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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 22, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ a major shift of power in the senate as democrats drop a so called nuclear option, the landmark vote prevents republicans from filibustering to block presidential nomination. a chilling discovery in britain, a modern day slavery, three women held against their will in a home for more than 30 years. and intense search for survivors after a supermarket roof comes crashing down and dozens are dead and more are feared trapped in the rubble. >> president kennedy has been assassinated and it's official the president is dead. >> reporter: and half a century later the nation pauses to remember one of its darkest hours, the death of a beloved
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president, john f. kennedy. ♪ for a generation of americans the death of president john f. kennedy was a touch stone, every one know where they were in dallas 50 years ago today and the shooting and aftermath viewed by millions and carried the news around the clock and a half century later the nation is marking the moment that changed our nation and al jazeera will have continuing coverage of the somber anniversary all day long and later in the hour we will look at the final days of jfk and how reporters captured those moments. plus we will focus on an unique photography exhibit that has snapshots of his presidency from beginning to end. very good friday morning and welcome to al jazeera and stephanie si has the morning
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off. we begin with a historic power play in congress, senate democrats passed the so called nuclear option, the landmark vote limits the use of filibustering to block presidential nominees and democrats say the move will engridlock in washington and allow president obama to get his appointments approved but republicans say the partisan bickering in the capitol is only going to get worse. >> this is not a very proud day in the history of the senate. in order to distract attention away from obamacare, the senate has just broken the rules in order to change the rules. >> reporter: under the new rules only a simple majority is needed for the confirmation of most executive and judicial nominees. the world change represents a huge shift of power in the senate and 200 years the chamber prided itself on giving more power to the minority party. and the senate majority is
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guaranteed to have nomineed approved and i want to bring in erica who has more and some republicans are seeing this as a power grab. >> senate democrats are using majority to their advantage here and an easy vote, they passed a measure to eliminate the use of the filibuster to block presidential nominees, to give you an idea why democrats are using the so called nuclear option and in the last month there were three votes to the influential dc court of appeals and republicans blocked them all and now that won't happen and you can imagine that the president praises the change. senate democrats changed the game when it comes to filibusters, something we have seen and heard of recently, it's a strategy used to prevent a vote by allowing a senator to hold the floor and means any senator can block a bill by speaking as long as necessary. >> and i would go for another 12 hours. >> a deliberate and determined effort to obstruct everything no
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matter what the merit just to refight the results of an election is not normal. >> reporter: the numbers may seem to support the lack of normalcy. in the four decades before the obama presidency nominees were blocked by fill busters 68 times, in the five years since he has been in office obama nominations have been blocked 54 times. >> the constitution charges the president with filling vacancies to the federal bench. every president has exercised this power since georgia washington first name justice to the supreme court in 1789. but my judicial nominees have waited nearly 2 1/2 times longer to receive "yes" or "no" votes on the senate floor than those of president bush. >> reporter: a lot more yeses know because the change means 51 senators can now confirm all presidential nominees except those to the supreme court. before today that number was 60. with 53 democrats in the senate and just 45 republicans, this
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means they will not need any votes from the gop to push through presidential nominations. incensed republican senator john mccain got words from when he was a senator in 2005 and obama was against this very change. >> it's the right of free and open debate is taken away from the minority party and the millions of americans who ask us to be their voice i fear that already partisan atmosphere in washington will be poisoned to the point where no one will be able to agree on anything. >> reporter: one thing the republicans seem to agree on, they say this move is just a way for democrats to try and shift the focus off of their disaster healthcare roll out. >> millions are hurting because a law that washington democrats forced upon them and what do they do about it? they cook up some fake fight over judges, a fake fight over judges that are not even needed.
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>> this move by democrats had immediate results shortly after the change the nomination of one judge to the dc court that was blocked just weeks ago moved forward with 55 votes. and as unhappy as republicans are about this change right now, thomas, you can imagine that in the next election, if they have the majority in the senate then this change will fit them. >> the mid term is taking place in 2014 to be perfectly clear here this doesn't mean, this measure doesn't mean the filibuster is dead and gone does it? >> it's alive and kicking when it comes for votes for supreme court justices and bills and has to do with nominees to the lower courts. >> thank you, the future role of troops in afghanistan enters a second day, the council of elders are discussing to accept or reject a security deal with the u.s. and there are doubts on the issue because afghan president karzai told the council he would not sign the
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agreement until after elections of the spring at the earliest and if they say yes 15,000 foreign troops could be allowed to stay in afghanistan until 2024. the proposal would give u.s. troops immunity in afghan courts and troublesome between karzai and president obama. scott land yard said it's the worst case of modern day slavery they have seen and they rescued three women held captive for three decades and they were held against their will in this london neighborhood and one reached out to an anti-slavery group called freedom charity after see agree documentary on tv. >> they basically told us they were being held and they needed support to come out of a very difficult situation and we are a charity and take every call seriously and we have a 24/7 help line which they contacted and from that moment on word it
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was sensitive to assist them in escaping. >> reporter: they are cared for by freedom charity and i will bring in tim friend and good morning to you, what have we learned about the women's conditions? >> well, they are traumatized and of course this is the challenge that is now confronting the police as they build their case. very, very carefully and delicately, they are questioning the women to try and establish exactly what happened during those extraordinary three decades and 30 years and one of the women was 30 years old. it's quite possible she was born into servitude but spent her entire like in domestic slavery. now the police say they had limited amount of free done and one saw a tv program in which a charity that helps people like this was featured. she made a call. the charity then contacted the
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police and events ran on from there and eventually all three women were released. but as you can imagine this is a very tricky case for the police to handle and they are having to move very slowly, two people arrested have been released on bail until the new year. >> reporter: can you tell us anything more about what the life has been like over the past 30 years for these women, what led up to this day? >> well, information is very scarce at the moment. it was an ordinary london street, the kind of everyday suburb street that goes unremarked upon in the general run of things. and apparently the neighbors had no idea during these three
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decades of what was happening behind those doors. and it's only now that when the police have moved in that those extraordinary events have started to emerge. >> more details to come and al jazeera tim friend in london this morning and thank you. arizona's child welfare agency is under fire this morning after allegations of neglect, a report on thursday said 6,000 complaints of suspected child abuse to a state hotline were never investigated and it happened over a span of four years and the hotline generates on average 4,000 calls each month and since the start of 2013 only one case in 12 was investigated. the report also says child protective services improperly designated the calls as not investigated and never followed up. arizona law says all reports to the hotline must be investigated. another troublesome story this morning two children are dead and three others in critical condition after the car they were riding in plunged into an
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icy minnesota pond. police say it went off a highway ramp thursday in a suburb of minneapolis and the woman who was driving escaped and the car was submerged for nearly 45 minutes and rescuers fought to free the children. >> a passersby jumped on the water and on the roof of the vehicle on and up to his neck and you are looking at probably 8-9 feet deep and nearly freezing temperature water. >> reporter: the driver is the mother of three of the children, her 7-year-old son and her boyfriend's five-year-old daughter were killed and police are trying to determine if excessive speed was a factor in the accident. they are searching the wreckage of a grocery store in latvia after a deadly accident. the roof clansed at the store in the capitol of riga. at least 32 people are confirmed dead including three firefighters. the cause of the collapse is not yet known. al jazeera's doras has more.
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>> this is what is left of a busy super market in the capitol and the roof collapsed in the shopping time and bringing down the walls and windows and 20 minutes later what was left of the roof caved in trapping rescue workers and a number of people died including two firefighters. >> translator: it was crashing, most people started crying and screaming as it was sure that those who were left inside after the first collapse would not be alive after the second fall. >> reporter: i had just left the super market 8 minutes ago but now i feel sorrow for those who are there. >> translator: they were building a playground for children, obviously they did something wrong and the roof did not hold this. >> reporter: as the rescue operations continued the prime minister determined that criminal investigation had been launched and the mayor of riga cancelled holiday and calling an emergency meeting of rescue
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services and local officials. meanwhile firefighters continue to work around the clock to try and rescue those still trapped inside, al jazeera. >> reporter: 40 people rescued and rescuers are still searching for survivors. in the devastated philippine city of tacloban they are housing 3,000 families and others finding shelter in their ruined neighbors and the government wants to build bunk houses with room for 25,000 families but as henry faucet reports time is running out. >> reporter: in the low-lying city of tacloban some areas were hit harder than most and the houses made of wood next to the sea splintered and washed away. on the outskirts of time some started rebuilding and even on the low, marshy ground and following the house to the foundation to start again.
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people here say they would move somewhere safer if the government provided it but there is no sign of that just yet. >> translator: i like it here. i want to stay because there is work here and the markets are nearby. >> reporter: some of the largest, sturdy concrete structures have survived and others were simply washed away. >> i never thought, never in my dream that in seconds no more, gone. >> reporter: the climate change will have more intense typhoons than i have an effort to move people away from areas most at risk and with no where to go people are rebuilding old houses and make due as best they can but the government is worried the longer they do so the harder it will be to get them to live somewhere safer and the government is promising to build temporary bunk houses and more
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permanent decisions about where to rehouse those most in danger are considered. >> they have to build bunk houses first so we are working with them to do that and they have already identified tracks of land to do that but in the meantime it's going to be difficult to convince these people to go back and should stay in temporary shelters. >> reporter: the streets are slowly coming back to life and people trading and talking about the future of this town. tacloban's people are gradually adapting to life after this super typhoon and the question is if they will be safer if or when the next big storm hits, henry faucet, tacloban. >> reporter: death toll is 5,000 and expected to climb higher, let's look at the weather here as we head into the weekend and some areas are seeing rain, freezing rain and snow, let's bring in nicole mitchell to talk about a mixed bag. >> everything in the kitchen
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sink with it and add to that the dropping temperatures in a lot of cases. let's get to what we have now. what we will watch is anything from rain in the northeast, temperatures will fall later in the weekend to the frontal boundary that brought the dramatic drop and we can see mixed precipitation this morning as well. so as we get through the rest of the day there is moisture funneling from the northwest and will stay with chances of rain and especially overnight when the temperatures really drop, chances for freezing precipitation and you may wonder why do we get one thing versus another with all of this going on a lot of different winter watches and advisories out there but it's really the atmosphere and we had cold air and when you go in the atmosphere the air gets colder. in this case with the cold front it got under some of that warm air so you have the moisture that comes through. if we get sleet it goes through a shallow warm layer and turned into a droplet and rephrases and
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it tings on your windshield and freezing rain goes through the warm layer and only as briefly below freezing so the droplets don't have time to totally refreeze, they do what we call super cool, so that then they freeze on contact so freezing rain is the more dangerous of the two because that is what can really weigh down tree limbs and possibly snapping and cause power outage or snap on the ground causing icy conditions. and with the moisture we are going to have another shot of cold air. that comes in over the course of the weekend and that one also impacts the east coast. so really everyone is getting in on the game over the next few days and i will talk more about the temperatures coming up, in a couple minutes, back to you. >> how low will they go. talks on the nuclear program continue in geneva and some progress and took a back seat thursday while european union republicans met with the foreign minister and tried to chip away
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at differences over tyron and what are the sticking points between iran and the west and could we see a deal today? >> well, that's the big question. there is still hope here in geneva a deal will be reached by the end of the day and a sticking points. there are a number of sticking points and on the western side of the equation the issue of the iraq heavy water plant in iran that is due to come online following construction that has many people in the west very concerned because that produces platonium and used in weapons and the surplus of enriched uranium is a sticking point and thought they are the two primary
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issue and on the iran side of the equation we hear the word the right to have a nuclear program and they want it in the document, in a signed agreement that would verify they have a right to a nuclear program and that is a contentious issue. >> if an agreement is reached will we ever see a final deal? >> well, you know, a final deal is the ultimate goal. but the delegations here have repeatedly said that this is an initial period and it would be a six-month period where sanctions would be eased, somewhere around the $10 billion mark and that there would be a system of inspections, that there would be verification. >> what exactly the iranian nuclear program is about and that is a temporary measure and the delegations here including u.s. delegation said this would only be the first step to a larger program that would ultimately put the world at ease
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about what is happening with the iranian nuclear program. >> thomas the talks continue and phil is live in geneva and thank you. back in business a milestone for the stock market and what pushed the dow above 16,000? plus unforgettable photos of president kennedy and the last moment that was seen around the world and a closer examination of kennedy's final 24 hours including rare footage of the president and jackie in dallas. >> i didn't hear the news, i was standing at the daily plaza and saw them pass by and heard the three shots and i was on the chase and capture of oswald and saw him grabbed in a texas theatre and to days later by a stroke of bad or good luck, i'm not sure wish, i got down in the basement when ruby killed oswald.
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power of the people until we restore our fr
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♪ good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america and good to have you with us i'm thomas and
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coming up, we will share a photo exhibit that provides an unique snap shop of john f. kennedy's presidency and let's look how low the temperatures will get across the nation and nicole mitchell is joining us once again. >> we are in shell shock because the temperatures have been plummeting. look at dallas, yesterday morning at this time we were in the 60s, this morning we are in the 30s. if you were to drive from a dallas to corpus or houston, the same as corpus in the 70s that is 40 degree plummet in a few hour drive so you can really tell what the front is doing as it goes through the region. the cold air is midwest with temperatures in the teens and some winds went down and not dealing with as brutal of a wind chill this morning on copy of that. this is not the only cold air and we had the initial pass and another front that will reenforce this and make it cooler over the next couple days and the temperatures in the midwest will be going down once again and let's talk where we are getting snow this morning
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coming up. >> looking at what is making business headlines this morning, wall street reaches another milestone and dow jones industrial average is above 16,000 for the first time ever. the market has been on fire lately up 22% for the year, stocks futures are flat at this hour so here is where we stand this morning dow 16,010 and s&p 1797 and nasdaq 1769 and yesterday was jobs employment. >> and on thursday that was much lower than anybody expected and indeed week to week change was the strongest since earlier i guess about ten weeks ago. >> overseas european stocks following the lead and stocks mostly higher at this hour. in asia markets are mostly in the green and tokyo a six month
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high. "starbucks" servers and saying they must share tips with supervisor and they sued for $5 million over the sharing rule but say they spend their time carrying out the same duties and samsung has a huge fine to pay and awarded apple $290 million in a patent case against samsung and had given apple a million dollars and they copied several features from the i-phone. 50 years today a sunny day in dallas turned to the darkest place in history and john fk was assassinated and we report and provide a glimpse of the man who captivated a nation.
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>> there are i'm -- images of people shaking his hand or get close to the charismatic president. >> this passion for him and sense of intimacy and desire to get close is what fueled all these kinds of personal photographs. >> reporter: pictures of john f. kennedy taken by bystanders adorn the walls of international center of photography photography in new york taken when cell phone cameras were not imagined. >> how is that different from i-phones. >> exactly the same and making the argument this is prehistory of citizen journalists as we know them today. >> reporter: the most famous photo was taken by mariann eshm morman and was noted as going viral. >> this photograph was on
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newspapers and television stations around the world within hours. >> reporter: this is the only photograph that captures the exact moment of impact. >> to my knowledge, yes, it's the photograph that shows an unique look across the grassy knoll. if you look closely in the photograph you see shadows of figures and the one that generated the most debate and is reproduced in all of the conspiracy books related to the assassination. >> reporter: television stations went into continuous coverage of the aftermath of kennedy's death. >> the intersection of these two types of photography were a lot of people took photographs from their television sets to remember the moment as they witnessed it on television. >> reporter: including the shooting of his presumed
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assassin lee harvey oswald. >> put them in scrapbooks and saved the magazines and newspapers and there was a very personal relationship to this event, people trying to understand and assimilate the news into their own lives. >> reporter: captured images that had meaning for those who took them and piece together history. al jazeera, new york. >> many historians say it was photography that helped shape the image of jfk and camelot. a boy is indicted for killing his teacher and there are questions if he will be tried as an adult or child. witnesses to history, two dallas surgeons who tried to save president kennedy speak about jackie's final tender moments with her husband. a comprehensive timeline that traces john f. kennedy's last days. >> there appears as something happened in the motorcade group, something has happened in the motorcade route. numerous people running up the
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hill and elm street and the freeway.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to
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you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news. welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm thomas and here are the top stories we are following at the hour, a 14-year-old massachusetts boy faces charges in the rape and murder of his teacher, an undietment indictment said he had a box cutter and accused of stealing the victim's underwear, credit card and iphone. a person indicted for murder is free for now and released thursday on bond and bail was $1.2 million. he served 11 years in prison since being found guilty in the
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death of martha moxly and the judge said he is entitled to a new trial saying his attorney did not adequately represent him. alabama granted pardums and the tri were accused of a rape in 1931 and some were dropped in 1937 and another one in 136 was pardoned and helped to launch the civil rights movement. in november 1963 john f. kennedy was shot and rushed to the hospital. it's an amount that dallas surgeons have never forgotten and al jazeera heidi joins us from dallas where she spoke with the doctors who tried to save the fatally wounded president. good morning to you heidi. >> good morning, tom.
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we are here and to the right is the grassy knoll where 50 years ago today the sniper lee harvey oswald shot john f. kennedy and that was five decades ago for the two men you are about to hear from it felt like yesterday. doctors ronald jones and robert mccleland were young surgeons in 1963, friday november 22 was a day that began like any other and just after lunchtime. >> i heard a little tap on the conference room door, the president has been shot and they are bringing him to the emergency room and they need doctors right away. >> reporter: men in business suits parted away for the doctors. >> i saw mrs. kennedy sitting on a folder chair outside trauma room one and saw and i was horrified to realized it is just what they said it was, that the president had been shot. >> reporter: president kennedy
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lay on a journey arms spread and eyes open and covered in blood. >> i could not get sterile gloves and opened the tray and bare cut it down and got an iv going in his left upper arm. >> reporter: dr. mcclelland was the first to see the head wound. >> the back sid of his head was gone and as i stood there the part of the brain fell out and this was a fatal wound and nothing could be done about that. >> reporter: dr. jones was asked to tell the news. >> he said i need to call jay edgar hoover and behind them was secret service and said i need to call joseph kennedy and tell them the condition of his son and right then i realized that joseph kennedy will get bad news and the whole world will find out kennedy was dead. >> reporter: in that moment jones faced a dilemma,
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jacqueline kennedy asked doctors to delay the death pronouncement until after her husband received his last rights. >> i told him he was not doing well but i knew he was dead. >> reporter: moments later a priest arrived. >> he said if you livest clothes to the president's left ear and i couldn't hear him say anything else. >> reporter: after that mrs. kennedy entered the room and the doctors witnessed the farewell to her husband. >> she stood there and very self contained, stood there for a moment and exchanged a ring from her finger to the president's finger and a ring from his finger to her finger and she leaned over and kissed his right foot and then walked out of trauma room one. >> reporter: less than 48 hours later both doctor also be operating on a dying oswald. the men say they just did their jobs while history unfolded on their operating table. and today the city of dallas will work that history with a
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ceremony and a moment of silence at the time when john f. kennedy was shot and killed and expect to hear more about the president's legacy and the lasting impact of his death. >> chilling account and al jazeera's heidi reporting from dallas and thank you. one of the most iconic and tragic pieces of memorabilia from the day in dallas will not be seen for nearly 100 years, the pink suit worn by the first lady is being held in the national archives out of public view and the brightly colored suit bears the dark stains of jfk's blood, at the request it won't be seen by the public until the year 2103. on that fateful day 50 years ago darwin paine was a reporter for the dallas herald cover -- covering a reception for the first lady and witnessed one of america's darkest chapters and now a professor of communication at southern methodist university
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and we asked paine what he remembers from that day. >> take us back to the day and what do you remember most? >> well, i remember of course our city desk officials were listening to the police radio and hearing the transmission about shots having been fired, so that was a frightened moment and i was asked by the city editor to go directly to daily plaza which was about five blocks away and i remember it being a scene which police officers with rifles, fire truck, people in distress, tears and they were all pointing to the depository where it is concluded shots had been fired from there. >> you learned that abraham had footage of the assassination itself. tell us what happened next. >> yes. i was, as i interviewed eyewitnesses a couple of young ladies told me that their boss
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had film of the assassination or the shots being fired, they didn't know he was dead at the time. and so naturally i was very curious about that. and asked them to take me to their does so they did. he was abraham zabrooder in the very next office building so i went up to his office in the fourth floor and saw him there, saw his camera on top of a filing cabinet and as he described it to me often in tears he said the president was dead, he knew he was dead, he said i know he is dead. i was watching through viewfinder and i saw his head explode like a firecracker. >> there was life before and after the assassination and both sides of their lives were different. how did your life change? >> i don't think it changed me that much frankly but gave me some horrendous memories and i
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was always mindful of that and knew that it would be a moment in history forever etched in my mind. >> you kept a notebook from that day. >> this is it. this is the regular reporters notebook that we had and let me hold up my notes from, well, here are the notes i took. i took notes and the address is 1026 north beckley, after i finished with mr. zabrooder and went to the newspaper office they gave me this address which i wrote down in my notebook 1026 north beckley, that would be the rooming house where oswald lived. so i went to 1026 north beckley and interviewed erleen and it was a rooming house and got a
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lot of information about oswald there although he was registered under an assumed name being oh lee. >> mr. paine there are so many opinions in your opinion having lived with the story for 50 years who killed president john f. kennedy? >> well, i'm convinced of course it was lee harvey oswald and he was found on the floor and palm print was there and three expended shells on the floor. he is the only employee to leave the building. he shot officer tipet when confronted by him and tried to shoot the police officer one of several police officer who was arrested him in the texas theatre, if it was part of a vast conspiracy they would not have chosen a person such as lee harvey oswald because he had an unfortunate childhood and, mall adjusted and before the
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assassination he went to irving where his wife was and they were separated and he begged her to come back to him. and i think if she had agreed to come back to him to live together as husband and wife he wouldn't have gone through with the assassination. and it's very difficult to keep such a secret for 50 years so i can't imagine having survived all that time if others had been involved. >> reporter: certainly that moment in time changed history, but what was america like in the moments right before kennedy was shot? in november of 1963 california was about to pass new york as the most populus state and the population was over 190 million. the u.s. was the richest country in history and was getting richer. the country's economy expanded for 34 months straight, the longest peace time growth in history. and america's women were still expected to be at home. it would be three more years before the national organization for women was launched. remembering kennedy 50 years
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later, a detailed look back at the popular president's final day. >> i was a freshman law student at the university of texas in austin. i was having lunch with fellow freshman at a mexican restaurant, the waiter came and said something happened and the president is shot. we ran out and got in the car and listened to the radio and the rest is history and classes were discontinued for several days because nobody could concentrate. f
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[[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation chang
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nnovation chang ♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, just ahead while you might soon be able to reach out and touch someone from your seat on an airliner. but first let's look at who is expecting rain and snow across the nation and metrologist nicole mitchell. >> rain, snow, freezing precipitation and even thunderstorms out there so let's get to it. this is the broad look of what is going on and thunderstorms moving through the south and heavy rain in the southwest. so i'm going to start there because this could actually lead to some flood concerns in places like arizona, you see the moist flow coming in the area and that
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is persistent for us and watch for flash flooding across the region and that moist flow is moving through states such as texas and will keep the area of the country moist. you can see with the front we have thunderstorms in the south and the combination as i said of the two areas means more of that winter precipitation for portions of the southern plains. midwest snow and northeast starting the morning with areas of rain and back to you. >> some major environment groups have frustration on climate change and 800 people from the world's nonprofit walked out of the summit in poe land on thursday and world peace and say they lack commitment and talks going know where but the climate secretary expects modest progress. >> thousands of off duty police
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take to the streets and protesting the government's latest austerity measures and has increased risk of security and rescue loans are worth $100 million. travelling in the friendly skies may get loader. the government says it will rethink the ban on use of cell phones aboard airliners, a decision is expected next month and it would allow phone calls once a plane reaches 10,000 feet but calls would be forbidden during take off and landing. john henry smith has sports and one of the best teams in the nfl was at it last night. >> the nation feeling good this morning, i will admit the phrase throw out the records when the teams play is cl'ech'e but also true for any game futuring the saints and falcons, thursday night drew brees and company had 8-2 but the 2 and 8 falcons were
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ready for action and 9 minutes left and first quarter 7-0 falcons and the first lead since they led in the first quarter four games ago and not much time to enjoy and 7 minutes later breeze hit watson for a 1-yard score and the tight end jimmy graham will get his and second quarter and breeze looks for and finds graham down the left sideline and 44 yards later graham finds the end zone and he is a former basketball player and dunks and atlanta's goal was no match and he knocks it crooked and check it out and delays what is 17-13 and saints are out of the nfc race. the florida attorney interviewed the woman with sexual charges against winston and meg says he will decide in the coming days if there is enough evidence to
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bring charges against winston, according to law enforcement analysis dna by winston matches a dna sample from the underwear and his client is never denied being at the scene of the accident but said winston had consensual sex with the woman. nhl and devil's and kings and tied in over time, look at 41-year-old slide and glide and the game-winning goal and it's the 121st game win of his career and tying gordy and he holds the record for over time goals scored with a team. devil's win 2-1. the month of november is national diabetes awareness month, one man is doing his part to drive awareness literally and that is indy car racer charlie kimball and has not let diabetes stop him from a breakout session in 2013 and we caught up with
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him and asked him about learning and he was one of 25 million americans who suffer from this disease. >> i did not know if i would get back in a race car when i was diagnosed with diabetes and racing was the only thing i wanted to do in life so it was hard until i realized that working with a team of doctors and healthcare professionals i could come up with a program and get back into the cockpit. once i knew i would get behind the wheel life started to make sense again. >> how do you manage your diabetes leading up to race day, i'm curious if it's fear factor effects your health and performance? >> a lot of my diabetes management happens before i get in the car. managing my hydration, my nutrition, adjusting my blood glucose level. i take my insulin using the flex pen, all aiming towards getting in the race car so when i'm in the car even with the adrenalin i know what is going to happen and i can focus on just driving.
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>> if you could give one piece of advice to people living or people who are just diagnosed with diabetes, what would you tell them? >> i think the biggest piece of advice from myself and from novonotis because diabetes doesn't need to slow yo down and you can chase your dreams and passions and if it's diabetes or another condition, with the right tools and management you can overcome the challenges and still do what you want in life. >> reporter: we end this morning on a sad note the chief of baseball player association died michael weiner had been fighting inoperable brain tumor for the last 15 months and it ended thursday at his home in new jersey and he took over as head of the players union four yearsed ago and smoothed over the management and he was 51 years old and back to you. >> a loss and so young. the holiday battle of the video game consults is heating up and
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microsoft x-box one went on sale at midnight and the question is can it beat the new sony playstation four and sony said it sold more than a million conso consoles in 24 hours after released last friday and sells for $500, $100 than the ps 4. a new milestone in historic history of the u.s. marines and for the first time three women graduated from the combat infantry course and trailblazers at camp lajune in nevada. on move november 21, 1963 the president decided to seek a second term, the two-day five-city tour and the first lady was to make extended public appearances since the loss of their son patrick months before
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and san antonio and then fort worth but the next day would change history and al jazeera ronald pinkston reports. >> we are still the keystone in the arch of freedom. >> reporter: at a breakfast at the chamber of commerce he spoke of the future for his country. >> and i think we will continue to do as we have done in our past, our duty. >> reporter: 30 miles away 19-year-old buel drove lee harvey oswald to work in dallas and 24 hour oswald put a package in the back seat saying curtain rods. airforce one landed in dallas. >> the usual welcome committee presents mrs. kennedy with red roses. >> reporter: they greeted them at the airport. >> break right away and come right up to the fence. >> reporter: mrs. kennedy dressed in a pink suit that
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would become a symbol of her quiet courage and profound grief. the motorcade headed for the dallas trademark ten miles away and it was sunny and they removed the car's bubble top. >> turning on elm street. >> reporter: before noon an estimated 150,000 cheering spectat spectatspe spectators looking at the president and the first lady and going to tragedy. no secret service agents were in their car at the request of president kennedy who told this. >> if i did not want to shake hands i couldn't be elected dog catcher and i don't want the agents riding in the car. >> reporter: before they reached it. >> she turned to the president and said you certainly can't say dallas. >> reporter: then the gunshots that changed history. [gunshots] it appears as though something
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has happened. >> reporter: he jumped on the presidential limousine as the car went on a rush to the hospital. 30 minutes later doctors at parkland conceded they could not save the president. >> from dallas, texas the flash apparently official, president kennedy died at 1:00 p.m. central standard time, 2:00 eastern standard time, some 38 minutes ago. >> reporter: the death of president kennedy is seen to be the first dramatic news event to be reported on television nonstop. for four days the networks suspended regular programming to cover the tragedy. and a traumatized nation watched. >> dallas and looked up at the fifth or sixth floor and saw the rifle being pulled back in. >> reporter: they quickly found it at the school book repository and after that he made his way
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home and grabbed a pistol and crossed paths with the police officer tipit who stopped oswald for questioning and several witnesses saw him tire four times killing the officer before running away. nearly 90 minutes after president kennedy was shot oswald, a former marine marksman was arrested for murdering officer tipet then when police traced the rifle to oswald he was accused of assassinating the president. >> did you find the rifle? >> i deny these charges. >> reporter: flying back to washington with her husband's body mrs. kennedy witness to lyndon johnson assumed leadership of the nation. >> this is a sad time for all people. we have suffered a loss that cannot be waived. >> reporter: then two days after the assassination another shock, on live television nightclub owner jack ruby shot and killed oswald as he was being moved from the jail.
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in washington memorial services began and america's mourned their slain commander-in-chief. randall pinkston, al jazeera. >> dallas was forever changed by the events around that fateful day and it will be marked with a ceremony in daily plaza and the first event there to honor president kennedy. at the end of our first hour here is what we are following this morning, senate democrats vote to end the filibustering of presidential nominees, republicans say that democrats will regret that decision when they lose the majority. three women held captive for 30 years have been freed in london. investigators say one of the victims secretly reached out to a charity for help. and the nation marks 50 years since the assassination of president john f. kennedy. >> the fact of being there, you know, and that was kind of amazing to me to just to be
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there. >> reporter: in the next hour hear from the people who were there of what it was like to witness the assassination. >> i'm john henry smith and coming up, in sports we will take you to oklahoma city where fans are coming to thunder games and bringing jump shots with them. >> i'm nicole mitchell a storm system is bringing everything from thunderstorms and snow and i will have the forecast. >> i will be back in 2 1/2 minutes and stay with al jazeera america all day for continuing coverage of the jfk assassination 50 years later, i'll see you in 2 1/2 minutes. >> it's not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. [applause]
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>> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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>> we find the fault lines that run through communities. >> the shooting happened about 30 minutes ago. >> companies... >> the remains of the fire are still everywhere here. >> the powers that be at home and around the world... >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even have to explain why? >> well thats exactly what i said. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism at it's toughest.
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>> the nuclear option, the senate makes dramatic change and makes history in the process. house of horror, three women held captive for 30 years in a domestic slavery case that has shocked britain. >> as on earth, the united states is second to none. your old men shall dream dreams. your young men shall see visions, the bible tells us, and where there is no vision, the people perish. >> a day of remembrance, looking back at the life and legacy of president john f. kennedy, 50 years after his death.
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>> good morning. for a generation of americans, the death of president john f. kennedy was really a touch stone. everyone knew where they were when he was assassinated in dallas 50 years ago today. the shooting and its art math were viewed by millions on television which carried the news around the clock. half a century later, the nation is again marking the moment that really changed our country. aljazeera will have continuing coverage of the somber anniversary all day long and in just a few minutes, we'll go live to dallas for a preview of the proceedings that will take place later today. >> first, to our top store. certainly a historic power play in congress. senate democrats have passed the so-called nuclear option. the landmark vote limits the use of filibustering to block presidential nominees.
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democrats say the move will pretty much grid lock washington and allow president obama to get his appointments approved. >> today what we declared is on the side of the problem solvers, that's really true, simple fairness. the changes we made today will apply equally to both parties. a republican in power, these changes will apply to them, as well. >> republicans objected furiously to the rule change, accusing democrats of making a short-sighted power grab. >> this is a proud day in the history of the senate. in order to distract attention away from obamacare, the senate has just broken the rules in order to change the rules. >> john mccain said the nuclear option changes the senate entirely. >> what we really did today and
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what is so damning and what will left foot for a long time unless we change it, that could permanently change the unique aspects of this institution of the united states senate as if a majority can change the rules, only a majority can change the rules, then there are no rules. >> ma'am appraised the action and criticized republicans for a pattern-- >> today's pattern, it's not what our--envisioned. a determined effort to obstruct everything, no matter the
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merits. we are joined now with more on what this shift in strategy means. >> from senators rand paul to ted cruz, we've heard a lot about fill busters recently. it's a strategy used to prevent a vote by allowing a senator to hold the floor which means he or she can block a bill by speaking as long as necessary. with these judicial nominations, they don't technically have to talk, they can make a motion to proceed. it's congress jargon but nets the same result of blocking the nomination and it's been happening a lot. in the four decades before the obama presidency, nominees were blocked by filibuster sick eight times. in the five years since obama has been in office his nominations have been blocked 54 times. those numbers will get better, because the new rule allows a simple majority of 51 senators to confirm presidential nominees except those to the supreme court. before today, that number was
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60. with 53 democrats in the senate, and just 45 republicans, this means the dems will motte need any gop votes to push through nominations. keep in mind, if the tables are turned after the next election and the gop becomes the majority, they will experience the benefit of the change. thomas. >> means one side will always remain unhappy. thank you. >> another deadline called for in the affordable care act maybe eased. the obama administration is thinking about extending the enrollment period, shifting the date to november 15, after the mid term elections. >> the obama administration is pressuring afghanistan to sign the pact.
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karzai said he will not sign until after the elections. if the proposal is accepted, 15,000 foreign troops would remain in afghanistan after 2014. >> scotland yard said it's the worst case of modern day slavery they have seen. police rescued three women held captive for three decades. the women say a couple held them against their will in this london neighborhood. authorities say one of them secretly reached out to an anti slavery group after seeing a documentary on t.v. >> well, they basically told us that they were bunk held and they needed support to come out of a very difficult situation. the charity takes every call very seriously. we have a 24/7 help line they contacted. from that moment on, it was very sensitive negotiations in order to assist them in escaping. >> police say officers were shocked by what they saw.
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>> all three women were held in this situation for at least 30 years. they did have some controlled freedom. a human trafficking unit of the metro police deals with many cases of servitude and forced labor. we have seen some cases where people have been held for up to 10 years, but neve seen anything of this magnitude before. >> the women are now in the care of a charity that helped to rescue them. >> the kennedy cousin convicted in the 1975 murder of a neighbor is free for now. michael skakel was released thursday on bond. bail was set at $1.2 million. he has served 11 years in prison since found guilty in the death of martha moxley. he was granted a new trial. >> alabama has granted post human mouse pardons to the scots borough boys 80 years after
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their death. they were falsely accused of the rape of two white women. charges against five boys were dropped in 1937. a sixth man was pardon thatted in 1976. the group's legal journey to fight the convictions helped to launch the civil rights movement. >> two former police officers are under arrest in the 1994 killings of two women at a kentucky massage parlor. the suspects are edward cardin and leslie duncan. they are accused in the deaths of 22-year-old candace belt and 18-year-old gloria ross. the women who ran the parlor said for years that the officers were responsible. >> temperatures across the country are set for a dramatic drop this weekend. for more, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> we've started to see the tumble. if you're in the midwest or south, parts of texas had 40-degree temperature changes, if you just drive a couple of hours because of the front going through. that was just shot number one.
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we have round two already on our doorstep, moving into the northern tear of the united states. on the east coast, temperatures have remained on the mild side and you're thinking ok, we got away with this. yeah, round two is going to be coming in this direction with really arctic air. this is that canadian cold air mass that will move across the region, already ahead of some of this, there have been some areas far to the north of snow, more snow chances as we get into the weekend. with this and with the pressure change that we'll see along with it, winds will gust. that could bring wind chills especially in the early morning hours as we get into early neck week. feeling like below zero in a couple of places. if you haven't quite dug out all the winder stuff yet, this is the time to do it. this is going to be the combination of this and it reinforcing the cold air in the midwest, it's going to be some of the coldest air so far this
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season for a lot of the country. with the first front, everything from storm south ward to areas of know along the great lakes. it is going to be a mess out there. we'll talk more about who is going to see temperatures this morning, coming up. >> investigators are searching the wreckage of a store in latvia after a roof collapsed at a grocery store. at least 32 people are confirmed dead, including three firefighters. the cause of the collapse is not yet known. we have more. >> this is what is left of a busy supermarket in the latvian capitol. the roof of the building collapsed in the busy evening shopping time, bringing down the high walls and windows. twenty minutes later, what was left of the roof caved in, trapping rescue workers. a number of people have died including two firefighters. >> it was crashing. most people started crying and screaming as it was sure that
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those left inside after the first collapse would not be alive after the second fall. >> i had just left the super market eight minutes ago, but now only feel sorrow for those who were there. >> they were building a play ground for children. obviously they did something wrong and the roof did not hold this. >> as the rescue operations continue, the prime minister confirmed that criminal investigation had been launched. the mayor has canceled his holiday and is calling an emergency meeting of rescue services and local officials. meanwhile, firefighters continue to work around the clock to try and rescue those still trapped inside. aljazeera. >> we should add four people have been rescued and workers are still searching for survives. >> it was 50 years ago today, november 22, 1963 that president john f. kennedy was assassinated in dallas. for the first time since then, the city of dallas is holding an
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official event in dealy plaza to honor j.f.k. good morning, heidi. >> good morning, thomas. well, you know, back in 1963, the sixth floor of the texas school book depository was a mess. investigators entered that day of the sass nation to find books stacked in piles randomly on the sixth floor, hiding the sniper's mess, a half eaten chicken meal and rifle. today it is very popular with visitors. 323,000 people come here a year to learn of president kennedy's legacy, and the details of his assassination. >> what is happening today in dealy plaza? >> it's a big event for the city, which is the first
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official time they are commemorating the assassination. at 11:30 central time, the program will begin. at 12:30 at the moment of the fatal shot, the city will mark with a moment of silence and bells tolling all around dallas. it promises to be a solemn and short ceremony to commemorate this day that still has impact 50 years later. >> it really does. you've spoken with eyewitnesses to the assassination and doctors who tried to save the president. what are they saying about that historic day 50 years ago? >> well, you know, i hear it over and over again, it's 50 years ago, but for these people who saw history unfold before their eyes, some were unwilling witnesses to it, it felt like yesterday to them. we spoke with spectators around the route of the motorcade who saw the fatal shots. those images are difficult to erase and never will be from
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their mind and they shared their stories with us and how their lives have changed as a result of this. some have been reluctant to tell their stories, but 50 years later, they feel it's time. >> it certainly will be an emotional day for many. heidi, thank you. >> looking back on november 22, 1963, from the floor of the new york stock exchange. however has the dow come since the death of john f. kennedy? >> we'll hear from people who were there on that tragic day in dallas. >> i was fortunate to be one of the people who was invited to eat with the president on the day of the assassination, so i was at the trademark. as soon as i got there, i sat down, and was preparing to eat and the announcement was made that the president had been shot and then subsequently died.
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i was angry, devastated, but as i said today, i noticed that after we heard that he was shot and died, no one i saw, no one could eat anymore food. we all got up, and made our way out of the auditorium. i never saw so much left over food in all of my life, because we did not need physical food on that occasion. what we needed was some soul food. john f. kennedy john-claude duvalier
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food. >> something is terribly wrong. >> you're looking live at the eternal flame at the site of president john f. kennedy grave in arlington as we honor him on this historic day. coming up next, it was on this date 50 years ago that president
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kennedy was assassinated. some people who were in dallas on the tragic day say it still seems look only yesterday. coming up in just a molt, we'll hear from those who witnessed the tragedy. first, let's look at the temperatures across the nation today and what we can expect. meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> it is a chilly start especially portions of the southern plain where temperatures were in the 60's starting yesterday. now a brutal start in oklahoma with temperatures freezing as we head out the door. you can see the contrast where the front has gone through and not gone through. all those temperatures are going down. here's the contrast from yesterday, dallas dropping 30 degrees from yesterday morning. highs for today, ahead of the fronts coming through, yes, that was plural, you're seeing temperatures in the 50 says and sitting's. already, the new one is coming into parts of the midwest, the
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northern midwest. minneapolis 31 goes down to 18 and some of those 50's and 60's goes down at least 10 degrees with the initial shot coming through. back to you. >> nicole, thank you. although it happened a half century ago, those who saw the fatal shooting of president kennedy in dallas say it's a day they will never forget. >> with the eyes not only of the nation, but the world upon him. ♪ ♪ >> my mother loved him. she thought oh, he's pretty, he's handsome and i want to see the president. >> my assignment that day was to meet air force one at love field and cover the arrival of the president. i was then to get in one of the cars in the motorcade. >> we were standing right on the side of the car when the
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gunshots happened. me and my mother had actually stepped down into the street and the first shot hit the ground and ricocheted off the ground. then two other shots came right after. >> after the third shot, of course, the car's still moving. i just looked straight ahead of me, because we were facing the book depository and there's a rifle resting on the ledge, the window edge. i looked to my left and i observed this scene of bed lamb, really, people running, covering their children on the grassy knoll. i could see the president's car and johnson's car disappear under the underpass. >> block the hospital, there has been a shooting. the hospital has been odd advised to stand by. >> when i arrived, ms. kennedy was on the left and the president was not moving, his
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eyes were open, he was staring, his arms were on arm boards and i knew there was a large wound in the back of his head. we got the i.v. going and got a heart tracing machine hooked up and he had a straight line that i saw when i looked at it. i didn't see any evidence of myocardial activity. >> it's official. as of a few minutes ago, the president of the united states is dead. >> the sixth floor was really a mess. it was school book storage place. there were some boxes piled up that looked like they could be used for an outfit for a rifle rest. >> he's been shot. >> none of us were expecting him to get shot. >> i worked for the dallas times herald in the advertising department and jack ruby was one of my clients. knowing him the way i did, i believe he thought he could shoot oswald, be the man that
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shot the man which, you know, the code of the west, and that no jury would ever convict him and he could go back and operate his business and be the main attraction. >> ruby fired, i jumped and i got the picture. >> i was in middle school and we were studying history, and i seen a picture of me and my mother in the history book. the fact of being there, you know, and that was kind of amazing to me, to be just -- just to be there. >> few subjects have prompted as much debate and speculation as the assassination. joining us is james swanson, the author of end of days, the assassination of john f. kennedy. he joins us this morning. i have to say your you book is me tim clause in attention to
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detail. you got the sense you were completely wrapped around every second of the story. was there an emotional cost to being involved that deep in the details? >> there was, because having already written about the lincoln sass nation, which was troubling and profound, to write about this story was more so. this happened in my lifetime. i barely remember it and i felt like i was there. when i write my books, i write them as true crime thrillers. i want to put the reared in the car, in the motorcade, in the window, seeing what oswald saw. to do thattive you were there history, i have to go there first. i felt like i was in dallas. i felt like i saw it. it was traumatic to write about this. >> you really have done so. what are things you discovered that may have surprised you most in doing your research? >> how many twist and turns could having a different direction and president lived. if oswald was arrested seven months earlier when he tried to assassinate a u.s. army general in dallas using the same rifle he'd later use against president
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kennedy, he would have been in jail. if his wife had told police he tried to do that, he would have been arrested, the rifle confiscated. on the night of november 21, if she had greed to get back with her husband, he would have never taken a rifle wrapped in a brown paper bag to work that next morning. instead, he left behind his wedding ring, his cash and took that recall to work. if it had been range that day, the president would have lived, because the secret service would have put the bubble top on the car. not bulletproof, but a high speed bullet can be deflected or shattered. i don't think oswald would have been able to shoot him had it been range. kennedy made anker restatement to jacki. >> a lot of what ifs. is the story the assassination of president kennedy as it has been told over the years too simplistic?
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>> no. there's no doubt that lee harvey oswald was the man in the sixth floor window. ten people saw the rifle barrel pointing out the window. three are his coworkers heard the three shots. that he heard the rifle both operate and heard the empty cartridge cases bounce on the wooden floor above their heads. those are a few of the dozen pieces of evidence that point to lee harvey oswald. after talk of grassy knolls, conspiracies involving the c.i.a., texas oil men, lyndon johnson, the cubans, those theories are conflicting, controversy and to this day 50 years later not proven with real hard evidence. they have a corrosive effect on american public life and distract us from what we should be thinking about this day. >> of all the things you touched on in your book, other than the
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actual gunshots that killed the president, what is the most searing memory? >> when i was a little boy, i was four years old. my mother told me the neighbor girls are coming over to watch television. they we should allowed to. i thought why are they coming over. my mother said because the president has died and we're going to watch a horse drawn carriage take his coffin to the u.s. capitol. i remember that like it was yesterday, but it's so important to remember something else. we should remember that today, a wife lost her husband, two little children lost their father, america lost its president. j.f.k. was a great man who briefed in america exceptionalism and greatness, optimistic about our future. >> what would you like readers to take away not only from your book, but on this 50t 50th anniversary? >> this shouldn't be lee harvey oswald's day, a day we go on
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about conspiracy theories. we should think about the real john kennedy and what he stood for. jacqueline kennedy said think of him as this little boy, sick in bed, reading stories of american heroes, as he grew up. maybe that will inspire other children to be like him. she said i should have known he was magic all along that we wouldn't have forever. he did not believe the purpose of life was to live in luxury and ease. he believed in service to others and the nation. she said this in the end is what my husband stood for. john kennedy believed that one man can make a difference and that every man should try. on this day, we should think of the real john kennedy, what he stood for, and what america lost on the day he was assassinated 50 years ago today. >> james swanson, his story "end of days, the assassination of j.f.k." good to have you with us this morning. >> 711.49, that historic number
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was the closing level of the dow 50 years ago today. the dow 16,009.99. it will be the first time that the blue chips opened above 16,000. it just reached 15,000 back in may. >> as we continue to look at the legacy of j.f.k., we'll hear from some of the president's closest allies and talk to an author who has written about their relationships. >> take a look at the man held responsible for the assassination, lee harvey oswald. one woman's story of the tenant who lived at her grandmother's house, who was change american history. >> shortly before the dawn of saturday morning, john f. kennedy comes home to the white house. he had been the nationed 35t
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35th president for a period of two years and 10 months. in fact, we depend on you, your ideas, your concerns. >> all these folks are making a whole lot of money. >> you are one of the voices of this show. >> i think you've offended everyone with that kathy. >> hold on, there's some room to offend people, i'm here. >> we have a right to know what's in our food and monsanto do not have the right to hide it from us. >> so join the conversation and make it your own. >> watch the stream. >> and join the conversation online @ajamstream.
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weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> president kennedy has been assassinated. it's official now, the president is dead. >> you're looking live at the arlington national cemetery in virginia, a day that we remember the former president, good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. good to have you with us. fifty years ago, america and the world were shocked by the assassination of john f. kennedy on a sunny dallas afternoon. in a few minutes, we'll talk with an author who sat down with the most notable people about what kennedy was like behind the scenes. first, a look at our top stories. >> another delay in the colorado shooting case. the judge is postponing the trial indefinitely, giving attorneys time to argue whether holmes should undergo another
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psychiatric evaluation. he pleaded inning by reason of insanity to killing 12 people at the theater in aurora in july of last year. >> the killer of a toddler has pleaded inning. her body was found in a cooler along a new york city highway. her identity remained a miss city until a few months ago. juarez was charged with second degree murder. he could face 25 years to life in prison. >> a 14-year-old massachusetts boy faces new charges in the rape and murder of his teacher. an indictment claims suspect phillip chisholm was armed with a box cutter and used and object to assault the high schoolteacher colleen ritzer. he is accused of stealing hear underwear, credit cards and cell phone. >> the first of the 30 activists
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in russia have been released after demonstrating near a russian oil rig. >> two children are dead and three others in critical condition after a car plunged into an ice why pond in minnesota. the woman driving managed to escape. the car went off a highway ramp thursday in a suburb of minneapolis. the car was submerged for nearly 45 minutes. >> this date, 50 years ago was a dark chapter in american history. the people of dallas were forever changed by the assassination of president kennedy there in 1963. his death also marred the reputation of dallas, texas for years to come. as aljazeera's alan fisher reports, the city is now trying to reclaim its good name. >> in a place once known at city of hate, messages of love across dallas and 65 locations.
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school children, amateur artists, even prisoners, 20,000 people asked to contribute to redefine the world view of a place. >> the connection between the kennedy assassination and dallas will never be erased, we intend for the love project to change that narrative a little bit so that in the scope of talking about that, the world knows that within dallas, there were thousands and thousands and thousands of people who believe that love and compassion thrive here. >> now they're trying to make dealy plaza look more like november 1963 with restored street lamps and a makeover. >> the president's car turning on to elm street. >> for so long, the city tried to ignore and forget the day john f. kennedy came to down. at one point, the city discussed knocking down the building where lee harvey oswald took passion and fired.
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here, preserved behind glass, the place where he fired those shots, which changed history and changed the way that people viewed this city. >> now a museum lets people learn about the events of exactly 50 years ago and the stain it left. >> this milestone is an important moment for the city of dallas. it's a cathartic experience and opportunity for the city to share with the world its respect of president kennedy, it's need to memorialize this tragic event. >> in 1963, dallas was conservative, deeply religious and many angry at the president. it's a different time and dallas is a different place. >> this growth just naturally changed the way the city is. a huge influx in terms of immigration, a change in culture, a change in politics. it used to be a totally
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republican city, a totally republican county, now it's basically a totally democratic-led county. >> for many, the assassination defined a generation. dallas is determined it won't define a city. >> dallas will mark the tragedy of j.f.k.'s assassination today with a special ceremony, the first official event there honoring kennedy. we are joined live from dallas. good morning, leanne. >> good morning, i'm not far from where the president was shot in 1963. behind me is the stage, they are setting up now the v.i.p. section, getting ready for the program set to getunder way later this morning. thousands expected to attend, despite the call for very cold temperatures and howling winds. the mayor has sent out a statement saying the program will go on as scheduled. they've been planning this a
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very long time, as was mentioned earlier. it's a joint public-private endeavor. there will be a military fly over, a moment of silence and tolling of the bells at exactly 12:30 p.m. central time, the same time the president was shot all those years ago. again, thousands of people expected to line the streets of dallas and to attend to honor the president's legacy. >> thank you. during dozens of personal interviews, our next guest collected thought-provoking commentaries from notable men and women connected to the president. joining us now is journalist and author of november 22, 1963, reflections on the life, assassination and legacy of john f. kennedy. he joins us from washington this morning. good morning, mr. owen. >> good morning, thomas. >> you had access to and interviewed many people with close ties to the president. how closely aligned is the
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public image with the private more intimate views held by the people who really knew him? >> there are similarities, but also some important differences. john kennedy was concerned about how history would portray his administration and some of those such as former pennsylvania senator harris wauford elaborates on those points of the differences between the private and public john f. kennedy. >> what are key notes you discovered in hearing those public stories or prief stories that the public isn't aware of. >> one i thought was very interesting was from charles bartlett. he introduced john to jacqueline. he was a journalist in washington. he commented that on the night before the kennedys left for texas, he had a gut feeling he wanted to talk to his friend one more time. kennedy, he said wasn't concerned about going to texas as much as some reports have indicated. he was still very upset and
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angry with israel because of their ability to acquire the knowledge to create a nuclear bomb behind his back. he was very upset and determined that israeli would never be allowed to detonate such a ball. that's one of the interesting reflections that many members of the public may not be aware of. >> in hearing those many private stories, how strong was kennedy's desire to shape not only his public perception of him, but his administration? >> i think it was very, very strong. he wanted to be known as, i think, the president who made significant strides to end the cold war. as some of your readers might not be aware, of course, his inaugural speech, we all know of course about the famous ask not phrase, but he also talked about how the u.s. would pay any price and bear any burden to preserve freedom around the world. over the course of his presidency, his view about the
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world, i think changed particularly with the experiences of the ill fated bay of pigs and of course the incredible cuban missile crisis in october of 1962. one of his claims he really thought was one of the highlights of his first term was the limited nuclear test ban treaty to try to start the end of the use of nuclear weapons. signed in august of 1963 with the u.s., the soviet union and the u.k. >> there have been more than a few people who have said that kennedy was at best an ordinary president and that if he hadn't been assassinated, history would not have treated him so kind will you. based on your research, dowell that? >> i think this is an unfinished life. i think had he lived and won a second term, the u.s. might not
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have gotten involved as it did in vietnam, certainly under lyndon johnson, and other events, i think his mind, his thoughts about foreign policy were changing, evaluating what -- how america should lead, and how it should reflect the values of the american people around the world. >> do you think he set a level of what a role model should be? >> absolute will you. john kennedy mentioned changed the face of the sufficient presidency. he was america's first television president. he was the youngest president ever elected to office, cars massic, witty, charming, beautiful young wife and two gorgeous children. he was a role model for many, many individuals and inspired many young peel, again through that ask not phrase in his
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inaugural address to go into public service. >> really is fascinating reading, the many private stories. appreciate your time, joining us from washington this morning. >> the boarding house where lee harvey oswald was staying at the time of the assassination is now for sale. we go to the home which remains virtually untouched since that day. >> he was just another regular guy. >> an hall knew him when he was 11. she and her brother saw lee harvey oswald every day. they ran a boarding house. this house hasn't changed much in 50 years, the t.v., piano, stove and furniture is the same as when oswald stayed here for $8 a week. >> the dining room table and all of this, all of that is original. this is husband room. >> justify five by 14, space for
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a twin bed, nightstand, wardrobe closet and a dresser. >> he played ball out in the front yard with my brothers a lot. with me bunk a girl, we didn't play. [ laughter ] >> but, he was just very -- he was a quiet, soft-spoken man. >> a couple of weeks before the kennedy assassination, hall says oswald did something she'll never forget. her brothers had gotten into a physical fight in the front yard. >> lee got up off the porch, broke them up, sat hum on the stairs and sat down between them, and he looked at them and he says i want to tell you two something. he said this is important. he says you're brothers one need to take care of each other and you need to love each other, and never do anything that would harm another human being. >> after the assassination.
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>> well, my grandma was absolutely ashamed and embarrassed that she had such a person living here. >> palm says the f.b.i. quickly came and got what he had at her grandparents. >> they duke everything out of the drawers, everything that was in the closet, anything that was in the nightstand, they dumped it on the bed, grabbed the corners of the sheets, pulled it altogether, and walked out the door. >> hall said she wants $500,000 for a home that ordinarily might not fetch $100,000. she said i'm selling history. >> she'd like to see it become a museum or bed and breakfast. so far, no buyers. >> the family that owns the home opened it briefly to film director oliver stone. he filmed scenes for his movie
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j.f.k. in 1981. >> a huge cargo plane touches down at the wrong airport. how they got the big plane off a very short runway. >> a popular drug to help people quit smoking being linked to hundreds of suicides. one woman's story about her experience with a medication that resulted in her life coming apart. >> my brother-in-law called, told my mother turn on the television right away, the president has been shot. she ran and got my father up, they turned on the t.v., they waited while it warmed up, and i just -- the excitement and fear that you could feel through them was just palpable.
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>> and now a techknow minute...
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>> the flash apparently official, president kennedy died at 1:00 p.m. central standard time. 2:00 eastern standard time, some 38 minutes ago. >> those words chilling 50 years later. it's good you with us.
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welcome back to aljazeera america. on this 50th anniversary of president kennedys assassination, all day we're looking back on that fateful day in dallas and on kennedy's legacy. we'll check other headlines, including the growing concern about the anti smoking drug linked to 500 suicides. let's look at who's expecting rain and snow across the nation today. >> we do have a little bit of everything. here's the broad picture, so everything from mississippi into louisiana, thunderstorms to heavy snow in colorado. you can see the moisture coming in from the southwest interacting with where we have the front. the southern plains are going to stay active as the system pulse through the next day as we get even chances for some freezing precipitation out of all of this. i want to mention that moist flow in the southwest pretty much inundating parts of arizona with run. we have a lot of flood concerns, flash flood concerns and we're going to stay moist through a
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god chunk of the day. thunderstorms in the south will continue to roll across the region. with that area i was mentioning, the winter weather, southern plains, watch for that, including possible freezing precipitation again overnight tonight. >> ahuge cargo plane took off thursday after a mistake led to a landing at the wrong airport. the jet was supposed to land wednesday at mcconnell air force base in kansas, but missed that destination by nine miles. instead, it landed at an airport which doesn't usually handle planes that size. there was confusion when the plane touched down. >> we'll get back to you here momentarily. >> it's nine miles southeast. >> yes, sir, you just landed at the other airport. >> the f.a.a. is still trying to figure out what went wrong. >> the anti smoking drug chantix has helped millions to kick the
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habit but in many cases has brought deadly side effects. >> it was justify like all of a sudden, you know, boom, something went wrong. >> tina and herself described perfect life as a wife, mother, business woman came unhinged after she started taking chantix. >> i started screaming, yelling, crying, threatens suicide at that time. i threatened to jump out of a moving car. the police came and the paramedics and they had to tie me up, put restraints on me. >> according to u.s. fda documents obtained by america tonight under the freedom of information act, 544 suicides have been reported to the f.d.a. as adverse events associated with chantix in the last five
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years. documents also show 1,869 attempted suicides associated with the drug. we should point out these adverse event reports don't prove chantix caused people taking the drug to become suicidal or have any other side effect for that matter. dr. michael segal, a professor at boston university school of public health has studied tobacco and smoking for 25 years. >> we know that chantix has effects on the neurotransmitters in the brain, so it's not surprising that a drug like chantix could have effects on personality and could lead to depression and suicidalty. >> pfizer, the drug company that manufactures chantix played close to $300 million to settle most of the 2700 lawsuits filed against the company over chantix suicides and other serious side effects.
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pfizer declined to sit down with us for this story. in a statement, the company said: tina says her life is finally back to normal. she turned down a settlement offer from pfizer so she could keep speaking out against chantix. >> i'm very fortunate that i'm ok, and i'm living a great life right now and that that's behind me. it could have turned out much differently. i could have been like many of the other people that have taken chantix and killed themselves, or hurt somebody else. >> you can see more of the investigative reports on america tonight airing weeknights at 9:00 eastern right here on aljazeera. >> the holiday battle of the video game consoles is heating up. x box one is now available in london and new york. last friday, sony's play station four was released.
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the x box sells for about $100 more than the p.s.4. john henry smith is joining us now with sports and a tough divisional matchup last night in the nfl. >> the x box is a little out of my price range. >> $500. >> i will buy one used. >> it's true for any game with the saints and falcons, brew brees and company came in at 8-2, but the 2-8 follow consist were ready for action. the falcons up 7-0 with the one yard t.d. run, the first lead since they led in the fourth quarter four games ago. seven minutes later, drew brees hits watson for the score. the guy hugging him is the main tight end, jimmy graham and he's going to get his. second quarter, brees is going to look for and find graham down
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the left sideline. graham finds the end zone. graham is a former basketball player who likes to dunk over the goal post-after he scores. graham is going to knock the goal post crooked deal delaying a win. the falcons are officially out of the southeast race. >> college football, a florida state attorney interviewed the woman accusing james winston of sex charges. he expects to decide if there is enough evidence to bring charges against winston. according to a florida analysis, d.n.a. provided matches a sample from the underwear of the woman. winston's attorney said his client has never denied being at the scene of the incident. he says winston had consensual sex with the woman. >> to the action on the field, central florida, 18t 18th president standings, hosting rutgers.
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hits like a mack truck, en route to a 20-yard game. same drive, johnson gets the caught from a yard out. he had two touchdowns in the game. u.c.f. leads 28-0. u.c.f. hunting the ball away later. rutgers gets in there and do what they do, block a a kick. the ball recovered in the end zone for six. rutgers cuts the deficit in half, but that's as close as they would get. >> what do you do for an encore after you've broken magic johnson's record to start a season? if you're chris paul, you make the record harder to rebreak. chris paul and the clippers visiting the thunder last night. what do you do if you're an o.k.c. fan taking a shot? you hit it, of course. no big deal. that's the second straight gaming and the future time since march that a fan went home with
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long ball loot. the pros back on the court, griffin knocks down the j. he had 27. still in the third, clippers down 13. makes the three. paul had 17 points and 12 assists extending his reward for double-doubles to start the season to 13 straight games. kevin durant and the thunderer were too much for the clip show. durant had 23 points as the thunder win 105-91. >> michael weiner, took over as head of the players union and helped smooth a rocky relationship with baseball management died today.
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>> at the end of our second hour, here is dell wha del walt. >> republicans say the democrats are going to regret the decision when they lose their majority. >> three women held captive for 30 years freed in london. one of the victims secretly reached out to a charity for help. help. >> >> the nation marking 50 years since the assassination of john f. kennedy. >> del is coming back with you in two and a half minutes. have a great morning.
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every sunday night, al jazeera america presents... eye opening films from the worlds top documetary directors. next sunday, >> there's probably about a hundred people living in the extreme tiny houses... >> is going small part of a big movement? >> part of the reason for moving into a tiny house is to get rid of all this "stuff"... >> what you gain by having less... >> let's think about giving up mcmasions... >> a tiny american dream, al jazeera america presents... tiny: a story about living small premiers next sunday 9 eastern.
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>> a major power shift in the senate as the democrats use a so-called nuclear option. the landmark vote prevents republicans from filibustering to block most presidential nominations. >> an intense search for survivors after a supermarket roof crashes down. dozens dead, more feared trapped in the rubble. >> a chilling discovery in britain, a disturbing occasion of modern day savory. three women held against their will in a home for more than 30 years. >> president kennedy has been assassinated. it's official now, the president is dead. >> a half century later, the nation pausing tomorrow one of its darkest hours, the death of a beloved president, john f.
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kennedy. >> for a generation of americans, the death of president john f. kennedy was a milestone. everyone knew where they were when he was assassinated in dallas if you have years ago today. the shooting and its aftermath viewed by millions on t.v. carrying the news around the clock. now a half century later, the nation once again marking that moment that changed our lives and our country forever. this as you can see is a live picture of dealy plaza in dallas where the president was fatally shot in his motorcade. this is a love picture of arlington national cemetery, the eternal flame still burge at his grave site, president obama and clinton placing a wreath there earlier this week. >> dallas will reflect and remember what happened on that day, the first official event that the city has held in dealy
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plaza since that fateful day 50 years ago. we are there in dallas. this is a major milestone for a city that became known as the city of hate after the assassination. what do they have planned? >> it certainly is a mile tone for dallas. here we're having a solemn and dignified ceremony in the words of the mayor, starting at 11:30 central time here. at 1230, when the president was fatally shot, the city will mark with a moment of silence and bells ringing throughout dallas. as you pointed out, del, this is an effort by the city not only to commemorate this day 50 years ago, but also to prove to the nation and to the world which will have its eyes on that dallas once again, that the city is no longer deserving of the dark reputation it earned as a result of the assassination. >> they have made changes lately in the plaza where j.f.k. was assassinated. what type of changes are we talking about? >> well, was, there's the expected renovations leading up
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to this event, the new grass, new fountains. what's notable is what's been taken away. 2x's, until monday, marked the spot where j.f.k. was hit. the two times he was hit by oswald. monday, city crews came up and tore up the asphalt removing those martian. the city did you not guff an official explanation but did tell the press this was an effort to create a dignified ceremony today and not promote a culture of voyeurism of murder. >> mark schneider is at a park set up to handle the overflow. they are expecting a lot of people. people there will be watching today's events on monitors. mark, bring us up to date. >> del, 5,000 tickets weren't near enough for the demands, so i am at one of three spots where overflow crowds can gather. there's a big screen on the stage and speakers and room for
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at least a couple thousand people out here later today. there are still a lot of people in the dallas area with a connection to this historic event. i recently talked to a woman who knew lee harvey oswald when she was 11 years old. he stayed at a boarding house run by her grandmother for the six weeks leading up to the assassination. she remembers he did something she'll never forget. when her brothers got into a physical fight in the front yard, he did this. >> lee got up off the porch, broke them up, sat them on the stairs and sat down between them and he looked at them and says i want to tell you two something. he said this is important. he says you're brothers, you need to take care of each other and you need to love each other, and never do anything that would harm another human being.
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>> is that something? and pat hall says after the assassination, things were never the same. her grandmother was so ashamed and embarrassed that lee harvey oswald had lived in their home. she said her grandmother got death threats when people found oswald had lived there. >> mark, thank you very much. >> aljazeera will bring you continuing coverage of the somber anniversary all day long. we're going to take a look at a website where people are sharing their memories. later this hour, we'll talk about kennedys quest for peace and where his presidency was headed before he was killed. >> a story of power play in congress, senate democrats passing the so-called nuclear option. the landmark vote limits the use of fill busters to block presidential nominees. the move will end gridlock in washington and allow president obama to get judicial nominees approved. the republicans say the bickering will only get worse.
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>> this is not a very proud day in the must of the senate. in order to distract attention away from obamacare, the senate has just broken the rules in order to change the rules. >> under the new rules, just a simple majority is needed for the confirmation of most judicial nominees. this change representing a major shift in power for the senate, for more than 200 years, the senate has given pride and taken pride in giving more power to the minority power than any other legislative power in the world. now a president is almost guaranteed to have all of his nominees approved. some republicans are calling this a power grab. >> in an easy vote, they passed a measure to eliminate the use of the filibuster to block presidential nominees. just to give you an idea of why democrats decided to use the option, in the last month, there were three votes of obama
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nominees to the influential d.c. corpse. republicans blocked them all. that won't happen anymore. the president praised the change. >> in a landmark move, senate democrats changed the game when it comes to fill busters, something we have seen and heard a lot of recently. the filibuster is a strategy used to prevent a vote allowing a senator to hold the floor, which means any senator can speak as long as necessary to block a bill. >> i would go for another 12 hours. >> a deliberate and determined effort to object struck everything, no matter what the merits, just to refight the results which an election is not normal. >> the numbers may seem to support that lack of normalcy. in the four decades before the obama presidency, nominees were blocked by full busters 68 times. in the mere five years since he's been in office, obama's nominations have been blocked 54 times. >> the constitution charges the president with filling vacancies to the federal bench.
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every president has exercised this power since george washington first named justice to the supreme court in 1789, but my judicial nominees have waited nearly two and a half times longer to receive yes or no votes on the senate floor than those of president bush. >> he's going to get a lot more yeses now, because the change means a simple majority of 51 senators can confirm all presidential nominees, exit those to the supreme court. before today, that number was 60. with 53 democrats in the senate and just 45 republicans, this means the dems will not need any votes from the gop to push through presidential nominations. innocenced, republican senator john mccain con record. >> up the president's words when bam has himself was against this very change. >> it's the right of free and open debate is taken away from the minority party and the millions of americans who ask us to be their voice, i fear that
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already partisan atmosphere in washington will be poisoned to the point where no one will be able to agree on anything. >> one thing the republicans seemed to agree on, they say this move is just a way for democrats to try and shift the focus off of their disastrous health carolout. >> millions of americans are hurting because of a law washington democrats forced upon them and what do they do about it? >> they cook up some fake fight over judges. a fake fight over judges. that aren't even needed. >> this move by democrats had immediate results. shortly after, the nomination of one judge to the d.c. court blocked just weeks ago moved forward with 55 votes. as unhappy as republicans are about this change, keep in mind after the next election, if the gop gains the majority in the senate, then the tables have turned and they can benefit from this change. >> there's the 2014 mid terms. this is not the end of the
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filibuster. >> no, this is definitely not, you're absolutely right. this solely has to do with nominating judges to lower courts beneath the supreme court. it does not have to do with supreme court justice or votes on any other bills. >> thank you very much. >> switching gears now, the talks on iran's nuclear program are resuming. western leaders taking a back seat thursday while representatives from the e.u. met with iran's foreign minister. they tried to chip away to iran's rights to enrich uranium. the iranian minister on t.v. this morning, what did he have to say and what tones did he take? >> very interesting words coming out of the foreign minister's, basically saying he thinks there's a possibility for an agreement within hours. he also said that he thinks that
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the international community, the p.5 plus one have to hash things out among themselves. that this is a very interesting announcement that he made to the iranian television network press t.v. if that is true, we could see a major break through today and possibly even an agreement. del. >> even if we an interim agreement, even if an interim agreement is reached, are we ever going to see a final deal? well, yeah. that this is a first step. that's the way it's described by the u.s. delegation here. this is a test, this is a trial, six months is the proposed time period where the iranians would give up some of their enriched
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uranium, possibly an agreement on a couple of other issues, like a heavy water plant within iran and in return, they would get an easing of sanctions. this would be a trial period that then if it is successful could possibly be extended into a longer term agreement and possibly even resolve this long-standing dispute. >> phil, thank you very much. >> now let's get a first check on our weather heading into the weekend. some of you are going to see a mix of rain and freezing snow. let's turn to nicole mitchell to find out exactly how all this happens. >> a lot of times we'll see rain or snow. this is a situation where we actually have had some muscled precipitation, freezing precipitation. that's in part because this is such a dynamic settle. as its shot the cold air south wards mixing with warm air, as you move into the atmosphere, we
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get colder. even overnight tonight, we have some of the chances for freezing precipitation. there's moisture coming in from the southwest interacting with a front moving well south ward. we could see more of this. how exactly, and that's why we have the different advisories up, how do we get that versus plain snow. the cold front is inserting under what was the warm air, so as the precipitation falls, it hits that warm layer. to get sleet, it goes through a larger cold air and is able to refreeze droplets. if it hits more shallow layer, it doesn't have time to totally refreeze, it's just super cool. that's when we have the freezing rain. it's cold enough that it's below freezing, it hasn't free-throwsen yet. it freezes when it contacts with things like trees. freezing rain more tang russ. on the trees, it weighs
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everything down. on the roads, that's that skating rink that you don't want to deal with. that's something we'll watch as the system goes through, slick roadways especially into saturday morning and freezing precipitation. the other side is we have the next boundary reinforcing the cold air, so if you think you've gotten away with anything in the east coast, it will be dropping for this weekend. i'll talk more about those temperatures in just a couple minutes. del. >> investigators are searching the rubble of a grocery store in latvia after a deadly accident there. the roof collapsed at the store in the capitol of riga. at least 37 are now dead, including three firefighters. forty people had to be rescued. the cause of the collapse is still not known. >> scotland yard saying it is the worst case of modern day slavery they have ever seen, three women held captive for three decades. they were enslaved in this london neighborhood. they were allowed outside only
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to hang laundry. a woman lived her entire life there, 30 years as a slave. one woman secretly reached out to an anti slavery group. >> where were you when j.f.k. was killed? a lot of people were asked this as part of a unique project trying to keep the memory alive. >> two dallas surgeons who tried to safe j.f.k. are speaking out about jacki and her last moments with her husband. >> we're going to focus on j.f.k.'s lasting legacy as both a president and a person. >> when i heard about the president's assassination, i was a high school freshman in california. it was a catholic school. the principal made an announcement with a shattered voice, and we piled on the buses and went home immediately. i watched my father cry for three days, and i'd never seen him cry before.
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president kennedy, we were irish catholic, originally from boston and san francisco. he was an unbelievable hope for us and it was a loss that everyone in our family remembers profoundly to this detail.
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power of the people until we restore
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♪ ♪ >> you're looking live at the eternity flame at arlington national cemetery, bagpipes playing in the background. it is there the late president killed 50 years ago today, john f. kennedy, only extinguished twice, once by holy water by mistake and once for maintenance, although the flame continued even while it was repaired. >> in just a few minutes, we'll look at a unique on line project that gives people a way to express themselves about the loss of president kennedy and what he meant to them and to our nation. first, we want to check on
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whether it's going to rain or snow where you are today. we turn a nicole mitchell. >> we have a little bit of all of that, and what's possibly even more significant is we definitely have the cold air that's moved in. this is going to get dangerously cold over the course of the weekend. we look at temperatures, oklahoma city blow freezing, just through texas, we have a temperature range of over 40 degrees in some areas, because that is where that front is going through. these are temperatures changes from yesterday morning at this time. oklahoma city around 60, pretty brutal to walk up this morning with some freezing temperatures, a little shock to the system heading out the door. the next front is coming in within reinforcing the cold air. we'll see minneapolis get cooler and for the east coast, these will drop 10 degrees and more over the weekend. these are already starting to drop and temperatures in the midwest drop. it is going to be a a cold one ahead. i'll talk more about the snow, coming up. >> here's what's making she's
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news, the dow jones trading above 16,000 for the first time ever. the blue chips are up 22% for the year, stock futures slightly higher at this hour, dow futures up. stocks were propelled higher yesterday with encouraging news from the jobs front. one economist said the fed is still casting a huge shadow over the markets. >> the fed carries a big, big stick. as soon as the fed makes up its minds that it is going to change its monetary stimulus program, we will see a huge impact both in stocks and in activity of interest rates. >> over seas, european stocks not sharing in wall street's rally, mostly lower at this hour. in asia, markets closing mostly in the green, tokyo hitting six
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months highs. barristas must share their tips with supervisors. several sued the company for $5 million over the tip sharing rule, bullet courts said that supervisors spend a lot of time doing the same thing as barrista's do. >> samsung has a huge fine to pay, a jury in california awarding apple $290 million in a retrial of a pat tent in strengthment case. the original gave apple more than a billion dollars. samsung was found guilty of copying several feetures from the i-phone. >> in a speech in february, 1963, john f. kennedy said a man may die, nations rise and fall, but an idea lives on forever. his life came to an end, but his ideas live on 50 years later. in a unique project, the j.f.k. library captured his impact and legacy for those who weren't
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around 50 years ago. >> some people just asked why my name is kennedy. my mom's almost obsessed with the kennedy family. she thinks the name represents strength, leadership and courage. maybe if he wasn't president, some things wouldn't have happened. >> my japanese name is kenji. i'm really proud of my identity, and the duality of who i am, having the first name kennedy means a lot to me and is not something i'm going to change. >> joining us now to discuss the project is brian williams, the creative director at the martin agency, one of the forces behind the project. he's in richmond this morning. how did you come up with the project "an idea lives on. >> thanks for having me on. we are an ad agency for the kennedy bribe rather and have been for 19 years.
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they're a pro bono client of ours. this anniversary, we knew well in advance that many people would be talking about his death and so we wanted to take this chance to talk about the ways in which he lives on today. obviously, the mission of the library is to educate the ways, the things kennedy did and the way he's still important today, so we thought well, a way to do that is to come at it from many voices, so we partnered with a product company in santa monica and a man we worked with several times and said let's reach out to a great variety of people and find a couple of freedom writers during the civil rights protest and talk to people who were inspired to go to space and people named after kennedy, as you just saw in the clip. through that, we will start to get a bigger picture of some of the surprising ways in which he lives on today. >> when you go to the website, you can't miss how interactive
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the new media is. that that is something that the kennedy library felt very strongly about. >> kennedy himself was a big advocate for new technology. when we do a project for them we always think how are we going to go fuse history and technology in a way that's not really just to try something new or an experiment, but to make the stories more accessible for everybody and make sure everybody has a chance to experience some of what's at the museum in boston. >> i am part of that generation that will never forget where i was on that day. the site features a number of personal stories. it that what makes the site so special? >> it absolutely is. there's focus today, even driving in this morning, a lot about where was i on this day. this is really about what's happening right now, so we were lucky enough to get commander chris cassidy shoot a video for us on the international space
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station and there he is floating in zero gravity with a coin with kennedy's head on it and talking about how kennedy's call to go to space in 1961 really has impacted his desire to be an astronaut and all of our space exploration efforts, so drawing that thread between when kennedy was alive up until today is really kind of the point of the site. you're right, the personal stories are what make it, so i think human and fascinating. >> what is the one story that stands out the most? >> that is a really good question. i'm going to give you a cop out. i hate to do it, but individual stories are so wonderful, we got a chance to go to main to interview president obama's inaugural poet and he talks about how he feels a connection to robert frost, kennedys nag really a poet. there are so many stories individually. if you visit the site, you'll
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see as they begin to build up and you see more and more, the best part really is them in total and the diversity of voices there. >> brian williams joining us live from richmond, thank you very much. before we let our years go, you can watch those testimonies and all of the people who shared their stories of j.f.k. at w.w.w..anidealiveson.org. >> we will have more as aljazeera takes a look at how the day unfolded from the spot where it all happened. >> the president's been shot and they're bringing him to the emergency room and they need doctors right away. >> we'll talk to two is yourians who were witnesses to history on that day describing what they saw during the president's final hours. >> plus, unforgettable photos of president kennedy, including a snapshot of his last moment, this image seen around the world. >> we were about right under the
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sixth floor window of the school book depository when the shots were fired, and there was no doubt in my mind that we heard three explosions. when we passed dealy plaza, you could see patterns shielding their children, putting their bodies on top of their kids on what they call the grassy knoll. i saw motorcycle policeman try to get up the knoll and he filmed off. they didn't know where the shots had come from at that point, but they had come from the school book depository. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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>> we find the fault lines that
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run through communities. >> the shooting happened about 30 minutes ago. >> companies... >> the remains of the fire are still everywhere here. >> the powers that be at home and around the world... >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even have to explain why? >> well thats exactly what i said. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism at it's toughest. >> welcome back. i'm del walters, these are our top stories. there's been another delay in the colorado movie theater shooting case, the judge postponing the trial of james homes indefinitely, giving attorneys time to argue whether he should undergo another
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psychiatric evaluation. holmes pleading not guilty by reason of insanity. >> a 14-year-old massachusetts boy is facing new charges in next with the rape and murder of his teacher. an indictment claims that phillip chisholm had a box cutter and used and object to rape his teacher. he's accused of stealing her underwear, credit cards and iphone. >> the kennedy cousin convicted in the 1975 murder of a neighbor is now free for now. michael cake he will was released on bond, bail set at $1.2 million. he has served 11 years in prison since found guilty in the death of martha moxley. a judge ruled he is entitled to a new trial. >> 50 years ago was a dark chapter in american must and dallas was changed forever by the assassination of president kennedy. it happened on this day un1963,
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that city marking the tragedy today with a special ceremony. it is the first official event there ever honoring the president. we have more. >> the president's car is now turning on to elm street. >> these iconic images provide a snapshot and a half century later remain haunting. >> several shots were fired. >> there was a bang. we all said what was that? was that a shot. there were two more bangs closer together. >> robert mcneil was a reporter for nbc news, a day that started with promise until. >> i thought some idiot fired the shots as a demonstration. it was inconceivable to me that the shots would have been directed at kennedy. >> president john f. kennedy died at approximately 1:00, central standard time today here in dallas. >> news of his death halted the
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nation. >> i was sitting in latin class my freshman year in high school. that this is just kind of seed into your brain. >> this is the first really very serious adult incident in my life, and it's just been there ever since. that. >> today, 50 years later, continues to bring people back to the spot that has become both a memorial and a museum he. >> unique in american history, terrible. >> the sass nation and chaos in the moments that followed sense shock waves across the country and ripped apart the national era of hope kennedy inspired. >> not only his charm, his with it, his glamour, his eloquence, but what he helped to in still in america, that sense of hope and purpose and confidence that america could achieve great things. >> now, five decades on that, the nation will once again focus
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on dealy plaza to remember and ohennor the fallen president. >> that is leanne greg from dallas. thank you very much. professor of economics at columbia university sent home like many of us that day is author of a book and is with us this morning to talk about his book. you focus on more than just the cuban missile crisis. you say that kennedy might have had a profound effect on what we saw as the collapse of communist that came decades later. >> kennedy had a profound effect in saving the world first at the cuban missile crisis, because it was his calm and his decision not to do something sudden as the military advisors were saying you have to strike that allowed a peaceful resolution rather than a nuclear war. then he went from there for the next year, the final year of his life, to do something absolutely amazing in that time.
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this was the height of the cold war, the height of the mistrust, and he found a way to reach a peace agreement with the soviet union. i think it is statesmanship and leadership have absolutely the highest quality, and in my book, i talk about how he pulled that off. it was this mix of vision, eloquence, and ward politics that allowed him to do it. >> was it brinksmanship, too? what was it about kennedy that was different than those who followed him? was it that he could articulate what it was that he wanted to see happen and also havele the guts to see to it that it happened? >> i think he would have used the word courage and he displayed it. that was his ultimate political highest idea. he talked about profiles in courage and at the height of the cold war, he had the courage to say to the american people, let us reexamine our own attitudes towards peace and towards the soviet union. what he made his niche tissue
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for peace, it wasn't saying to the soviet union you have to do this and this and this, you tricked us. he said to the american people let us reexamine our own attitudes to remember that the other side is also human. he humanized the cold war. he charmed across chef, pulled the american people alongside him and he not only was able to negotiate a treaty, the nuclear test ban treaty, but got it ratified through that nearly impossible institution, the u.s. senate by a vote of 80-19. >> wher we grew up with those speeches and remember them on television. does his leadership withstand the test of time? >> it does, especially his final year. the first two years were shaky for his administration, but he learned how to be president. he learned the levers of power. he learned you can't just listen to your c.i.a.o. military
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advisers. you to have lead and use your judgment. in the third year, he was achieving greatness. we remember him for all the hope, but also for what he accomplished. >> how would the world ever changed and i preface this by saying when i was working on a documentary film, i remember the words before ask not and it was reaching out to places like africa saying we want to bring you now into the 20th century. how would the world have been different had that day not happened. >> hugely different. he said to the people in the hudson village around the world, we pledge our best efforts to help them help themselves, not because the communists are doing it or we seek their vote, because because it is right. this was his view and he had this practical idealism to have the long vision and practical street smarts, the ward politics to get things passed, and that's
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what he was beginning to accomplish in a very big way in 1963. he also put the civil rights movement for the first time on the national political highest moral plane. kennedy in the words he you the erred his most famous civil rights speech when he said the issues we confront is as old as the scriptures and clear as the u.s. constitution. he put it on a moral plane. >> it was a life without teleprompters, without social media. it was simplistic and yet they relied on the spoken word so much. have we seep the last of the great statesmen? >> i hope not, because we have a lot to learn. of course he had not only this eloquence and he had theater sorts and alongside was the greatest speech writer in modern history, but he had with it and charm, and therefore, he was able to bring people along with
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that incredible hope. it's that combination that did it, and it reminds us of what great leadership can mean. >> thank you very much for being with us this morning. >> as we have been talking about that day, president kennedy was rushed to park lynn memorial hospital in dallas. it is a day two surgeons can never forget. >> dr. ronald jones and robert mcclellan were young surgeons at dallas parkland memorial hospital. friday, november 22, 1960 that he was a day that began like any other. just after lunch time. >> i heard a little top on the conference room door, the president has been shot and they're bringing him to the emergency room and they need
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doctors right away. >> men in business suits parted the way for the doctors. >> i saw mrs. kennedy sitting on a folding chair outside trauma room one and saw then i was horrified to realize that it was just what they had said it was, that the president had been shot. >> president kennedy lay on a gurney, arms spread, eyes open and covered in blood. >> i couldn't get any sterile gloves, opened the tray and bare handedly did can outdown and got an i.v. going in his left upper arm. >> dr. mcclellan was the first to see the head wound. >> the back half of the right side of his brain was gone. as i stood there, the cerebellum, lower part of the brain fell out through the hole on to the cart. this was obviously a fatal wound, nothing could be done about that. >> dr. jones was asked to deliver the news. >> the secret service man came up with a badge in his hand and identified himself and said i need to call j edgar hoover and
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tell him the condition of the president. secret service said i need to call joseph kennedy and tell him the condition of his son. right then, i realized that joseph kennedy was going to get bad news, the whole world was going to find out that kennedy was dead. >> in that moment, jones failed a dilemma. jacqueline kennedy had asked doctors to delay the death pronouncement until after her husband received his last rites. >> i told him he was not doing well, but i knew he was dead. >> moments later, a priest arrived. >> he said if thou lives, down close to the president's left ear, then i couldn't hear anything else. >> after that, mrs. kennedy entered the room. >> she stood there. she was very self-contained. stood there for a moment, and exchanged the ring from her finger to the president's finger and a ring from his finger to her finger. she leaned over and kissed his right foot and then walked out
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of trauma room one. >> less than 48 hours later, both doctors would be operating on a dying oswald. the men say they just did their jobs while history unfolded on their operate i can table. >> one of the most iconic and tragic pieces of memorabilia from that day in dallas has never been seen for nearly 100 years. the pink suit worn by the first load -- rather it wasn't be seen for 100 years is being held at a public archive out of public view. it still bears the stain of j.f.k.'s blood. at the family's request, it won't be made public until 2003. >> a scholar and director for the center for presidential history joins us from dallas this morning. professor, we talked about your
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view on how a kennedy candidacy would have shaped that world had that day never happened. >> the truth is we'll never know. kennedy unfortunately was a presidency and a life that will always be becoming. he will always be full of potential because he was cut short so much. we can start to see a little bit of what might have been in what happened later, especially in lyndon johnson's great society. johnson did tractic things to change the political landscapes with welfare legislation, medicare legislation answered changed the nature of how government interacted with people throughout the country. all of those programs had their foundation in the kennedy administration. perhaps, perhaps, kennedy might have been able to push forward similar legislation, though i think not as much as johnson ultimately got. >> you believe j.f.k. might have achieved more in death than in
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life, correct? >> yes, it's a sad irony here that johnson was able to get his legislation passed, this massive sweeping great society legislation in large part because he was able to use the foundation of a memory of a dead and martyred dead president. if you couldn't be persuaded to vote passage for those bills because they were the right thing to do, because of lyndon johnson's persuasion, he had one extra trick up mischief, to say do this for the legacy of our dead president. that would allow him to get the votes he needed to push legislation through. so kennedy, i think had he lived would have pursued similar legislation, but it's unclear to me he would have gotten quite as much passed as johnson did using
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the legacy of kennedy's death. >> sometimes when we see the images of the funeral, we are enamored by a past that really wasn't. the united states in 1963 was segregated, not only segregated along the lines of race, also along north and south and east and west and there was a violent undertow that they were worried about kennedy going to dallas. tell us about that world and how it changed. >> thankfully, it's changed quite a bit. there was a violent minority. it was a minority, but a very vocal minty and well funded of right wing extremists. they were anti-government, they didn't want government in their lives, but more importantly i think for a kennedy, they were upset with the federal government if the early 1960's because of his increasingly vigorous stances on civil rights. one could think of this as a
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replay of the civil war, that kennedy represented northern power, yankee power telling people in the south what to do. the south and west with, not everybody was so keen to have a liberal yankee president tell them what to do. some of these gaps began to center in dallas, where the west and south come together for banking, commerce and communications. when kennedy came here, he was going into the heart of where this minority, again, a minority, was based and they were able to pass out leaflets, saying president kennedy is guilty of treason. they took out newspaper ads saying mr. kennedy, go home. it was centered in dallas, the small minority. >> professor, thank you very much. >> unforgettable photos of president kennedy, including a snapshot of this, the last moment that was seen around the world.
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>> a milestone for a group of female marines. what they did that has never, ever been accomplished before. >> i was nine years old when i got the news that john kennedy was shot. i was in a barbershop with some friends. on the way home, we had this strange conversation. we were all very young, and i said to one of the older boys, do you think he's going to die? and he said oh, yes, he'll die, because that's what always happens in these stories. that's the way we were, i think. we were innocent. we didn't know much about politics or policy, we just knew this momentous event had occurred. we were so innocent, we didn't know the name of the vice president of the united states.
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>> start with one issue education... gu
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. we'll look at a photo exhibit that provides a unique snap shot of j.f.k.'s presidency. >> first, let's find out if it's going to rain or snow where you are. >> the broad picture has the
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cold front coming through. a lot of cold air with that. we have a moist flow in the southwest creating flooding concerns for parts of arizona, higher elevations, a lot of snow. the intersection of that, over the southern plains where we could have some of our big evident problems. you've got the cold air under a moist, warm air and the moisture falling through creates freezing rain possible overnight tonight. that not a lot of it, but enough where roads could be slippery to tart out the day. for the non-tier, snow moving through the great lakes and for the northeast dealing with rain this morning, another part of the country where temperatures will drop, so be prepared. >> traveling the friendly skies is about to get a little louder. the government says it's rethinking it's ban on you using your cell phone on a plane. the decision is expected sometime next month. the proposal would allow calls once the plane reaches
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10,000 feet, but they would still be forbidden during take out of and landing. the holiday battle over video games is heating up, x box is going on sale at midnight and a lot of people are lining up to get one. john henry smith is here now and two of the best teams played last night in the nfl. >> i can't figure out those fancy machines, i'm not going to be in line for one, not yet, anyway. thursday night proved you can throw out the records when the saints and falcons play. they put on a very tight show. drew brees and company came in at 8-2, but the 2-8 falcons were ready for action. just under nine minutes left, steven jackson puts the falcons up 1-0, the first lead since the first quarter four games ago. they didn't have much time to enjoy it. seven must notes lawsuit problem breeze for a one yard score. the guy hugging him is jimmy graham and he's going to get
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his. down the left sideline, he finds graham and graham finds the end zone. graham is a former basketball plier and likes to dunk over the goal post after he scores. graham knocks the goal post crooked, briefly delaying what would turn into a 17-13 substantiates win. falcons were officially out of the n.f.c. south race. >> a florida state attorney interviewed a woman leveling sex charges against winston. according to a florida department, d.n.a. samples match him in her underwear. he says he had consensual sex with the woman. >> to the action on the field,
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central florida, 18th in the b.c.s. standings, hosting rutgers. he obliterated en route to a 20-yard game. johnson gets the call from a yard out. he had two scores in this one. leads it 21-0. late first half, punting the ball away, rutgers gets back into the game. patton recovers the ball, in the end zone for six, rutgers cut the deficit in half. that's as close as it would get, beating rutgers 41-17. >> breaking magic johnson's record, if you're chris paul, you make the record harder to break again. chris paul and the clippers visiting the thunder on thursday night. what do you do if you're an o.k.c. fan taking half court shot for 20 grand?
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of course you hit it. that's the second straight game and fifth time since march that a fan went home with long ball loot. gets a big up jam jay-z courtside. >> kevin durant and thunder too much this night. 28 points, the thunder go on to win 105-91. >> look at 41-year-old slide to the net and score the game-winning goal. >> the union chief of major
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league baseball players association has died. michael weiner had been fighting an inoperable brain tumor, that fight ended at his home in new jersey. he took over four years ago. >> as we have been reporting, 50 years ago today, a sunny afternoon in dallas turned into one of the darkest chapters in u.s. history. john f. kennedy was assassinated. a new photography is open in new york. >> images are taken by americans waiting to shake his hand or get close to the cares massic president.
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>> the photographs line the walls taken when cell phone cameras weren't even imagined. >> how are they different than by standers today? >> exactly the same, making the argument that this is the prehistory of citizen journalists. >> the most famous photo was taken and circulated on wire services within hours. what today is known as going viral. >> this is the photograph that went out and united press international. this photograph was on newspapers and televisions around the world within hours. >> this is the only photograph that captures the exact moment of impact. >> to my knowledge, yes. >> it shows the unique look across the grassy knoll. if you look closely, you see shadowy figures. it's the one that has generated
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the most debate and is reproduced in all of the conspiracy books related to the assassination. >> television stations went into continuous coverage in the aftermath of kennedy's death. >> the intersection of these two types of photography were a lot of people took photographs from their home television set to remember the moment as they witnessed it on television. >> including the shooting of his presumed assassin, lee harvey oswald, also caught on live television, all moats that made their way into family albums. >> they put them into scrapbooks, they saved them, they saved the magazines, newspapers, so there was a very personal relationship to this event. people were trying to understand and as i am lay the news into they are own lives. >> captured images that had meaning for those who took them and now piece together history.
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>> a lot of history storeians say photography helped create camelot. >> thanks for joining us and stay with aljazeera america add we have our continuing coverage of j.f.k., the assassination 50 years later. >> to see this young and vig rouse man, i mean, cut down in a matter of seconds by the bullets fired by a madman, i think it just for me helped me to understand the preciousness of life and i think from that day on, live my life as if each day would be the last one. i think it was because of that.
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