but could stay home or some have to work and get their pay later. we see national parks and museums close down and veterans' benefits could be jeopardized. one momentum of com pro mace that may come out is assuring members of the military do get their pay, even if the government shuts down. the senate is likely to pass that today. the federal health care law continues to get implemented, even if the government shuts down. >> libby, thanks so much for joining us this morning.
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>> stay with aljazeera for continuing coverage of the looming government shut down. you can always get the latest on line at aljazeera.com. in just a few minutes, we'll actually talk to republican strategy its to get the gop's take on this battle. >> this morning, president obama will welcome israeli prime minister netanyahu today. we have a look at exactly what's at stake. >> this tense photo op seems to sum up the relationship. in his second term, the white house has been trying a different tact. smiles and tributes by the u.s. president in israel, his first foreign trip after reelection.
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>> real break threws on these two issues. iran's nuclear program and israeli palestinian peace would have a profound and positive impact on the entire middle east to north africa. >> the president isn't talking about attacking, but talking, putting the focus on a diplomatic solution. mr. metten yahoo literally drew everyone a picture at the u.n. last year. he wants a red line drawn, a convincing threat that the u.s. military will bomb iran's nuclear facilities sooner than later. >> israelis fear that obama is almost taking off the table the possibility of a military strike. the president wants to pursue the diplomatic approach, if all
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else fails, trust the united states to take care of it. >> the media blitz by rouhani seems to have made that a sell for the american people as he is described as a moderate. >> they don't have ahmadinejad anymore. he was the gift that kept on giving for extreme iran haters and chest thumpers around the world. the joke in tehran and i don't know, maybe it's not even a joke is that with the departure of ahmadinejad, the israelis lost their best agent in tehran. >> mr. netanyahu will likely push for tough words from the president and a definitei time line. >> on sunday, netanyahu vowed to
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tell the truth in the face of sweet talk, saying that truth is vital for security and peace in israel. >> an iranian accused of spying on israel wasn't formally charged this morning. he used a belgian passport to enter the country and had photos at the time of his arrest. he was arrested earlier this month as he was trying to leave israel. >> it's getting now more difficult to record the electronic messages and confidences of al-qaeda. "the new york times" said a terrorist plot by al-qaeda that was leaked in august is forcing u.s. officials to now scramble to find ways to spy on the group's leaders and their operatives. the breach actually caused more damage to their counter terrorism efforts than the thousands of documents published by former national security agency contractor edward
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snowden. >> at least 51 people are dead. al-qaeda is blamed for the attacks which rocked mostly shia neighborhoods in baghdad. a parked car exploded near a market, killing seven and injuring more than a dozen people. it was followed by 10 other car bombs which exploded across city parking lots, near markets and other crowded areas. >> four suspected militants are now dead following a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. the c.i.a. operated drone shot two missiles into a house near the afghan border. six suspected militants were targeted by u.s. drone strikes in the exact same region. pakistan claim drone attacks vital the nation's sovereignty. u.s. officials claim the strikes have aided in defeating
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insurgents. >> storms are pounding the pacific northwest. heavy rains and winds are now moving into the area. the first of the storms has already brought a month said worth of rain. a close watch is being kept on the weather and brings us more now. >> the national weather service calls this the strongest storm within memory for the month of september. this area we don't usually see storms like this until lately november, december and through the winter months. this on top of a record-breaking rainfall on saturday, which has potentially weak bed the hold that tree roots have in the soil raises the hazards of falling trees, breaking branches and potential for widespread power outages in areas hit by wind. the wind is expected to hit washington and northern puget sound and the stealth islands. wind gusts are expected to be 50-60 miles per hour, closing
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the bridge over lake washington. the high wind warning remakes in effect until 4:00 a.m. local time. >> while the northwest deals with plenty of wet weather, the rest of the u.s. will be dealing with dry conditions. for more on the morning national forecast, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> it was a lovely fall weekend for a lot of the country except the northwest, sorry for those of you that were suffering under that. you can see how dry it is. the last system that pulled out from the northwest across the rest of the country, that's more great lakes southward. we'll have a couple of showers along the south with that. that is predominantly dry now. it's this next system that is the bug player. a lot of moisture still coming in, so we're talking possibly a couple more inches of rain for the coastline. we get interior, elevations four or 5,000 feet or above for places like the rockies as this moves in. that could be a couple inches of snow. really, there's been such a strong pressure change with
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this, that really funnels the winds and cranks those winds up. easily, i've been seeing reports this morning of sustained winds in the 20-30-mile per hour range. advisories coming out of the rookies, and wind warnings are for winds that could easily as they channel through the mountainens be 50 miles an hour gusts, some in the 80-mile per hour ranges. that's what causes the damage. along with that, the rest of the country has been at or above. this is one region of the country where temperatures are on the cool side. morgan. >> thanks so much, nicole. >> time is ticking away for lawmakers. is hope for a deal already dead on arrival? >> coca-cola loses its title at most valuable brand. we'll tell you what tech giant
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replaced it. >> residents in the gulf want b.p. to pay up. the heavy sums the company may have to cough up for that major oil spill. >> u.s. markets open soon. how are they responding to the threat of a possible government shutdown, coming up next. s2úq@ex
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>> lets return to our top story, the pending government shutdown. house republicans passed a bill that would prevent a government shutdown and delay the affordable care act for another year. the senate responded by vowing not to pass the house bill, making the potential for a showdown even more likely. joining us to discuss republican motivations is republican strategist brian murray. >> good morning. >> good morning. thank you so much for being with us. >> thank you. >> republican congressman david nunez it is the democrats benefit the most from a shutdown. why the hold out? >> in 1996, that's what happens.
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the republicans overplayed their hand, clinton played it very well. if you look this weekend, where was harry reid and the senate, why did they call everyone back 10 hours before the deadline. that looks disingenuous. >> do you think he holds the card? >> they're trying to if that if he cared about the country, he would have been there this weekend with the house. they could have worked it out over the weekend instead of waiting for the last few hours. >> is this a political play for republicans? dragging this out to the very last minute, does it give boehner a chance to swoop in and play hero. >> the house was out the week before they came back in on wednesday. they went through this process and they were here all weekend and we knew what was going on. the senate, you didn't know when they were coming back and what they were going to do. we've known for years that this was going to happen. there's no surprise, the timing
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on this. why don't the democrats take up this bill and pass it and give americans what they want and deserve? the unions don't like it. jimmy hoffa has written letters saying we don't like it right now. big corporations don't like it. why can't mom and dad and kids wait another year? if it's that good a program, why not get it done right. >> there's a rush because americans are needing it. >> americans don't need it right now, don't want it right now. this was passed with democratic support. >> the democrats wouldn't agree that now isn't an appropriate time. the lengthiness of this debate has been going on for so long. >> it's question of giving america what we want. the unions were one of the biggest proponents of this bill. >> it's a law, passed into law. >> the unions realize that we
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can't give our members the coverage that they want and deserve. >> what do you mean americans don't want it? i mean, this is the law. >> it was passed when the senate had 60 democrats in the senate. that's when it was passed. it was not passed with one single republican vote. that's not necessarily the best law for america. i think if they had reached across the aisle, it would have been a much different scenario. if you could go across state lines to buy insurance, that would have been one way to do things. they didn't do that. this comes down to what americans want and deserve. why do the corporations get a pass? why do the unions say it is no good anymore? why do members of the hill? they're covered, but they don't have coverage for their own staff. >> they have move from unfunding to delay. how do you understand that? >> the unfunding wasn't working. lets take a breath. >> would you do you think the
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unfunding wasn't working? >> they wouldn't play along at all. will the senate wake up and say let's do this right. if they care about americans, they would have been here this weekend and done what they had to do to get it passed and to negotiate with the house. now they've got 10 hours to do it. >> we'll find out at midnight, won't we? >> yes, we will. >> thank you for joining us. >> the second stage of the b.p. trial begins this morning in a new orleans court and b.p. is trying to avoid billions of dollars in fines after a rig exflows in 2010 killed 11 people and then caused the largest offshore oil spill in u.s. history. who exactly is responsible and for how much of the damage is turning into a huge fight. we explain what's at stake for b.p. and the for the people in the gulf coast.
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>> this family has been raising out of theres since 1904. >> we grew from a 14-acre lease to now roughly almost 15,000 acres. it's a pocket of oil here. >> he's keeping a close eye on the march. >> you see it along the mud right there, that's oil. that's definitely oil. >> three and a half years ago, these marches are covered in oil that poured into the gulf of mexico for 86 days after the explosion of the deep water horizon drilling rig. >> today the oil is a little more difficult to find, but you can smell it. according to the state, 200 miles of shoreline till has oil. 14 are considered moderate to heavily oiled. >> it's been devastating. oyster processing plants of closed and oysters haven't spawned in the gulf in two
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years. >> 2014, we're going to see a draftic decline in oyster production, which is even worse for the markets, because the few processes that are left can't get enough out of theres. >> who's to blame is the subject of a federal trial in new orleans under the clean water act. phase one earlier this year focused on the cause of the blowout and level of negligence by b.p. and other companies. phase two concentrates on the events after the explosion. >> it's everything that happened after the blowout in terms of the efforts to cap the well and to determine how much oil was actually spilled. >> co owners of the well are the defendants in phase two. they say 2.4 billion-barrels of oil spilled. the government's figures are 4.9 billion barrels. >> some low ball estimates by b.p. are frankly laughable. >> the judge will assess expert testimony to come up with the correct number.
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the court still must decide the issue of negligence, which is needed to determine fines based on the clean water act. they could range from $4.5 billion to $17.2 billion. that's on top of $42 billion b.p. has already spent on clean up, fines and settlement payout the. anyone who depends on the gulf for their liv hood will be watching. >> we need to win for our futures. >> 80% of clean water act fines will be spent on restoring the gulf coast. aljazeera, louisiana. >> for more, let's turn to dawn ostrom where the trial is set to kick off in less than an hour. the first leg of the trial focused on what led to the explosion, what can we expect for the second part? >> the second part is expected to last four weeks and cover two
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things. the first week of the trial will cover did b.p. and its partner ani darko do enough to stop the flow into the gulf of mexico. the second phase will include technical expert testimony on exactly how many million barrels of oil spilled into the gulf. b.p. says it was over 2.54 million barrels, the government 4.5 million bar else of oil. no telling when the judge will rule. he has yet to rule on phase one of this trial. >> we're hearing that b.p. could be fined anywhere between 2-$18 billion. how are these figures calculated? >> it comes under the clean water act, and depends on that number, how many millions of bar else of oil spilled into the gulf of mexico. the fines could be levied
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anywhere from $1,100 per barrel to $4,300 per barrel of oil. it depends whether the judge finds that b.p. was grossly next or ordinarily negligent. >> thanks so much for being with us this morning, town. >> apple is now the most valuable brand in the world. according to the latest report from interbrands, the tech giant took the number one spot from coca-cola. that's boasting a value of $98.3 billion versus coke's $79.2 billion. this marks the first time in 13 years that interbrand has done the report that coke hasn't been at the top, falling to third place for 2014. >> the rest of the top five, google at number two with $93 billion. i.b.m. takes fourth place with
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$78 billion. microsoft has $59 billion. >> we have the latest business news. >> wall street is very skittish right now about the potential government shutdown. right now, futures are sharply down. major asian markets are seeing a lot of red. tokyo's nikkei is down, hong kong is losing 1.5%. european stocks are faring poorly. the dow stands at 15, 258. the s&p declined, as well president the nasdaq was the only winner last week.
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investors may be getting nervous. stocks could have a knee jerk reaction. >> this time around, what makes this particularly sensitive is we have a number of con fluences, declining earnings, worries about bernanke, worries about obamacare. i think the market is more skittish than it has been the last couple times we've seen this. the market has more potential to be more violent. >> a long term view is always the best strategy. stocks were quick to recover after the last put somedown. some other business news, twitter is recordly a step closer to its public stock debut. forbes is reporting twitter plans to make its filing this week. twitter hopes to be trading by thanksgiving. the social media company is expected tole valued at up to $15 billion. the company is reported to be leaning towards taking the new york stock exchange over the nasdaq for its trading.
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>> dallas mavericks owner mark cuban will be in a federal court today. the securities and exchange commission has charged him with insider trading, saying he dumped stock in 2004 just before shares fell in value. cuban denies the charges. >> as we approach a possible government shutdown, a new analysis shows the current job recovery is the slowest since truman was president, so a lot of economic factors are at play as the clock counts down. >> speaking of this government shutdown, if this shutdown happens, what's the exact trigger that will affect the market? >> the key date that you want to focus on is october 17. if by then the government doesn't raise the debt ceiling, if they don't agree to allow themselves to borrow more money, the government won't be able to make payments on its bonds. this you don't pay your debts in
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a timely manner, you know this, then your credit score will go down. we all have friends that borrow money and they don't pay it back on time and we are skittish about loaning money in the future. if investors believe that there's doubt, that sends shock waves throughout the global market. >> with a government shutdown, do congressman still get paid? >> they do. the ones causing this mess. >> their paycheck is guaranteed. >> they will continue get, inc. it, but the other people who work for the government, they may miss a paycheck. when you live check to check, it can be very difficult. >> officials in india call off the rescue efforts in the wake of a building collapse that left dozens dead. >> an international team is en route to syria to dismantle that country's chemical arsenal. the challenges they face with
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that very large task. >> it all came down to the last game of the season for three of baseball's wildcard hunters. we've got has drama and more, coming up later in sports.
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hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay
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attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. >> welcome back. i'm morgan radford. time is running out. we're 15.5 hours away from a possible government shut down. the house passed a spending bill that would delay the affordable care act. the senate is expected to reject that version of the bill this afternoon. >> prime minister netanyahu is meeting with president obama
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today. he weren't that iran should not be trusted. >> new picture of emerged that show exactly the depth of devastation of last week's mall attack in kenya. rescue workers are still looking for dozens of missing victims and at least 67 people were killed in a raid by eight al shabab. we have more tram a town near i can't even and somali that has for years suffered from the conflict. >> this is kenya near the long border between kenya and sow national i can't. it's reeling from the effects of insecurity. suspected al shabab militia's have been carrying out attacks here. >> this is the entry point. nobody has been serious about
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it. >> in october, 2011, on the front line. >> the kenyan government the called the suppression in somali to protect our nation, but protecting the nation has come at a price with the killing of hundred was kenyans by al shabab. [ singing ] >> some of the worst attacks happened at places of worship. almost two years, the gunman have killed people. tight security is not enough to reassure them. >> many still fear coming here. attendance is steadily increasing. we get up a 80 worshipers on sundays. >> people here believe that al shabab used attacks in the region to test the strength and resolve of kenya's security
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agencies before taking their offenses to the capitol nairobi. >> lack of preparedness. had we prevented this from happening here, what would have happened in nairobi would not have happened, but they took it for granted. the government has been accused of handing out collective punishments in the province in the past. this is what happened last november when three soldiers from the kenyan military... the town was on fire as the militaries pumped into the area with their vengeance. >> it is not my wish to see it.
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with its people tried by a known gunman and those they know only too well, residents hope government action will finally help to bring their suffering to an end. aljazeera, kenya. >> at least 50 people are dead after a gunman stormed a college dorm in nigeria. we have more. >> the situation is now calm after security forces have deployed trying to rea is that your everything is under control. soldiers and policeman have been combing the town to find out if there are more terrorists. the attack amounted two weeks after public schools reopened to a new academic calendar. three months ago, the government shut down all public schools because of an attack that killed more than 22 students. the situation in the northeast
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especially is becoming more and more precarious. in the last two or three weeks, more than 200 people have been killed in attacks. following the declaration of state of emergency three months ago, situation has improved tremendously with less and less attacks and normalcy returning to those states. in the last five or four weeks, there has been an upsurge in the number of attacks. people are beginning to think the bad old days are back. >> mostly teenage students were killed in an air strike in syria, the strike hitting a secondary school sunday in that amateur video use that here was posted on line and claims to show the aftermath. the city has been under the control of insurgents suns march and government forces has bombed it repeatedly.
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>> a team of inspectors is expected to arrive soon in syria, their mission to destroy the countries chemical arsenal, which is something that's never been done during a civil war. syria has until 2014 to get rid of 1,000 tons of chemical weapons distributed over 50-70 sites. >> for the latest, we are joined from beirut. what exactly are they up against trying to dismantle the stockpile? >> they are arriving tomorrow to start their work. it will be a daunting task. it is being described as one of the biggest and most dangerous disarmament operations while syria is at war. the inspectors will be facing security, as well as logistical
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problems. syria's believed to have up to 1,000 tons of chemical weapons. they're working under a very aggressive time table, mid 2014. they're supposed to eradicate and dismantle and get rid of syria's chemical weapons. the international community is calling this a breakthrough, but the syrian opposition feel this is not going to change their lives, because it doesn't stop the war and the syrian government continues to use conventional weapons. >> you describe that as a breakthrough, but a separate group has been sent but the u.n. to investigate new attacks just within the last month. what information does their investigation show that we didn't really already see in last month's report? >> a u.n. team is on the ground in syria. they've been there for the past week, investigating seven reported cases of chemical weapons attacks in various locations across the country. that weapons inspection team has a very limited mandate.
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they go in, they inspect, they say whether or not chemical weapons were used, but they do not apportion any blame. this was why many people really feel that it's not going to change much on the ground. >> you said they don't apportion blame, but at least 43 rebel groups fighting in syria have now banded together to form the islam army. will this make the rebels stronger, make them an easier target for assad? >> well, really, the pictures on the ground he is complying. the oppositions weakness has always been the fact that it's fractured. now that we have a new army calling the islam army, they are not going to operate under the umbrella of the free military council. it is friendly to the west, but right now is being sidelined. we have the islam army now in the suburbs of damascus. we have the most powerful influential brigades on the
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ground in rebel controlled northern syria, rejecting and refusing the authority of the western-backed syrian nag coalition, so who is going to represent the opposition on the ground? definitely not the s.n.c. it's the forces on the ground that are divided that hold sway. >> thanks for being with us this morning. >> in india, mumbai officials called off the rescue operation of a building collapse that killed 60 people last week. first responders saved 33 people from the rubble, pulling the last from the rubble on saturday. a 50-year-old man sustained very serious injuries. authorities do not know what caused the collapse. >> the f.a.a. is working to figure out how many people were killed when a business jet crashed at the santa monica airport. officials say no one survived the crash and subsequent fire. the twin engine as he is in a citation ran off the runway after landing yesterday evening
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before crashing into a hangar. that hangar then collapsed and firefighters were unable to enter it until two hours after the crash. various models of the jet carry from seven to nine passengers. >> this morning, attorney general eric holder is expected to launch a lawsuit against north carolina for alongside racial discrimination, suing the state over its new votings rules. north carolina is one of several southern states adopting tougher voter identification requirements. voters must show a photo i.d.s to vote. republican lawmakers insist the new law is needed to prevent voter fraud. democrats say the tougher laws are intended to make voting more difficult for minorities. >> the wild weather we've been watching in the northwestern part of the country will begin to wind down finally. for more on the national
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forecast, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> it's moving more interior, so not at much rain for parts of the northwest. one of the other big temperatures is it's just been some beautiful weather lately for the rest of the country. you can definitely see that pattern shift, the cooler temperatures here in the northwest where we've had two systems go through in the last week, right now in kind of the midst of one of those. i want to point out, you know, you start to need those cooler temperatures to get the fall colors to change. we haven't seen a lot of collars change yet. patchy colors are being reported. if you get into northern parts of new england, we're starting to see a little bit of that. we are going to see pretty much 70's across the board, really comfortable, drier skies and into the midwest, kind of the same thing, 70's and even 80's as we get farther to the south.
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that's well above average for this time of year now that we're just on the cusp of october. this region of the country, enough disturbance to bring clouds, not a lot of moisture with all of that. the last weather system that pulled out of the northwest, you can kind of still pick out the clouds with that, but that is really dried out, not a lot of cold air associated with that. the one place we might see showers is along the gulf coast where we have access to the gulf moisture that could help pick out some of those scattered showers. a lot of the region staying dry, so you can see some of that moisture that we could be getting a lot of it light to moderate. the one region of the country we have been suffering lately into the northwest, not only the rain, and the snow for the higher elevations, but a lot of what you see here in the advisories, those are for high winds, especially as this strong system comes through the mountains, a dramatic pressure change means it funnels those
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winds and you get them in the mountain passes, could see went gusts of 70 miles an hour. >> baseball's final day is proving to be an important one. >> years ago, they said the wildcard was a bad idea. i think that's been proven to be false. it was a high stakes final day of the regular season in major league baseball for the indians, rays and rangers vying for a mere two wildcard playoff spots. the indians knew a win over the twins would put in my in. nick swisher and the indians riding a nine game-winning streak. he gave up five hits in just one run over 6 2/3 innings of work. bottom of the ninth, grounds to
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second, kipnis with the great defensive play. indians win 5-1, they make the postseason for the first time since 2007. the indians host the a.l. game. will they host the rangers? we will start in toronto with where the rays suddenly found themselves in trouble by dropping their first two games against the blue jays. the florida boys came out sunday with the eye of the tiger. evan lange gore i can't's r.b.i. double was part of a six-run first inning for tampa bay. toronto spent the rest of the game steadily chipping away at the commanding lead, but couldn't quite get it all the way over the hump. the rays would hold on to stay alive. that put pressure on the rangers to win or go home. things not looking good for darvish, the sole lehome run to
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center on the first. with the game tied at two in the bottom of the six, geovany soto comes through with the two-run double, giving the rangers the 4-2 lead. all the rangers need is someone to apply the dagger. beltre was up to the challenge. he's going to ice this one by cranking the sole lehome run, the rangers would go on to win 6-2, leaving the rays and rangers tied for the last a.l. wildcard spot. hello, tie breaker game. >> they showed heart, fight, gut, any other adjective you want to find. we knew we had the games in it, just a matter of getting it out. the way we played on this home stand when we were at our best during the season is exactly the way we played. we was able to find it at the right time. >> we have something to prove. we've left that place too many times with our head down and
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disappointed. i feel like now is the time to be able to turn that page, and i think that if we do win tomorrow, it will be a tremendous boost, you know, a huge moment for us moving forward throughout the playoffs. >> that huge moment is game 163, a tie breaker game to see who will move on to the postseason. first pitch at 8:07 in texas as the rays and rain injuries fight one more day to see who will travel to cleveland for the take all game. >> the miami season finalie marlins against the tigers. henderson alvarez was in the on-deck circle. with the bases loaded, the marlins scored on the two out
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wild pitch to beat the a.l. central champion tigers and secure the no-no. it was the first one ever to end on a wild pitch. this was the first walk off complete no game hitter since the detroit tigers threw one on may 15, 1952. that's your look at morning sports. >> two of the catholic church's most influential figures are set to be saints. pope francis pushed to unify the church with the canonization of two popes. on inside story, we bring together unexpected voices closest to the story, invite hard-hitting debate and desenting views and always
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explore issues relevant to you.
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>> you're watching live pictures the of the retrial of american student amanda knox in florence, italy. the highest court ordered the new trial for knox and her
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boyfriend he overturning an earlier acquittal in 2007. the court said the acquittal was full of deficiencies and contributions and knox served four years in an italian prison for that crime. neither knox nor her exboyfriend were present. she said she could not relive what she had already lived through. >> an announcement was made by pope francis, approving a miracle distributed to pop popen paul. for more on the sainthood, we're joined by phil ittner live in rome. why did the pope decide to con onize two popes together? >> there's a lot of reasons why he may have done it together. it is quite interesting to see that done. according to the vatican press
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office, it's the first time that's actually happened in modern history. there are an awful lot of connections between these two popes. as a matter of fact, john paul ii issued the beatification process for pope john xxiii. there are connections between the two and it is thought that that reason that it made this really unprecedented decision to cannonnize both on the same day. >> phil, pope francis went against vatican rules what he said john xxiii didn't require a miracle. why not? >> well, there are a lot of reasons for that, as well. >> we know pope francis is a fan of both pontiffs. there are a lot of reasons why,
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perhaps pope john xxiii was fast tracked. there is something to be considered in the fact. a holy day was made because of a polish nun. in a lot of ways, it's more about john paul ii than john xxiii, but he convened vatican two, which radically changed the catholic church.
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two saints being announced in one day. >> thanks so much for being with us this morning. >> the so-called peace kite soared in the skies in jordan this weekend. they want families to see kites in the air rather than war planes. a social club aims to promote humanitarian initiatives. the group wants to spread messages of peace and security in a region that's been in turmoil for two years. >> jordan's late king hussein had an expensive hobby, rare cars. the collection will be featured showing oldest models of luxury sports cars. >> some of the rarest cars in the world can be found here in jordan's capitol iman. here you can see vehicles as old
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as this 1916 cadillac given to king hussein. this 1952 lincoln was first used by the royal palace in england before brought to jordan for the king when he was 18. he was also very fond of sports cars. this mercedes benz was one of this is favorites. >> this 1955 is one of the most important historic cars in the world from a sporting perspective and in jordan from a historical perspective. not only it's a very unique and very desirable sports car right now worldwide, but also, king hussein started racing hill climbs in it in 1955 with his friend. >> the king survived two assassination attempts by palestinian guerillas in this 1963 mercedes benz.
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he used to call it the blessed one. he drove this 1952 austin martin while studying in the u.k. this 1961 lincoln continental convert i'll was used for official and private events. it continues to be used by the royal palace today. all the cars are in working condition and driven once a week. the museum receives 10,000 visitors a month and is the most representatived in the country. >> the condition of cars and number of cars the family has collected is phenomenal. >> the late king hussein was last seen alive in public in this car upon his return from cancer treatment in the united states in 1999. after his death, the car was never used again by the jordanian royal family. >> even though he was living his
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last days, king hussein insisted on greeting the people through this sun roof. the museum is a vivid reminder for a leader they loved, for visitors, a history of cars. >> the museum was set up three years after of the king's death. in just 10 years, it has become the most visited exhibit in the country. that will do it for this edition of aljazeera news. i'm morgan rad ford. more headlines in just two and a half minutes. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, could striking workers in greece delay your retirement? i'm here to make the connections to your money real.
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>> obama administration officials said they need to enrol 2.7 u.s. redents between the ages of 18 and 35 in exchange plans to balance risks and hold down costs. will they enrol come 1 october - should they pay the face. >> joining me now is jen mishory, deputy director of young invincibles, she's in washington d.c. and yevgeniy feyman, a research assistant at the manhattan institute.
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thank you for being with us. i want to start with you yevgeniy feyman. the young people are crucial to the success of obamacare. >> absolutely. they'll balance out the risk pool, they'll keep premiums that need the insurance, and the administration is reaching out to them. >> jen, the young invincibles are in the 18-34 group. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories.
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>> hello, and welcome to the news hour. i'm stephen cole, al jazeera headquarters in doha. these are the top stories. after the siege al jazeera goes intinside kenya's westgate cent. and turkey reforms, but leaders say they don't go far enough. coordinated attacks create more

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