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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 13, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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a desperate relief effort in the philippines, panic sets in among the survivors - waiting for food, water and medicine. >> the president should honour the commitment made to those people. >> a critical comment a problem for president obama. why bill clinton says if you like your health care plan, you should keep it. >> are you on cholesterol medication, you may be - drastic changes on who gets the job and who doesn't. >> a video game designed to find a perfect employee - how some companies are using it to
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evaluate job applicants. [ ♪ theme ] good morning and welcome to al jazeera america. a glimmer of hope for survivors of typhoon haiyan. philippines' officials say all major roads damaged by the storm are passable. it's welcome news to relief and rescue workers who have been struggling to deliver aid since last weekend. there's a sense of urgency to get supplies out fast as conditions are worsening across the battered country. in village after village families are begging for basic necessities - some standing on the side of roads with signs saying, "please help us", turning pleas for help into looting for food, water and medicine. here is where the worst damage is - in the central philippines
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the devastation stretches from leyte, to tacloban, and palay. also to cebu. we have the littest -- on the latest >> so many suffering after typhoon haiyan slammed into the philippines. >> we can survive without the houses. we can sleep anywhere. we need food. >> hundreds of thousands of people displaced by the storm are desperately seeking food, water, medicine. bodies line the streets. the official death toll is 2200. >> the smell is overpowering. so many dead bodies have not been picked up. there are reports of rape and robberies at homes. it's to difficult. >> in hard-hit tacloban city more than 200,000 people are
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without basic necessities. clean water is to tough to find people are digging up water pipes from under ground. it is now a threat to life. people are worried about ty foyed fever, because people are drinking and bathing in the same water filled with the dead. >> we have a spine factor. mostly trauma injuries. we have pregnant women coming in >> that director delivered two babies in the past day, with aid taking too long to get to those who need it, desperate people are taking matters into their own hands. eight people were killed when looters stole stockpiles from a government warehouse. in tacloban soldiers chased down suspected looters. >> translation: they are shooting out there.
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>> many residents lined up at the tacloban in the hope of leaving the storm-ravaged area. >> we want to go to manila. the main - the goal of our family is to live in the city so that we can start a new life there because here, tacloban, there's no food, water. we cannot live here. that's it. >> of course, we needed to get people out of here, especially the sick and wounded and the elderly, the children because they became desperate here already. they lack food, you know, water, medicines, and they want to get out of here. >> at the same time there are residents that made it out of tacloban to the city of cebu only to gather supplies and return home. >> i am scared, but i have no choice, i have no choice. my family is in tacloban. when it comes to those
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policing the devastated areas, some officials say many employees are dead, missing or too overcome with grease to -- with grief to work. out of the police force only 20 have shown up to work. >> now that the roads are passable, as reporters are saying, is aid getting to people in remote areas? >> that is interesting. this is something that we have talked about and are focussing on. some of the big areas have airports, there are remote regions that have not seen relief. one has about 40,000 residents - no relief as of today. >> thank you. as you were saying, 10 airports were forced to close after the enslaught of typhoon haiyan. hard-hit tacloban is having trouble handling survivors trying to escape the situation. wayne hay reports from tacloban.
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>> as each day passes the scene at tacloban airport is more chaotic as many try to leave the area because their homes were destroyed. here a makeshift medical center has been set up. there are sick people stilling outside, inside while people have faith for the flights, there has been a baby born and one person has died from illness, as far as we know, and outside here, why not the fence, you can see many waiting or the flights. each day thousands of people make a long walk from where they used to live here to the airport, to try to get on a military flight out of here to the capital manila or other areas nearby. there are only a certain number of flights and seats available. night-time they are not flying because of issues with safety.
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the runway lights cannot be turned on because of electricity issues. when the gates are closed and the last flight has gone for the day, there are scenes of desperation and anger by the people trying to leave the area because of the devastation caused by the storm. >> officials say small commercial planes can land and take off at tacloban airport. it could be weeks before the bigger craft can use the airport. the u.n. is calling for more than $300 million in contributions to help the philippines. the appeal for relief funding would provide help for six months, experts say it's short of the damage to the philippines' economy, estimated at $12 billion. >> agriculture took a hit in the aftermath of typhoon haiyan. over a million farmers were affected by the storm. officials are asking for more than $24 million to help.
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the damage include hundreds of thousands of acres of rice field, coconut - half the country's agricultural exports - wiped away. and fishing communities saw the storm destroy boats and gear. nasa released dramatic images of typhoon haiyan. cameras on the international space station captured the storm as it swirled across the philippines last friday. the storm system that hampered the relief efforts moved out of the philippines. the cold air is creeping south. let's bring in nicole mitchell. good news. the disturbance that has been moving across the island is not organised, it's bringing showers and storms to some areas hardest hit. it's moved off. it's over water. there's a better chance that it may develop circulation. the rain is moving out here -
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that's good news for the recovery efforts. the cold front in the united states - it moved through the cold air, descrepding to southern parts of florida. so we are feeling it this morning. temperatures will be what people are talking about. places like hooust job, into the "50s, and '60, now in the 30s, you'll need the extra lay, and the coldest temperatures feeling like with wind gusts in the 20, and 30s. feels like 10 on the skin. some places feel like single digi digits. i want to give you hope, already today the high pressure behind the front is sliding east ward. more of a flow. we get back in the 40s, places like minnesota, and the pattern tomorrow - they nudge up as we get some cases today, some
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tomorrow at a closer look at the temperatures. >> the nation's chief technology officer will appear before a house committee investigating healthcare.gov. todd park played a small role, but when problems developed park blamed a large number of visitors to the site. darryl isis wants a technical explanation for the gixes. >> president obama is hearing criticism of the health care law - this time from bill clinton who says the president should honours his promises for those that want to keep their policies. >> i believe even if it takes a change of law. the president ought to keep his promise to the people. >> president obama sis the batched roll out is like the trouble and medicare part d. clinton said it was a disaster and they fixed it.
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some of the online state-run insurance exchanges are plagued with technical problems. issues raise from not being able to pay for policies. online enrolments are lower than analysts projected. >> a push for congress over iran's nuclear program. secretary of state john kerry will ask the senate banking committee to hold off on new sanctions for the country. we are asking for a pause, a temporary pause in sanctions. we are not taking away sanctions. we are not rolling things back. this is about ensuring our legislative and negotiating strategy are running hand in hand. iran, the u.s. and other world
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powers failed to reach on agreement last week in geneva, but kerry spects a deal within months. israel abruptly suspends plans to build 20,000 settlements in the west bank. the prime minister says it would cause friction. tom ackerman plains with palestinians and the u.s. don't like the idea. >> money was approved for the stage of construction planning in the contentious areas of the woing by the israeli government. >> palestinians fear more settlements could end honts hopes of a viable state. the u.s. government expressed displeasurement. >> we are surprised and are seeking explanation from the government of israel. our position on settlement is clear. we don't accept the lij mass
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any. >> secretary of state john kerry used tougher ring wij. in interviews with israeli and palestine media john kerry said it sends a mess thaj that: business >> prime minister benyamin netanyahu said the housing ministry's announcement was made with no prior notice and had been cancelled. he said it: >> but benyamin netanyahu did not signal a decision to scrap the long-term development of 24,000 housing units in the west bank and east jerusalem. before the orders were cancel the palestinian authority said it would have destroyed the peace process >> translation: it means negotiations are over and
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everything planned with the united states was not work, we'd ask all to hold israel responsible for the collapse. >> in july a 9-month deadline was set for talks to end the conflict. >> with time running out the latest episode puts those negotiations in deeper doubt than ever. >> the plan calls for 4,000 settlements, 12,000 east of the border. >> the democratics union party will introduce a constitution and regional government. the kurdish minority makes up 10% in the areas near turkey and iraq. they hope the move will puck out islamic groups that moved into the region. >> a court ruling end a 3-month state of emergency in egypt.
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emergency laws and curfew was used by the military government in a crackdown of mohamed morsi. six times a week the curfew ran from 1am to 5am. it took effect at seven, a time when mohamed morsi supporters staged large demonstrations. >> the united nations elected 14 members to its human rights council. the new pick is seen as controversial. saudi arabia, china, russia, vietnam and algeria. human right watch said it blockediations into reports into its country. there were protib et activists near new york. >> the fact that there's over 123 self of mutilated protesting the chinese rule demonstrates that the chinese government does not deserve a seat at the human rights council. u.n. human rights council may
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serve for six years before standing for election. the u.s. is a current member. >> native americans fighting a new battle. tributes trying for recognition from the government. the largest airline, what america and u.s. air promised to give up to join forces. a new part of the job process that it fun and games. and we look at a live picture of the capitol building this early wednesday morning.
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good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. straight ahead - how the approved merger between american airlines and u.s. airways could affect airfares. first the weather with nicole. >> it is a chilly one. in some cases our coldest morning in places like the south. the cold air coming in from canada, midwest on monday, more of the east and some parts of the south.
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today it spread through the golf coast with the exception of some parts of florida. that's where the front is, if you have the warmer temperatures you have chances for a little bit of rain. because of the cold air a lot of 20s and 30, different frost and freeze advisories. this will be one of our coldest nights. the skies cleared out and temperatures dipped down. temperatures for today starting to get a little milder in the midwest. it will take a couple of days to recover. >> typhoon haiyan cut through a swath of the philippines, destroying a lot of villages. days later mean sought refuge in camps where they are without power and other essentials. i'm in a fill in in northern cebu. it's 6 o'clock at night. as you can see it's pitch dark. there's no power at all. according to the local authorities it will take at least another two months before
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the power goes back on. people are sitting in front of their half-destroyed houses in their makeshift shelters waiting for help to pass by and people to drum up food and water for them. it's been a long night for them for the last six days. basically people are waiting and sitting around. they have no aid. people are stopping sometimes to drop off food, often they pass by to go more affected areas. >> so many that still need help. that report from cebu. >> the world's biggest airline is clear for takeoff. the justice department signing off on the merger of american airlines and u.s. airwayseneding a lawsuit over concerns it will hurt consumers and raise fairs. the two carriers must give you landing slots and gates at several airports, including
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laguardia, new york, regan national in washington, making way for competing low-cast carriers. >> some of the smaller airlines, which are not small figured out a way to paying a profit. if the merger drops, it could be an does note for smaller carriers to move in. >> small airlines will control 80% of flight of the the final settlement will go to a jum this month. here is what is making business news. stocks taking a break. futures are lower. yesterday the markets pull the back as investors cashed in recent product. here is where we stand:
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asian markets posting losses. >> maceys will garner a lot of attention - posting quarterly earnings, and wall street will search for clues about how consumers feel heading into the holiday shopping season. this time of year is make or break for the retailers. heavy emphasis is being placed on internet sales. >> they are putting presence on social media, apps and because of snant gratification they are offering consumers test messaging. when the client goes into the storm and wants to get an instant coupon. >> internet retailers will get a 57% increase in sales, analysts
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predetective. >> a bitter defeat for starbucks. an ash bit traitor saying they must pay kraft food. starbucks complained the partnership was not working and prematurely end the contract in 2011. >> gl the model s sedan real is denied. the electric car is 5-times less likely to have a fire than a petrol-powered car. tesla's stock has plummeted. >> the government is moving closer to selling its stakes in general motors, selling $1 billion of gm stock. the government recovered $37 billion of money it spent to say gm. taxpayers are still $12 billion
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in the hole. >> native north american tribal leaders gather in washington to meet with president obama. more than 500 tribes will be gathered for the white house native leader conference. they'll discuss mascots, violent crime amongst more. we spoke to a chief who was not invited because his tribe is not federally recognised. >> it's difficult to determine the exact numbers. >> the chief ken adams does not conceal his disbelief that as far as the federal government is concerned his tribe does not exist. >> the first people that met the british and colonies were established in this area. they are not recognised by the federal government, it's ironic that the people they came here and were supported by the native people to help the economy initially - those people are not
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recognise by the federal government, and that's when they began. >> in the 17th century the british aged the native american presence in map and treaty. but the chief has not been invited to the conference. the members of upper matinpan jirks inhabited the area for centuries. up to this point it's impossible for the tribe to achieve federal recognition. such recollection is the historical collection to the lands. it's also a matter of principle. the chinakok was the last tribe to receive federal recognition in 2010. >> it's humiliating, degrading.
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it - it tears you apart. we predated even the records in this country. >> much of the ancestral land of the upper patap, rni is no longer owned by the tribe. 600 members br scattered throughout the state. >> for chief adams, it's a way of holding on to the past and future. >> people have a tendency to shift away from the tribal focus and drift to other areas of life. i think a recognition will bring a stronger sense of cohesion. >> the other was among the first of the u.s. tribes to be def stated by blood shed and disease. here its members stand no matter the opinion of the u.s. government. the tribe is recognise the by the state of virginia, but not the federal government.
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a native american tribe says it has federal approval to build a casino on martha's vineyard. it will be blocked. the state claims the drive gave up its right to build on the island upon agreeing to a land agreement in the '80s. >> typhoon victims in their own words - first responders distrib the bat m >> why doctors my prescribe cholesterol-lowering drugs to millions who have never taken them before. >> coming up an epic college in college basketball. >> and a live look at la guardia airport.
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one of the airlines in the pig u.s. airlines airway merger.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. these are the top stories - typhoon haiyan survive juniors are growing straight for food, and medicine and waters. >> the "george washington" is expected to arriving today. >> the health care battle moves to capitol hill. the chief technology officer will be asked by health -- healthcare.gov is not working. >> the united nations elected 14 members to its human rights coup. but some say china, russia, and
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others should be excluded because of human rights issues in their own county. >> survivors of typhoon haiyan are begging for help from anywhere. it's taking a toll on rescue workers. >> there's death and devastation everywhere, people need help. >> they can't survive without house, they'll sleep anywhere. >> our priorities for the response will be water, sanitation, hygiene, nutrition, health, protection and education. theed in priority is safe water, sanitation and hygiene. >> the counter situation puts the most vulnerable people at risk. women and children begging on the streets. powerlines still down, a lack of lighting has made children and
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women home and more vulnerable, especially at night. >> we are in discussions with the government of the philippines on access for u.s. forces. we have not come to a conclusion on that agreement. we have thousands deployed service members informant region, who can help respond. >> i feel terribly as does the coup and the strike group on what occurred and our matters go out to all the people in the philippines. we are very much pleased to be able to provide help and relief. i speak for the entire cruise and the group that this is an important mission that we provide and we are happy to be going and helping where we can. >> aid totalling tens of millions has made its way to the philippines. many countries, including the u.s. and great britain provided
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military support for rescue efforts. >> hawaii is about to become the 15th state to allow same-sex marriages, the state senate passed a bill legalizing gay marriages, the governor will sign is today. the state is expected to see revenue as a destination for same-sex weddings and honey moons. it will boost tourism by $217 million. >> some state lawmakers and indian want to strengthen the banning of gay memories. >> when beth and trish moved to blooming tonne, the state legislature had been debating gay marriage for years. >> i think it's not surprising that the indiana legislature would attempt to do this again. there's a political base that they'd have the expectation that
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they'd pursue the agenda. >> it's been pursued every year sips 2004. the latest attempt has the backing of lawmakers from both parties. it's an amendment saying: >> opponents say turning the ban on the books to a constitutional amendment would make it difficult for gay couples to win extra rates. >> it has implications for inheritance tax, pension, a number of very basic benefits that heterosexual couples take for granted. >> there is growing and notable opposition. this week indiana university became the first public institutional to support equal
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rights and speak against the amendment. >> this is something inherently unequal. it's not something we want to see happen. >> opponents of the amendment make an economic argument. >> anything that sends a message that indian is not welcoming of people of diverse background makes it hard to get employees. >> some of the biggest employees joined a coalition against pt amendment. the indiana family institute spoke in favour of the ban, but would not agree to an interview. a spokesman for the caucus offered no comment. for couples like beth and trish - it's not about economics, it's about equal rights. >> what i care about is equal protection under the law for trish and i. to be a full-flexed citizens of
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this great land of the united states and to be treated as such. >> to make it to a state ballot the resolution must pass the house and the santate. it passed once in 2011. it would be put to a public vote in november next year. . indiana state representative eric turner a republican is the driving force and repeatedly introduced the measure and is urging fellow lawmakers to pass it. the nation add roman catholic bishops chose a new leader, joseph kurtz of louisville kentucky. he will follow pope francis in his call for a church of the poor. archbishop kurtz, cardinal tim thith dowlon. >> republicans staged a phil which buster on tuesday against the nom nation of nina pillard.
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the court is the second-most important gones the supreme court. pillard served in bill clinton's administration. it's the third nominee the party blocked. >> caroline kennedy is the new ambassador for japan, and was sworn in tuesday at the state department. it brings a third generation of the kennedy family into the american diplomatic corp. >> the united states and asia, japan is an important ally. >> caroline kennedy is the first female u.s. ambassador to tokyo. she heads for japan on friday. a major shift in thinking about colester cole. statens have been used to lower levels. now the nation's top heart doctors are changing course
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saying 70 million americans should take the drugs to reduce the risk of heart attack and strokes. we take a look at the new guideline. this yearam a million americans will have a heard atake. 80 million more are living with heart disease. there's a new treatment option on the table - staten trucks, sold under krestor and lipitor and zotor. >> there may be millions of patients who were not considered candidates for staten tlerpy. >> that's because the american heart association and the american cardiology department take away the treatment from a number to a person approach. statens were used to lower ldl levels, bad colester om. doctors are urged to prescribe
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stattens for those likely to suffer stroke for heart disease. >> doctors will find the guideline easy to use. the focus is not on the number, it's on the right intensity of therapy. >> people who fall into high-risk categories will be given statens, including those with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and those with high levels of unhealthy collester roll. in addition there's a new target group. they are individuals that fall between the ages of 40 and 75; that had a percentage risk of developing heart disease or stroke in the next 10 years. >> whilst statens can be beneficial the old rule applies. emphasis on a healthy lifestyle, exercise and vegetables as a key to avoid a number one killer this the country. dr kim williams is vice
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president of the american college. cardiology, one of the groups calling for the statens and how they are prescribed. thank you for being was. this is called a major shift. what is significant about it, how did it come about? >> well, this is really a big change for us. thank you for having me. if you look at the history, heart disease has been the number one killers of americans since 1918 when planted by the spanish flu. it's been a long run. we would like to see the tide stem. this is an opportunity to take people at risk and give them the therapy they need based on evidence it will prolong their life and decrease heart attacks. >> what can you tell us about the serious side effects that some experience taking the drugs. >> it's interesting the side effect profile is something we focused on. many people feel they are having side effects when compared with
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a plas eebo or a fake drugs. the differences are small. this has gotten to the level where new guidelines and recommendations say we shouldn't spend a lot of time and effort checking on excessive numbers of lifr enzymes and kidney tests on a routine basis because they really are quite safe. there are a few people who are intolerant. there are people that have muscle and joint issues. and they should work with their doctor to design a therapy more comfortable for them. >> as gus reported in his report, there's a wider range of potential people that might be needing to take stattens. who should talk to their doctors about taking them. >> everyone, particularly if you have a family history. if you are not following the perfect lifestyle of diet and exercise as you described earlier. it would be a good idea for
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people to go and have their doctor run through their risk factors, adding them into the formula published yesterday. that will give you an estimate of the risk. there'll be an app for that i am sure. >> i am sure there will. women and african-americans that tend to be at higher risk - they are two of the group that should talk to their doctor. >> with women the problem is recognition. after menno pause they catch up with men. the recognition is behind where it should be. african american males - which i take personally - there's an increased risk for every risk factor that is known to correlate with cardio vascular disease. that has taken into account for
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the first time in the formula. >> dr kim williams, vice president of the american college of cardiology. thank you for joining us this morn. >> a teen whose dying wish was to celebrate one last christmas passed away. devon was diagnosed with brain cancer. he was released from the hospital in october so he could spend his final days in the holiday spirit. his town, sang car ols, made fake snow and decorated the town. he died monday. >> i said, "it snowed for you." i think it was god saying it was okay. >> his mum hopes her son will be remembered for how he brought his community together. several studies shows parents from poorer backgrounds are worse off in school. the economist has a million
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dollar grant to find out. greg duncan will find out if children are held back by financial limitations, or whether healthar personality issues will change things. >> he'll give $4,000 to single mothers for the first three years of their lives and compare what happens to another group of mothers. >> now for sport. college basketball is in the spotlight. >> you have to love it. how about a november to remember, not march madness. four out of five top teams hooped it up at the united center. aka the house that jordan built. kentucky with the freshman against the michigan stakes. sparks on fire, scorings the first 10. maybe the newbies for the wildcats were nervous. michigan state took advantages, up by 12 at the half.
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after the break kentucky's july yin randall went use. with a game-high 27 in the second half. that's special. n eventually tying up at 66. down the stretch the senior drained money. number 2 michigan state holds off uhuru kenyatta. in the night cap it was about the new kids on the block. wiggins on the left, and park on the right. >> 5, kansas tidied things up. barker, who grew up near chicago showed off what he had. duke down 72-71. parker comes up - clutch, crunch time. andrew wigan - can you say rop chop j-hop. this is why there are over 50
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nba scalps on hand. >> as for the guys - lebron james is not happy heading into the game against milwaukee. the heat have been sleepwalking on defense. when lebron talks and says, "pick it up on d people", everyone listens. miami - with a bunch of easy buckets. ley pron 33 points and -- -- lebron 33 points and sat out the fourth quarter. >> the miami dolphins were asked to delay their meeting with jonathan martin because the ffl wants to talk to him first. steven ross was scheduled to meet with jonathan martin today. he wants to get to the bottom of the martin rickie incognito scandal. an investigation a being conducted by wells, he wants to meet with martin first, on
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friday in new york. miami pushed things back. he is scheduled to release is a video statement. as for the dolphins, they come off a lose with tam pea bay whilst dealing with off field distractions. >> i'm not worried about moreal. we have a short week, we are focussing on the situation we are in football wise. we can't focus on what we can't control. we can't focus on things going on outside of football. >> the green bay packers have issues at quarterback. they decided to bring back nat flynn, backing up aaron rodgers. rodgers is nursing a broken collarbo collarbone. the packers lost two straight
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without the player. >> the man of the lead twent to terence, and pittsburg's skipper was the top skipper. >> congratulations to them. thank you. speaking of playing games - how about games to get a job. how some companies are using video games to judge prospective employees. these three paintings smashed a record price set by edvard munch "the scream" how many someone paid for "the three studies of lucian freud - 1969 ." >> cold care - it was a cold radar. i'm look at the wet spots. and a live look at new york city where the sun is rising. the sun starting to peak up behind the capital building in washington dc.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead - instead of
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traditional job applications some companies are using video games to evaluate hires. first let's have a look at the precipitation we are looking at across the u.s. nicole mitchell, metrologist is here. >> the system bringing in the cold air brought high pressure to the mid section of the country. look at how dry the skies are. frontal boundaries stretching through florida. rain into florida and south florida. there's a system in the west and lighter out here. as the system went through some places it was the first snow of the season. for chicago, monday - you can tell chicago, it's a cloud gait for the jelly bean in the background. people taking the snow, 0.4 of an inch and making a snowman out of it. you can see the window pattern contributing in the areas. limited moisture westward, but a few areas of rain. we'll see if people enjoy it come february.
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>> i like the snowman. one world trade center in new york is officially the tallest building in america. the skyscraper is 1776 foot tool including a 408 foot spire. the council on tall knocked the willis tower from the top spot. it came down to design. >> one world trade is a taller building to its architect turl top, the tallest building in the united states, but the willis power has a higher occupied floor. we see it from the architectural top. >> the council says it mite change its standard for measuring skye scrapers because more buildings are topped with huge decorative spires to gain vanity height. when the new world world trade center was designed in 2003 it was slated to be the tallest building in the world. it's third behind a dubai
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building and a tower in saudi ar abia, here is how they measures up: in second placement. -- in second place: and the third tall es: >> a company in new york city has created a new way for employers to screen job candidates without assisting through application, it's a game. we have more. what if playing a video game could get you a job interview. what if it could help you find your next star employee.
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that's what this game is designeded to do. it engages a job seeker in a similarly simple desk-top game. gathering a tonne of data that can be analysed. >> part of the point of the game is seeing how long you wan evaluate people. >> nyu piloted the program to suggest whether it would be useful to provide candidates with its program. >> top medical students are applying for our positions. we have 700-800 applications for 12 positions. >> the group is narrowed to 72 people and four full days are spent interviewing the finalist. you'd think with high lie killed individuals that every person with a position would work out wonderfully. it doesn't always work out that way. >> guy hopes to solve the problem he's the company behind
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the video game and a new one. >> the game is a human experience that reveals a lot of information about our behaviour and who we are, "are you competitive, how do you deal with change, adversity. do you strat guise? >> beyond insight he believes the data will help to predict which candidates will be successful in roles the company is hoping to fill. >> it does this by matching job seeker data with those in the organization. >> the first person is a 95% match. >> this is not the only company seeing the potential. e-harmony known for compatibility in relationships is developing an algorithm matching employer and employees. several other companies from connect cube and silicon valley's evolve designed applications. the data-base approachers do
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more nan identify match talent. they pinpoint which job seekers are likely to stick around. nyu is not sure whether to denoi more elections. they can see the potential in using video games. >> the positions of the future - they are into this. they are very adept at it. it's part of their natural state of being. a painting that's less than 50 years old is auctioned for a record setting price, "the three studies of lucian freud - 1969 " from francis bacon sold for $172 million, it surpassed that of edvard munch's "the scream." >> it's a dire situation, eight killed in the philippines when thousands of typhoon survivors stormed a government rice warehouse.
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u.s. chief technology officer todd park testifies before the government about problems with the federal health website. millions of americans could take cholesterol-lowing statten jobs. >> in sport - the nfl gets first dibs on speaking to jonathan martin, in the hopes of resolving the hazing scandal. >> and cold air moves to the coast coast. textures 20 below average. i'll have the forecast. >> thomas and i are back in 2.5 minutes. al jazeera america conditions. -- al jazeera america continues.
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>> people here are desperate, don't of anything to eat or have water. >> a desperate situation in the philippines even after stepped-up relief efforts and panic is setting in among survivors still waiting for food, water and medicine. >> new medical guidelines for preventing heart attacks and strokes. >> some doctors will find these guidelines naturally easy to use. the focus is not on the number, it's on the right intensive therapy. >> right recommendations of doctors could double the number of people taking cholesterol-lowering drugs.
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>> the all clear for takeoff from u.s. regulators. >> president obama's approval ratings hit rock bottom as more americans say they don't trust him. >> a glimmer of hope today for survivors of typhoon haiyan. good morning and welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> it is encouraging news, hi, i'm thomas drayton. all major roads damaged are now passible. it is welcome news for relief and rescue borqueers who have struggled to deliver aid since last weekend. >> there's now an increasing sense of urgency to get supplies out fast as conditions worsen. in village after village, families are begging for the basic necessity, some standing on the side of the roads with signs saying please help us. it's turned desperate pleas for
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help into widespread looting. >> the destruction stretches through three provinces. we have the latest. >> they lumbered into the air force base with military precision delivering their precious cargo, those who couldn't walk were carried, the sick, the old and those who simply wanted to escape the disaster. >> bodies are on the roads and nobody's picking them up. >> the injured and sick were taken to a military hospital. for many here, the horror of losing their families far outweighed the pain of injuries. this woman was struck by her roof as it collapsed in the storm. she managed to crawl out with her daughters after it passed. they were among the lucky ones.
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>> she survived. >> the doctors are working around the clock, overwhelmed by the sheer volume of injured, but every now and then a ray of hope. >> today, we have a spine fracture, pelvic fracture, so mostly trauma injuries. we have pregnant women coming in, so delivered two babies yesterday. >> after unloading human cargo, supplies are loaded for those facinged hardship of another day. >> the u.s. government are helping us and various other international governments helping us with aid. we continue to receive sport for people affected by the super typhoon. >> the relief supplies are not always getting to those who need it most, today the government sending more troops to control the looting. also, a few brave survivors determined to go back to the disaster area, despite all
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they've been through. >> imagine the courage of these people here in cebu at the air force base. many of them who were there during the storm are waiting for a c130 hercules aircraft to arrive to take them back into the devastated area. why? because in those bags are food and water, things that they say their family need to survive. >> these survivors say the government's aid isn't reaching their families fast enough and going back is their only option. >> i am scared, but i have no choice. i have no choice, because my family's in tac tacloban. the united states that directed the u.s.s. george washington to head to the philippines and provide support. u.s. marines are already on the ground, but as bad weather begins to close in the survivors wonder if they'll ever arrive in
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time. >> a state of national calamity is enforced throughout the philippines. it's president said they had no choice. the aftermath of the typhoon pushed parts of the country into anarchy and disorder. aljazeera is in cebu with more. >> the state of national emergency that the country is under is meant a stabilize the situation in the worst affected areas or at least try to. a curfew has been imposed in areas like tacloban to stop the looting that has taken place, people are so desperate for food, water and medicine, that they've been taking things from establishments like damaged malls, and even from the houses of people who have died or disappeared. it's not just the victims that have now been reported to have caused a security concern, but the communist rebels that are in operation around these areas and in the provinces that surround the most devastated areas have been planning or been caught by
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the military to be staging an ambush on relief convoys that are trying to bring in materials to help the victims. in one of the skirmishes that military men had with these alleged communist rebels, two people were killed, and this happened on tuesday. the military say, though, that they are very, very quickly trying to take the situation in hand, and that they have special forces on the ground that are trying to ascertain that people who are bringing in relief goods can get to where they need to go safely. >> the looting has taken a turn for the worse. officials say eight people were killed when a mob overran a rice warehouse. nasa has released dramatic i am packages of typhoon haiyan as seen from space. cameras on the space station captured the storm as it squirreled across the philippines last friday. >> let's get a look at the conditions they are facing. >> unfortunately, the disturb
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answer has now moved out. this is what we're talking about, now back over open waters, which means it's more likely that it could be organized enough to be a tropical depression. yesterday at this time, we were catching it even cause some thunderstorms in the heaviest-hit areas with, a lot of people without shelter and trying to get relief efforts in was causing problems. good news that we now of more cooperative weather for the island. as we head back to the united states, it is the front that has moved across the area with the cold air behind it. this is now stationed through florida, but the rest of the region and florida's getting the rain because of it, is seeing much colder air this morning, some of the temperatures in the 30's, houston for example is 50's and 60's yesterday at this time. when you walk out the door, it's going to be kind of a blast of reality as you get going. feels-like temperatures with wind gusts in the 20 and 30-mile per hour range.
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of course, that makes i feel colder on your skin. some of these like around omaha feeling like 10 degrees, a couple parts of iowa and minnesota, the feels-like temperature are in the single digits, you certainly want to bundle as you head out the door. the high pressure that's been in place is starting to move eastward. on the backside of the high, you get winds out of the south. you see temperatures in places like chicago and minneapolis are starting to warm back into the 40's today. we'll see more from the east coast tomorrow. i'll take a closer look at your temperatures in a minute. >> we'll talk about the big chill. thank you. >> richard gorman, chairman and c.e.o. have the red cross in the philippines will join us to discuss relief efforts going on there. >> president obama's approval rating is his lowest ever. the affordable care act is to blame according to voters. according to a new poll, 55% of those surveyed say they oppose
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obamacare. nearly the same number say they disprove of the president's performance overall and 52% say he is not being honest with voters. >> president bill clinton is adding his voice to the debate over the health care law. he said president obama should honor his promise to those who want to keep their current medical policies. >> i personally believe even if it takes a change in the law, the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and let them keep what they've got. >> mr. clinton said he has faith in the affordable care act. he said the rollout is like the trouble with medicare part d. when introduced under president george bush. clinton said it was a disaster and they fixed it. >> healt healthcare.gov's lead contractor has fixed 60% of the
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glitches. c.g.i. is having software problems handling high user volume. >> the nation's chief technology officer will appear before a house committee that's investigating healthcare.gov. when problems first developed, it was park who inaccurately blamed the large number of visitors to the site. house oversight committee wants a technical explanation for all those glitches. >> an all-out push by the administration to buy more time for negotiators to reach a deal with iran. >> what we are asking for right now is a pause, a temporary pause in sanctions. we are not taking away
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sanctions, we are not rolling them back. this is about insuring that our legislative strategy and negotiating strategy are running hand-in-hand. >> several senate republicans and democrats say tighter sanctions against tehran could help resolve the dispute over its nuclear program. lawmakers will be briefed on the initiative. >> recovery efforts in the philippines in the wake of a typhoon there, joining us now to discuss the challenge of getting aid to victims, richard gordon, president and c.e.o. of the red cross in the philippines. we're approaching nighttime where you are. what's the situation on the ground right now? >> well, the situation is not as exciting as you want it to be in terms of being effective in providing relief. relieve is coming in in
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trickles, finally reaching the outskirts of tacloban. it takes 18 hours, and now we are trying to try to bring in more goods into the area from the south and from the north and we have recommended and we are going to provide ships to evacuate those who want to leave the area and go to their relatives in the next province. we're going to make sure that those who are sick are brought to the next province and those who want to be evacuated to a camp site, that's what we're planning for right now with international help. >> do you have a number of those who are sick and those who want to evacuate? >> no, we don't, but we have two ships at the moment that are
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ready, and we're preparing the infrastructure so we can get them out. we are skill discussing how we attempt to do that, because when we want to do, there is no power there, there is no water there. many of them are walking to the airport to try to get out, so maybe we should get them out, so we can get relief to those who remain behind. part of the suggestion we have made is to get food for work right away, clean up the rubble out there. pay them minimum wage, and make sure they are doing something constructive so that they don't go into lotting. >> we saw a momentum ago with the video boxes being carried away, it is a dire situation. that what are the most critical needs of the people right now. where do we stand with the basic needs, food and water. >> well, you know, water in
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water filtration plants. trucks carry 25,000 liters. people need water distributed within the town. there are other towns with goods coming in from the south. we should be able to put more water facilities in the next towns that have also been devastated and provide food for them, provide tents, provide, you know, psychological social support and the like. we're getting ready for that. we are very confident that our volunteers both domestic and international will be able to do their work very well. >> we understand most if not all of the roads have been reopened. what other issues are you facing getting supplies to the isolated villages?
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>> i didn't understand you. >> are you facing issues getting supplies to the isolated villages there? >> we are packing goods so we can go in. the security situation, the -- >> we know you have a lot of work. >> hello, are you there? >> we're going to let you go. chairman and c.e.o. of the red cross in the philippines. i know you have a lot of work ahead of you. thanks for joining us from manila. >> new guidelines for treating cholesterol ahead. >> two major medical organizations are calling for changes. >> how it could mean millions more american adults will be prescribed statins. >> the u.s. government giving the clear for u.s. airways and american airlines to merge. how the deal could affect you
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the next time you take to the skies. >> i've seen a lot of dead fish. >> it's called a clean source of energy, but new data is showing ethanol production is having an impact on one part of the u.s. >> a live shot of laguardia airport in new york, which is set to see the effects of that airline merger.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> good to have you with us. coming up in a moment here, the gulf of mexico isn't cleaned up from the oil spill three years ago. it was an in environmental disaster. a new pollutant is pouring in from what is touted as clean energy. >> first let's look at the weather. good morning, nicole. >> if you've paid no attention to the weather pattern you're getting a surprise. houston is going from 60's yesterday in the morning, so those are morning temperatures,
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to 30's this morning. nashville, 70-degree highs monday, gorgeous with sunshine. by tuesday morning, it was snowing, today temperatures with a wind chill around 20, so cold air has settled well southward. we have front of the and freeze advisories across the region, coldest air of the season in many cases. a lot of these cities up and down the east coast especially through the south running 10-15, even 20 degrees blow average. starts to moderate a little bit tomorrow. we'll take a closer look at where there's rain, coming up. back to you. >> a court ruling ends a three month long state of emergency in egypt. a curfew that was ordered in august has also been lifted. emergency laws and curfew were used by the military government in its crack down of supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. six nights a week the curfew ran from 5:00 a.m. to evening.
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>> senior officials are in cairo to hammer out the details. last month, the u.s. announced a partial cut in military assistance to that country and now egypt is looking for billions of dollars in russian weaponry instead, including air defense systems, anti tank missiles and fighter planes. aljazeera is in cairo right now. how close are they to signing this deal? >> they're actually stale few thousand miles away, because the russians have been delayed. we were expecting them to be in cairo today, but now we are not expecting them to land in the capitol until into the night, possibly not until early tomorrow morning, so they will
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have to get here before they can sit down around the table. of course, a full day of meetings scheduled for tomorrow with the foreign minister, and the general, the defense minister. when they get around the table, how close are they to deciding? that's a difficult question. it depends on the money. egypt at the moment is a poor country. it can't really afford a new wrath of expensive russian weapons, so the money's going to have to come from somewhere, possibly somewhere else. if you believe what has been coming out of some of the global international media that's been reportedding on this, maybe the suggestion is that the money is going to come from one of the gulf states. now, that is something that we have been speaking to here, people saying maybe that is hopeful from the russians and possibly the money from the gulf states won't be forthcoming.
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i'm not going to say it's likely, but certainly possible that the russians could come here to sign a big deal and maybe go away empty handed. >> we'll continue to follow that story. >> the number of americans taking cholesterol medication could be set to double. the american heart association and the american college of cardiology have issued new guidelines on who would benefit from taking cholesterol lowering drugs called statins. the new plan considers more risk factors, smoking, high blood pressure and family history. they also encourage prescribing higher doses to anyone with risk factors regardless of cholesterol levels. some cardiologists say it's about time. >> if you look at the history, heart disease has been the number one killer of americans since 1918 when it was sup planted by the spanish flu. that's been a very long run and we'd like to see that tide stemmed. >> under the new guidelines, a third of all adults should
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consider taking the drugs. >> the world's biggest airline is cleared for takeoff. the justice department signed off on the merger of u.s of theo carriers. they must give up gates in laguardia and reagan national in washington. experts say that would make room for competing low-cost carriers. >> probably the best thing for consumers is competition. some of those smaller airlines, like jet blue and southwest have figured oh you the a way to make a profit and serve routes skipped by the big airlines. if this merger drops routes with, this could be an opportunity for them to move in. >> four airlines will control more than 80% of all commercial flights. the final settlement will go to a judge later this month. >> taking a look at business headlines, stocks taking a break from the record down, do you
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futures down 34 points, pointing to a bear start for the strayeding day. yesterday, the dow pulled back slightly from all time highs as investors turn their focus back on the reserves and stimulus plans. the in december remains up 20% so far this year. the s&p is at 17,068, the nasdaq at 39,020. overseas, renewed speculation about the fed dragging down the market, european stocks mowly lower at this hour. losses posted with hong kong and shanghai. >> macy's will post its quarterly earnings this morning. wall street will look for clues for the upcoming shopping season. one analyst said success depends on internet sales. >> when you look at the s&p 500,
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internet retailers expect a jump of 57% in earnings this holiday season. with netflix and amazon taking a big part of it, they have an over200% growth rate this weekend. >> incidentally, macy says it will open thanksgiving evening for the first time ever. >> a bitter defeat for starbucks, a ruling that starbucks must pay kraft foods $3 billion for ending their grocery deal too early. bags of coffee were sold, but starbucks pulled out of the contract in 2011. >> $9.5 billion, you see that number right there? that's what chef ron is ette to pay after a court in ecuador ruled it was liable for environmental damage. it goes back to a ruling against texaco for its work in the amazon through 1990.
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thousands were sickened by run off in their water supply. chef ron acquired texaco in 2001. >> the bio fuel ethanol is called clean energy, but made from corn, it may not be as friendly as believed. farmers planting corn for ethanol have plowed more than 5 million-acres of conservation land, destroying has been tats and polluting water flies. corn crops have produced damages fertilizer run off, which has flowed deep into the gulf of mexico. >> on the gulf of mexico, fishing is not only a way of life, it's big business. >> i've seen a lot of dead shrimp, dead fish. you've seen it wash ashore. >> a dead zone that stretches across 5800 square miles of sea floor, about the size of
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connecticut. >> some of the ingredients in the fertilizers in the heart land that help the corn grow are worsening conditions down here in the gulf of mexico, creating an environment in packets of the gulf where there's no oxygen and marine life can't sustain itself. >> it's not rocket science to figure out if you plant more corn, more of the fertilizers gets into the gulf of mexico. >> this accelerated when the corn and ethanol began six years ago. >> some day, you're going to be using this in your cars. >> when president george bush signed into law the obama administration since championshipped. now oil companies are required to add billions of dollars of corn based ethanol to their gasoline each year. the goal was to develop a cleaner fuel and reduce u.s. depends on foreign crude. >> air quality and water quality is benefiting from this industry and we are reducing our reliance
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an foreign oil. >> according to the associated press, producing ethanol is far more damaging to the environment since the government admits. since president obama took office, 5 million-acres of land set aside for conservation are now corn fields. this map based on the u.s. department of agriculture data shows the change. the dark area represents the dense city of the corn acreage. the fertilizer used is being washed into the mississippi river and downstream to the gulf. steven demarco, an oceangrapher is tracking the flow. >> pushed past the tipping point, it will have a significant effect on the eco system and cause fish dying. >> not so says the nation's leading ethanol producer. they say there is no correlation between the increased production and environmental degradation of
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the gulf. >> we are going to stand up and defend our product against an in environmental claim or performance claim. >> shricher david dardar says there is no question that the fertilizer run off is ruining these waters. >> it kills everything in its path. it just kills everything. nothing size in it. there's no oxygen in the water. >> the usda says it's been good for farmers and the environment. >> ethanol producers have disputed claims in the investigation. >> the devastating typhoon in the philippines is being felt beyond the borders of the nation. >> filipino americans are feeling the impact. >> how they are mobileizing to help relatives back home. >> president obama set to sit down with native american leaders, talking about the struggles their people face and what the the white house can do.
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we'll talk about the issues with the president of one organization representing more than two dozen tribes. >> in sports, an epic night in college basketball. over60nb ax scouts on hand. we'll tell you why in just a bit. >> but when is it too much time? >> i heard the word life, but i didn't understand that meant i was gonna die in prison... >> could a landmark ruling give him a second chance? >> my day will come... >> a controversial special report... >> i was completely re-traumatized by the fear of this offender... >> locked up for life america tonight 9 eastern, tonight, on al jazeera america.
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>> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax cuts... the economy... iran... healthcare... it goes on and on... ad guests on all sides of the debate. and a host willing to ask the
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tough questions and you'll get... the inside story theses are strait forward conversations, no agenda, just hard hitting debate on the issues that matter to you ray suarez hosts inside story only on al jazeera america >> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera marrying. it's so good to have you with us. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm stephanie sy. it's a scary scene in the philippines several days into the tragedy. we're getting reports of people not getting food and water, so difficult to get supplies to the areas. we're going to hear from filipino americans in the country trying to help. >> they don't have the basics and images we've seen all morning long are troubling.
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>> back here at home, president obama's set to meet with leaders from several native american tribes. this is his fifth meeting, so what's new? we'll talk about that. >> in a few minutes, we'll speak with the representatives of two dozen tribes. >> there are issues with that community. getting back to our top story, typhoon survivors are growing desperate for food, water and medical supplies in the philippines, pushing parts of the country into anarchy and disorder. aljazeera is in cebu with more. >> the state of emergency is meant to stabilize the situation in the worst affected areas or at least try to. a curfew is imposed in tacloban to try to stop looting taking place there since the typhoon hit on friday. people are so desperate for food and water and medicine that they've been taking things from
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establishments like damaged malls and houses of people who of died or disdisappeared. it's not just the victims that have now been reported to have caused a security concern, but the communist rebels that are in operation around these areas and in the provinces that surround the most devastated areas have been planning or been caught by the military to be staging an ambush on relief convoys trying to bring in materials to help the victims. now in one of the skirmishes that military men had with these alleged communist rebels, two people were killed, and this happened on tuesday. the military saying though that they are very, very quickly trying to take the situation in hand and that they have special forces on the ground that are trying to ascertain the people who are bringing in relief goods can get to where they need to go safely. >> back here in the u.s., filipino americans are trying to cope with this disaster. most haven't heard from their
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family and friends since the typhoon. it hasn't stopped the outpouring of good will from those communities across this country. we have the story. >> the typhoon impact mobilized members of this city's neighborhoods, organizing donations dropped off over the last few days. this collection center started spontaneously when students showed up after school with food for survivors of the typhoon. it's just one of the many places in the bay area responding to the disaster. >> we are collecting canned goods, children's clothes, adult clothes. banquet, everything, they lost everything. >> south of san francisco is one of the largest filipino communities in the country. >> it's a big community, because it's the biggest one, it's
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bigger than katrina. >> i believe we have at least 18 typhoons a year, and this year, yolanda is the strongest r. >> so many have donated food and supply with the best of intentions. it will be costly to mail and weeks before it reaches the philippines. disaster relief agencies say a financial contribution is the best way to help now, allowing experts to uses funds for maximum impact. >> it's whatever people feel they can give. rudy kept the doors of his community center open until midnight to collect donations. he's confident that despite the tragedy, everything will be ok. >> the will of the filipino people is such that, you know, they're very resilient. they can overcome a lot of catastrophe and will overcome this. >> so far away from the disaster, filipino americans
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here have certainly stepped up to the plate to reflect that very strength, sending help and hope. aljazeera, san francisco. >> once again, we want to point out relief agencies in the u.s. and worldwide say the best way to help the victims is by sending money to your preferred charity. >> relief agencies from around the world are working to get supplies to the typhoon victims. with us, emergency preparedness director with the international rescue community. thanks for being with us. you do have a team on the ground right now heading to the worst-hit areas. what are the most critical needs as you understand them right now? >> one of the most critical needs is we still don't have good access to most of the hardest-hit areas. we know that upwards of 10,000 people have been killed, even though the government has only registered 1800 deaths so far, it's a matter of getting into those locations that have been cut off. roads have been closed, bridges blown out. it's a big challenge to get to
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the hardest hit. >> not to mention there are so many agencies on the ground, n.gg.o.'s, military. >> w we have a lot of experience in doing this. we responded to the tsunami in tow, haiti. the u.n. is setting up. >> there is a tremendous record of going into places hard-hit by natural disaster. how does this rate as far as what you've seen from the reporting compared to haiti, compared to the tsunami? >> it's the largest storm the world has seen, the winds of 190-mile an hour sustained. it's huge. >> the storm surge, too. >> it would have devastated if it had hit. so, the i.f.c. has been responding to conflicts and natural disasters around the
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world for 80 years. we've seen disasters of this scale before, but the access issues we're facing with power outs, hospitals closed, because they're worried about people being electrocuted by hanging wires, it really is chaos. >> so many things you don't think of. we have heard reports in the last 12 hours or so that there is increased violence and real chaos occurring in certain areas. how do you sort of protect your team against those types of conditions? >> we're going in, our first priority is to meet the most urgent needs, life-saving needs of populations on the ground. we have experience working in these conditions. people when they don't have access to clean water and food do get desperate. we're going in to try to save their lives and work with them to rebuild homes. >> we wish you and your colleagues best of luck.
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thanks. >> thank you. >> federal prosecutors are considering whether the boston marathon bombing suspect should face the death penalty if convicted. attorneys for him say he could face the death penalty. prosecutors will send their recommendations to sufficient attorney general eric holder this week. he is expected to decide by the end of january. >> hawaii is about to become the 15th state to allow same-sex marriages. the state senate passed a bill tuesday legalizing gay marriages. the governor said he will sign it as soon as today. that will put the law into effect on december 2. the state is expected to see additional revenue as a destination or same sex weddings and honeymoon. >> a lot going on in the nfl. >> you got to love it.
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you can forget about march madness, how about a november to remember? >> four of the top five teams in the country hooped it up at the united center in chicago last night. nba scouts were on hand. number one kentucky with all their talent said fresh men lacing it up against michigan state. a classic ballgame from the get-go, spartans scoring the first 10 points of the ballgame. maybe the wildcats were nervous, but the upper class men from michigan state took advantage, up by a 12 pack at the half. after the break, kentucky freshman sensation racked up 23 of his game-high 23 points in the second half as the wildcats eventually tied things up. down the stretch, the senior spartan, drains the money ball. michigan holds off kentucky
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78-74. >> number five tied things up against number four duke. parker showing off his hops as the 18-year-old kid has 27 points. duke down 72-71, but parker comes up clutch. but in crunch time, the 6'8" wiggins seals the deal, scoring 16 of his 22 points in the second half as the j hawks rock the duke urologist 94-83. >> in the nba, can you believe that it's been exactly one year since mike dan i. took over for the lakers. the lakers minus their star power taking on anthony davis and the pelican. davis still has his trademark on the unibrow. jordan hill, first start of the season attacking the racks, hill
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with 21 points, 11 boards. henry takes it right at wiffy. they used to be teammates at kansas. lakers would hammer the pelican by 21 points. >> the nfl called a delay of game on the miami dolphins by asking them to delay they're meeting with jonathan martin, because the nfl wants to speak with him first. miami owner steven ross was scheduled to meet with martin today. he wants to get to the bottom of these alleged harassment scandal. the league also conducting their own investigation, and wells wants to speak with martin first. that meeting reportedly taking place on friday in new york. miami has pushed things back while martin has yet to speak, although he is scheduled to release a video statement sometime soon. >> the kansas city chiefs at 9-0 have a perfect season going until this weekend.
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their star receiver arrested for speeding, and then when the cops pulled him over, found 14-grams of marijuana in piss possession. he is scheduled to appear in court, but the chiefs do not need this headache right now. they are getting their sunday night showdown against peyton manning and the 8-1 broncos. >> reed has been injured for most of the season and demoted to the back up. the texans are struggling. you kind of want to see the young kids in play. >> new kids, who thought. >> native american leaders are in washington today to meet with president obama for the annual white house tribal leaders conference. on this map, the purple areas represent tribal lands across the country. there are more than 500 federally recognized tribes.
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aljazeera's patty culhane melt with the leaders before the conference. >> the plight of native americans is rarely seen. they are less than 2% of the population. once a year, that changes. they are called to the seat of power, washington, d.c. their main concern this year, the economy and jobs, a normal complaint that president barack obama often hears but for the native american community, it is a much mr. urgent problem. the population has a much higher rate of its people living in poverty, more than 28%, compared to the national average of just over 15%. they say more than most, they have been severely impacted by across the board spending cuts known as the sequester. >> it's hardest on tribal governments, because most of the tribes across the country are completely reliant or at least mainly reliant on the federal government for operations of
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programs and services, and when those are cut off, then the poorest of the poor suffer. >> i can't get anybody into in-patient treatment anymore, because there are simply no more, they had to be cut as a result of sequestration. the same for mental health evaluation and service for kids. >> you won't hear that from this president who campaigned for their vote and till has their support. >> this man is second to none for what he has done for the tribes. >> they get about as much money under the federal park service. under president obama, national parks actually get slightly more money than native americans, about the just around $2.5 billion. the group said there polite is about more than money. for them, it is as much about independence and recognition. >> november is national native
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american heritage month. >> joining us now to discuss the issues that are expected to come up is the president of the south and eastern tribes, the national american organization that represents twenties six tribes from texas, florida, and up to maine. he joins us from washington. good morning to you, mr. patterson. >> good morning, sir, it's a pleasure to be with you. >> thank you so much. we just highlighted some of the struggles facing native americans, high unemployment, health issues and environmental destruction. the president has a new call for action, the fifth time. what's the most pressing issue right now? >> indian country has lived on the fringes of society and as a forgotten people for the past 200 years. for 200 years plus, our people have lived with dire poverty, impoverished conditions, endured
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countless generations of trauma, yet remain intact in our ancient home lands that raised our ancestors. today into the american consciousness, indian country rises with the support of the president in addressing the unique relationship that this country enjoys with its first peoples, so this is the fifth summit the president has gathered american indians leaders from across the country, including our lass dozen native brothers and sisters. we discuss the issues that are pertinent to indian country and key to our survival. in exchange for hour land, water and resources, promises were made, sacred commitments were made from the leaders of this country to the leaders of our nation. they promised our health, security and welfare. the we will being of our people, yet we see the identified needs of other people as you have as if you look at health care as an
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example, the identified need of our people is not being met in the promises committed, so indian country, in this generation, indian country is looking for self-determination to determine our own future and our own ability that. we do that through exercising our treaty rights, exercising what we call in this country the trust responsibility. for indian people, it's the sacred trust, the word given to us by the leaders of this country and the promises made. >> over the past five years, president obama made a promise that the native american people won't be forgotten. do you remember he lived up to that promise? >> i believe president obama has done exceptionally well. for one, he understands the unique relationship. not every president has given the attention, being that american indians are such a small segment of the population, for example, president reagan could not exemplify the unique
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trust relationship. he said this is something we gave. the indian people enjoy this freedom in our homeland since time in memorial. president obama recognizes that fact. >> once again, that conference is set for later today and hopefully we will get to the core of the issues. we unfortunately ran out of time. thanks for joining us from washington this morning. appreciate it. >> coming up, a new leader for america's roman catholic bishops. >> today, the archbishop of louisville, kentucky has been tapped for the position. >> where he stands on some of the pope's new suggestions for the future of the church. coming together for the greater good, how farmers in one african country are putting aside their differences to help feed the 14 million people there.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> a beautiful sunrise over the nation's capitol on this chilly morning. we'll have a complete wrap of what's going on in washington through you the day here.
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welcome back. it's good to have you with us. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm stephanie sy. zimbabwe is facing a growing crisis trying to feed the millions of citizens there. they are trying to revive the agriculture section and help the country. >> meteorologist nicole mitchell is back. >> the high pressure that settled in, that kind of moved out the precipitation. we've got a little bit lingering with the front in florida, most of it has wound down, though. let's take a look at kind of what with we saw in the meantime. this is out of chicago. you can see what a lot of people call the jelly bean here in the background, but minor amounts of snow, you really had to struggle to make those snowmen out there. the lake effect machine is cranking down. that's when winds come out of the northwest, picking up that moisture and redepositing it. in the pacific northwest, a
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little bit of moisture with a weak system coming through, but a lot of that is a little rain or know for the higher elevations, not too many moisture problems out there. you just have to bundle up. >> the nation's roman catholic bishops chose a new leader from louisville kentucky as president of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. he says he will follow hope francis in his call for a church of the poor. archbishop kurtz succeeds the bishop from new york. >> zimbabwe farmers are proposing to work together to rebuild the countries struggling agriculture sect tore. we have more on mistrust between both sides. >> di most of the countries 4,00
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white farmers were the backbone of the economy but forced off the land which was then given to blacks. today, the new landowners are trying to revive the sector, but the country is struggling to feed its people. now white farmers unions propose working with the new black land owners and their unions to rebuild. >> what we're really trying to achieve is one voice for agriculture, more of a unified agriculture industry, which can lobby government and can get policies which will benefit agriculture in zimbabwe. we've got to put our differences aside and get on and work together. it's the only way we're going to getting a ago going. >> a commercial farmer doesn't trust the white's latest offer to work together. >> what is their agenda? given the situation, they should realize that from the john set, we're going to look at the
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modalities of all and them coming in with experience and to so fort. >> it hasn't been easy running commercial farms. the economy is still struggling. bank loans aren't favorable. equipment needed to farm property is either too expensive or can't be found locally. >> many have started farming, but there are still a few white special farmers that managed to survive because they stay out of politics and try not a antagonize the government. they do whatever they can to hang on to their land. >> many evictimmed white farmers will work as consultants of farm managers, but land use and ownership are sensitive issues. some politicians feel that the rest of the world could get the impression that black farmers can't top and land reform has failed. >> the world food program says more than 2 million homes in that country could go hungry next year. >> at the end of our second
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hour, del walters joins us now with a look at what we're following this morning. >> eight people were killed in the philippines when thousands of survivors stormed the government rice warehouse. government officials say the relief effort will run more smoothly now that all major roads are passible. the chief white house technology officer testified before white house today about problems with the health care website. >> millions of americans could start taking statin drugs because of recommendations from the nation's top heart doctors. >> del walters is back with you in two and a half minutes. >> have a great morning.
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>> desperation growing in the philippines, even after stepped-up relief efforts. now panic is setting in among survivors waiting for food, water and medicine. >> the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and lethem keep what they've got. >> that comment prosing a problem for president obama. why bill clinton says if you like your health care plan, you should keep it. >> u.s. irways and american airlines getting the all clear for takeoff from federal regulators. >> are you on cholesterol medication? you could be after a different strategy affects who gets the drug and who doesn't.
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>> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. there was a glimmer of hope today for survivors of typhoon haiyan. officials in the philippines say all major roads that were damaged by the storm are now passible. now that is good news for relief and rescue workers who have been struggling to deliver aid since last week. there is an increasing sense of urgency to get supplies out fast, as conditions there are getting worse. in village after village, families are begging for basic needs, necessities, some stand i can on the sides of roads where signs are saying please help us. some have now stopped waiting and instead turning to looting, searching for food, water and medicine. the worst damage in the central philippines, the devastation stretching from letay province to tacloban. as the humanitarianies is in its
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sixth day, there are new challenges. we have the latest. >> >> hundred was thousands of people are desperately seeking food, water, medicine. bodies line the streets. the official death toll is 2200. >> the smell is overpowering. there's so many dead bodies that have not been picked up. prisoners have escaped. there was report of rapes and robberies at home. it's so difficult. >> in hard-hit tacloban, clean water is so tough to find, people are digging up water pipes from underground, but that
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water is now a threat to life. medical officials worry about the spread of diseases, because people are drinking and bathing in the same water filled with corpses and sewage. hospitals are overwhelmed with the wounded. >> today we have a spine fracture, pelvic frackure, so mostly tom has injuries. we have pregnant women coming in. >> that doctor delivered two babies in the past day. with aid taking too long to get to those who need it, desperate people are taking matters into their own hands. eight people were killed in one town when looters stole rice stockpiles from a government warehouse. >> in tack crow ban, soldiers chase said down looters. >> they are shooting out there. >> many residents lined up at the airport in hopes of leaving the storm-ravaged area. >> we will go to manila.
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that that's the goal of our family is to leave the city, so that we can start a new life there. here in tacloban, there's no food, water, so we cannot live here. >> we need to get the people out of here, especially the sick and wounded, elderly and children, because they became desperate here already. >> residents who made it safely to the city of cebu to gather supplies and return home. >> i am scared, but i have no choice. i have no choice, because my family is is in tacloban. >> some government employees are dead, missing or too overcome with grief to work. of tacloban's 200 policeman, few of showed for work.
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>> now that the roads are passible, does that mean the aid is getting through. >> you would hope so, but some government officials say some of those more remote areas were actually really hard to get to before the storm. we've heard that there's one area with about 40,000 people living in it that has not seen any relief at all. >> bad situation made worse. thank you very much. >> there are incredible stories of survival coming out of the philippines. every child at one or nannage in cook clowe ban made it out alive thanks to quick o. thinking adults. fifty children climbed on to the roof as waves pounded the walls. only a few walls remain after the typhoon september a wave of water through the city. they are now trying to find shelter for those children, who are now staying at a park next to what was once their home. >> the camps in the days after the storm, thousands flocking to them, and they are without power, water and other
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essentials. we have more from the air field where help is coming in. >> international aid continue to go stream in here at the air force base. the australian medical team just arrived. they are a collection of doctors and nurses provided by the australian government approximate. they are going down to the island to tacloban to set up field hospitals and help provide relief on the medical front, much needed right there. they arrived on this c130 just a short time ago. the government today saying that the situation is still extreme. they don't expect the number of dead to be as high as they originally thought, however, which is the first good news that we've had, but there is still looting. they currently have about 600 soldiers that have been deployed to the area to try and control what they say is still a very dangerous situation. >> that is craig leeson.
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>> as survivors of the typhoon fight to find food, shelter and water, the u.n. calling for more than $300 million in aid to help with relief efforts. the funding would provide help for six months, but experts say it's still far short of the damage to the fill teens economy, estimated at $12 billion to $14 billion. >> in some parts of the philippines, they're still cleaning up from a previous disaster. mr. young with, this is did he ever station on top of devastation, first an earthquake, now a typhoon. how dire is the need? >> hi, dell, thank you. actually, the need here is great. the people that are still suffering from the earthquake that rolled through on the 18th and our neighbors on oh the north to be ravaged by
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typhoon dyan is two calamities back-to-back. the philippines is a resilient country, but to have suffered these calamities so close together, they are definitely in great need here. >> sometimes we forget that aid workers themselves are in place during the typhoon and had to survive, as well. what was your experience? we had 20 volunteers at our base that were responding to the earthquake. we had an emergency plan in place. we had extra food and water, and we were minimally impacted, but it actually has allowed us to be in a position to more quickly respond to haiyan. >> from your perspective, how are the officials in the philippines handling this crisis? unfortunately, the philippines suffers from a lot of disasters.
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they are in the ring of fire and also in the path of typhoons that roll through in the area. they have a lot of experience, but they've been overwhelmed. the earthquake that hit was somewhat unprecedented. they see typhoons, but not really earthquakes and then the scale of haiyan is really going to be a challenge to the country to respond. international organizations, such as all hands, and other aid organizations do a great job of helping support the government in these type of responses. >> thank you very much. that is mark yuck, little director of international disaster response. as you heard, he is with all hands volunteers. agriculture also taking a big hit in the philippines. the u.n. estimates more than 1 million farmers are affected by the storm. local officials are asking for more than $24 million in help.
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they say some of the damage there includes hundred was thousands of acres of rice fields. coconuts accounting for nearly half of that countries exports were almost destroyed. fishermen say the storm destroyed boats and gear. nasa has released this dramatic image of typhoon haiyan, a scene from space, cameras onboard the international space station capturing the storm as it hit the philippines on friday. fortunately that system has now moved out of the philippines and here in the sufficient, it's cold. let's turn now nicole mitchell. >> yes, it's cold. let's look at the philippines. not only the typhoon last week, but then we were dealing with a bit of a disturbance. yesterday morning, i was talking about thunderstorms over the hardest hit areas. you can see that has moved off. a chance now that it's back over water, could get some circulation and definitely oh that into a depression. we'll monitor that. we have drier skies for the
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relief efforts now. let's get to the united states with, where it is cold, as you mentioned. we have the front that's gone all the way into parts of florida, so that's one area, if you're in south florida that we still have warm 60's and 70's today, but also a chance for rain because of the front. the rest of the area has cleared out. a lot of 20's all the way to the south, up and down the east coast, as well. temperatures through the day will run 10-20 degrees below average. some of the chilliest stuff is in the midwest, a 20-mile per hour wind gusts make it feel on your skin like single digits in some cases, so watch for that. i want to give you a little hope, though. the high shifts, the flow around that brings air up from the south. we start to get back to more 40's here into the northeast, where it's 30's today, we'll start to see with that same
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flow, 40's tomorrow and 50's by friday. a couple of weeks ago, i would have said temperatures in the 50's people thought it was cold, now people will think it's a heatwave. >> i look forward to those good old days. >> there is another health care hearing this morning on capitol hill. the chief white house technology officer set to face a committee. millions of people have faced canceled policies. president obama now facing criticism even from bill clinton, saying the president should honor those who want to keep their policies. >> i personally believe even if it takes a change in the law the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and let them keep what they've got. >> has there been response from the white house. >> that's the last thing they needed, but the right house insisted that the president
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himself apologized last week saying he was so sorry that all these people are getting their cancellation notice the after he had said if you like your health care plan, you can keep it. millions of americans finding out that is not the case. the white house will have a fix. it's working on a fix for these folks, but hasn't said what that will be, and it does not support the call by former president clinton and a number of lawmakers to rework the law to grandfather in all of these health care plans. it is promising some sort of a solution for those millions of americans. we'll have to wait and see what that is. >> yet another hearing today on capitol hill. should should we expect more drama? >> i think you'll see some folks on the hot seat today. this is the house oversight committee. the person we'll be watching for is todd park, the chief technology officer for the white house. the white house had insisted he doesn't have time to come up here and talk to you folks today. he is trying to get this website
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up and running. the chairman, a strong credit particular of the administration wanted to hear from park. he issued a subpoena. park will be here today and there's a sort of tongue in cheek webcam pain going on saying led todd work, trying to argue that he really doesn't have time to appear before the committee, but he will be here today to talk about the bungled healthcare.gov. >> the post this morning says that deadline of the end of the month may not be the deadline anymore. what is the white house saying about that? >> the white house is still insisting that it will have the one seat up and running in some fashion by the end of this month. they feel confident enough that they are sending out hundreds of thousands of emails to folks who tried to get on the website and could not do so, saying please come back again, we want you to try again. we'll have to wait and see. del. >> aljazeera lisa stark joining
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us live from washington. thank you very much. >> the president's approval rating i guess at its lowest level ever, saying the affordable care actle is to blame. only 39% of the voters approve of the job president obama is doing, down from 45% last month. 55% of those surveyed say they oppose obamacare. nearly the same number, 54% say they disapprove of the president's overall performance. for the first time ever, a majority, 52% say they don't think president obama is being honest with voters. >> making money on the reservation. how native american entrepreneurs are starting business ventures a little close to home. >> we'll tell you about the get-rich scheme making it nearly impossible to fly in or out of some south american countries. >> why doctors may start prescribing 11 roll lowering drugs to millions of americans who have neve taken them before. >> you're looking live right now
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at capitol hill, which is going to be busy this morning. yet another hearing on healthcare.gov. power of the people until we restore our freedo
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. straight ahead, we're going to tell you how some native american entrepreneurs are creating job opportunities right on their reservations. first, let's get a look at temperatures across the nation. thick coal mitchell, i get a feeling they are going to be cold. >> they already are cold. a little bit of a shock to the system especially for the south this morning. many with the fronts coming through have seen a taste of the cold air. a day or two ago here, we were talking 70's and 80's, this morning temperatures blow freezing in cities like atlanta. florida had the front laying across the state, so northern cities 37 degrees, versus key west at 75, all in one state. we have that 40-degree temperature change because this is just such a potent front. as we get to the next couple days, we have front of the and freeze advisories across the
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area. as i said, a slow warmup over the next couple days, so at least there's hope in sight. del. >> thank you very much. >> hundred was native american leaders are in washington to meet with president obama today for the annual white house tribal leaders conference. the president met with a dozen leaders yesterday, the focus on job creation and economic development. more than one squatters of all native americans struggle with poverty. one native american trying to turn things around on this reservation. john terry has the story. >> the coffee's on at. we's place. this is the 10th year ben has been roasting and grainedding fair trade beans from south america, at his factory in the reeverration near south hampton, long island. it's not been easy. >> i had to build this facility, work for years while i still had the business, keep pouring money
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into the business for years before i could even open it, perfect my green bean roasting process, my purchasing process, find source, that's six, seven years right there before any return. >> he employs three young people and plans more. >> i think it's great to have something different other than smoke shops along the highway. who doesn't love coffee? >> afuture head of marketing right there. >> for generations, they have lived on their reservation behind me surrounded by some of the most expensive real estate in the country. many have taken jobs in that community, but it is rare to find a native entrepreneur like ben. >> according to figures from the u.s. census bureau, the trend is up. there are 237,000 native owned businesses in the u.s. employing
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184,000 people in tribal communities nationwide. altogether, these enter prizes generate $34.5 billion in receipts, mostly through native owned construction and manufacturing enter prizes. that's an increase of 28% over 2002. >> what is this area? >> elizabeth thunder bird, a teacher, an elder, shows me around the recently opened outdoor museum. >> our people have recreated a small village so that everyone can see what it looked like in 1640. not like my house down the road. we have -- >> you have air conditioning. >> we have air conditioning. [ laughter ] >> she's confident the trends towards native american entrepreneur ship will continue. >> we don't imagine that somebody's going to hand us a lot of money. we have no idea of that.
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i don't think that the people want to live that way. i think we do want to find a place in the outside world where we can make that kind of money, but bring it home and develop what we have here. >> she says native americans may have a hard time qualifying for bank loans to start their businesses, but they do have other distinct advantage, their indian family. >> ben did not have to go out and rent something at the will of somebody else, come and go, go out of business, ruin him, whatever. no, he could build here and nobody would ever take it away. that's what you have to know. >> in these uncertain economic times, that's quite an advantage. south hampton, new york, aljazeera. >> other oh issues expected to come up at the conference, cry lent crime, and education. >> the world's biggest airline
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cleared for takeoff, the justice signing off on the merger ending the lawsuit over concerns the deal would hurt consumers and raise fares. they have given up terminal space, making room for low cost competition from carriers. >> probably the best thing for consumers is competition. some of those smaller airlines, like jet blue and southwest have figured out a way to make a profit and to serve routes skipped by the big airlines. if this merger drops routes, this could be an opportunity for them to move in. >> that decision means that four airlines now control more than 80% of all commercial flights. the final settlement will have to go to a judge later this month. >> a flight to venezuela could prove to be a tough ticket. all trips there being booked months in advance. it seems a loophole in that countries economy is to blame.
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we have more. >> this woman has been waiting months for her children to come visit from spain. they got their passports and money. she even booked the hotels for the holidays. what she can't find are the airline tickets. >> it's been an odyssey. there are no tickets in or out until next year. i've been to at least six or seven travel agencies. my sister is stuck in miami for a month trying to get back here. >> the reason has nothing to do with the airline service. venezuelans can exchange their money for u.s. dollars only under strict circumstances, one of which is traveling overseas, so thousands of them have been buying every available ticket in a scheme that guarantees huge benefits. >> with a valid ticket, venezuelans can get a credit card with up to $3,000 at a
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cheap state-set rate. once abroad, they turn the credit into dollars, with cash in hand, they resell back at home at a much high are price. >> they make a killing selling the dollars they got for cheap on the black market. they use the cards to get it and resell back home. it's a play called the spray. everybody knows it. we call them currency tourists. >> venezuela keeps a tight control on its exchange system, but while the official exchange rate is 6.3 for each dollar, on the black market, it's nine or 10 times higher. the president of the local airline association said foreigners too have learned to profit from the situation. >> thanks to the exchange difference, travelers do a stop over here, change their currency into local money and buy tickets to fly around the world, europe, asia, for just pennies.
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>> the airline scam is just one cops convince of venezuela's out of control currency market. inflation has reached 50% while the people have grown accustomed to shortages of basic goods. add fly tickets to the list. the government says it will bring in controls to crack down on currency travelers, but this woman fears she'll have to wait much longer to get back with her kids. >> american airline currently has about 48 flights in and out of venezuela each week, the airline says it's asked the government there for additional flights but has gotten no response. >> here's what's making business news this morning. there is breaking news coming in from macy's, the retailer optimistic about the upcoming holiday season, following a better than expected third quarter, profits jumping 31%, sales rising three and a half% despite a tepid economic
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climate, macy's says it is entering the fourth quarter with defense. >> the dow down 70 points, with a bearish start to the trading day. investors focused on when the fed might cut back on that stimulus program. here's where we stand this morning. the dow industrial average hoping at 15750, index up so far this year. the s&p at 1768, the nasdaq at 3920. overseas, there is renewed speculation about the fed dragging down markets, european markets mostly lower. asian markets posting losses. >> johnson and johnson agreed to settle thousands of lawsuits over a defective hip implant. the tentative deal could reach $4 billion, making it the largest legal payout for a medical device. the all metal hip implant was
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recalled as failures continue to mount. >> a group of investors say they want to buy parts of the mortgage giants fannie may and freddie mac. the treasury department took over fanny and freddy years ago. they have been fighting to reform the companies and want to recover the money they lost after the government took control. >> illegal workers coming back home to yemen after being deported from saudi arabia. the harsh treatment they say they were subjected to being tossed out of that country. >> as another obama administration official prepares to testify to congress about problems with the health exchange website, we'll look at what's gone wrong with the rollout. >> in sports, an epic night in college basketball in chicago for the champion classic. >> you're looking live at laguardia airport, one of the
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hubs in that american airlines-u.s. airways merger. future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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>> 2000 aljazeera america. i'm del walters. typhoon survivors are growing increasingly desperate for food, water and medical supplies in the philippines. the uss george washington expected to arrive today packed with troops and supplies. for some of those survivors, time is running out. desperate for help, some have turned to looting and violence. >> the state of emergency is meant to stabilize the worst affected areas in the country or try to. a curfew have been imposed in tacloban to stop the incidents of looting that has been taking place there. people are so desperate for
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food, water and medicine, that they've taken things from establishments like damaged malls, even from the houses of people who have died or have disappeared. it's not just the victims that have now been reported to have caused a security concern, but the communist rebels that are in operation around these areas and in the provinces that surround the most devastated areas have been planning or been caught by the military to be staging an ambush on relief convoys trying to bring in materials to help the victims. now in one of the skirmishes that military men had with these alleged communist rebels, two people were killed, and this happened on tuesday. the military is saying that they are very, very quickly trying to take the situation in hand, and that they have special forces on the ground that are trying to ascertain the people who are bringing in relief goods can get to where they need to go safely. >> the nation's chief technology
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officer is set to appear before a house committee today investigating healthcare.gov. todd park played only a small role in developing the rollout of the website but when the problems first developed, it was park who said wrongly that the large number of visitors was the problem. the committee chairman wants to hear about those claims. only 50,000 people have signed up through those websites. the managing editor of think progress.org joins us. the democrats are starting to look like a circular firing squad, this time president clinton saying that president obama should honor the promise that you could keep your coverage. is this a riff now? >> they are facing a lot of political pressure. the president made a promise firmly time and time again. now there's this transition
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period where people are losing coverage and they can't easily access the obamacare exchanges. the truth is when you really kind of look at the policy and what the law tends to do, it's very difficult to make sure people don't lose the individual plans they had, so there's a lot of political noise depending on what you could actually do. i think that's fairly limited. >> when you say political noise, we're talking about a lot of democrats ducking and running for cover. hillary clinton has not yet declared for 2016, but all eyes in washington are on her. is bill clinton trying to protect his wife, the candidate or his friend, the president. >> i'm not sure what the president is doing there. certainly, if you establish new rules in the marketplace and say that the new plans have to be comprehensive to make sure people don't go bankrupt even if they have this kind of insurance, you're going to have a period where people are going to have to switch to new policies. that was the case with hillary care, it's the case with
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obamacare. i'm not sure what his intenses are, but i would caution democrats from pressing too harshly on this, because at the end of the day, you want to get rid of the system that was broken for so long. that's the direction that obamacare's trying to move the nation. >> now you have cautioned democrats, what about republicans? they have wanted to do away with this since day one. is there a risk that the 50,000 people signing up, things not looking good, if they win, could they lose? >> well, the 50,000 number is relatively low, i think to expectations, but in the context of all of the website problems, of all of the bad press, the fact that he didn't really have any kind of real enrollment push, i think 50,000 is all right. i think a lot of people expected it to be even lower, and there's certainly time to build. as the website is hopefully fixed, those numbers will go up. i think that's kind of the
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general sense that if you can get the website working by the end of the month and people can sign up for coverage successfully, all of this talk about making sure people can stay in these sub prime plans that they have is really kind of going to dissipate and make way for reform. >> one of your ifs involve the websiting up and running by the end of the month, the washington post saying it's not going to happen. >> we're going to have to wait and see. if it doesn't happen, you know, the administration's going to try to look at alternative ways to help people sign up maybe through the phone, maybe through these navigators, but at the end of the day, it's going to face a real problem and cause a lot of concerns in terms of what that risk pool looks like, are premiums going to go up, is this thing ever going to get off the ground. it's critical for the website to work. if it doesn't, that creates some real political headaches and the kind of headaches now, but some
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real policy problems for the administration. >> before i let you go, is medicaid the big winner in all of this obamacare rollout debacle? >> i think it's really the silver lining, the fact that you have hundreds of thousands of low income americans now enrolling in coverage for the very first time is very good news, and medicaid with all of its auto he rollment procedures and years of experience in signing people up for coverage i think can teach lessons to the exchanges in how to help people connect to coverage. i think it's a very good atory for a lot of people and a story that i don't think is being told loudly enough. >> thank you very much. the managing editor of thinkprogress.org joins us live from washington. >> state exchanges are also being plagued with technical problems, the issues not being able to pay for policies to wrong information about eligibility for plans. "the new york times" reporting on line enrollment on the state
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levels also lower than many analysts had projected. >> hawaii is about to become the 15th state to allow same-sex marriage, the state nat passing a bill leading gay marriage. the governor says he will sign it into law as soon as today. that would put the law into effect december 2, the state expecting to see a revenue in destination for same-sex marriages. >> the nation's roman catholic bishops have chosen a new leader from louisville he was elected and says he will follow pope francis in a call for a church of the poor. he succeeds archbishop dolan. >> the israeli prime minister
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saying building more settlements would cause unnecessary friction. it is a major obstacle in talks between two sides. >> it means that the negotiations are over and that everything the united states has planned isn't working. all parties involved in the peace talks hold israeli responsible for the collapse in the negotiations. >> about 1200 units would be built east of the border of jerusalem. >> the white house is making a push to stall further sanctions against iran. secretary of state john kerry meeting with members of the senate banking committee. that panel thinking of stepping up the economic limits against iran because of its nuclear ambitions. kerry is going to brief them on the status of talks. the white house is trying to buy time for negotiators to reach a deal. >> what we are asking for right now is a pause, a temporary pause in sanctions. we are not taking away
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sanctions. we are not rolling them back. this is about insuring that our ledge layive strategy and our negotiating strategy are running hand-in-hand. >> just a few moments ago, the head of the u.n. nuclear wash dog agency sees no radical change in iran's nuclear program over the last three months. >> a court ruling ending egypts three month long state of emergency, a occur fee in place since august has been lifted. the emergency laws were used to crack down on supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. it had run from 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. six days a week but took effect friday at 7:00, a time when supporters had been staging those massive demonstrations. >> yemen says nearly 60,000 citizens are back home on home soil, but not by choice. they were forced to leave saudi arabia when the government deported its illegal workers.
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aljazeera reports on the men who say their path ahead is anything but easy. >> these men are returning home after being deported by saudi arabia. their numbers are on the rise, and so is tension at the crossing near the saudi border. saudi officials say illegal workers were given seven months to fix their legal status in the kingdom, but many here say they were forced to leave. >> saudi policeman aim add gun at me and threatened to expel me. there are thousands suffering in saudi jails. >> this man says he was humiliated and that he feels betrayed by his government. the president is supposed to defend us, he says. many were jailed in saudi arabia, their if i canner prints taken, and that once out, they won't be able to return.
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>> we were about 3,000 people in jail. they gave us nothing, no water, no food. three people died in jail. that's thought fair. >> these are mostly unskilled laborers. they have almost no chance to find work elsewhere. many workers who were deported have spent most of their lives in saudi arabia. now, they feel abandoned and betrayed. >> the way they treated these people is inhumane. as soon as they cross the border into yemen, they start complaining about the way they were treated. it is an ordeal. >> there are about half a million illegal yemen workers in saudi arabia. they face a tough choice, staying illegally in rich saudi arabia or returning to their poor country where the future looks bleak. >> we've tried to get a comment
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from the yemen government about accusations that saudi arabia is mistreating illegal yemen workers but officials we contacted declined. most called is a sensitive issue. we do know is that the kingdom contributes hundreds of millions of dollars in financial aid to yemen every year, and because of that, officials here prefer not to upset their neighbor. >> saudi authorities have rounded up more than 16,000 illegal workers, the kingdom issuing more than 1 million final exit visas, banning workers from ever coming back. >> that countries human rights record raising its collection to a major u.n. body, now a member of the human rights council. it is among 14 countries admitted, china, russia, algeria. those countries have stopped the u.n. from investigating reports of abuse.
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as the new members were announced, protestors were in new york near the headquarters. >> the very fact that there are over self mutilation, demon traiting that the chinese government does not deserve a seat in the prestigious council. >> members serve for six years. the sufficient term expires in two years. >> caroline kennedy now if i believely the new u.n. ambassador to japan was sworn in tuesday at the state department. her confirmation brings a third generation of kennedys into the american diplomatic core. >> japan remains our most important ally. u.s. japan relationship is the cornerstone of regional prosperity, stability and security. >> caroline kennedy, by the way is the first female u.s. ambassador to japan. she heads there friday to meet with the japanese prime minister.
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>> ross shimabuku joins us now with sports and college basketball is in his sights. >> you got to love it, dell. forget about march madness, how about a november to remember? four of the top five teams in the country hooped it up at the united center last night in chicago, a.k.a., the house that jordan built. kentucky with talented freshman lacing it up at the classic. a classic ballgame, the first 10 points scored in the ballgame for them. maybe the newbies were nervous. the upper class men from michigan state took advantage, up by a 12 pack after the break. rocking up 23 of his game high 27 points in the second half. the wildcats tied things up at 66. that kid is some kind of special. down the stretch, the spartans drain the money ball as michigan state holds off kentucky 78-74.
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>> it was all about the new kids on the block, andrew wiggins, parker. wiggins is silky smooth. kansas tied things up at 42 against duke, but parker, who grew up near chicago showing off his hops. i wish i could jump that high. down the stretch, duke down, but parker comes up clutch. in crunch time, wiggins rocks, shock jay hawk. this is why there are over 60 nba scouts on hand. jayhawks rock the dukies. >> lebron james was not happy heading to milwaukee. the heat had been sleep walking on defense. when lebron said pick it up on d., del, everybody listened. milwaukee economied 18 turnovers, leading to a bunch of easy buckets for the king.
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lebron racked up a game-high 34 points and sat out the entire fourth quarter as the heat spanked the bucks by 23 points. >> the nfl called a delay of the game on the miami dolphins, asking them to delay their meeting with jonathan martin because the nfl wants to speak to him first. miami owner steven ross was scheduled to meet with martin today to get to the bottom of these alleged harassment hazing scandal between martin and incognito. the league is conducting their own investigation headed by ted wells. he wants to speak to martin first on friday in new york. miami has pushed things back, while martin has yet to speak, although scheduled to release a video statement sometime soon. the dolphins team are coming oh of a monday night loss to tampa bay while dealing with all of these off deal distractions. >> i'm not worried about team morale. we had a team meeting this morning. we've got a short week this
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week, we've got to focus on football, and we're still in this. we're not out of the picture. we're focusing on the situation we're in football wise. we can't focus on what we can't control, things outside of football right now. >> the green bay packers decided to bring back a familiar anyways in matt flynn. he backed up aaron rodgers for four seasons, but now rodgers is nursing a broken color bone and scott getting his first start. the packers have lost two games since rodgers went down. coincidence? i think not. >> today the cy young award winners will be announced. >> i remember the days when the only dolphin you would you talk about is flipper. thank you very much. studies have shown that children
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from poor backgrounds fare worse in school. what happens if their families are given more money? there is a million dollar grant to find out whether children are are held back by a lack of money or if other factors like substandard housing, poor health or parental issues are to blame. a low income single mother will be given money for the first years of their children's lives and compare that to those who get less. >> 40-year-old ronald phillips is set to die by lethal injection in ohio. he wanted to donate his organs to a sycamore and sister. his mother has kidney disease and is on dialysis, his sister has a serious heart condition. the prison cited strict security procedures. phillips was sentenced to death for raping and killing a toddler
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two decades ago. >> a teen who's dying wish was to celebrate one last christmas has since passed away. devin coleman was diagnosed with brain cancer at the age of 12. he was released from the hospital in october, so he could spend his final days in the holiday spirit. take a look at this. the town of port clinton, ohio rallying behind the eighth grader, singing christmas car also, making fake snow and decorated the town park. he died on monday. >> i thought about it, and it was i think devin and god saying that he's ok. >> his mom hopes his son will be remembered for how he brought his community together. >> doctors are urged to prescribe cholesterol lowering drugs to more and more americans. why you could be among them even if your cholesterol level isn't that high. >> these paintings smashed an auction price.
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how much someone paid. >> the cold front that pushed through the country, lots of cold air, but it has moved out most of the moisture. we'll look at where you might still be seeing rain today. >> the big apple is cold, to say the very least, temperatures in the third's. we'll be right back.
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>> we're going to tell you about new guidelines calling for a third of american adults to take cholesterol lowering drugs. first, let's look at weather. >> this is one of the whyes quit raiders i've seen in a while. we have a disturbance through it is rockies, weak, not a lot of major. northern plains could get moisture. behind that, really warm air. los angeles, some parts of the suburbs near 90 degrees today.
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well, four inches of snow is what we got in chicago monday as that went through, enough for a tiny little snowman. a little snow this morning right around the great lakes, even that is shutting off with the wind pattern today. the snowmen are excite i can, but nobody is excited about the snow once we get to february and march. >> that is a small snowman. >> saturn in a whole new way is a panorama of the ring planet backlit by the sun. it's a mosaic of 140 wide angle images from nasa. mars, genius and earth appear as lights of dot. >> you might soon be told to take statins to lower your cholesterol levels. the nation's top heart doctor saying that 70 million americans should take the drug to reduce their risk of heart attacks and
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strokes. we look at these new guidelines. >> this year, almost 1 million americans will have a heart attack, and an estimated 80 million more live with hard decease. in an effort to reduce those numbers, there is a new treatment option on the table, so-called statin drugs, sold in the sum under the brand name crest oar, lipitor. >> patients who are previously not the considered candidates for statin therapy will now be started on statin. >> new guidelines by the american heart association and the american college of cardiology take the focus away from treatment on the disease through a number to a more personal approach. in the past, they were used to specifically lower a person's l.d.l. levels, the so-called bad cholesterol. doctors are now urged that prescribe them to a wider array of patients including those who suffer stroke and heart disease
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as they get older. >> doctors will find the guidelines easy to use. the focus is not on the number. the focus is on the right intensei therapy. >> those with heart deceased, most adults with type two diabetes and those with extremely high levels of healy cholesterol above 190 are the new target group. they fall between the ages of 40 and 75 that have a certain percentage risk of developing heart decease or stroke in the next 10 years. >> while statins can be beneficial, doctors say the old rules still apply, emphasis on a heart-healthy lifestyle, exercise and men i of vegetables is the key. >> those new guidelines say a third of all adults should consider taking statins. >> the painting less than 50 years old fetched a
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record-setting price at auction. it cold for a whopping $142 million. 1969 work was auctioned tuesday night. the price broke the record of 120 million set last year when the famous work the scream was sold. aljazeera continues in just two and a half minutes. we want to take you live right now to iraq where muslims are celebrating their day of aphonement. agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about
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the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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>> a special america tonight report. guilty of a violent crime... >> desperate people do desperate things... >> but when is it too much time? >> i heard the word life, but i didn't understand that meant i was gonna die in prison... >> could a landmark ruling give him a second chance? >> my day will come... >> a controversial special report... >> i was completely re-traumatized by the fear of this offender... >> locked up for life america tonight 9 eastern, tonight, on al jazeera america.
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