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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 16, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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in the philippines the desperate scramble for food and water more than a week after the storm. was it murder - a white home owner shoots and kills an unarmed black teenager - the racially charged case out of detroit. >> a growing health scare at an ivy league school that has officials looking overseas for help. >> ladies and gentlemen, our superhero saved gotham city today. >> a tiny caped crusader hits the streets of san francisco.
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>> good morning. morgan radford live from new york. >> eight days after typhoon haiyan made landfall in the philippines the death toll is rising. more than 4,000 people are confirmed dead. 1,000 others are missing. survivors are scrambling for food and water. supplies are being flown in from around the world. rescue teams are working around the clock to reach areas that have been cut-off by the storm. distribution centres in places like cebu are overwhelmed with demand. that's where we find al jazeera's steph. is relief reaching those cut off by the storm >> yes, we can talk about a massive relief operation in cebu. a lot of the aircraft came in from over the world bringing relief goods that are desperately needed. the second question, of course,
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is are the relief goods going there. some packages that have been brought up are behind me. they hadn't left the airfield all day. they'll actually be brought to these areas - will they go to the people who need it, the people who lost their homes, lost everything. a lot of people in those areas - i have been talking to them. they are complaining, and are frustrated about the speed of the relief operation and don't trust the government. they say aid organizations have to give us relief foods. they need tents, food, medicine, they want it directly. >> you mentioned people who lost everything. what about those that are missing. are families likely to hear word soon? >> yes, it's a good question. of course there are people missing.
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there are organizations trying to locate people. there's not of coming from that. people have been waiting more than a week. it's a difficult situation for them. steph live in the philippines. thank you for joining us. >> survivors of typhoon haiyan are left to pick up the pieces. joining us to discuss recovery efforts in the philippines is mark young, director of international disaster response with all hands volunteers. he joins us live from ormoc. >> thank you for being with us this morning. i understand you have travelled from behal to ormoc. how are the challenges different in each place? >> good morning. thank you. the challenges are a little similar, but with the devastation being so recent in orm ormoc, the need is greater.
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ormoc was hit by a tidal surge like that intercepted in tacloban. where i went today, i saw thousands of homes that were damaged and you could count on one hand how many homes i saw were not damaged. the numbers here are much greater than we thought, but honestly, i have a thing where if your house is 100% destroyed - it doesn't matter if your neighbours are or not. the need is great. the emergency is great. it's a dissolving situation. now emergency supplies are piling up. there's food and water shortages will end. the next face is all hands - looking at the recovery. >> you mentioned you can count on one hand the number of homes
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that were not damaged. so what are survivors needing most now, and what about the basics like electricity, running water and things like medicine? >> that is exactly where i was going to go. the need now - it is really to help people shelter from the weather. it rains almost every day, and people - immediately or simultaneously they need building supplies. they need corrigated iron for roofing. what they are hoping to do is - there's a fundraising campaign to raise money for building supplies. >> you mentioned it's rained
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almost every day since the storm. are your volunteers worried about contamination as the debris builds up? >> the urban areas - there is pretty good flows, it is an area of the country (audio breaking up) we confirm there was containens spreading through the communities. >> thank you mark young, director of the international disaster response with all hands volunteers. thank you for joining us from ormoc in the philippines this morning. >> meanwhile president obama's affordable care act suffers another blow. this time his own party's loyalty is tested.
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dozens of democrats backed a measure 262 to 157 votes is a sign of defection and maybe the most troubling news for the president. >> house republicans tried to chip away at the affordable care act. this bill gained more democratic reform than most, 39 votes. >> it was called a keep your health care act an obamacare fix. >> now we find out it was talk. that is what this country is fed up with, the talk coming out of washington. >> president obama announced a policy shift thursday that americans can keep health care plans next year. the house bill goes further, letting insurance companies sell plans to don't meet the basic obamacare requirements, like maternity care and equal
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fremantle of victims. mike doyle says it defeats the point of health care law. >> if we allow private insurance companies to sell policies discriminating against women, setting caps and life-time caps - if we allow all of those practices that every american, 80-90% of americans want in the health care system the risk pool goes away, rates go sky high and premiums will be raised for every american in the country. >> the 39 democrats what split from the bill want to be on the record to vote for fixes. the white house threatened to veto the bill and jay carney said barack obama's fix is the right one. >> he will work with congress to do - so that congress can do what it can do legislatively in
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a good faith effort to address problems, to improve the implementation of the affordable care act. he will not support policies designed to sabotage, repeal the obamacare. >> democratics leaders don't want to move forward on anything that will weaken the health care law. getting a letter in the mail saying heath care has been cancelled is less overwhelming if you knew you could go on the website. the obama administration set end of the november as a deadline. president obama reiterated that that's when americans will be able to get on line and look for their next set of health care options. >> following the house vote president obama invited a number
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of executives to the white house to discuss issues available to americans under the affordable care act. >> the website is looking better. we'll brainstorm on how to make sure everyone understands what options are. because of choice and competition and a whole lot of americans who see health insurance out of risk or out of reach will be in a position to purchase it. >> insurance industry officials warned the president's plan could raise health care prices. >> a shooting in michigan sparked anger and charges of racism. a detroit man is facing murder charges for the killing of an unarmed teenager. he claims it was an accident. civil rights groups believe race played a roll. we go inside a story striking a nerve. >> his name theodore wafer. until now authorities refused to
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identify him. he appeared in court for arraignment for the shooting of 19-year-old renisha mcbride on his doorstep. the prosecutor is charging the dearborn heights man with second degree murder, manslaughter and possession of a firearm. a conviction could carry a life sentence. he said little standing before a vuj. >> we obviously do not feel the evidence in this case feels the defendant acted in lawful self-defence. the charges coming two weeks after theodore wafer shot mcbride as she stood on his porch. before renisha mcbride was killed she struck a parked car in detroit. she left the scene and wound up in this neighbouring suburb. her family believes the high school graduate went to theodore wafer's door seeking help. the airport maintenance worker told police he thought someone was trying to break into his home and his 12 gauge shotgun
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accidentally went off. by all reports she was unarmed. there were no signs of forced entry to the homes. toxicology reports reveal bride's blood alcohol level was more therein twice the limit and there was marijuana in her system. renisha mcbride's relatives said they believed it was a case of raci racial. >> in this case the charges has nothing to do with racial. >> renisha mcbride's fam spoke out. >> we -- family spoke out. >> we want to thank the prosecuting office for the charges they have done, bringing the charges against mr wafer, i don't know why i say mr wafer, this monster that killed my daughter. >> you took a life, a beautiful life that was starting to blossom into a beautiful woman.
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for that i hope you stay in gaol for the rest of your life. >> wafer's lawyer maintains he acted in self-defence. >> under michigan law a home owner has the right to use force, but must prove their life was in danger. >> an evacuation in dallas was evacuated after a drilling crew punctured a gas line causing an explosion much chevron apologised for the accident. crews are working to repair it. . let's bring in our metrologist. jalala. >> it will be beautiful out there. i don't know what your plans are, late tonight, early in the
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morning there'll be a beautiful spectacle of light. look at the picture. gorgeous, taken in palm springs california. here we can see the meet yore striking across the sky. shooting star. believe it or not the stars travel at 72 k/hr -- 72km per second, 161 miles per hour per second. beautiful. tonight there'll be mitigating factors inhib itting people seeing the beautiful spectacle of life. living across the south-west, california, down to arizona back to texas, having clear skies, but the rest of the country, due to a cold front pushing through will have a little difficulty, we have a front pushing through, producing volatile storms across the ohio valley. if you live in new england, we are looking at clear skies. a beautiful night, fair
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conditions across the carolinas and georgia. the best time to view the meet yore showers are early in the morning. if you go outside to witness the meet yore shower, you want to go out 30 minutes prior so your eyes can adjust to the light. in new york city cloudy skies. it's not a good place to view. again, out west across the desert south-west the skies are clear. it will be comfortable. temperature wise with temperatures in the 50s. when be come back i'll tell you about the storms brewing across the ohio valley, and why we'll have severe weather break out over the next couple of days. >> how fast will the meetors travel. if i wake up in the morning to travel, how will i see it? >> 10 to 15 per hour. go out 30 minutes prior so your eyes can adjust to the light. we are entering the final stage of the moon. there'll be a bright sky.
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spend probably about 30 minutes to an hour before the sun comes up. i think you'll see them. >> i have to be here with you at 6am. we'll go out side for a few minutes. >> and a handful of princeton university students come down with a rare form of meningitis. federal officials are importing emergency vaccine from overseas. >> a dangerous outbreak at princeton university yip. >> it's very serious. >> a 7th case of menning itis b confirmed. the university is working for the centres for des control saying current -- disease control saying current vaccines in the u.s. do not prevent the strain. anunprecedented step is taken, and they are importing emergency doses of an investigational vaccine licensed in europe and australia. >> this is a dangerous disease that we know in the united states. there's several different
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strangers, it's acyw 135. our vaccine covers the strain, they have an outbreak of b. there's no vaccine in the united states for that. >> it attacks the brain and spinal cord and can be fatal. doctors say it spreads easily. young people are at a high risk. >> the risky behaviour of the adolescents meaning that you share water bottles, and have risky sexual promise cuty - with that intimate contact that's the cause - it's spread by respiratory droplets. >> university officials are quiet about when the vaccine will roll out on campus. saying, "we will discuss it with trustees. when we have something to announce, we'll make an announcement" 8,000 graduates and undergraduates could be vaccinated, if launched. >> six of the students cracking
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the disease have recovered. health officials say even though the vaccine is not made in the u.s., there's no dangers or concerns over the imported vaccine. it's made by the same company that makes the vaccine routinely given here. policy change in china - the communist party relaxes a law that may spark is a baby boom. plus more trouble for toronto's embattled mayor. pressure mounts on him to resip. a vote is taken to strip him of power. the food crisis in zimbabwe, a controversial proposal to fix it.
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good morning and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. next - a change to china's one-child policy. first let's get at look at what temperatures will do across the countries. i tell you one thing tsks so cold across the neest. on wednesday there was a high of
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38. temperatures are certainly on the rise. take a look at the map. albany coming in at 54. in our nation's capital it will be a comfortable day. we'll see a great deal of sunshine. high pressure is in control. some of that high pressure. the winds around it drew up moisture off the gulf of mexico. we had showery weather. it won't be a problem. sun shines in a lot of locations. including atlanta, rebounding from cooler temperatures. overall comfortable, beautiful day across the east coast. temperatures will continue to rise as we track into tomorrow. >> comfortable and beautiful. i like the sound of that. couples in china reacting to news the government is loosening long-standing one-child policy.
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billions will have the option to have bigger families. it was one of several reforms announced by the communist party leadership. >> for a generation this is what a typical chinese family looked like. soon an extra face may feature, reforms allowing a second child to a couple where either parent was a single child. most soon to be parents were born after "79 and were single children. >> i'm very excited. i want a girl too. >> two girls. >> yes, another girl. >> this woman is grateful. much as she complained about the old policy, she never thought it would change. the one-child policy was introduced when china was a poor country.
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over three decades the policy was thought to have prevented 400 million births. china is richer than it was. as lands develop families are smaller. a generation of single children has grown up to become parents themselves. they have the option to have more than one child. whether they will or not is another matter. we are a growing population in 1979. it's an ageing population m china's labour force shrank and it was announced by the government that retirement age will rise. the president has also signalled a reduction in the number of crimes carrying the death penalty and the education in
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labour camps where millions were imprisoned without fire for all manner of offenses. >> people will be allowed to defend themselves, appeal, seek lawyers. seek first appeal, second appeal. in brief - have more opportunities to defend their right. >> most of these parents lived through three decades of profound change in china. if the latest reforms are a sign of things to come children will grow up in dramatically changing times. m >> the u.s. government is now offering up to 10 million in reward money to find anyone involved in the benghazi embassy attack. the state department acknowledged it offered the ward since january. the american ambassador chris stevens was killed with three other americans when militants stormed the embassy on
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september 11th last year. >> speaking of libya the government called for a cease fire between armed gangs and residents. street battles in tripoli left more than 40 dead. the fighting started saturday after an armed gang opened fire on hundreds of protesto, who demand local militias leave the capital. demonstrators took up arms against the gang. >> an unprecedent move by a staunch washington partner. >> for a week they have gathered outside the parliament in tehrana, albanian demanding washington's request refused. the prime minister believed to have been in favour of the idea
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turned it down. n >> translation: with the highest of respect for our friend and our irreplaceable partners, it is impossible for albania to get involved in the operation. >> it will be a welcome decision here. the weapons are weapons of mass destruction, and albanians can never accept them. this decision from the government is late, but it game when the people stood up. >> and yet six years ag albania was able to destroy its own stockpile of chemical weapons left over from the communist periods. syria's stops are larger, albania's experience, whilst a close nato ally made it an attractive option for the task. norway has been askeded and refused. no one else is jumping at the chance. snow for prime minister rama two months into the job the decision is not likely to have been easy. side with popular opinion or
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support an unpopular request from an ally to destroy tonnes of chemicals and their by-product. >> the hague at the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons discussions will resume to work out how to rid syria of chemical weapons. >> the executive council has adapted a landmark plan for the destruction of all chemical weapons in syria by the end of june 2014. most of the chemicals - the most developic of them will have to be out of the syrian territory by the 31st december 2013. >> the question remains - removed to where. >> the international weapons
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watchdog hopes the chemicals will be gone by the end of next montedz. >> suing over security measures, why residents say tactics to protect the world trade center go too far. >> the power of a promise. a michigan community banking on its students. >> jonathan martin spoke publicly for the first time. that story and more in sports.
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welcome back, i'm morgan radford. these are the top stories. eight days after typhoon haiyan hit the philippines survivors scramble for food and water. relief is flown in from around the world. rescuers are getting access to those hit hardest.
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>> an unarmed teenager shot dead. a michigan home owner faces charges. >> an emergency supply of medicine imported to the united states to treat a meningitis outbreak at an ivy league dismoo. toronto's mayor may see his last days in office. a string of violations increased outcry. canadians want him out. >> it's never happened before. toronto city councillors moving against their mayor, stripping away authority. the city never had a mayor who admitted no drinking, smoking crack cocaine. he was a little contrite. >> obviously if someone else steps out of line like i have it will affect the councillors and the mayor for, i think, for years to come. >> in fact, when it came to a
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vote just the mayor and his brother, a councillor, opposed limiting his powers. council told the mayor his apologies were not enough. he is, as one of them said, mayor in name only. >> we have said the powers that council delegated to the mayors office, not rob ford, have been withdrawn from the mayor's office. >> rob ford has been colourful and controversial. he came to power, promising to cut spending and taxes. he has. his chaotic behaviour cost him his authority. many of his loyal supporters too. this woman voted for rob ford three years ago and is now part of a campaign to make him quit. >> it took a 1.5 years to realise what a terrible mistake i made. last year his behaviour is unacceptable. >> come on. >> there's no way to displace a toronto mayor between elections,
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now there's talk of changing the law. >> it was never envisioned that a mayor would be doing cocaine in his office. allegedly cocaine in his office. potentially with prostitutes. you never looked at things like that. it rob ford says he'll go to court to get his powers back and councillors, next week, will try to strip him of his office budget. the only way this will end is for the mayor to say he's resigning. that's not something he's contemplating. ford says he's getting medical help. he admitted to excessive drinking and drug use, he insists he's not an addict. >> for some new yorkers security comes with a hefty cost. city police proposed tough security laws at the world trade center neighbourhood, and some say it's turning it into an unnecessary fortress. >> it's the worse part of the
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city's history in my lifetime or my father's for grandfather's. >> mary experienced seven out close, ground zero is outside her kitchen window. >> furniture, people's cards - it took years to call this place home. 10 years later it's not what is going on inside the apartment that concerns her, but what is going tonne outside. >> now this is the regular check. the plan calls for the copes being replaced by a cement wall. >> that year the n.y.p.d. announced a plan to create a security perimeter around the trade center. within the campus streets would be open to pedestryions, bikes and -- pedestrians and bikes. security checkpoints will be for
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cars to be checked. we are pictures of what it will look like. the n.y.p.d. says processed measures are necessary. following the 1993 world trade center bombing, and the september 11th attacks. they aresidents will get around freely on foot, so long as they enrol in a precleaning program. for some it is not enough. the world trade center alliance is suing the n.y.p.d. over the security. saying it's an isolated fortress impairing their quality of life. this lawyer relates the neighbourhood alliance. >> there are ample ways to ensure security without making the world trade center campus a fortress. that is what we don't want it to be. >> the neighbourhood group wants security, just not on the scale. there are fears that the neighbourhood will be run by businesses, not people.
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they are worried tourists will have an easier time getting around than they will. >> have a great memorial. respect the families, give them a place to go. don't cut life out of here or cut this off from the rest of the world. >> the majority of the security measures will be implemented by 2015. the city anticipates the world trade center to be occupied by 2019, the same year the n.y.p.d. will take a look at the security cam pass and evaluate how well it's working. >> people who regularly come to the area will be able to enrol in a trusted access program. police are not giving out specifics of the program for - you guessed it - security reasons. >> a settlement for jpmorgan. they have to pay $4.5 billion to investors who lost money during securities during the financial
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crisis. a city in michigan is making headlines. it's offering students free tuition thanks to a generous scholarship. the callet ma zoo promise m it's been so successful cities around the nation are trying to do the same thing. we explain. michigan state university, this girl is thinking about graduation. >> going through high school gave you a push. >> students who complete 9 through 12 in callet ma zoo get 65% of fees covered at state university. those who go through 12 years in a callet ma zoo school get a scholarship. requirements, live within the school district. the money can be used for 10 years after although.
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callet ma zoo has 75,000 residents. figures show one in three live in poverty. since the announcement enrolment shot up 24%, as families who would have aborted callet maz u moved in and snatched up property. director emert us says because of increase in enrolment teacher jobs were created. 70% of student enrolled in local schools and tuition revenue jumped. >> $30 million in the community swirling around. >> 30 similar programs popped up around the country and dozens in the works. pittsburg has 26,000 students, twice as many as callet ma zoo. they estimate they need a $250 million endowment to honour the promise to students in 2006. the university of pittsburg
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medal center pledged a $100 million challenge grant and considers it an investment. >> many students are becoming nurse, doctors, human resource professionals, finance - all things needed. >> like most programs pittsburg's relies on the generosity of middle class people, not the superrich. >> some programs are struggling because they have continual fund development needs. >> professor michelle miller adams wrote a book about the callet maz u promise. many in callet maz u are convinced the economic boost will come around the 10-year mark when students come home as professionals with high income jobs. >> i couldn't think of anything better to come back and help where i came from. >> most other promise scholarship programs are not as generous as callet maz u. many have gp a and attendance
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requirements. >> the environmental protection agency proposed to reduce how much corn-based ethanol is mixed into gassa lean, in response to a slow down in consumer demand for fuel. the proposal is unwelcome for farmers since it drove down corn prices. fuel prices could rise if ethanol requirements are not scaled back. >> zimbabwe is facing one of its worst food shortages. white farmers forced off the land are offering to partner with black farmers. suspicions are deep in the racially-divided country. >> zimbabwe's land reform in the year 2000 was controversial and racially divisive. back then most of the country's 4,000 white farmers were the backbone of the economy m they were forced off the land, given to black zimbabweans. the new landowners are trying to
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revive the farming sector. the country is struggling to feed its people. white farmers's unions propose working with the black landowners and their unions. >> we are trying to achieve one voice for agriculture. more of a unified agricultural industry, which can lobby government and get policies of benefit to agriculture in zimbabwe. we have to put differences aside. we have to work together. it's the only way to get agriculture going. >> this is a commercial farmer. he doesn't trust the white's offer to work together. >> why now? what is their agenda. given the situation they should have realised that from the onset. let's share. and if it was like that, we will look at the modalities of how we are going to, and them coming in with the experience and so forth. >> it has not been easy running commercial farms.
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zimbabwe's economy are struggling. bank loans are not favourable. equipment is too expensive or can't be found locally. >> black zimbabweans started slowly. they managed to survive because they mind their own business, stay out of politics and try not to antagonise the government and do what they can to hang on to their land. >> many white farmers may work with black owners as consultants. land use and ownership are sensitive issues m by allowing whites to the farms, the rest of the world could get the impression that black farmers can't cope and land reform failed. the u.n. world food program predicts a quarter of the rural population will face shortages in upcoming months. >> access to the nile has been a source of conflict between countries along the world's longest river. egyptians get 95% of their
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water. a dam being built in ethiopia could jeopardise supplies. rory chal aned reports from cairo. >> for millenia egyptians used the nile as a gift from god. what god has given them they fear man might take away. this is the renaissance dam under construction on the blue nile in the ethiopia, where a majority the nile's waters originate. when operational the hyd hydroelectrical development will be africa said is biggest. egip shans are not happy. >> ethiopia will have the power to control the flow of the nile. it leads to an advantage over egypt. this is a long-held ethiopian dream. >> this man's land used to be
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igated by water from the nile. mismanagement blocked the canals. now he relies on water pumped from wells. >> if they build the dam on the nile it will affect egypt and the water. the underground water is linked to the nile. if they build the dam there'll be no more underground water. we won't be able to farm. >> water security is a vitally important issue for egypt. the global scandal for water density is 1,000 cubic metres per person per year. the average egip jan van access 700 cubic metres. the country is water scarce. the population of egypt is due to increase by 50% by 2050. ethiopia says the dam will not have long-term impacts.
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>> the egyptians have to believe us. we believe in equitable utilisation of resources, win/win approach and cooperation. >> but until the reservoir is filled egypt can expect a reduced flow. five years is ethiopia's aim. it could take longer. the geopolitics. dam are tense. how to share the resource is clearly difficult. the nile might be seep as god's gift to egypt, but it belongs to the either i don't knowians, sudanese and other upstream countries too. >> egypt and sudan control more than 90% of the nile's water. other countries in the basin want a bigger share.
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>> now some more news from the jonathan martin, rickie incognito saga. john henry smith tells us about it. >> is it me. does it seem like the scandal lasted two months. there's interesting stuff coming out. >> a significant development on friday in the miami dolphins bullying scandal. jonathan martin had his long-anticipated meeting friday in new york city with special investigator ted wells. martin's meeting with wells lasted seven hours. martin emerged to a large group of supporters and spoke for the first time since leaving the dolphins two weeks ago. here is his prepared statement. >> today's meeting is consistent with my commitment to kopt rate with the nfl as a player on the miami dolphins. i went into great detail with ted wells. i will not discuss it publicly at this time. i look forward to speaking to
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steven ross and the dolphins organization. >> the controversy on campus where florida's freshman senn says jamesin winston is dogged by an incident from his past the the florida's state attorney oi investigating his role in a year-long sexual assault says his office could decide whether to pursue criminal charms. the victim filed a report with tallahassee police on september 7th on 2012, she described her attacker between 5'9 and 5'11. he's unnamed. he's 6'4. >> florida state, will suspend him if he's charged. >> u.c.l.a. is using miles jack as a running back the last two weeks. it's working. last week the freshman ran 120 yards. what would mr jack---all-trades do. he's master the it washington
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huskies, 59 carsiers, 14 touch towns, he must be the greatest. number 13 druins move a step closers, beating the hussies 41-31. the c.i.a. a championship came between the rams and troejons have been cancel after five trojons cornered rudy johnson in a bath room and beat him up. virgin state player lamont brit was arrested and charged with assault. johnson was treated at hospital and released. >> to the nba. the indiana pacers are rolling, being the on undefeated team. big nite for the big fellow - 24
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rebounds. georgia added 32 points. the pacers first team to start 9-0 since the maverics in the 0-2, 0-3. mets travel to phoenix to fas the sun. darren williams went up. he left the stage, x-rays were negative. joe johnson took over. made the running ja. suns down two. in transition eric allows for pj tucker, slamming it. channing fry takes the free and misses. grabs the bored, joe johnson driving the length of floor - game winner. blooding out the suns 100-98. wuls derrick rose missed the friday night game with a sore hamstring. he missed two days of practicing
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earlier in the week. rose hurt the hammy late in monday night's win over the cafe leers. bulls defeating the raptors. >> i feel safe in saying no one who saw illinois's kevin weir shatter his leg while jumping to defend the shot will forget what they saw. friday night weir returned to action since the injury, scoring five, grabbing two rebounds. louisiana crushed core very well. the cardinals wins 19-straight games. michigan state taking on columbia, getting a scare from the ivy leaguers. columbia up. nailed three from the corner. columbia up seven. mich gap up one. keith in for adrian pap with the alley oop. deja vu.
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it's not a replay. spartans survive. >> while the college basketball season is underway recruiting never stops, especially at duke. two of the top prospects. several years ago duke and jones discussing going to the same school as a package. >> go dukes go. and there's a new sport taking japan by storm. it's called precision walking. it became a viral sensation after students at nepon sports sign university posted this video. they trained for five months three days a week to master the synchronised moves. batt kid to the rescue, the five-year-old whose wish is to battle the bad guy. kid to the
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five-year-old whose wish is to battle the bad guy
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shudankodo. welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead we'll tell you about batkid coming to the rescue. first a look at the forecast. jalala. >> the snow is coming down, there's a winter storm warning across the west. if you are in boycie, on the roads use caution. visibility has been diminished to a mile. we have winds pushing in out of the north. it will be breezy if you travel along the i-5. you'll run into showers. be careful along the roadways. we are looking at 12-18 inches of snow across the highest elevations in the north-west. >> a 5-year-old boy with cancer became an overnight superhero and internet sensation. we are told about batkid who put on a cape for a day to save san francisco. >> holy smoke, it's batkid out in his batt mobile to fight
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crime. to the great relief of citizens in the city. his first feat rescuing a dam sell in distress. phew that was close. we are hearing rorts of another crime. let's see if batman can put a stop to it. batkid got the riddler in the middle of a heist. can he beat the villain, he does. at union square in the heart of san francisco thankful fans wait to catch a glimpse of the superhero. >> ways at work and heard the commotion, helicopters were flying. i guess said there was a crime scene and batkid saved the day. good to be in gotham today. >> we are here to support what the city is doing.
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it's a great, amazing thing. so fantastic to be in a city, representing a city that has so much compassion. >> miles' adventurous day include a stop at the ballpark where he takes a victory lap before heading to city hall to meet a thankful mayor who presents him with the keys to the city. >> what would we do without you? the streets of our city are safer because of you. >> when this started organizers expected a few hundred people to help. instead it went viral. thousands of people offered support. including the president. >> way to go miles, way to save gotham. miles fought cancer nearly all his life. now it's in remission. he is healthy and started kindergarten this fall. >> it's make believe but miles' battle with leukaemia as been
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every bit as difficult as any battle batman faced and he has won the heart of citizens in this town. >> fresh from gotham city. here is what we are following - desperately needed aid continues to make its way to remote areas of the philippines more than a week after typhoon haiyan. a michigan man has been charged with murder in the shooting death of a 19-year-old girl on his front pomp. >> there's a menning itis outbreak at a michigan university. >> al jazeera continues. i'm back with you in 2.5 minute. see you shortly.
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in the philippines the stram ble for food and water more than a week after the storm. the island almost completely watched away >> deadly clashes in triply after mill irna men open fire on protesters. >> hello, welcome to al jazeera
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ameri america. i'm marred ford. >> -- mad morgan radford. >> survivors of typhoon haiyan are scrambling for food and water. supplies are being flown in from around the world. meanwhile aid distribution centres in places like cebu are overwhelmed with survivors, they are in need of relief and supplies. >> it's been a busy say is cebu airport. lots of planes have come in from around the world, bringing in badly needed goods. the question is are the goods going to the necessary areas. goods have been brought in here at the airfold - some are laying here, it is dark, and they won't leave today. in the hard-hit areas people are
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desperately waiting for shelter. i visited a city where the storm hit first, they were sleeping in the open air. there was hardly any shelter, snow tents. it's something that is important to bring as soon as possible. >> people are frustrated and skeptical about the goods reaching them. they asked every organization to give the relief foods to them directly. they don't trust the government. they see the goods coming in. they don't believe they are getting them. >> live from cebu. >> for those living in areas isolated by the storm, delivery supplies is an issue. craig leeson report from a remote island. people have been without food, water and medical services for about a week. >> early morning light filters to the deck of the "mv gemini
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6." it fails to wake the crew. they've been up overnight loading to bring relief to a remote island off the northern tip of cebu. the sleepy fishing and army island was one of a dozen to be decimated. >> i can only imagine what the people have been experiencing. all the suffering, hunger, difficult station - the fare in their eyes. >> the cebu based rapid response team, a volunteer group working with the government to help with disaster relief says 95% of the island was wiped out. all but forgotten until now. many have been without food, clean water, medical services for a week. roads have been cleared. bringing in aid is hazardous. >>. >> this won't hit the truck. okay. he's completely hit the powerline. as you can see.
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this is part of the reason that this is a dangerous trip for these guys to make. we are on a truck taking rice to santa fe. it's not live - hang on, wait, wait. something like that can take your head off. the guys are making the trip on a daily basis. it's dangerous. there is not one house or powerline that has not been affected by the typhoon. >> the seaside resort village of sant if he was the last on the island to receive aid. the first responders were confronted by the cheer -- sheer hunger. day turned to night. more people came, mouths to need. old, young, desparate. >> we need water and food. we need help. >> more aid it on its way.
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international ngos are planning convoys of supplies. for now this is all they have. >> they'll return tomorrow with goods. one more day, tomorrow. >> it has been chaotic. people, you know, because it's more survival of the fittest. they want to eat. >> less than 20 people were killed on the island, but escaped the tidal surge that drowned so many. the power of the wind was evident. the favourite of the mainlanders, there is almost nothing left of this beach resort. almost all the boats were damaged and vegetable crops destroyed. there's little the islanders can do except wait for aid and think about how to rebuild. >> aid groups say 4 million children within affected by the typhoon.
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tamara googlemyer, director of marketing and communications with all hands volunteers join us on the phone from behal. we understand you have been in bohol for a few days. what is the situation on the ground there? >> the situation is intense. we have no electricity. on our project in bohol living and working conditions are very primitive. we have one bucket of water per person per day for essential needs. we had the good luck and fortune to have a generator donated in the last 24 hours. so we are looking at getting electricity and water back up and running. certainly the closest city, tacloban, for example, is still in the dark, and is likely to be in the dark for the next three months at least. possibly up to 12 months.
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it's precarious. >> you mentioned there was no electricity. is communication an issue. how do you coordinate the volunteers on bohol and other islands? >> communication is absolutely an issue. the internet is patchy at best. personal - and you know other cell phones are working. but communications continue to be a challenge, and will be going forward. it's one of the essential for modern-day living. we in particular are really stretched to capacity in terms of trying to get people in place, coordinate just basic logistical - you know, day to day living and operations. all of those things are increasingly challenged with
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lack of telecommunications and internet access and everything. >> do you think the logistical challenges you mentioned - what about the remote areas. the philippines is over 7,000 islands. are you apply resources to the remote areas? >> the area we are working in in bohol is not - it is - it is one of the more remote areas. we generally tend to go in and focus on getting people back into their homes. so that and what we are focus the on in bohol. we are a small nonprofit org highsation. so at the moment we are looking at a fourth and fifth projects in the philippines with bohol and the typhoon haiyan response. that - those efforts will be
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significant for us. we'll partner with organizations on the ground. first of all, we like to get in, learn about a community, learn about the needs of that community and decide how best to support those. we know that we have other partners working in other areas. and certainly we are coordinating with them. we will be focussing our efforts and remain in the hole and decide what our response in typhoon haiyan will be. >> you mentioned getting people back in their homes. are you focussing on rebuilding old homes or finding new smelter. it's a little bit of both, depending on the needs of the community are. we are deconstructing homes here. the structures are unsound. people are traumatised.
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they are concerned about their safety. they are sleeping out doors. but as you might imagine, in the philippines, there's a bit of rainfall. when the rains start, people return to their homes and that's dangerous for them, obviously. what we are doing in bohol is taking down homes in a safe a way as possible and then salvaging the building materials. obviously this is an underserved community. people do not have a lot of money. so to the extent that we can sal vig the building materials and save them for later, families may be able to get back into homes sooner because they don't need to wait as long as they might otherwise to be able to afford to buy building materials and sort things to rebuild homes. >> thank you.
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director of communications with all hands volunteers, joining us from bohol in the philippines. meanwhile - back in the u.s. president obama's affordable care act suffers yet another blow. this time his own party's loyalty is being tested. doze eps of democrats are throwing their weight behind a bill, allowing americans to keep a health plan even if they fail to meet standards set by the affordable care act, the republicans call it the keep your halted care insurance. they say the barack obama health care law is not delivering. >> now we find out it was talk. this is what this country is fed up with, tired of the talk coming out of washington and want people representing them. that's what we are here to do. >> following the house vote president obama invited heath care to the white house.
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>> a detroit man is facing murder charges for the killing of an unarmed teenage girl. dearborn heights resident theodore wafer is charged with second degree murder and the death of renisha mcbride. the 19-year-old girl died of a gunshot wound to the face. police believe she knocked on a door and family members say she was there asking for help. civil rights groups say race played a roll. evacuation orders in effect. the town of mill ford was evacuated after a drilling crew punctured a pipeline. the explosion could be seen for miles. chevron a308 guised for the accident. thousands are forced to evacuate. mt sinabug is spewing plumes of
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ash. 5,000 are forced to flee. it erupted in october for the first time in three years, from volcanos to media showers. let's bring in jalala to tell us what it's about. >> we'll have a few meetor showers tomorrow, reaching a weak in the season. earth continues to pass through. some areas witness it. we have a front pushing through across the central portion of the united states. it contains energy. as a matter of fact it will be responsible for severe wherever across the ohio valley and hor tennessee. look at temperatures. 65 in omaha. it's relatively worm. >> as you travel to the south, the cold front bringing in a lot
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of chilly air, creating instagility. you get a lot of energy any. it will eject into portions of the ohio valley, we have a threat for damaging winds, hail and isolated tornadoes across ho chi minh into indiana. this is a watch that the spc storm rediction center issues. what we have here is all the way from porgss of michigan and the north-east, all the way down to the north coast, a threat for winds, hail and isolated tornadoes. we'll monitor this closely. it'll occur sunday night into monday morning. >> still ahead - the church to find a willing partner to destroy syria's chemical weapons. we'll tell you which country
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told the u.s. no thank you. >> one man's story of finding a second through foster care.
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good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. national elections in nepal. we'll tell you what is happening and why voting is not open for everyone. first the temperatures across the country. >> temperatures are on the rebound across the central plains. we were in the 40s last week. miniappo lass climbing to a high of 52, all the the way down to tal sea. we are in the 70s. further south corpus christy reaches a high of 80. in san antonio 79 and 61 is in albuquerque. a cold front is on the move swaping to the ohio valley. it's fuel by the warmth. on the east coast temperatures are rebounding. look where we are by monday.
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70 degrees for the daytime high. we'll have a couple of showers. back to you morgan. >> the u.s. government is offering up to $10 million in reward money to find anyone involved in the embassy attack in mag arsy. security concerns prevented the department discussing the reward. chris stevens was one of three americans killed when militants stormed the embassy. >> more than 2300 have been killed. >> gerald tan reports. >> the message was simple - get out. people heeded the call during friday prayers to protest and demand militia leave. as they approached the headquarters of the misrata
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brigade they were met by bullets. several people were killed. dozens of others injured. >> i saw scenes of chaos at the hospital. in front of the hops with a lot of armed men trying to divert the traffic. the same team was reflect inside the hospital. i saw lots of armed men running around, overwhelmed. what happened today was unprecedented. in recent weeks rival armed groups had been fighting with each other. this is the first time civilians were the target. >> they started shooting. this is the blood of libyans. i say, "you traitors", and to the government you traitors. where is the army, where is the police. >> the questions reflect a frustration with the central government, struggling to contain the militias.
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they refused to disband, despite a december deadline. >> translation: the departure of the militia from tripoli is a command, a necessary and urge demand. >> the militias began as local rebel groups who fought and overthrew muammar gaddafi. years after the uprising they have grown in size and influence. once hailed as hero, they became the reason many libyans say the country is lawless. >> the libyan government called for a ceasefire and said it's working it disarm militia groups. now that syrian's chemical weapons have been rounded up now the question is where to dump them. the albanian prime minister said no thanks. norway rejected the request and the u.n. chemical weapons team
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adopted a team to get rid of the toxic agent, some 1300 tonnes, it must leave syria by the end of the year. >> nepal heads to the polls for national elections. not everyone can cast a ballot. many don't have proof of citizenship - especially ones that don't own land. without a sit significant ship card, they can't vote. >> election season gripped many here in southern nepal. it's just subsection everyone in the district talking about who might win and why. not many people are interested here. not many people here will be able to vote in the november 19th elections. most of the people belong to a tribe. they are untouchables, the bottom of the system. uneducated and exploited. they never owned any land. it has been promised land. they were lected and never came
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back. >> broken promises aside the villages were on the electoral lift in 2008. now they are told they need a citizenship card. >> these two were born in the district. parents and grandparents are from here. but they have no way of proving ner nepalese. they have no land titles tying them to their home. >> the officials asked us to bring citizenship. >> it is the same situation for more than 500 people. according to u.n. reports people from the southern plains face more than just citizenship. >> the national identity is sometimes questioned. groups like this - the problems are worse. the masars had no instance on the state.
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they are not entertained. they have to take someone else. they have to go it the district headquarters and they don't have the money to go that far. the state must come to them and give them citizenship. without that they can't get basic services. >> electricity lines run through the village but never meant for the villages. without a land ownership certificate they can't access the services. they can touch the poll, but when the sun goes down they are forced to live in the dark. without the right to vote they'll have to wait and see whether the next government will grant them a right to be citizens. >> it's estimated some 1 million nehmalees families are in squatters. >> china is relaxing its 1-child policy marking some of the most sweeping reforms china has seen in decades, coming after top
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communist party officials decided to allow couples without siblings to have two children. they are scrapping the controversial labour camps. >> the u.k. is threatening pan investigation of sri lanka's 26-year civil war. the country has been criticised for lack of human rights. journalists are targeted for speaking out against the government. we have this report. >> this is sri lanka's most watched nightly news program. channel one news reaches millions of viewers. it's one of several news channels, and more than two dozen newspapers. on the surface the media is thriving. the reality is complex. sri lanka's bloody civil war earnt it a reputation as being a dangerous play. four years after the end of the conflict threats and attack on media continue.
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>> this man founded this with his brother. they edited a paper and was a critic of the government - he was shot a few months before the civil war ended. >> he expected nothing to happen. he constantly said, "god is on my side, because i'm on the right side." >> several press freedom groups believe the killing was orchestrated by links to the president. accusations the government denies. >> i would say as far as press freedom is concerned there's no control as such when it comes to the press. >> in weeks commonwealth heads of government meeting in colombo emphasis human rights violations. the pattern of violence following the end of the civil
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war included a period of white van attacks in which doze eps of people, journalists to activists were abducted in commercial vehicles. many were beaten, some never returned. >> including this woman's husband, an illustrator whose political cartoons marked the government. this mural painted by her two young sons depicts the abductions. she says she knows responsible who is responsible for her husbands's nearly 3-year disappearance. >> translation: the sri lankan government is behind it. >> while sri lanka's media is expanding its independence is continuing to shrink. jpmorgan is coming out of pok again, settling another legal dispute. they have to pay $4.5 million to
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investors who lost money on mortgage-backed security. the company agreed to pay out more than 5 billion for selling risky mortgages to fannie mae and freddy mac. >> agency are reporting a loss. postal officials want congress to stop saturday delivery and cut retiree benefits. this week it will make sunday delivers for amazon. >> democracy in action - voters recall legislation at an increasing pace. the winter olympics are 82 days away. meet a pioneer who hopes to lead the u.s. women's hockey to another medal.
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recall legislation at an
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>> you are watching al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford.
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these are the top stories. . 8 days after typhoon haiyan hit the philippines survivors are scrambling for food and water. other supplies are flown in from around the world. rescue teams are working to reach areas cut off by the storm. >> the libyan government called for a ceasefire. street battles in tripoli left more than 40 dead as the fighting started friday after an armed gang opened fire on hundreds of protesters rgs demanding that local militias leave the capital. demonstrators took up articles against the gang. >> a tough week for the president as democrats crossed the aisle voting with republicans to let americans keep health insurance plans. president obama met with a group of health insurance officials calming fears about new laws under the affordable care act. it came after an announcement that people scan keep health
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plans until 2014 even if they don't meet a new requirement. president obama steered away from health care in his weekly address, highlighting u.s. energy dependens. >> this week we learnt for the first time in nearly two decades the united states of america produces more of our own oil at home than we buy from other countries, that's a big deal, a tremendous step towards american energy independence. this is important too - we reached the milestone in part not only because we are producing more energy, but we are wasting less energy. >> here to give us insight into the tough week for president obama is kech soreti. a reporter. joining us from washington d.c. >> good morning. >> can you explain to us what is the mood in washington right now? does it feel like the white house is under attack even from inside the ranks? >> i think the daerty and
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members up for re-election in 2014 have come to chris site president obama. 39 house democrats voted with republicans yesterday for an obamacare fix-it bill going further than the one-year delay that president obama announced earlier this week, saying it's not enough. what it comes down to are mid term elections. they think that they've been having to go on the defense on a largely unpopular partisan bill. they'll have to walk the middle for midterms, a rough week. >> the president says that this time the wrath is justified. do you think the mea culpa helped to calm down critics. >> no, he said it was justified but that he would veto the bill. when you have 39 house democrats bucking the white house, i think
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that's a huge message that they are trying to send. you look in the senate. you have close allies like diane fienstein from california cit sizing him on obamacare. i think this is the hallmark piece of legislation for domestic policy, it's been unravelling the roll out. whether it will be a footnote in the obamacare legacy is unknown. this will be a long of term domestic story we'll follow. if you think back before obamacare there was hill larry care. this has implications more midterm elections and 2016 elections. >> we have seen presidential apologies, low approval ratings, what is next for the affordable care act. >> a 39% approval rating for president obama, the lowest we have seen. we have had the government
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shutdown and the majority of folks blame the republicans. we'll have to get numbers up. folks signed up. they had been hoping to reach 7 million people, so only 100,000 people have signed up. they wanted 7 million by march 31st. i think the rollout continues. you'll see a continuation of the administration trying to go on offence. but i have yet to see that translate into anything significant in which they have been able to grab hold of the narrative. they haven't been able to do that. >> let's look forward. other items on the agenda are iran, immigration. congress is not going to make it easy for the president to pass anything by the end of the year, is it. >> absolutely not. barring a huge international impetus where something would happen with iran, i don't see legislation being past. i don't think the impetus is
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there. the past couple of weeks you asked me about the mood. we are coming out of a shutdown. we had sequestration, across the board spending cuts, unemployment above 7%, 7.3%, and now you have obamacare mess. and i think the parte significantship is heightened and everyone is prepping for the midterm 2014 elections. a second term president has a limited amount of time to accomplish anything. barack obama faces a time cump before his term really becomes dictated by elections. >> a time crunch. thank you. >> and an emergency supply of medicine is being imported to the united states to treat a menning itis outbreak. a case of the deadly virus was confirmed on campus. the university is working with the centres for disease control,
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which says counter vaccines in the u.s. do not prevent the rare strain. health officials are importing emergency doses of a vaccine licensed in europe and australia. >> more than 1,000 women are gathering in baltimore for a day-long journey, the john hopkins conference is the result of two women who survived their own health scarce. >> meet molly block, a medical miracle surviving one health crisis after another. >> i had two heart surgeries, a stroke, cancer four times. i don't know, don't you think that's enough. >> block's health story began at age 27 with a shocking diagnosis of hodgekins lymphoma. >> when i had hodgekins there was one thing to do. you had your spleen removed,
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radiation. i had no choice. >> today, no matter what the disease patients with a dizzying array of treatment option, no one right answer. it's a reason block and fellow cancer survivor harriet legg um dreamed up a women's health conference covering topics - everything from hypertension to meditation. >> it helps women understand they can have a second opinion, they can have an opinion themselves. they can - they can make decisions. >> even today women have second place status when it comes to health care. research subjects are mainly male, with results applied to both genders. we make assumptions that women are small men. >> take this doctor's specialty - cardiology, heart des - the leading killer of men and women. >> women get the heart attacks
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10 years older for men. average for men is '60s, for women in their 70s. >> concern that busy women may ignore symptoms prompted this message. chest pain is not the only sign of trouble. women may experience cold sweats, nausea, abdominal pain. women see doctors more than men but not as likely to head to the emergency room. when they have heart attack symptoms a man high tails it to the er quicker than a woman. education is power. it's critical for women who make 80% of health care decisions for the family. >> i read it on the internet and said, "oh, my gosh, this is the reason i'm doing this." >> a woman who had her own health struggles helping others
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get through theirs. >> the conference is in its 19th year. >> the olympics are right around the corner. team usa is looking as strong as ever. john henry smith is here to tell us about it. >> it's an exciting time when the olympics come up. we have a diane afty. the 2014 winter olympics feature women's ice hockey. julie was laced up for three. she's more than an olympian, july chu is a pioneer. >> we are pushing harder. we are training smart, full-time as a team, in boston. we come to the rink with a smile.
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we know we can become better as a team, working on systems. >> julie chu knows a thing tore two been preparing for winter olympics. she's on in the last three olympic games winning silver and bronze. julie draws on her experience to help her keep her eyes on the prize. >> the biggest things is to focus on the present moment. it's an incredible journey. it's over in a week and a half, 2-week period. we have to stay focus the and not spend too much energy. we need energy left in the tank for later in the tournament. >> as the first asian american to play. as a harvard graduate and 3-time olympic medallist chew has accompanied much pt the idea of being seen as a roll model is something that surprises her.
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when i played hockey the dream of being an olympian wasn't there. women's hockey was not a sport until 1998. i have been fortunate yourself to represent our country with other players, it's a responsibility, an honour, it humbles me. i would never be here unless mum and dad could say i played hockey. i girl asking to play hockey was non-existent. she may be less than comfortable with the label pioneer, julie is set to become a pio near, becoming the fires asian american to win ice -- first asian-american to win hockey gold. >> recall votes - a rare occurrence in state legislature is a tool for gun activists. they are using them to vote in new leaders to vote restrictions, we have more.
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>> jennifer kearns of california is in denver colorado. she led a grassroots campaign to recall two state sooernts. the recall in colorado was a referendum on gun right. her targets john morse and angela harone leading a push to tighten gun laws. the night of the election the phones rang off the hook with people in california saying, "you have to help us." california passed tighter gun restrictions. kearns is taking aim at half-a-dozen recall elections in the golden state. those fighting restrictions on gun rights turn to recalls, a weapon reserved for politicians who break the law or do something ilmoral. >> are you a hired gun - pardon the pun?
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>> yes, i do western states, media strategies. >> some legislators battle the reaction to newtown, aurora and other shootings that led some to tighter gun controls. >> i'm a parent, a single mum of two children. when i go to sack re mmento i think about them more than the gun lobby. >> california joirnt is a law-maker, free call fornia that may be recalled. >> we see gunmen going into public arenas where there are people who have nothing to do except hide when these things happen. >> in colorado john morse says he is has no regrets. >> i don't think there's a question that colorado was safer. >> for now he's done with politics. >> it's a small price to pay when you look at the price that families pay every day
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>> it's a political price more lawmakers may face. >> there's a mini trend. >> john with the bipartison policy center says we can see a lot of cash to other elections like in colorado. more than 3.5 million pored in from united states. it puts them in campaign mode. >> there are five other states looking down the barrel of strict gun control regulations. we may go to other states after this. stay tuned. >> don't expect recall campaigns against lawmakers supporting tighter gun controls to back off soon. >> coming up on al jazeera america - one man's story of the finding a son through foster care. >> i'm john henry smith, jonathan martin spoke publicly - we'll have that and more coming up in sports.
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welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead an update on the menning itis outbreak at princeton university, first a look at the storms on the way with jalala. >> doesn't look like much is going on across the central plains, there's a cold front on the move. look at the map. you can see it by the clouds all across minneapolis and arizona. these clouds will push to the east. that's is a cold front. warm air in place. 55 degrees today into tomorrow across denver. tracking towards memphis temperatures in the 70s, it's the difference between the airmasses where the airmasses will erupt. there's instability. it will push into the ohio valley where we'll see wind and hail. >> and while aid is pouring into the philippines from around the
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world, there's no guarantee it will reach vilages where it's needed most. some villages have been isolate by the storm, others may be cut off by local politics. >> work has been cut off for days. victims pack relief goods in exchanges for food. these bags last a family of five for three days. officials say half the families have been serviced affected by the typhoon haiyan in leyte. 615,000 people. sacks of rice are being transported by the military to a local government unit. these are individual villages affected by typhoon haiyan. the officials in the villages are tasked with distributing it to the residents. there's no guarantee under a
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state of calamity that the aid reaches its ultimate destination. the survivors say they are yet to receive help, and allege food distribution is coloured by local politics. the village chairman that won the last election is there, the one that lost is our area, 62 b. those from that area and the other area received aid, not us. >> national government representatives make the rounds. they expect damage assessment from local officials from each village and an accounting of aid received. >> i personally go to check in. i do it personally. i do the distribution personally, >> there is always a way to get around the system. they are aware of the problems, but the national government has little more than trust to rely on. >> we assume that they know who
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needs it most, and who needs it quick will and how to get it to them. it's an assumption that worked in every situation. the philippines faces 20 storms a year. this is the way we always worked in terms of coordinating with the government. >> it may be time to change the system, especially here where many local officials are victims too. >> the u.s. provided $20 million in aid to distribute supplies. >> and some more news from the jonathan martin-rickie incognito saga. john hxenry smith is here in sport. >> a significant development friday in the miami dolphins bullying scandal. jonathan martin had a long-anticipated meeting in
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friday, in new york city with nfl special investigators ted wells. it lasted around seven hours. jonathan martin emerged to a group of reporters and spoke for the first time since leaving the dolphins two weeks ago. here is his prepared statement. >> today's meeting is consistent with my commitment to cooperate with the nfl's investigation. i went into great detail to mr ted wells and his team. i do, however, look forward to speaking with steven ross, and the dolphins' organization. now to cof si on campus, where florida state's freshman finds himself dogged by an incident from his past the the cornery alleging jamesin winston's role in a sexual assault. they'll decide whether to pursue
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criminal charges. the victim filed a report with tallahassee on december 7, 2012, and described her attacker between 5'9 or 5' 11, he is 6' p 4. >> miles jack has been used as a running back. it is working. he ran for 120 yards, what would mr jack-of-all-trades do nor an encore - he doesn't are is a mark on his face, he must be the greatest. the number 13 druins moves a sep closer to the rose bowl, beating the huskies. >> here and what the national champion have:
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>> i'll do the nba. intiana pacers are rolling. coming into friday night as an undefeated team. the bucks came in trying to slow a roll down. rol hib it rolled them over of the big fellow with a big night. eight shots. he leads the league with flour blocks. paul george 22 points. the pacers starting 9 and 0. losers of three straight. the nets travel to phoenix to face the suns. darren rms went um strong. his ankle has a heart beat. >> jo johnson took over, making the running jay.
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the game sent into ot. in transition pj tucker for the alley oop game tie at 98 with six seconds left. channing fry takes a three, miss, the nets grab the board and jo johnson drives a leg to the floor. it's in there for the game winner. nets blood out the suns 100-98. that is sport. >> two points. thank you so much john hxenry smith. >> about 400,000 children are in foster care in the u.s. and 100,000 waying to be adopted. many are ageing out of the system alone, without a family. we are told about a man trying to change all that. >> he's known as mr travis to the 80 teenage boys he's fostered since 2000. >> i try my best to ignite the hope. it seems their hope has died. we want to reactivate the hope, that they believe they can
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achieve success. >> 40-year-old travis davis found his life's purpose in fostering teenage boys, and sees potential where others see obstacles. he has optimism when others have fear over bringing a challenging teenager into their home. >> i deal with each child as an individual. >> patrick came into travis's home at 14. he had been living in foster care since he was seven. >> as i got older i was frustrated moving from home to home. i was searching for a family i didn't have. >> patrick's hope for a permanent home is shared by thousands. according to the administration for children and families, in 2011 there was 153,000 kids between the ages of 12 and 20 in foster care. 26,000 aged out of the system. >> a lot don't want teenagers
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because they figure you can't shake them. we need the forever families that will say, "i will take you unconditionally." >> travis says adoption was never the plan. when a family expressed interest he realised he wanted to be patrick's father. >> you fall back. you have a back up. i'm here to push up and you get op your feet. >> travis and patrick share their homes with foster kids, three teenage boys. patrick knows how lucky he is. patrick is the only one who ended up being adopted. >> experts say for many kids transitioning out of foster care leaves them in danger of becoming homeless or winding up in gaol. at the end of the first hour here is what we are following: in the philippines the desperate
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scramble for food and water continues more than a week after the storm. aid distribution centres like cebu are overwhelmed with survivors and relief supplies. >> 44 have been killed and many injured after fighting in libya. >> china reacting to the news that the government will stop the one-child per family policy. it was one of a number of reforms announced by the communist party. al jazeera continues. i'll be back in 2.5 minutes. follow up on aljazeera.com and join in the conversation. because, as always, there's more to it.
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that the government will stop
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it was one of a number of
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in the philippines the scramble for food and water more than a week after the storm. was it murder - a white home owner shoots and kills an unarmed black teenager. a racially discharged case out of the new york. >> a health break out in an ivy league school - seeking overseas help. >> and a tiny caped crusader hits the streets of san francisco. [ ♪ music ]
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welcome to al jazeera america, i'm rochel cary in new york. eight days after typhoon haiyan made land fall in the philippines the death toll is rising. more than 4,000 confirmed dead. 1,000 others are missing. survivors are scrambling for food and water of the supplies are flown in from around the world. rescue teams are working around the clock to reach areas cut off by the form. cebu has been overrun by demand. >> it's been a busy day at the cebu air force feel. a lot of planes are coming in from yoour op, asian countries. the question is are the goods going to the areas? the goods brought in at the airfield, laying here - it's dark.
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the goods are not going to leave again. today in those hard-hit areas people are waiting for mainly shelter. when i visited riaan, a city where the storm hit, they were still sleeping in the open air, there was hardly any shelter, no tents to be seen at all. this is important to bring as soon as possible. people are frustrated and skeptical about the goods reaching them. they ask every organization from abroad to give the relief goods to them directly, they don't trust the government. they are seeing the goods but don't believe that they are getting them. >> thank you very much. jennifer hardy we'll talk to. talking about necessities like food and clean water that food are trying to get to. it's running dangerously low. let's talk to jennifer hardy on
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the phone. communications officer for the catholic relief services. she is in ormoc, the philippines. thank you for joining us. what are the main issues confronting people in ormoc? here in ormoc i see the need for materials to repair homes and shelter. there are structures that are still standing and need to be repaired. i travelled to the east side of the island and it is harder hit. structures are destroyed. we are seeing a lot more need on that side of the i would. >> what types of things have the people with the catholic relief services been able to do? >> we are working with the local church and other networks to get shelters to people. we are seeing that as an urge need, especially as it is rainy season right now.
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it rained hard. in palo it was hard hit and people are taking shelter from the rain under makeshift structures. it's not sufficient in this weather. >> are we talking about the fact that some people have been without shelter for days now? >> yes, yes. as your story shows, there are goods coming into manila. the backlog is happening, getting from cebu and manila on to the islands. we have some great local distributors we are working with to get the trucks up and moving. we have trucks en route at the moment. >> how difficult is communication among the relief groups trying to coordinate and be as effective as possible? >> right now with telecommunications improving every day on the island things
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are getting better. it's difficult, which increases the challenge for groups talking to each other. we have a cluster. it allows a group to get together for each specific thing they are working on - shelter, food, water, sanitation. they are happening to ensure that we reach the greatest number of people with the help that they need the most. >> how long do you anticipate your group and other groups being there. how monumental of a task is this. >> the scale of the disaster is enormous. it's a long-term recovery. there'll be levels of recovery from emergency needs to transitional needs of getting people on their feet. it will be a long process. services have been in the country and continue to be in the country for mean years.
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we will continue to be with them in the future. >> jennifer hardy, thank you for letting us know how this is going. jennifer hardie, communications officer. joining us from the philippines. >> president obama's affordable care act suffers a blow. this time his partyie's loyalty is being tested. dozens of democrats are throwing support behind a gop bill. the president says the bill allows americans to keep cancelled health plans if they failed to meet standards set by the affordable care act. that's why the gop put the bill force. it's called the keep your health plan act. saying that the health care law is not delivering. >> now we find out it's talk. we are fed up. we want washington to represent us. >> following the vote president
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obama invited a number of health care executives to the whaus , it included ceos of various companies. they discussed ways to let americans know what their options were. >> a shooting in michigan sparked anger and charges of racism. a detroit man is facing murder charges for the killing of an n unarmed girl. it is striking a nerve across the country. >> theodore wafer - authority refused to identify him until now. he appeared in court or arraignment and shooting of renisha mcbride on his doorstep. he's charged with second degree murder, manslaughter, and possession ofs a firearm. >> a conviction could carry a life sentence. he said little as he stood before a judge. we obviously do not feel in the
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evidence in this case feels that the defendant acting in lawful self-defence. >> the charges come nearly two weeks after theodore wafer shot renisha mcbride in the face. before renisha mcbride was killed early saturday morning she struck a parked car in detroit. she left the scene on foot and wound up in a neighbouring suburb. her family believes the high school graduate went to theodore wafer's door seeking hep. the airport maintenance workers told police he thought someone was trying to break into his home and the gauge shotgun accidentally went off. >> she was unarmed there was no signs of forced entry. >> renisha mcbride's blood alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit for driving. there was marijuana in her system. when renisha mcbride's rely difficult said they believed it was a case of racial profiling it incited rallies.
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>> in this case the charging decision has nothing to do with the race of the parties. >> shortly after theodore wafer turned himself in, mcbride's family spoke out. >> we want to thank the prosecutors office for the thorough job that they had done to bring the charges that they brung against mr wafer. i don't know why i say m mr wafer - this monster that killed my daughter. >> you took a life, a beautiful life that was starting to blossom into a beautiful woman. for that i hope you stay in gaol for the rest of your life. >> theodore wafer's lawyer maintains he acted in self-defence. >> now under michigan law the home owner has the right to use force during a break in but must prove life was in danger. >> evacuations orders in effect near dallas, mill ford texas was
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evacuated after a drilling crew punctured a gas line causing an explosion that could be seen for miles. chevron apologised and crews are working to repair it. . meetior showers are supposed to peak. let's bring in jalala. >> it will be a beautiful night. storms brewing across the central plains. in terms of views look at the map behind me. it will be poor conditions in it interpret of visibility across the north central claims into the ohio valley and the gold coast and across the west. we have storms brewing. we have a storm making its way across the north-west dumping 12-18 inches of snow, certainly in the higher elevations of your
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travelling across the passes. you want to use precautions, very poor visibility. if you live in the south to texas, the conditions will be ideal given the fact we'll see clear skies. i want to push the storms across the plains. we'll continue to have to mop tore them -- monitor them. they'll produce damaging winds and the chance for tornado across indiana and ohio. instability in the atmosphere. temperatures in the 70s, a cold front is pushing through, it will be responsible for the instability. we may see volatile thunder storms passing through tomorrow into the evening. back to the west - a snow storm is pushing in out of canada. the know is falling. visibility is diminishing. if you are on the roadways use precaution.
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along the coast from seattle to portland the rain will fall for you. >> highs in the '60s and 70s. when you push into texas, because of the instability in the atmosphere, that's the reason we'll see the volatile storms. >> a handful of students came down with a rare form much menning itis. officials are scram pling to scrambling to bring in vaccines from overseas. >> a dangerous outbreak at princeton university. >> it's very serious. >> a seventh case of menning itis b confirmed on campus. the university is working with the centres for disease controls saying counter vaccines given in the u.s. do not prevent the strain. federal health officials take on unprecedented step, importing an investigational vaccine licensed
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in europe and australia. >> this is a dangers disease that we know in the united states. there are several strains of this. it's a, c, y, 1135. our vaccines cover all four. at apprenticeships tonne they are having an outbreak of b. so that strain b - there is no vaccine in the united states. >> the disease attacks the brain and spinal cord and can be fatal. doctors say it spreadseesly, young people at a high risk of the. >> the risky behaviours of ato less ents. you share water bottles and have risky sexual promise cuty. that is the cause, spread by droplets. >> university officials are quiet on when the vaccine effort will be rolled out saying, ": >> it launched nearly 8,000
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undergraduate and graduate students could be vaccinated. >> six of the students who retraibility the disease recovered. even though the vaccine is not made in the urks there's no dangers. it's made by the same company that makes the vaccine given he here. >> a policy change in china - the communist party relaxes a law that may spark a baby boom. >> more trouble for toronto's mayor. >> droughts and residents in zimbabwe unable to feed their people.
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dangers. people. people.
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welcome back to al jazeera america. we'll talk to an nyu professor about the change to china's one-child policy, first the temperatures across the country with metrologist jalala.
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>> let's start out where a winter storm is pushing across washington into idaho and montana, dragging the cold air with it. the temperatures climbing to a high of 44. now, right at the freezing mark, the snow is falling. take it easy on the road. there could be patchy black eye along i15 and eye90. snow levels are around 2,000 feet. you want to use precaution. anywhere from 12-18 inches. cold air sinking south into salt lake city. only expected to climb to a high of 43. back in san francisco it's always beautiful and will reach a high of 60. >> it's nice there. >> couples in china reacting to news the government is loosening the long-standing one-child policy. millions will have the option to have bigger families.
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it was one of several reforms announced by the communist leadership. andrew thomas reports. >> for a generation this is what a typical chinese family looked like - soon an extra face my feature. reforms to allow another child to parents who were an only child themselves. most of the soon-to-be parents were born after 1979 and were single children. there are a few to whom the policy won't apply. >> i'm excited, i want a girl too. >> two girls. >> another girl. >> this woman is grateful. much was used to complain about the policy, she never thought it would change. it was introduced when china was a poor country. the policy is thought to have prevented as many as 400 million
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births. baby booms now is likely to be moderate. china is richer than it was. as countries develop families tend to get smaller. what was usual in the 1970s, is the norm. >> a generation of single children have grown up to become parents. they have the option to have more than one child. whether they will or not is another matter. >> growing population was a problem, now it's the ageing population. for the first time china's labour force sank. it's been announced the retirement age will rise. >> president xi jinping signalled a reduction in the number of crimes carrying the death penalty and the abolition of labour camps where people
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were housed without trial, and on minor offenses. >> translation: children can -- people can seek appeal, defend themselves with lawyers, have first appeal, second appeal. >> most of these parents lived through three decades. if the latest reforms are a sign of things to come their children will grow up in amagz times. >> to understand china's one-child policy i'm joined by rebecca carl. thank you for joining us professor. >> i think it's difficult to overstate how huge this is. can you put it into perspective? >> it's not that huge. >> really? >> it's made into a huge issue. >> that's why you are here. >> it will be phased in over the
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course of the next five, eight years, and the policy is going to eventually allow all couples to have two children. it will be from a one child policy to a 2-child policy. >> why was the government not specific in when this will happen. >> they wanted to see how it would work. they want to see if the relaxation of the policy will lead to the rumoured baby boom. they are phasing it in in the urban areas, where the social and economic prohibition is against having more than one child are well absorbed. internalized by the population. people don't want more children. they can't afford it. >> our reporter pointed out because people can have more
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children doesn't necessarily mean they will. >> the issue is going to be that what they want to see with the elaxation, how many more children are going to be born. >> is the ultimate goal what we think it is. >> what do you think it is? >> it seems to be about labour force population, what is the multiple goal. >> it's they are facing a hugely analing population which by 2050 will be 33% of the population. >> i have numbers. we show by 2050 the older population, which were categorising it as 60 or older is projected to grow by 164%. at the same time the working age population, that will be people between 15-64 as expected to decline by nearly 11%.
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>> correct. >> that's problematic. >> the ageing population is a big issue. the other issue is gender imambulance. there -- imbalance. there are 118 boys per 100 girls. that is going to lead to serious social issues - people can't find wives, can't form families and so on. among many other more egregious issues. what they are trying to do is lesson the incentive for having that one boy so that you can have two children and hopefully find a balance. >> is this the beginning of something bigger or should we note read into it?
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>> i don't know what bigger is. 1.5 billion is an i deal population around which they wish to stablilize the number - the demographic growth. they have projected that by opening up and relaxing the pop si, they'll be ability -- be able to do this and maintain the population for a number of years. that's the number they think they can sustain. >> okay. thank you very much for your perspective by telling us it's not as big a deal as everyone thinks. that's why we called on you, we appreciate it. associate professor rebecca krl with nyu. >> the u.s. government is offering up to $10 million in reward to find impinge involved in the benghazi attack. they have been offering the reward since january.
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security concerns prevented the department from discussing the award sooner. american ambassador chris stevens was killed along with others. the government is calling for cease fires between armed gangs. street battles left more than 40 dead. the fighting started on friday after an armed gang opened fire on hundreds of protesters demanded militias leave tripoli. libya struggled since of over through of muammar gaddafi. >> albania says it will not be a dumping ground for syria's chemical weapons. for a week they have gathered outside the parliament. albanians demanding their
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government refuse washington's request to destroy syrian's weapons on their sail. prime minister edi rama, previously in favour of the idea turned it down. >> translation: with the highest respect for our friends and irreplaceable partners, it is impossible for albania to get involved. >> the weapons are weapons of masz destruction, albanians can never september them. the decision from the government came late, but when the people stood up >> six years ago albania destroyed its own stockpile. syria's stocks are larger. albania's experience made it an attractive option. norway has been asked and refused. no one else is jumping at the chance. >> for prime minister rama,
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two months into the job the decision is not likely to have been an easy one. sided with popular opinion or support a requesting from a powerful ally to destroy more than 1,000 tonnes of dangerous chemicals. in the hague at the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons discussions will resume to work out exactly how to rid syria of chemical weapons. >> the executive council has adopted a landmark plan for the distribution of all chemical weapons in syria by the end of june 2014. most of the chemicals - the most toxic of them will have to be out of the syrian territory by the 31st december 2, '30. >> the question remains -
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removed to where? >> suing over security measures - why residents attack ticks to protect the new world trade center go too far. not a hand out but a hand up - giving money to impoverished families makes a difference to their education. we talk to a professor of university of california. >> i'm john hxenry smith, it's a big weekend for the top teams in football. all that and more in sportremov?
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>> i'm john henry smith, it's a all that and more in sportall t welcome back, these are the top storiestories: eight days a typhoon haiyan, survivors are struggling for food and water. rescue teams are providing access to badly needed aid to areas affected by the storm.
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>> an unarmed teenager shot dead. the home owner faces murder charges. an emergency supply of medicine is imported to the united states to treat an outbreak of menning itis in an ivy league school. >> democrats vote with republicans for americans to keep health insurance plans. president obama spoke with a group of chief executives calming fears on the affordable care act. president obama steered away from health care in his weekly address, highlighting energy independence. >> this week we learnt for the first time in nearly two decades the united states of america now produces more of our own oil at home than we buy from other countries. that's a big deal. that's a tremendous step towards american energy. >> this is important. we reached the milestone because we are producing more energy and wasting less energy
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>> toronto's infamous mayor may see his last days in office. there has been an outcry and canadians can't him without. >> that's never happened before, toronto city councillors moving against the mayor, stripping his authority, then they've never had ha mare -- had a mayor admitting to smoking crack cocaine and drinking. he seemed a little contrite. >> if someone else steps out of line like i have it will affect councillors and the mayor, i think, for years to come. >> in fact, when it came to a vote just the mayor and his brother, a councillor, opposed the motion to limit his powers. with almost unheard of unity council told the mayor his apologies were not enough, he's
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mayor in name only. >> we said that the powers the council delegated to the mayor office, not rob ford, have been withdrawn. >> rob ford has been colourful and controversial. he came to power promising to cut spending and taxes - he has. his chaotic behaviour cost him his authority. if polls are right - many of his supporters. this woman voted for forob ford and is part of a campaign to get him to quit. >> it took 1.5 years for me to realise the mistake. >> there's almost no way to displace a toronto mayor. thanks to rob ford, there's talk of changing the law. >> it was never envisaged that a mayor would do cocaine in hiss it is office, allegedly, with potentially prostitutes in his
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office, assaulting his staff. you never looked at things like that. >> mayor ford says he'll go to court to get his powers back. and next week councils will try to strip him of his office budget and his ability to hire and fire. the only way for it to end is for the mayor to resign - not something he is contemplating. >> ford says he's getting medical help but insists he is not an addict. >> the environmental protection agencies is considering reducing how many corn will be mixed in ethanol in response to a slowdown for fuel. it's unwelcome news for formers, driving down corn prices. food prices could rise if ethanol requirements are not scaled back. >> zimbabwe faces one of its
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worst food situations in years. we report on their flight. >> the effect of months with no rain and little food show. cattle in rural zimbabwe survive on the bare minimum. people like this woman try to get buy. she looks before her two grandchildren and says it's the only meal they'll eat. once cooked she'll send the children to neighbours to ask for bread. some give me food, some don't. there's nothing i can do. i try to grow more food. it's too hoot. >> in another village they do not know when help will com. there's nothing to eat. things were bad last year, this time she says it feels worse. >> translation: i'm hungry. men left the village. others too our cows where there is grass to eat. >> farming in zimbabwe was so
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good. it was called the breadbasket of africa. now food has to be imported. some rely on food aid. 2.2 million people are affected. from now up to next year they'll have nothing to eat. >> officials say the food crisis is caused by a number of factors - drought, political and economic instability. >> when it rains the river fills and flows all the way to moez am bike. people use the water to fish and irrigate crops. it's been like this for months and the community is worried. >> this family is taking a risk planting. if it doesn't rain, it will die. that means there'll be nothing to eat or sell. families have been told by the government help is on the way - they don't know when it will
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reach them. >> the world food program predicts a quarter of the rural population will face shortages in the coming months. >> there is a proven connection in education between a child's success and socioeconomic status. what if you took a low income family and provided them with cash - would a child's chance of success rise. a study tested that. >> greg duncan, co-author, and a distinguished professor at the university of irvine. thank you for joining us, he is in irvine. >> glad to be here. >> your research says the cognitive development of low-income children differs from children raised in high-income families. that's controversial. that is more than saying it's environmental. you are saying that their brain development is different. am i getting that right?
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>> that's right. there have been many studies showing that children growing up in poor families do worse on many dimensions. they complete less schooling, health is worse, they have less successful careers. one of the possible mechanisms is the way in which their brains are wired. in the early years brain architecture is formed in ways that can be efficient or not. growing up in a family with resources can presumably lead to more efficient brain connections and higher cognitive development. it's not that research shows this, it's that the intervention project that we'll do is going to test this. >> is it - ok, are you saying that it's a matter of - not that the children are born this way,
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but that the effects of - happen so quickly that the intervention has to happen quickly. >> that's right. and that's what we'll test. it's controversial whether the tact that poor children do not do as well as rich children is the result of the income that is available. we know low income children are more likely to be in single parent families, likely to have parents with less education. we are interested in testing to what extent it's the income that makes the difference, and our plan is to conduct out out >> tell me how you'll test this, let's talk about this. >> it amounts to a clinical trial. we'll enrol 1,000 women around the country who have given birth and offer two different chances for a lottery. one - half will win a modest
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amount $750 over three years. and the other group will receive more. 12,000 over three years. and the idea is to track both groups and determine not only whether there are differences in how kids develop, but differences in the ways that the families are operating, the kinds of expenditures they make and the stress levels of the mother, parenting quality or things like that. how does this help children. that's what this is about. >> in the united states there are many debates about public policy. we know that the last congress cut food stamps, and the question is whether programs that are increasing or decreasing the generosity of benefits like food stamps or cash assistance make is a difference for children's lives. the idea is to do a straightforward test to inform a lot of approximately sis that
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are either increasing or decreasing the amount of financial resources available to families. >> greg duncan, keep us posted on the results of this interesting study. thank you so. >> thank you. >> a distinguished professor with the college of education. >> access to the nile has been a source of conflict along the world's long e -- longest river. ejip shans get 95% of their water from the nile. it's being hampered by a dam being built by ethiopia. >> for millenia egip jans found nile to be a gift from god. what god has given them it may be taken away. >> whenoperational this
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multibillion hydro electric development will be africa's biggest. egyptians are not happy. >> it gives ethiopia power to control the floor and change the balance in the region to ethiopia's advantage. this has been an ethiopian dream. >> this hand used to be irrigate by water from the nile. mismanagement blocked the canals that brought it to him. now he relies on water from wells. >> translation: if they build this, it will affect egypt and the underground water, which is linked to the nile. if they build the dam, there'll be no more underground water and we won't be able to farm. >> water security is a vitally important issue for egypt. a global standard for water
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scarcity is 1,000 cubic metres per person per year. the average egyptian can only access 700 cubic metres. so the country is water scarce. factor this in - the population of egypt is due to increase by 50% by 2050. ethiopia says its dam will not have long-term impacts downextreme. >> egyptians have to believe us. they have to believe ethiopia. we believe in equitable utilisation of resources - win/win approach. and cooperation. >> but until the reservoir is filled egypt can expect a reduced flow. five years is ethiopia's aim. it do take longer. the geopolitics of the renaissance dam are tense. how to share the resource is
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difficult. the nile also belongs to ethiopia, sudanese and other upstream countries. >> jpmorgan forking over more cash, paying another $4.5 billion to investors who lost money on mortgaged back face ilties, they agreed last month to pay $5 billion to fannie mae, and freddy mac. >> security in new york comes at a price. tough security laws for the world trade center neighbourhood, which some say is turning into an unnecessary fortress. >> it's the worst part of the city's history in my lifetime or father's or grandfather's. >> mary experienced september 11th up close. ground zero is outside her window. >> it took years for her to call
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this place home. more than 10 years later it's not what is going on inside the apartment, it's what is going tonne outside. >> right now this is the regular check. the plan calls for the cones being replaced by a cement wall. >> earlier this year the n.y.p.d. announced a plan to create a security perimeter around the world trade center, within the campus. streets would be open to pedestrians and bikes and closed to unauthorised vehicles. sidewalk barriers will be built around the perimeter, with police operating the barriers, and security checkpoints for vehicles to be checked for explosives. illustrations depict what streets would look like today and once security is in effect. n.y.p.d. says the proposed measures are necessary following the world trade center and the
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september 11th attacks, and says residents will get around freely on food, so long as they enrol in a prescreening program. for some the compromise is not enough. the world trade center alliance is suing the n.y.p.d. describing it as a fortress impairing their quality of life. >> this lawyer represents the neighbourhood alliance. >> there are ample ways to ensure security without making the world trade center campus essentially a fortress. that's what we don't want it to be. >> the neighbourhood group wants security, not on this scale. there are fears that the neighbourhood will be run by businesses, not people, and they worry tourists will have an easier way to get around than they will. >> have a great memorial, respect families, but don't cut life from around here, don't cut this off from the rest of the
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world. >> the majority of security measures will be implemented by 2015. in 2019 the n.y.p.d. will look and evaluate how well the campus is working. >> more news from the jonathan martin-rickie incognito saga john henry smith has that. it's a sports news story. >> this thing had legs. it doesn't show signs of slowing down. it's a significant development in the miami dolphins bullying scandal. jonathan martin had his long-anticipated meeting friday in new york city with nfl special investigator ted wells. it lasted around 7 hours. martin emerged to a group of reporters and spoke for the first time since leaving the
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dolphins two weeks ago. here is the prepared statement. >> today's meeting is consistent with my commitment to cooperate with the nfl with my experience as a player on the dolphins. i wept -- went into great detail with ted wells. i will not discuss it now. i look forward to more discussions. >> there's an afs showdown pitting the denver broncos against the uptown kansas city chiefs. we have a preview of the heavy wait bout. >> the denver broncos have mile-expectations which is why pay tonning -- peyton panning will line up. >> i made a lot of adjustments
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in the past two years, you know. at this point in time in my career, and this is another one of them. >> i think it makes sense. i'll be better for it. >> 37-year-old manning issuingest rated the highest office in the league. kansas city as the stinkiest defense, giving up 12 points for context. and a league-hif 36. >> the chiefs understand that peyton must go down and down hard. >> i'm playing football. people will get hit. we do as good a job as anybody in terms of it protecting the guy. it's important. we continue to do that. >> we have to put pocket on him. he's not a mobile guy. we are not going to be fooled by him not being 100%. peyton knows what he needs to do. >> we have a tonne of respect
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for their offence, for peyton, for the things they have accomplished. we understand all that. they have done a great job. it's important that we prepared ourselves, you know, to play a good football team. >> statistically they are number one in all the main categories. i mean their ability to create points themselves as a defense, and certainly not giving up - i guess they are two that jump out. >> despite a perfect record the chiefs run into a string of losing teams. they are actually underdogs heading into denver. sunday night is a chance for casey to earn respect against one of the quarter backs of all time. >> the broncos under jack dellrio hopes to send john fox a get well victory, pulling denver
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into the top spot. >> it's a big game, it's a division game. >> it's the first time playing the chiefs. it was uniic in scheduling. >> i recognise this has play-off implications. all those things - it's exciting. i think we are looking forward to it. >> on campus u.c.l.a. used miles jack as a running back. it is workingle last week the freshman ran for 120 yards. what will he do for an encore. he will master the huskies. get this, he's only 18. the number 13 druins move a step closer to rose ball. >> here is what the other teams are doing:
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back to you. >> all right. fighting for truth and justice - batkid to the rescue. we meet the 5-year-old whose only wish is to battle the bad guys.
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welcome back to al jazeera ameri america, time for a look at the forecast of the >> take a look at chicago - i think they'll be in the center of all the callality that will take place across the country as a cold front swings through. look at the temperatures in the low to mid '60s. showers and thunder storms pushing through on sunday. temperatures dropping. strong storms capable of producing damaging winds, hail and the chance for isolated tornados all the way from
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chicago through detroit, the ohio valley into the gulf coast. keep it in mind tomorrow into tomorrow night. back to you rochelle. >> a 5-year-old boy with cancer became an overnight superhero and internet sensation. melissa chan tells us about that ki. >> holy smoke it's batkid out to fight a crime. his first feat - rescuing a damn sell in distress. whew, that was close. >> we are hearing reports of another crime, let's see if batman can put a stop to it. batkid caught the riddler in the middle of a bank heist. will he beat the tricky villain? of course, he does.
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at union square in the heart of san francisco thankful fans wait to catch a glimpse of the superhero. >> i was at work. i heard a lot of noise and commotion and looked out - the helicopters were flying. i guessed there was a crime scene and batkid saved the day. good to be in gotham today. >> we are here to support what the city is doing, it's great, amazing. fantastic to be in a city, representing a city that has so much compassion. >> miles' add venturous day includes a stop at the ballpark where he takes a victory lap before heading to city hall where he meets a grateful mayor. >> what will we do without you. the streets of our city are safer because of you. >> when this started organizers
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expected a few hundred people to help. instead it went viral - thousands offering store, including the president. >> way to go miles, way to save gotham. >> miles fought cancer all his life. now he's in remission, he is healthy and started kinder garter this fall. miles battle with leukaemia has been every bit a battle as what batman faced and he's caught the hearts of resident in this town. what an amazing thing to do. that will do it for this hour of al jazeera. i'm rochelle cary. keep it here throughout the day.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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