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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 23, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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closing the deal. secretary of state john kerry arrives in geneva hoping to clench a deal on iran's nuclear program. a cry for help. an 85-year-old army veteran detained in north korea. his family make a plea for his relief. >> the death toll rises in the philippines as more bodies are discovered in the rubble. >> he was ambitious to make it a better world and so were we. >> remembering president kennedy. 50 years after that tragic day in dallas that changed the course of history. [ ♪ music ]
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>> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford in new york. world leaders in geneva appear to be on the verge of a breakthrough on iran's fuk leer program. secretary of state john kerry arrived there a few hours ago and late friday the state department said kerry's goal was to narrow the differences and move closer to an agreement. at a negotiation table foreign ministers from iran, russia, france, the uk and germany, hoping to clinch a deal limiting iran's nuclear activity. we explain what is at stake. for 10 years iran admits it built a vast nuclear infrastructure. it could be for peaceful energy but can create components of a nuclear weapons. today it's hoped a deal can be truck to cease that. >> it is the president's policy
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that iran must not be allowed to make a nuclear weapon. >> think of making a bomb like tea. iran is enriching uranium to about 20%. it will make building a bomb difficult. the deal also stops construction of a plutonium planned. allowing more access to inspectors. >> we need iran to provide information about the nature of its program. >> what iran does not have to do is tear down nuclear infrastructure. that's why israel opposes. >> it's a bat and dangerous deal, dealing with things that affect our survive ag. >> secretary of state john kerry hopes to secure a deal making the middle east more peaceful. >> more closer to achieving a
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diplomatic agreement with the iranians. >> even as negotiations gain momentum iran says there are some places where it simply won't bundle. last week the ali khamenei said his country will not compromise on red lines. the main point of contention, iran's contention that it has the right to enrich uranium. iran says it wants to use it for medical and research purposes, but that technology can produce nuclear weapons, which is why the world leaders in geneva want it to stop. trust is an issue. the p5+1 want iran to allow more people to get in there and inspect facilities. iran wants economicing sanctions to stop. thousands of pakistanis i protesting against drone
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strikes. imran khan is leading the rally and is giving the u.s. government until today to stop using drones in the counterterrorism program, or it will cut off a supply line. many pakistanis are outraged by civilian deaths caused by drone strikes. >> the wife of an 85-year-old army veteran is pleading for the release of her husband. merrill newman is being detained in north korea. his wife said. . we have more. >> you can well imagine how distraught the family is, and right about this time what is particularly heartbreaking is
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merrill newman wrote postcards in north korea to family and friends and right about now family and friends in the united states are receiving them. in them are the messages from merrill newman about how wonderful the trip has been and the weather in north korea has been. he was on the plane, about to complete his trip when the north koreans decided to detain him. merrill newman's wife issued the statement on friday asking for his release saying that this has been a misunderstanding and that her husband is in need of medication. she's not certain whether the north koreans are providing him the medications that he needs. merrill newman there not the only man to be held in north korea, there's also kenneth bay held at this point for about a year. >> merrill newman's trip to korea was inspired by a life-long desire to return to the battlefield where he fought.
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>> a deadly building call apps in latvia killed at least 50. rescue is under way against after stopping when another collapsed was feared. police opened a criminal investigation, trying to figure out what caused the tragedy. the mayor thing construction material on top of the roof was to blame. >> the city hit hardest by typhoon haiyan is paying residents to help with the clean-up. tacloban is creating a cash for work program where they are pat cash or in food. as rubble is removed they are d discovering more mod bys. >> it's rare to see caesar smiling. he misses his family. his parties and siblings died.
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he swam for hours before he was rescued. he is an orphan. his grandmother is inconsolable. >> translation: it's hard, painful. i should have died, not them, they had their whole lives ahead of them. >> the destruction is unprecedented. more than 90% of the people are homeless. and as the philippine government focuses an millions of families, such as food, water and shelter, the united nations says chin are vulnerable. more than 4 million have been affected. most are living in disaster zones at the rig of exploitation, abuse and trafficking. aid groups say they must be given priority. recovery will not come easy. almost all the schools have been destroyed. or they are used as evacuation centres.
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aid organizations are setting up learning and play interests, crucial in providing normalcy for millions of children across philippines. this has been a refuge for some of them. here they are taught songs. many of the children witnessed the devastation first happened. >> health, nutrition, clean water, san -- sanitation and get the schools up and running. children are the future. we need to take care of them now. building a safe environment may take time. these are children forced to deal with grief. they need to be protected before all their childhood is lost too. >> now back to our top story.
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al jazeera's phil itner is it in geneva where talks on iran's nuclear program are under way. it looks like phil can't hear us. technical difficulties. >> meantime you can follow us an aljazeera.com or an twitter. we encourage you to join in the conversation. . and we are dealing with a chilly start to the day as you make your way out this weekend. make sure you are bundled up. we have arctic air making its way south across the middle of the country, heading eased ward as we go through the weekend. something to think about as you plan your weekend as the arctic air moves in. we'll see snow showers coming in, off of ontario for parts of the eastern. into ohio. here is the radar scene.
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most areas are on the dry side. we have snow already coming in across michigan. northern and central areas of mish gan picking up on the snow. look how far south we are dealing with wintry weather. snow showers and a mixed bag of the precipitation down to oklahoma into texas, that's where the cold air is meeting up with a lot of moisture. just to show you how much moisture there is in the environment. we have moisture coming in across the southern plains. add that to cold air. that will be the case throughout the weekend into parts of texas. now, meanwhile we are watching this area of low pressure across the south-west. it will wreak havoc across the southern plains and end along the gulf coast states and the north-east. right now winter weather advisories extend to oklahoma and arkansas. we have seen our winter storm
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watch being upgraded to a warning in texas. they are expecting rain, but there'll be sleetly late this evening. wintry weather conditions. plan accordingly for travel plans. >> this weekend marks 50 years since john f. kennedy was killed in dallas. the city held its first formal commemoration on friday. heidi jo-castro reports from dealey plaza. [ singing ] >> under rainy skies pomp and circumstance for a fallen president. thousands of people gathered at dealey plaza where president kennedy was killed 50 years ago. >> the past is never in the past. this was a life-time ago. now, today, we the people of
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dallas honour the life, legacy and leadership of the man who called us to think not of our own interests, bit of our country's. >> historian david mccullough remembered the hope and promise that came with the president city. >> he spoke with us in the now distant time past with a vitality and sense of purpose such as we had never heard before. he was young to be president. but it didn't seem to if you were younger still. he's was ambitious to make it a better world, and so were we. 50 years later people in dallas recalled the terrifying day in 1963, and what it means to them now. >> i was 13. it was quite a coming of age. like 9/11 was for our children. >> i think dallas turned a corner in how they are
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approaching what happened here that day. it's time - time to honour it in a sophisticated manner. >> in boston, a rain-soaked wreath laying in front of the house where a statute of kennedy stands. in arlington a stream of people passing by the eternal flame at the grave site. dallas will be the place with kennedy's story ends. he was here to give a speech but never gave it. a memorial in the plaza is inscribed with the last lines of the people. >> for as was written long ago accept the lord, keep the city, the watchman waken but in vain. >> and family and friends remembered another fallen hero in dallas friday night. >> i really appreciate everybody
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coming out tonight to honor and remember him. it blesses me to see all of you here and know that you care about our family and what happened 50 years ago. >> lee harvey oswald's second victim was police officer jd tippett. he stopped lee harvey oswald for questioning, before he was stopped and killed. and the iconic pink suit that the first lady was wearing. jackie kennedy's suit has not been seen in the public sips. it's in the national archives and will not be shown to the public for 90 years, if the family approves it. >> a photo looks back at kennedy's assassination through the eyes of those that witnessed it. many were taken by bystanders
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who had no idea they'd be capturing history frame by frame. >> they are images taken by americans wishing to shake his hand or at the least get close to the charismatic president. >> this passion for him, this sense of intimacy and the desire to get close is what fuelled all these kinds of personal photographs. >> pictures of president john f. kennedy taken by bystanders adorned the walls of the international center of the photography in new york, taken at a time when directly phone cameras were not imagined. >> how is that different to bystanders with iphones. >> it's the same. i'm making the argument that this is the prehistoriy of citizen journalists as we know them today. >> the most famous photo was taken by mary ann moreman, wher picture circulating on wire services. what is known today as going viral. this is the photograph that went
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out uniting the press internationally. newspapers and television stations around the world were united in hours. >> this is the only photograph that captures the impact. it's a photograph that shows a unique look across the grassy knoll. if you look closely in the photograph you see shadowy figures. it's the one that has generated the most debate. and has reproduced all of the conspiracy books related to the assassination. television stations went into coverage in the aftermath of kennedy's death. >> the interception of two types of photography, where a lot of people took photographs from the home television set to remember the moment as witnessed on television. >> including the shooting of his assassin, lee harvey oswald,
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caught on television, moments that made their way into family albums. >> they put them into scrap books, saved them, and the magga zeeps, nurps. it was a personal relationship to this event. people were trying to understand and assimilate the news in their own lives. >> captured images that had meaning for those that took them, now creating history. >> the kennedy photo exhibit runs through mid-january. more than 20 years after the great migration, a hard lesson some somali refugees are learning in kenya. we meet students hoping to graduate from a large institution. paper, plastic - choice has been made. but not everyone is paying. >> computer skill - teaching the skill without paying the big bucks.
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. good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm
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morgan radford. next - more on the top story - a push for a deal on the iran nuclear talks. >> first the temperature across the country >> the cold air made its way into the southern plains, temperatures at or below freezing. parts of western texas have been dealing with winter weather, freezing rain and snow. it will press eastward, across the northern tier, a push of arctic air, making its way across the midwest. it will push to the north-east. today temperatures won't feel to bad. they'll tumble through the next 24 hours. here is a look at the temperature. wind chill advisories are in place. it feels like minus 14. in the north-east temperatures in the 20s, 30, and 40s. >> more now on our top story
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where al jazeera phil itner is in geneva, where talks on iran's nuclear program are under way. we are receiving reports that the british foreign minister william hague is saying that negotiations are difficult. how likely is the deal this time around? >> well, yes, until there is ink on paper none of this is a done deal. we know that there has been a flurry of activity in the building behind me where many of delegations are staying. secretary of state john kerry flew in this morning, and has had a succession of meeting after meeting. he met with the e.u. representative, the french and the russians. so there is an awful lot of activity, there is work to be done. even as he flew in the straightsaid -- the secretary of
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state said he was here to narrow the gaps. the statement falls in line with what he was hearing. this is not a done deal but they are close. >> you mention narrowing the gap. what do you see as the biggest obstacle to sealing a deal with iran. >> we heart -- heard all along in the talks that the p5+1 - the surplus, the stockpiles of enriched uranium that iran has and heavy water plants produced as plutonium - it can be used in a weapons program. on the uranium side of things their concern is the wording of a right. they want it written down that iran has a right to an
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enrichment program. that is contentious because the u.s. delegation said there can be an enrichment program. no countries has a right to enrich to wep jons' grade. >> you mentioned the right. are they likely to budge on this issue at all? >> they have to if they want to dom to an agreement. and both sides want an agreement. the iranians want to lift the crippling sanction, and the international community wants a resolution because the alinterpretive to a diplomatic solution is something unthinkable and that would be a military conflict. no one wants to see that. there is a strong desire to come to an agreement in geneva at this time. it has to be stated clearly that
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no one will be saying that this was a res lugs. any agreement in geneva will be an of-month trial period. this will not close the door on this. >> phil itner, keeping us posted live. thank you for being was. >> a virginia state senator was released from hospital. cree deeds was stabbed by his mum. he treated. . -- tweeted: >> presidential elections in honduras is set for sunday. the wife of ousted leader manuel zelaya is neck to neck. among the press k issues - drugs and gang violence, making honduras a dangerous city. up in smoke - police in panama
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burn more than 11 tonnes of drugs, cocaine, marijuana and heroin among the drugs seized. they were set on fire at a garbage dump and this is the fifth time they destroyed narcotics this year. >> ken ya's refugee camp is ham to the first refugee university. it's taught as a way to create more opportunities living there. peter greste went to visit the camp as students sat their first set of examples. >> it's a big day from dr joseph - the first of his refugee students are to sit their exams. this is a test of not just what each has learnt, but whether the idea of a refugee university works. there are four courses so kaf covering subjects that don't need special laboratories.
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until their campus is built, lectures and exams take place on weekends in the local high school. >> they are very enthusiastic. when they have a diploma in four or other areas, it is a door through which they can walk through into - i mean out of the camps. >> it is not a place most young people want to stay in. refugees have been coming to the sprawling camp for the past 22 years. for most of them football is a pastime, not a career option. unemployment and boredom are huge problems. the government refuses to let anyone leave without a special permit. at last the students emerged. out of half a million refugees, 90 got scholarships for the 2-year diploma courses. the university students present
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a challenge to authorities, they bring an air of performance to a place that the government insisted should be a temporary shelter for some articly refugees. >> this boy is not going anywhere until he has a diploma. he sees his course in nutrition and health as a way of helping not just his family, but his country. there is no academic culture here. no institutions to support learning. not even electricity. >> i'll finding it a bit difficult. we don't have access to the libraries. the library here you are only given text books to read. >> they cling to the course. they've been trapped since he was four. and the diploma may be a ticket
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out. >> kenya's them 600,000 somali refugees. >> a plastic problem in india - why a ban on plastic bags has done little to stop people using them. plus, colour controversy - a quest for beauty in thailand is more than skin deep. >> i'm mark morgan, and an injury for derrick rose. that in sport.
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welcome back, i'm morgan radford, these are the top stories: secretary of state john kerry is in geneva right now, joining major world leaders on the negotiating table to talk to
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iran about its nuclear program. there are reports that a breakthrough could happen soon. >> cash for clean-up. residents of the tacloban are getting incentives to clean the streets. 5,000 were killed in the disaster. >> thousands of pakistanis are protesting at a rally against american drone strikes. prominent politician imran khan is leading the rally in peshawar. he's giving the government until today to stop using drones in its counter terrorism program. if not, he'll cut off a nato supply land. we go to peshawar where the rally is held. >> on an ordinary day i would not be able to stand on this road because of the number of nato supplies, containers, heading through this match before entering the khyber pass and onwards to afghanistan. people are gathering here to
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protest against u.s. drone strikes. the pakistan saying they'll block nato supplies if the u.s. does not give an undertaking that it will symptom the dren strikes inside pakistan's territory. imran khan will come here shortly. convoys are heading from other city, and will converge at this point where you see supporters who arrived early. it will be a long day for peshawar. this will be a day where the people of pakistan will speak openly about the opposition to the u.s. drone strike. >> staying in the middle east - thousands of tribal elders in afghanistan are discussing the future of u.s. military presence in the country. the u.s. plans to end its combat mission. from kabul jane ferguson reports. >> this is the final day for the
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delegates of the jirga to go over the security pact for a full day. tomorrow they are expected to present their verdict and their opinion on the draft to president hamid karzai. at the moment he's stuck in a row with washington d.c. over when he might sign the agreement. he said he will not sign it until after presidential elections next spring. the u.s. are pushing for it to be signed by the end of the year saying it's unacceptable for it to be delayed further. hamid karzai has released a statement last night where he condemned what he called u.s. forces killing two civilians in a military operation in nangahar province. that argument gets to the heart of the bilateral agreement. isaaf forces said there was a military operation in nangarah. two were killed but the
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operation was done by afghan forces and coalition mentors. it was a joint operation. the two sides have varying accounts of what happened. the governor of nangahar said he looked too it. if the agreement is signed and implemented, u.s. soldiers here could go out into the field as mentors of afghan forces and so such an incident wouldn't be stopped by the signing of this agreement. >> that's al jazeera's jane ferguson reporting. >> meanwhile a security crackdown during protests in egypt left two dead, including a 10-year-old boy. violence broke out after security forces used gas on supporters. the protests marked 100 days since the government launched a crackdown on a sit-in.
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>> new information on a washington navy yard shooting. the company that employed aaron alexize pulled his security access for two days in august citing mental health problems. it gave it back, but never said why. less than six weeks later the former employees gunned down 12 people. >> residents of newtown may get closure. the prosecutors office is expected to release a report on the shooting at a school last december. the findings will be published online, but officials didn't say if it would be shared with the families. >> the former state chemist of the massachusetts will spend time in prison for jeopardising thousands of case, annie dukon faked lab results and breezed
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through them to appear productive. dukon's actions may have distorted results of criminal trials of more than 40,000 people. close to 350 of those have been released from prison as a result. >> it's been one year since plastic bags were banned in new delhi, when the ban was introduced activists and environmentally conscientious consumers welcomed the move. but it has failed to make the capital cleaner or greener. >> this woman is happy with her job - cleaning plastic bags for a conservation group is more appealing and safer than what she is used to. she is one of 70 workers who keep the production lines that preserve india going. this fashion company makes all sorts of accessories out of recycled materials. the plastic bags are fused together to make sustainable
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fabric. but while businesses like these are doing their bit by recycling the ban had little effect on the environment. plastic bags jut out like sore spots at landfills. with millions in circulation the ban seals -- seems to have done little. it highlights challenges that enforce. presents, and why cities like new delhi are in need of better and more modern waste disposal systems. now the garbage end up here and the plastic bags are impossible to miss. the the people that make the bags say their product is not the problem, arguing the local government is using plastic bags as an excuse. >> you can see them everywhere. that is why they bear the brunt of the campaign.
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they spread the myth that bags are the problem. >> that seems rather real in places like this. that's because plastic bags in the indian capital are used to carry tea, veg -- vegetables and everything else. the carryalls are a problem to some, to millions of others they are essential - particularly to the poor. without cost effective sustainable alternatives, it's hard to imagine most people using anything else. >> new delhi produces 250,000 tonnes of plastic waste every year, and a chunk of it comes from the 14 million households, which uses five carry alls a day. >> thousands of women demand an end to gender based violence in columbia. many of them walked to the city
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call tall, holding signs saying, "i am a woman, dress as i please", they were marching in support of peace talks aimed at ending 50 years of armed conflict with cuba. >> there's an intense advertising plan called racist. one sells doughnuts to pills with the aim of whitening skin. there's more to it than scin colour. this report from bangkok. >> this woman, like many thai women, don't like the way she looksism. >> i think i'm dark. >> she wants her skin to be whiter >> translation: i like people with fair skin. i think thai girls would prefer fair skin. people with fair skin have more advantages. >> thailand's skincare industry is it worth more than half a billion a year and one of its biggest lines - whightening
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products: citra makes lightening creams, it held a competition calling for uni students to hold their products and take a photo. the face of the thai beauty industry has pale skin. through billboards, tv, fashion models - women are told they need to be whiter to be pretty. >> if you look at social structure with the different social classes, women are lower strata, seem to be darker-skinned. >> the assumption is the fairer you are, the higher the class. it's believed it's rooted in a narrow look at the history. >> you never here about the history of commoners.
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the respect for common people is non-existen. that's why, you know, when it comes back though respect for different ethnicity, people of different colour. >> in cases like this contest, accusations of racial insensitivities are not understood which all thais. >> translation: when i saw the ad i didn't think anything of it. >> as the borders of the global market disappear. some feel companies and ad firms need to learn a less jp. they cap take on a different colour. >> thailand is not the only country where men and women invest in sign-whitening products. they account for 84% of the market. a sad sense of deja vu in the
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nba. >> chicago bulls player derrick rose pulled the aca and his left knee. now they may have to go without rose again. rose and team-mates - we pick it up second. bulls crewing. rose bulls up, 21. 3 quarter, rose driveing, his right knee buckles, not the surgical left knee. no contact. he limped to the bench, did not return. after his depart the blazers made a run. wesley matthews, two of his season-high 28 points. under 6 seconds. bulls down. can't get the three to go. blazers win 98-95. portland win nine in a row.
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rose didn't peak to the media but this is what the coach coach said: >> nhl new, colorado avalanche goalie semon varlamov was charged with assault. a secondary kidnap charge was dropped. he's free on bond and has been travelling and playing with the deem. he's scheduled to appear in court on 2nd december. if connected he could face two years in gaol. >> the florida prosecutor leading an investigation into an alleged sexual assault involving jamesin winston says there's no specific timetable for a decision on whether charges will be filed against the heisman trophy. state terny william megs who interviewed the accuser said, "there are loose end to tie up.
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a decision won't come until tuesday." megs will meet with his staff before deciding whether enough evidence exists to seek charges. >> the nfl showcased great carter back rivalries. sunday night the spotlight shines on tom brady and peyton manning at the 9-1 broncos visit the 7-3 patriots. we have more. >> they are two living ledgened and their numbers peak for themselves. peyton manning and tom brady have capture six mvp, including three super bowl mvps. >> we'll have to be on our game. their offence is capable of scoring points quickly and certainly if you have a lead,
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how quickly they are able to come back because of tom and that offence. >> sunday night will be the 14th game between the two future hall of famers. brady has the edge with nine victories. manning has the better numbers. >> it's a good team lead by a great quarterback. one of the best of all times. i'm despited to see how we do. snow the two icons have had epic battles, including the 2006 afc championship. they jump out to a lead. peyton engineered a comeback. the colts rallied back, securing a 38-34 victory. the rest is history. manning wins his one and only super bowl. in 2004 peyton threw for 49 touchdowns, a record many thought would infer be broken. in 2007 brady broke the record
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which tossing for 50. with the broncos at 37 years young, manning is having a stellar year and may beat that mark. >> the way he's better each season than the one before, telling you how he obviously approaches the offseason, takes care of his body, challenges himself every year. >> with manning at 37 and brady at 37, you may want to enjoy sunday night. we may not have many more of these meetings between the lejened, although they appear to be on a collision course to meet in the playoffs. >> that's your morning sport. >> hope his knee get better, got to get my balls back. >> and a man on a mission - we introduce you to one of a guy's quest to create a league of kid
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computerer korsd. -- coders.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead one man's mission to teach underprivileged kids to computer code. first a look at the rain across the country. a little too much rain in parts of the south-west where more rain is expected. flooding concerns continue. we are dealing with pressure sitting off of the south-west coast line. as it sits and spins the moisture is being funnelled up and spread. this is an area of concerns. it will be slow thanks to rain getting across bridges and overpasses - it could prove difficult. give yu plenty of time from texas on west ward. >> new studies show u.s. students are falling behind when it comes to stem education - --
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science, technology, english and maths. and a story on how a teacher is trying to change that. >> chelsea is about to teach a sixth grade class, a school in harlem, how to write computer code. >> we are going to learn java script. >> he is president of elite - his mission - develop curriculum based on stem education - science, technology, engineering and maths. >> stem is powerful. what is the first step. i am trained as an engineer. we are taught to raise questions, analyse, think critically and come up with solutions. >> stem education is expensy, the u.s. budgeting $3.1 billion.
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>> it sounds like a lot of money, but it's less than 1% of the budget. >> schools across the u.s. need entrepreneurs like chelsea robuck because there are not enough resources to teach stem. the private sector needs to help us think how to leverage scarce resources. >> today it's an exciting day. we'll use the computers i talked about. >> the team invented their own inexpensive laptop that he brings to schools that want to teach computer programming but may not have a lab. >> this is what we came up with. to design the backpacks we use a raspberry pie, a $35 single board computer, in controlled with a motorola laptops putting
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together a $100 lap dock. a computer lab to teach students computer science or programming. >> insert of the card. he's finding creative ways to bring something as powerful as coding and computer science to a young age group. >> i was especially interested in president douglas's academy. that has a population that is under-represented in stem fields. the school is predominantly african american. >> a study finding 5% of black forthgrade students scored above the 75th percentile as opposed to 75% of whites in the same scale. it's not just about sixth grade coders. he is also teaching robotics and megatronics to high school
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students. today they are hacking pumpkins, setting them up with lights, blood. >> he's using this as a pilot site for what he hopes will be a national program. >> we are focussed on trying to share the model as sort of more of an open-source platform that school leaders or passionate teachers can adopt into their own classes and curriculum of. >> there are a lot of things you use. >> the ability to create is one of the most powerful things that can happen to an individual. that is what we do. >> meanwhile - twitter says it will now be tougher to spy on its users. the microbloging sites stepped up inciption standards. this is the latest effort by a
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tech company to improve security after a leaked n.s.a. report revealed spying on a digital content. >> well-known visual art originated from a ham let in the north. works are coveted by collections around the world. some pieces are going for record prices. we report from a place that many called canada's most artistic community. (rhythmic drumming) >> into up here a barren land with no trees, where winter lasts eight months and the wind blows all the time. it's a land of legend and the sparseness of life feeding the imagination, inspiring art. >> this one is living under -
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beneath the ice. and once someone fall into the water, it pick up the person and carry it back down to the ocean. >> cape dorset clings to a rocky shore line near ottawa. a government official started a cooperative society to encourage the local nom adds to make art. each selection of the best works are printed and sent south for sale and shows. the theme is generational change this year. elders giving way to younger artis artists. >> i work on my imagination. i was trying to make that flying bird, but it looked like it was walking. i said it was a walking bird. i enjoyed drawing that one.
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>> today's sculptures carve with power tools. the work is con temporary. a statement from the cusp of change. polar bears dance, men and machinery taking on forms in stone. >> the art is modern. you see the work on a wall, it doesn't smack of art in the collective consciousness of canada. it's new, raw, troubling. other times it's joyous. >> in canada's north a hunting and gathering lifestyle gave way to settlement and supermarkets. think of art as a bridge from the past to the future and a welcome source of income and pride in a community in need of both. >> and that's the end of our first hour - here is what we are following. nearing a deal in iran's nuclear
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talks secretary of state john kerry is in geneva where talks are in the final stretch. the family of an 85-year-old war veteran detained in north korea pleads for his safe return. >> more bodies are discovered in the rubble in tacloban. >> i'm mark morgan - a year after suffering a knockout, manny pacquiao climbs back in the ring. that ahead in sport. >> al jazeera news continues. i'm morgan radford and i'm back with you in 2.5 minutes.
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>> closing the deal - secretary of state john kerry arrives in geneva hoping to clinch a deal on iran's nuclear program. >> what pam -- pakistani ministers are trying to do to stop drone strikes. >> cry for help, a war vet an detained in north korea. >> welcome to al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford, in new york city. >> world leaders in geneva appear to be on the verge of a breakthrough on iran's nuclear
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program. secretary of state john kerry arrived a few hours ago. late friday the state department says john kerry's goal was to help narrow the differences. u.k. officials say the gaps are narrow, but negotiations are difficult. our correspondent explains what is at stake. >> for 10 years iran admits it built a vast nuclear infrastructure. it could be for peaceful energy and could create components of a nuclear weapon. the u.s. hopes to make a deal to stop the building and give up the capacity to make a bomb. >> it is the president's policy that iran must not be allowed to retain a nuclear weapons. in this is how. think of making a bomb like tea. iran is enriching uranium, like brewing tea, to 20%. the deal forces iran to brew lighter tea, to 5%. making building a bomb for difficult and timely. it would stop construction of iran's plutonium plant and allow
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more access for inspectors to the facilities. >> we need iran to provide assurance about the peaceful nature of its program. the u.s. would lift 7 billion of sanctions. what iran doesn't have to do - tear down nuclear infrastructure. that's why israel opposes. >> it's bad and dangerous. it deals with things that affects our survival. secretary of state john kerry hopes to secure the deal that the u.s. believes will make the u.s. more peaceful. >> we are close to her achieving a diplomatic agreement for a first step with iranians. >> al jazeera's phil itner is in geneva with more. the british foreign minister's comments on the deal. >> well, yes, until there is an ink on paper none of this is a done deal. we do know that there has been a flurry of activity in the
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building behind me where many of the delegations are staying. secretary of state john kerry flew in this morning, and has had a succession of meetings after meetings. he met with the e.u., the french and the russians. there is an awful lot of activity, there's work to be done as he flew in. the secretary of state said that he was hear to narrow the gaps, trying to find a solution. but as you say, that statement by the british foreign minister certainly falls in line with what we are hearing on the ground, that this is not a done deal yet, but they are very close. >> that was phil itner live from geneva. >> the wife of an 85-year-old army veteran is pleading for the release of her husband. merrill newman is being detained in north korea after entering on a tourist visa. his wife said:
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>> we have more. well, you can well imagine how distraught the family is. and right about this time what is particularly heart breaking is that merrill newman wrote postcards in north korea to his family and friends, and right about now family and friends in the united states are refusing those postcards and in them are the messages from merrill newman about how wonderful the trip has been and how wonderful the whether in north korea has been. he was on the plane, about to complete his trip when the north koreans decided to detain him. merrill newman's wife issued the statement on friday, asking for his release, saying that this has been a misunderstanding and that her husband is in need of medication. she's not certain whether the north koreans are providing him the medication that he needs.
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merrill newman is not the only american to be held in north korea, there's also ken eth bay, held at this point for about a year. >> merrill newman's trip was inspired by a life-long desire to return to the battlefield where he fought in his youth. >> a building call apps in latvia killed for than 50 people. search and rescue is under way, after being suspended for fears of another collapse. police have opened a criminal investigation as to what caused the tragedy. it's believed construction material on the roof was to blame. >> the city hit hardest by typhoon haiyan is paying citizens to clean up. volunteers are given $11 a day
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or food. as the rubble is moved they are discovering more bodies. the storm has killed more than 5,000 people. >> thousands of pakistanis are protesting. imran khan, a prominent toll tirn is leading the rally. he has given america until today to stop using drones. otherwise he'll cut off supply routes for united nations. the u.s. government does not make drone operations public. we go to peshawar where the rally is being held. >> on an ordinary day i would not be able to stand on the road because of a number of nato supply containers heading through this patch before they
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end the kiber pass and onwards to afghanistan. people are gathering here to protest against a continued drone strike. the pakistan office staying they'll block nato supplies if the u.s. does not give an undertaking that they will stop the drone strikes. imran khan will be coming here shortly. convoys are heading from other cities. they'll converge at this point where you can see several supporters, it will be a long day for peshawar. it will be a day where the people of pakistan will speak openly about the opposition to the u.s. drone strike. >> and staying in the middle east a security crackdown in egypt least two dead, including a 10-year-old boy.
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security forces used tear gas on thousands of supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. it turned violent. it marked 100 days sense the government had a crackdown. >> princeton is report gs its i think case of menging gitize. college officials are telling students to be careful the the strain is stereotype b. on overseas vaccine will be administered soon. wild weather is hitting the country. let's look at that. arctic air is coming from the north. temperatures fall across the northern tier to the north-east as we continue the next 48 hours. a push of cold air is in place all the way down into parts of texas. that is where we are dealing
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with wintry weather. as we speak we have light snow and freezing rain coming across northern and western areas of texas making for messy conditions. that's what we are dealing with now. we are watching another storm system. notice the counterclockwise spin. it's an area of low pressure that we'll track over the next few days, it will be a storm system all the way to the thanks gaving holiday that is -- thanksgiving holiday that is impacting. we are going to see rain into parts of texas, but the wintry weather thanks to the moisture. a number of winter storm warnings in place across texas, back into new mexico. that's the area shaded in the darkest blue. we were under a winter storm watch. it has been upgraded. expect conditions to deteriorate as we head into the evening and
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sunday and monday morning. be prepared for changing conditions. we have winter weather advisories in place. the storm system will be on the move. freezing rain is what you can expect. highways, overpasses and breezes impassing. the area of pressure moving up the coast. it will present rainfall for wednesday, a busy travel day. we'll take you through the next several days with a storm system. expect travel delays here. now get off to an earlier start to travel plans this weekend. the storm system is heading nortes wards. >> that weekend marks 50 jeers since john f. kennedy as assassinated in dallas. new details are enmerging about what happened before and after his death. mike viqueira reports.
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>> the eternal flame draws visitors from around the korld. it was supposed to burn in boston as the nation reeled from tragedy, some in the kennedy family wanted him laid to rest at moment in massachusetts, a strange are played a decisive role. paul fuqua was a tur guide at arlington house. it sits atop a hill over looking arlington national cemetary. paul fuqua had an unexpected visitor. >> it was late afternoon, early evening. cars pulled up. a gentleman with ear phones hopped out and said the president was here. >> almost unthinkable now. the president was out on a lashing. he said he and his friend were driving around looking at the city and looked up here. they thought they'd come up. paul fuqua led them on a tour.
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>> they came out here and the city was incredible. >> the words kennedy spoke next loomed large. >> we poised longer. the city was beautiful. he said, "this is so lovely i could stay here forever." a friend with the president remembered those words as the family debated the site of the burial. he told them the story. soon more vip visitors were there. >> robert kennedy asked if that would be - you know could be done, could it be a grave site. secret mcnamara said, "yes, it was army" and he could convert it to that use. that was it. >> the day came. kings, queens and leaders from around the world joining the grieving widow jackie kennedy, surrounded in black in a kortage
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amile long. full honours for the commander in chief. >> but not all the military that day was american. two irish men, jim sre, nan and hugh odonel members of a drill team. they impressed j.f.k. during a visit to ireland where he saw them perform. >> we were in awe of this young charismatic irish catholic, leader of the free world. >> taken with his discipline he spoke of them to jackie. when the time came, she sent for them. >>, "get your act in order, get your gear together, you are
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going to the kennedy furniture in the morning to do the drill." >> once in position they were anxious. astonished to find themselves at grave site. >> what a fantastic occasion, how do we get to that? what sf something goes on. your mind would wander but then you get box. ush here to do a job, do it. 50 years later, we are sitting here and it is something i will never forget. >> a tour guide and a team of irish cadets leaving a memory, playing a role in laying the president to rest. >> the iconic pink suit the first lady was wearing the day the president was shot has not been seen since. it's in the national archives and will not be shape to the public for another 90 years, only if the family approves it. >> 50 years after president kennedy's assassination new
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developments about the man who killed his brother. >> authorities say he's been moved from one prison to another and was sentenced to death. it was commuted to life in prison. he was denied parole for the 13th time two years ago. >> the troubled health care web side eroding support. the loss is creating opportunity for the tea party. how anger over the program could create an vaj for tea party members. >> and anger over elections in honduras.
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>> good morning welcome back to j al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford. >> the tea party are trying to use the rollout of obamacare to their advantage. >> there's cold air in place across the dakotas into minnesota.
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that's where we are starting in the single digits and teens. it felt colder as you step outside. a day to bundle up as you make your way out and about. fargo - minus 10 it feels like. single digit wind shields into omaha nebraska. temperatures not bad eastwards. 28 in toronto. 44 degrees in philadelphia. 41 in new york city. temperatures in new york city 50 degrees. we'll take a tumble on sunday. colder air heading to the north-east. highs only in the low 30s. >> more delays for the affordable care act. federal officials extended the deadlines for americans that want to sign up. opponent say that's proof healthcare.gov is not working. >> americans have extra time to sign up online for government health insurance.
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consumers have eight days until december 23rd to sign up for coverage taking effect january 21st. the 2015 open enrolment period was scheduled to begin october 15, 2014. the federal health exchanges will offer enrolment november 15th, 2014, lasting through january 15th, 2015. it will give people more times to evaluate insurance options for the 2015 enrolment period and give insurance companies time to set premiums after reviewing 2014 information. >> we are doing it because it makes sense for insurers to gain a sense of the market. >> delays are giving critics of the affordable care act a round of ammunition. the house energy and comers committee released more documents claiming the white house and human services
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department new the site had serious problems. hhs secretary kathleen sebelius denies she ignored plans. >> white house officials were inflexible say new reports, and would not negotiate with the contractors to extend the october 1st debut. was the system delivered on october 1st. >> it was,s it wasn't performing as well as we liked. we did deliver a system. >> glitches, do you think, is that the proper word to describe the roll out. >> i think there are problems >> problems that president obama admitted to. >> i think we underestimated the complexities of building a website that needed to work the way it should. they insist that the website is
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improving. a chief economic provider happens been brought in to oversee repairs. >> glitches with the government healthcare website are deminnishing healthcare approval of president obama and his party. we go to rome, georgia where tea party candidates are using the troubled roll out to their advantage. >> in rome, georgia, political chatter about what is happening in washington. >> 90% of people up there don't have a clue about what is going tonne in the united states. >> in the foothills, rome is home to conservative republican congrassmans tom graves. he's an architect of the legislation to repeal obamacare. and voted to continue the government shutdown. he has plenty of supporters in rome that blame the president for the failures of government.
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>> people would be disposed to opposing him on partisan grounds. people v plantly opposed to the affordable care act. it's something that energised the tea party. >> in rome there's a lack of confidence in washington. specifically with the president of the united states. that is not really surprising. back in 2012, his opponent mitt romney won this region by more that 73% of the popular vote. >> now the problem-plagued rollout of the affordable care act and the partisan bickering leading to a shutdown of the federal government are leading to earlier dissatisfaction, contributing to disapproval ratings. >> it hurt him tremendously. >> charlene has been an independent pharmacist in rome. she thinks barack obama's policies - with the act it will
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get worse. >> independent farms sis are not preferred. it will cost customers more if they trade with us. in the local barber shop the hope was gone. >> he had an opportunity as a black man, being the first black president of the united states. that he could make changes. >> retired factory worker roy hudson supports the president. for him the anti-barack obama trend it about something else. >> from the day he went into office, it was because he is an african-american. >> some see it as being more difficult raising issues that cannot be ignored. >> some are attracted to the tea party because of racial
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resentment. tea party simply thighserers likely to -- sympathisers are likely to express views. >> growing anger in towns like rome could become a resource to bolls officer the party leading to the 2015 presidential bid. >> the white house says the affordable care act was actually helping economic growth by slowing down the rise of medical costs. presidential elections in honduras are set for sunday the race is razor thin. the wife of the leader manuel zelaya is neck and neck with the ruling party. among the precious issues in the race made honduras one of the dangerous cities in the world. in one prove ips, the rate of children born with birth defects is six times higher than the
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average. it's blamed on poor health quality. marga ortigas reports. >> the smell of burning coal is so pervasive that spoke from lunch sunday bother the children of happy house. all 29 of them are members of the pham family. as far as many in china are concerned, including birth parents, the children do not ki exist. >> translation: all the kids have problems. they were abandoned. i couldn't walk away and let them die. >> everyone calls her mother come. by doing odd jobs and with the help of donations she's been taking care of abandoned children for 40 years. they live south of beijing. one of china's coal producing areas in a polluted region in the world. research has shown that
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pollution leads to a higher chance of babies being born with neural or physical problems. a million babies with defects are born. 18% are from here. despite the central government plans to cut down on the use of poll to lesson pollution, 40% of the revenue from the province comes from. the local government has been offering incentives to prop up the ailing coal industry. the government has done little to help those that suffered from its effects. there's a place in the home for the list of every child raised. she believes the shame of having a defective child, compounded by the cost of health care may have led to children being abandoned. >> for some diseases, if you receive early and proper treatment they can live normal and healthy or improve the
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quality of thir lives. some parents don't know about this, so the tragedy hap possess. the central government is moving to shut down the coal fire plants. it is effecting physical and mental development of china's next generation. many feel for all the children's sake, cleaning up the environment should be treated as a national emergency. >> 16 of the world's 20 most polluted cities are in china. not getting enough sleep could pose health risks for men, according to a study saying men that don't get enough sleep are more likely to die from heart-related issues. not getting deep sleep are bad. >> the gaps are narrow, the talks difficult. secretary of state john kerry arrives in geneva hoping to clinch a deal on iran's nuclear
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program. snowboarding is a popular event. an american's quest to bridge hotel the gold.
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. welcome back. you are watching al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. here are the top stories: the wife of an 85-year-old californian man is pleading for the release of her husband. merrill newman is being detained in north korea after entering the country on a tourist visa. he is in need of medicine that he may not have. another american, kenneth bay, as has been held in north korea for about a year. >> pakistan demonstrates against drone strikes, and imran khan leads a rally in peshawar. he gives america until today to
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stop using drones, if not he will cut off a critical supply line of nato. >> secretary of state john kerry joins leaders to talk with iran about its nuclear program. there are reports that a break through could happen soon. >> jim walsh joins us to talk about the pact. thank you for joining us, mr walsh. what does john kerry's arrival in geneva really mean? >> i think it means that they are awfully close. now, 10 days ago when john kerry arrived and the other foreign ministers, i think most of us thought there would be a deal. there wasn't. i don't want to get too far ahead of the story. the deputy foreign minister said that progress was made. there's outstanding issues. the iranian deputy foreign
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minister said there's two to three things you are working on. normally you don't bring in the big guns unless you are close. but there's no guarantees. >> what about enriching uranium, is iran ready to accept limitations? >> the core of the deal - the deal has been around before hassan rouhani's election. in the first phase iran will end enrichment at 20% - which is the number one nonproliferation concern >> 20%. >> you don't want 20% sitting around that could be upgraded to 80 or 90%. they'll enrich at 3-5%, you cannot make a weapon at 3-5%. they'll freeze part of the program and condition a more modest enrichment program as part of the deal. >> despite this enrichment, what do you see as the biggest
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obstacle to a deal? >> the other thing right now, based on what affects are telling me is what will happen with the heavy water reactor. you can make nuclear weapons with highly enriched uranium tore plutonium. you get that by running a heavy water reactor. iran has been building a heavy water reactors. it is not due to come on line. the last iaea report announced that it would be delayed. because heavy water reactors are sensitive, people are sensitive. the french are trying to push it to the first part of the agreement. the iranians want to agree with it in the second part. that's probably where most of the discussion is. >> you mentioned the sensitivity. if a bill goes through, how long will it last. our reporter phil itner said it
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is an interim deal that may last six months. what do you think? >> it's supposed to last six months and lead to a follow on issue that is more comprehensive. it's not as if this deal lasts six months and goes away. if that happened that would be a bad outcome. the idea is have an initial agreement, get momentum, build trust, put limits on the program, get sanctions relief for iran and allow both countries to go back and say, "look, negotiation works, we can solve the problem, hang with me while we go to the next phase", is it possible for every one to walk away satisfied? >> the nature of a negotiation, a successful negotiation it one which no one walks away satisfied. it's one in which everyone gives something up and gets something. if there's one side that is 100%
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happy and the other is 100% mad, you don't get a deal. this is a deal that is so close, again the outlines of way have been around for more than a year. i think it is do ail. an interesting point is getting lots of people to agree to the same thing. we saw that when the french foreign minister threw up and threw a monkey wrench into the negotiations. the people to wash are the french. will they tonne cause problems, will we lose an opportunity because of last-minute shennan gans. it's hard to get seven countries, p5+1 and iran on the same page. >> last minute shennan gans. thank you jim walsh. joining us from watertown massachusetts. >> the united nations security council welcomed the news that pirate attacks have fallen to their lowest level since twi.. on monday they called on somalia
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to pass laws banning piracy. puntland is combatting piracy with little help from outside. >> on patrol in the world's most dangerous waters. this is the tiny coast guard of somalia puntland state. while international navies protect the gulf of aiden, an important shipping lane these are protecting puntland's waters. the naval forces mobilized by the international community. currently it may not work for long and pirates could be back in business. >> this is the man leading the war against piracy. >> translation: the pirates are here. their abilities to carry out
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attack are there. very little has been done. we have not been assisted. with limited capacity, there's little we can do. >> the success of some pilots proved a great obstruction for puntland, with little hope of alternative work many join the lucrative trade. today hundreds of pilots are held at the main prison in the port city. many are in prison or on trial in other countries. >> this man returned from seychelles where he was in custody for three years. he'll spend the rest of his 24 year gaol time here. for many it was heartbreak and bad memories. this 74-year-old woman's son was killed by french forces as he tried to hijack a ship. she is in shock.
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>> translation: everyone has a right. the french kelled our son and must pay us compensation. those that killed him must pay. >> it's a story typical. many families whose members turn to piracy and have been killed. to them they were somalis unofficial coast guard, a name invogued with pride. >> according to the united nations in march there were around 1200 piracy prisoners held in 21 countries around the world. up in smoke. police in panama burn more than 11 tonnes of drugs. coke april, marijuana and heroin were among drugs destroyed. this is the fifth some time narcotics have been destroyed this year. canada is taking steps to end
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cyber bullying. they are cg a bill to make it illegal to share intimate pictures online. >> canadians were appalled when a video by amanda todd was seen across the country. posted on youtube it went viral after she killed herself. a victim of bullying by extortionists who persuaded her to take obscene webcam pictures of herself. there were others. franco parisi was 17 when allegeded -- franco parisi rehtaeh parse sons was 17 when raped at a party and pictures posted on line. and todd loik bullied by classmates. >> people thing this is anonymous and they can do this
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without repercussions. it's 24/7. you can police someone any time of day or night. they can't get away. >> there's the grim fact that cyber bullying is sexual. something that immature teens can't handle. >> ministers announced a bill in ottawa that bans the sharing of intimate images online without the consent of the person depicted. >> canadians demanded action, we dlffed. we need to ensure that our laws address this. and that our young victims move us to action. >> the hacking group "anonymous" took an cyber bullying as a cause intervene gs in the amanda todd and rehtaeh parsons case,
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threatening to expose the bullies. parents said the goal is clear - making sure some day there are no more amanda todds. >> the kill gives police to track internet crimes. >> for those fronko files wanting to take paris home they can. a 15-step spiral staircase goes to auction. it's one of 24 sections from the original inveigling in paris in 1889. a 9-foot section sold to an american in 2009 for $43,000. >> and the olympics are around the corner. team usa is as strong as ever. mark morgan is here to tell us about that. >> the count down is underway
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with the winter olympic games over two months away. snow boarding with creative flourish is an event certain to grab the country's attention, we take a closer look at the athlete considered the face of women's snow boarding. >> with tricks and aerial displace, snow boarding is a popular winter globe. the united states snow boarding team is considered the greatest. they have a chance and grechen bligher is ranked third in the world. >> this will be my fourth olympic qualifying and third olympics. i had the best case scenarios and the worst. then i have the younger girls pushing me and hopefully i'll set an example for them. we are each other's biggest competitors. there's four spots for the women. i would say there's 7-plus girls
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that should be on the team representing the u.s. in the olympics. >> in the 2006 winter olympics blighter hit the pinnacle of a career by winning the seddal. in june 2012, while practicing a double black flip she overwrotated kneeing herself in the space, make the the journey back almost impossible. i shattered an eye socket, broke my nose and gave myself a severe concussion. it's an amazing journey, what we learn along the day, obstacles. you learn a lot of life lessons. keeping that in perspective. >> bligher has a chance to get on the pod youm in socchi. >> i work hard. if something doesn't work, i work harder. this was not the case, i took a step back and accepted where i was and not compare myself to
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where i was the year before. it was a different version of myself, i had to start over. >> after winning four golds and a seddal and the olympic madal. bligher is the face of women's snow boarding. she has a different view. >> there's to many women that made the sport. that's another cool part of it, everyone has their strength, everyone has brought snow boarding to a different light to the public and audience that wouldn't watch the olympics. there's so many different characters and that is appealing. >> thank you so much. the socchi winter games beginning february 7th. that's sports for now. >>. >> you left out one of the oldest football rivalries. harvard and yael.
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>> you are looking forward to that. >> i am, we'll beat yale. >> twitter says it will be tougher to spy on users. it enabled a technology called forward secrecy. this is just the latest effort by a tech company to improve security after leaked n.s.a. reports revealed spying on digital content. >> a twitter hashtag is making headlines headlines. afghan american students are using it to talk about life on campus. they are not holing back. >> hash tag being back. it was a talked about topping on twitter. >> we expect it to be big around campus. >> members of the black student union launched the twitter
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campaign to focus attention on what it's likes to be african american at the michigan predominantly white purpose. most tweets are negative. one wrote: another writes: . >> i'm lucky i had a positive experience, because most of my friends have not. >> race has been a hot-button issue. a fraternity set up a facebook party invitation. african american students were outraged the fraternity was reprimanded. the u.s. supreme court considered a case questioning the leg ate of a michigan law.
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since that law passed in 2006, the number of black and latino students at the university of michigan dropped by a third. the university took to twitter to comment about the bbum hashtag writing: these students we talk to say they are getting a chance. they just hope it makes a difference. >> we really want to get the dialogue started to get people talking. i do believe that's the first step to change. >> now they have the nation's attention the black student union is trying to build on the momentum. the group is planning several attempts allowing the minority students an opportunity to share experiences. >> a debate like this are not isolated to the university of michigan.
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a video from students went viral sparking national conversation about diversity on college campuses. >> xbox 1 in stores as the holiday shopping season gets under way. the demand is running high. >> i'm mark morgan, a devastating setback for derrick rose and the chicago bulls. details in sports.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. ahead demand for the xbox 1 game system. first, let's get a look at flooding in the south-west with metrologist eboni deon. unfortunately we'll see rain coming into a saturated area. watching this area of pressure it's had a lot of moisture, rain fall is expected into areas that don't need to see more rain. we is flood advisories posted for phoenix. a flood watch is in place. at least for the late morning hours. keep is in mind as you travel
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here. it will be a wet and soggy day. slow-moving area of low pressure. further west is the wintry weather. >> if you are looking to pick up a just-released xbox 1 game consoles, you need to hurry. a microsoft executive tells mcv magazine that demand is so great there won't be enough for those hoping to have one by christmas. x box launched one on friday a week after sony debuted its playstation 4. >> and it could be more bad news for derrick rose and mark morgan is here with sport. >> not again - they were probably repeated by players, coaches and chance of chicago bulls. >> derrick rose tore the acl in his left season and missed last
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season. now the bulls may have to go without rose for an extended period of time. bulls cruising. bulls up 21 at that point. third quarter rose driving, turning back up. right knee buckles. not his surgically repaired right knee, his left. he'll undergo an mri. after his departure the blazer made a run. wesley matthews comes off the scene. he led with a season high. under six seconds it play. it won't go. the blazers hang on to win at 88-95. portland won nine in a row. rose did not speak to the media, here is what the head coach said about the injury: >> elsewhere in the nba the
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spurs are showing no signs of a hang over falling short of the tight. they travelled to memphis. in recent years tony parker fuelled the offence. parker 8/14. the spurs were up 14 at the break and crewed to a 102-86 win. san antonio shooting 56%. the spurs 11 and 1 matching the pacers for a record in the nba. former head coach jim calhoun watching from maddison square garden. a late bucket. yogie drove. shevaz making the score. farrell dribbles, yukon with the loose ball.
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boxing now, manny pacquiao who won titles in eight divisions gets back in the ring tonight when he faces brandon rios. the two fighters had a fight yesterday brandon rios half a pound under. manny pacquiao easily made weight, tipping the scale at 45. he's coming off two losses and has not fought since ace knockout defeat almost a year ago. manny pacquiao confident he'll return to form against brandon rios. that wraps up sport. i'm mark morgan. >> bitcoin is the currency growing in value and popularity. that has lawmakers asking questions about how they are used and what they can buy. >> as more people are comfortable with bit coins, the digital crash created. the value of the virtual
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currency with its use on the black market is going up. adam lef een is editor of let's talk bitcoin. >> if you want drugs you can, it's hard. >> the price fluctuates with demand. in november the price hovered around 600. there are billions in bit coins used by fibre shops. in october the department of justice shut down silk road, a website described as the largest narcotics contraband. most things were brought with bitcoin. the government seized 170,000 bit coins. they were valued at over 70 million tax free dollars. on monday the senate held a here entitled behind the silk road risks and promises of virtual currency. >> bitcoin is in business,
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selling weapons, child pornography and murder for hire. >> bitcoin drew the tapes much departments of homeland security, justice and the treasury. because of concealing taxes, evading taxes, and the commodity future trading position. they are taking a look at virtual currencies. >> bitcoin supporters argue that government regulations are the not necessary saying too much interference will force it overseas. >> at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following: secretary of state john kerry is in geneva now. he's talking with iran about its nuclear program. there are talks that a breakthrough could happen soon. thousands of pakistanis are protesting at a rally against american drone strikes. a prominent pakistani politician
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is leading the rally. and the wife of an 858-year-old california army veteran is pleading for the release of her husband. merrill newman is being detained in north korea after entering the country on a tourist visa. coming up the new york giants - a preview of their showdown with the cowboys is on the way. >> wintry conditions in texas. freeing win and rained. we are tracking a system causing travel delays. >> i'm morgan radford, thank you for joining us. richelle carey joins us in 2.5 minutes.
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>> closing the deal - secretary of state john kerry arrives in geneva hoping to climp a deal on iran's nuclear program. protests in pakistan as calls for the u.s. to end its drone program. debt toll rises in the philippines as more bodies discovered in the rubble >> he was ambitious to make it a better world. so were we. >> remembering john f. kennedy after the tragic day in dallas that changed the course of history.
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good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey in new york. world leaders in geneva appear to be on the verge of a breakthrough. secretary of state john kerry arrived a few hours ago. late friday the state department said kerry's goal was to negotiate an agreement and narrow differences. p5+1 are hoping to clinch a deal in an exchange for break in economic sanctions. we have a report on what is at stake. >> for 10 years rain admits to building a vast infrastructure. it could create components of a nuclear weapon. iran is being convinced to give up the capacity to make a bomb. >> it's the president's policy that iran must not be act make a
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nuclear bomb. >> think of it like brewing tea. the deal would force iran to brew lighter tale, enriching to 5%. making brewing a become difficult. the deal would stop the construction of a plutonium plant and allow inspectors more access. >> we need iran to provide complete and utter reassurance about the program. in return the u.s. would lift $7 billion of sanctions. iran doesn't have to tear down its nuclear structure. >> the deals are the things that affect our survival. >> secretary of state john kerry hopes to secure a deal that will make the middle east peace. . >> we are closer than we have ever been.
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>> ... united states and other powers say that there is no such thing as a right to enrich. iran wants to use enriched uranium. that technology can produce nuclear weapons, which is why the world leaders gathered in geneva. they wanted to stop. trust is an issue. p5+1 wants iran to allow greater access. iran wants the economic sanctions to end. al jazeera's correspondent talks. phil, i understand that the british foreign minister said that the talks are difficult. they've been going on for a while. any hint of how it's going? >> well, they are keeping their cards very close to their chest.
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there is a creeping sense of pessimism. it is far from a done deal. we were told at the beginning of these talks that if, indeed the foreign minister arrived people like secretary of state john kerry, that they would not have come unless a deal was imminent. but as has been said by the british foreign minister, and some other of the delegations who are here until there's ink on paper nothing can be assumed. you cannot say that this is definitely going to happen. there seems to be some sticking point. we are not sure what it is. as i say, they've been cautious about putting out information, but someone somewhere is digging in their heels. >> let's assume that a deal is reached. let's assume. what would the next step be? >> well, it needs to be stressed
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this is not a resolution to the dispute. this has been intended as a first step. we are looking at a 6-month period. it's on the table, allowing for inspections in iran, an easing of sanctions that tehran is desperate to get and puts limits on the capability of the nuclear program in iran, but would be a trial period, testing the waters of the the ultimate resolution of this lopping-standing dispute is still far away. this is an important first step. so many of the delegates who are here are saying that possibly this could be a make or break moment unless this first step is agreed upon and embarked upon that this really does draw into question whether or not some sort of netted diplomatic solution to the uranium dispute can be reached.
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>> so much riding on it. phil itner, keep us posted. >> thousands of pakistanis are protesting at a rally. prominent pakistani politician imran khan is leading the rally in peshawar. he has given the u.s. government until today to stop using drones in a counterterrorism program, if not he'll cut off a nato supply round, supplies for troops are moved into afghanistan. many pakistanis are outraged over civilian deaths even though the u.s. government does not make drone operations public. >> the wife of an 85-year-old army veteran is pleading for the release of her husband. merrill newman is being detained after entering the country on a tourist visa. had is what his wife said:
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>> melissa chan has more. >> you can well imagine somehow distraught the family is, and right about this time what's particularly heartbreaking is merrill newman wrote postcards in north korea to his family and friends and right about now family and friends in the united states are receiving the postcards. in them are the messages from merrill newman about how wonderful the trip has been and how wonderful the weather in north korea has been. he was on the plane about to complete his trip when the north koreans decided to detain him. merrill newman's wife, distraught, issued a statement on friday, asking force his release, saying it's been a misunderstanding, and that her husband is in need of medication. she's not certain whether the north koreans are privating him the medication that he needs. merrill newman is not the only american to be held in north korea. there's kenneth bay, held at this point for about a year. >> that was al jazeera's melissa
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chan reporting. merrill newman's trip to north korea was a life-lon dream to return to the battlefield with where he fought in his youth. >> a building call oped in latvia, in the capital, riga. the roof of the supermarket caved in. the president called the disaster murder. police have opened a criminal investigation trying to figure out what caused the tragedy. >> the city hit hardest by typhoon haiyan is a paying residents to help with the clean-up. tacloban has created a crash for work where people are given $11 a day or food. as debris is removed they are discovering more bodies. the storm killed more than 5,000 people. >> it is rare to see caesar
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smiling. the 7-year-old misses his family. his parents and his siblings died when they were swept out to sea. he swam for hours. caesar is an orphan. his grandmother is inconsolable. >> translation: it's hard, painful. i should have died out there, not my grandchildren. not them. they had their whole lives ahead of them. >> the destruction is not press dented. more than 90% of the people here are homeless. and as the philippine government focuses on millions of families in urgent need of food, water and shelter the united nations said children are particularly vulnerable. more than 4 million have been directly affected. most of them are living in disaster zones at the risk of exploitation, abuse and trafficking. aid groups say they must be given priority.
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recovery will not come easy. almost all the schools have been destroyed or are used as e vac use centres. aid organizations are setting up learning and play centres, which are crucial in providing normalcy for millions of children across philippines. >> this tent has been a rev ug for some. here they are thought songs about living in a happy home. a break for a harsh life. >> many of these children witnessed the devastation first hand. >> we have to get the basic things, health, nutrition, water, sanitation, get the schools up and running. children are the future of the philippines, we need to take care of children now. >> we are building a safe environment again - it may take time. social workers say these are children forced to deal with grief at an early age.
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they need to be protected before all their childhood is lost too. well, we have a mixed bag of precipitation across the southern plains, making its way across the north drive. it's cold. that cold air made its way all the way south ward. it's the arctic air making its way east across minnesota as we head through the remaineder of the weekend. in two parts of the south-west we are watching out for rap. it's been wet here across parts of arizona, we are watching for flooding. this area of low pressure impacting parts of the south-west, tracking east ward and up the eastern sea board in time for the holidays, a system
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we'll watch closely. we have wintering weather in place into parts of oklahoma. that's where we are seeing snow and light freezing rain. conditions will continue to deteriorate around dallas. heading into this evening, sunday and monday. we have a number of winter weather advise ris in place, winter storm warnings stretching to new mexico. expect snow. initially we'll see the rain. that's what we are dealing with. it will change to freezing rain making for interesting roadways. the rain pushing up florida your. this is a look into wednesday. a busy travel day. ading up i-95 it will be slow.
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it then the wintry weather where it will turn colder. >> presidentiality elections -- presidential elections in hon dura. the wife of leader manuel zelaya is neck and neck with the ruling nationalist party. the pressing issues - drugs and gang violence. >> like many in honduras this man is waiting for justice. he has come to the attorney-general's office hoping for an update on his father's murder. there's more confusion about who is handling the case than answers. >> a political activist was killed two years ago in broad daylight, surrounded by witnesses. he sport the party. more of its members have been attacked and killed than all other political parties
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combined. >> translation: his case has not been vetted. it's supposedly under a special agency. they have not called us or told us anything. >> honduras's ex attorney-general admitted that his office could only investigate 20% of whom sides. this in a country with the most murders per cap ita. a former judge says impunity is part of a larger problem, a broken justice system. >> rule of law is an illusion. we don't have an objective attorney-general or an independent judiciariar a national human rights commissioner that can carry out functions. >> it's not only the justice system at risk, it's the judges. the united nations expert expressed concerns when the congress dismissed four supreme court judges after ruling a law unconstitutional. >> some are targeted. 60 lawyers and judges have been
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killed here since 2010. there's little faith and they are tasking with protecting the operation. 600 police have been suspended over corruption and organised crime. the problems go back a long time. what we are trying do is get on the right path and avoid cases of injustice and make sure the people that feel scared have a better tomorrow. for today, the government deployed a new military police force to patrol the most dangerous cities, a step that may make matters worse. >> translation: an organization that is is above the law, heavily armed is acting against the citizens. a stark warning for those demanding answers from their country. >> violence has gotten worse in
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honduras with whom sides double what they were. remembering john f. kennedy. his legacy - 50 years after his assassination. paper or plastic the indian government made a joys. not everyone is happy. computer coding. a man's mission to teach students this unique skill.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. next - we commemorate the 50th anniversary of john f. kennedy's death. first a look at what is happening with the weather. metrologist eboni deon. we'll see the temperatures tumbling over the next day or so. we are just going to see the temperatures taking a dive. on saturday, temperatures about where it should be. however, we are going to see colder air moving in as we get
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towards the end of the weekend. there's an arctic push of air bringing the temperatures down. high pressure is building in. that will keep us on the drier r drier side. sunday going into monday, temperatures in the 30s. as we get closer to the holidays we expect rain and wet weather. this reasoned marks 50 years since john f. kennedy was killed in dallas. the city held a commemoration on friday. heidi jo-castro reports from dealey plaza. [ singing ] >> under rainy skies, pomp and circumstance for a fallen president. thousands gathered at dealey
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plaza where john f. kennedy was killed 50 years ago. >> the past is never in the past. this was a lifetime ago. now, today, we the people of dallas honour the lives legacy and leadership of the man who called us to think not of our own interest, bit of our countries. >> historian david mccullough remembered the hope and promise that came with kennedy's presidency. >> he spoke to us in the distant time past with vitality and a sense of purpose such as we had never heard before. he was young to be president. but it didn't seem so if you were younger still. he was ambitious to make it a better world and so were we. >> 50 years later people in dallas recalled the terrifying day in 1963 and what it means to
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them now. >> i was 13. it was quite a coming of age, a shock. like 9/11 for our children. >> i think dallas turned a corner in how they are approaching what happened. it's time to honour it in a sophisticated manner. >> in boston a rain-soaked wreath laying in front of the state's house where a statute of kennedy stance. in arlington virginia a stream of people pass by the eternal flame. dallas will always be the place where kennedy's journey end the. a memorial at the plaza is subdescribed with the last line of the speex. >> except the lord keep the the city, the watchman, wake eth but
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in vain. >> one name looms large from the thous apped days of the president presidency. arthur joined the campaign as a speech writer and appointed special assistant to president kennedy "the letters of arthur junior" edited by his son. steven joins us, a fellow. thank you for coming in so early. what are your feelings the last 24 hours seeing this old video, film, clips, memories coming up? >> a bit troubling. i was 20 when the president was assassinated. i got to know him through my father. he was the youngest president elected in the country. he had a beautiful wife and represented a breath of fresh
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air after the eisenhower years which was an older generation. there was a feeling of lethargy. he had a nuisance of purpose for the country. and for him to be destroyed that way, in this despicable murder was the most shocking act i can remember. >> what effect did it have on your family and father. >> i was shattered for my father. he knew kennedy for 15 years. they worked on a number of projects. my father and he both lived in massachusetts. kennedy was my father's congressman. so it was a kind of debacle that one cannot imagine. and it took him many years to get through it. and he really never fully recovered from it. >> i want to show a fantastic
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old picture of your father with john f. kennedy, the first lady, lyndon johnson, they are watching the "mercury iii" flight in 1961. fantastic pictures. your father and j.f.k. are close, was it personal, professional both, was it mixed? >> it was mixed. professional at the beginning, personal as they started to work together particularly in the white house. and it was - to the extent that my father was close with jackie kennedy and they worked together on a lot of arts projects that were going on under kennedy, many of which remain today in washington. it was - the nature of a mixed kind of situation but one that obviously was far more than just professional. >> absolutely, you and your brother poured over 35,000
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letters for this book. you picked 400. what was the criteria for the 400 to make it into the book. >> that is an interesting gesent. my father, one of the things he was committed to was the notion of a liberal society. he was an iconic figure, particularly from the years that these letters cover, from 1945 though 2005. and so the letters we picked out reflect the commitment to the ideals. every alert in the book represents commitments made to ideas that liberals in his circle - economic fairness, activist government, public expenditure, civil rights, negotiations or diplomacy rather than war - and for all those
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reasons, his communications in this book represent different aspects of those particular commitments. >> what do you think president kennedy's legacy fits in the realm of being progressive, being a liberal. president kennedy was one of the last democratic presidents that said, "i'm a liberal", that is extraordinary. he was committed to the things that - the ideals that my father, himself was committed to. i think that's one of the outstanding characteristics much why kennedy's legacy lives on. all the issues that i just mentioned are ones that we are concerned with today. >> it is an honour to meet you this morning. it's a blessing to all of us that you and your brother took the time to go through the letters and share them with you. >> thank you for having me. >> another lasting image, the iconic pink suit the first lady
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was wearing, jackie kennedy's suit has not been seen in public sips. it's in the national archives and will not be shown to the public for 90 years, only if the family approve. >> why a ban on plastic bags have not stopped people using them. >> and how members of the public are not dealing with debt properly. >> chigago bulls are holding their breath waiting too see if they'll be without derrick rose again.
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. welcome back, i'm richelle carey. top stories: secretary of state john kerry is in geneva, joining major world leaders on the
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negotiating table to talk with iran about its nuclear program. there are reports that a breakthrough could happen soon. >> thousands of pakistanis are protesting. a prominent politician imran khan is leading the rally. he is giving the u.s. today to stop using drones. if not he'll cut a critical nato supply line into dana. >> residents of tacloban are being given incentives to clean the streets. more than 5,000 have been killed. >> delays for the affordable care act. the deadline has been extended. opponents say it's proof that the healthcare.gov is not working. >> americans have extra time to sign up on line for government health insurance. consumers have eight days, until december 23rd, to sign up for
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coverage that takes effect jan 21st. the enrolment period delay the. the 2015 open enrolment period scheduled to begin october a 15, 2015. now it will offer enrolment december 15, 2014, and last to 2015, 2015, giving people time to evaluate options for the 2015 period. it will give insurance companies time to set premiums after reviewing 2014 information. >> we are doing that for the consumers. >> the latest delays are giving critics of the health care act a new round of ammunition. this year they released documents claiming the health and human services department new the healthcare.gov site had serious problems before it
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launched. hss secretary kathleen sebelius denied the warn signs. >> new reports claim white house officials were inflexible and would not negotiate with the website's contractors to extend the site. >> do you believe the system was delivered on october 1st. >> it was. it wasn't performing as as well as we like the and had more glitches. we did deliver a system. >> do you think glitches is the proper word to use to describe the rollout. >> we think there are problems. >> problems that president obama admitted to. >> i think we underestimated the complexities of building out the website to work the way it should. >> the administration insists the health care website is improving every day. the president used outside help.
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>> the president pledged to have the website running for the vast majority of users by the end of the month. >> a senator has been released from the hospital. cree deeds was stabbed by his son, who took his life. deeds tweeted this: >> students at atlapta college are taking a unique and provocative approach about starting a conversation about body image. overcoming addiction, depression and abuse factoreded. >> showcasing the nude chiselled bodies of top athletes carries a tag line, "bodies we want." it sparked a conversation between editors of the maroon tiger
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campus newspaper at moorhouse college. >> here are these ideal, perfect physiques. what we wanted to do was do something that catered specifically to our campus, to to the bodies we had. we had different bodies, people struggling with issues that affect the bodies. we wanted to have the conversation. historically black college is taking a bold, conscious stand on espn's issue. the maroon tigers issue features students from a couple of universities revealing personal stories. >> one person talks about them reclaiming bodies after sexual assault. another talks about them being an athlete and having anorexia. >> this man shared his story on substance abuse. >> it was with me from 18 to 30.
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i thought it would be something - something i - i would have to confront my past. >> i was a chunky kid. and with my skin, not my skin dope, having the habit of picking my skin. >> moorhouse faculty was hesitant about students posing nude but got on board after realising the impact it could have. >> i think that's the main thing, it's important to be comfortable with who you are and who you might be if you want to make a change. that could come internally. you shouldn't make changes because of forces you feel from the outside. >> i'll pick up the edition and know that it is absolutely okay to talk about their bodies, it's okay to talk about struggles, flaws, triumphs, vagaries they had. >> with 80,000 online view, the maroon tigers provocative issue
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is the most popular. >> all right of the more than 50 people volunteered to pose for that project. >> age 19 to 29, millennial generation are in trouble paying off debt on time. according to the credit rating agent they have a score of 628 below 681. worse than that, generation x, baby boomers and the great ers. joining us to why the millennial generation are susceptible. it seems that this group, 19 to 29 has less debt, buts are not paying it on time. what is going on? >> it's a sense of not understanding, not having the proper financial planning in
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place. i'd like to see more classes in the classroom in the educational institutions that can put in place financial planning mechanisms so people are more proactive about understanding managing their own income statements. >> is it as such as you have to pay your bills on time or it's more complicated. >> it's a bit more complicated. the job market for the folks is more challenging. the proper planning mechanisms are a little more difficult. the income stream is not there as it used to be. they are having to tweak their expenses a little more. look, we have the united states government that's in the process of trying to figure out how to budget and make their own income statement. it's not easy, but there's a lot of technological distractions whether it's the new iphone or ipad and they overextend
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themselves. it can become easily confusing how to manage your own internal income statements. i'd like to see parental education or institutional education about strictly managing your finances. could it be as simply as - i think there are younger and older adults that don't realise what slow payments can do. >> the credit rating can be tricky. if you have no credit cards and no debt, your credit rating can be effected by that. they want to see, the credit rating agencies is that you have credit and pay on a regular basis. doesn't mean you have to pay off everything, but you pay the payments on a regular basis and your debt levels to what you have are somewhat in line. it's not i don't want any debt at all, it's are you taking out debt and are you paying your
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debt on a regular basis. >> in some ways you pointed out there are some people in the group of a weak economy. what effect might this have on the economy if we have a huge segment of the population. >> it's a good point. therein lies the issue where it can become a worst effect on things. the job market is weak. your credit rating gets weak. in order to get a job it's difficult. a lot of companies are checking credit ratings. they are seeing is this person fiscally responsible. be careful. with would say manage more of your expenses than revenues, the employment market for a lot of people is challenging. >> thank you so much. appreciate it. founder and management partner. >> it's been a year since plastic bags were banned in new
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delhi. when emphasise introduced activists and vinylly concess consumers welcomed the initiatives but it failed to make the cappal greener. >> this woman is happy. cleaning plastic bags for a conservation group a more appealing and safer than what she's used to. she is one of 70 workers who keep production lines that conserve india going. the fair trade fashion company makes all sorts of accessories out of recycled materials. the plastic bags are fused together to make the sustainable fabric that these men are working with. businesses like these are doing their bit. the ban had little effect on the environment. plastic bags jut out like saw spots at landfills, with millions in circulation the
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local government's ban has done little to curb the use. the failure of this ambitious environmental policy highlights the things that enforcement presents and why cities like new delhi have better disposal systems. now, the garbage ends up here, plastic bags are impossible to miss. the people that make the bags say the bags is not the problem but it is used by the government as an excuse. >> you can see them everywhere around the city. that's why they bear the brunt of the campaign in the environment. spreading a myth like this, carry bags are a hazard is not right. >> that seems real in places lying this. that's because plastic bags in the indian capital are used to carry veg tails and just about everything else.
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while these colourful carryalways are an environmental problem to some. to millions of others they are an essential item. particularly for the poor. it's hard to imagine post people here using anything else. >> new delhi produces 250,000 tonnes of plastic waste every year. a chunk of that comes from the capital's 14 million households using fire carry out plastic bags a day. >> deja vu at the nba - the wos kind. mark morgan is here with sport. i couldn't believe it. >> you feel sorry for the guy. he worked hard to get back. chigago bulls point guard derrick rose may face a crushing set back.
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he tore the acl in his left knee in april 2012 and missed last season. now the bulls may have to go without rose for an extended period of time again. rose and team-mates visiting the blazers - bulls cruising. looking good, drives, lays it in. we move to the third. rose driving, turning back up court after the steal. right knee buckles, no contact on the play, limping to the bench and did not return. he'll undergo an mri. after the departure the blazers make a run. two of 28 high blazes up. bulls down three. blazers hang on to win 98-95. portland won nine in a row. rose didn't speak to the media. here is what the coach had to say:
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>> it is week 12 of the nfl season and amazingly after a nightmarish 0 and 6 start the new york giants are in play-off. the g men face the cowboys in a grudge match tomorrow. >> from the chatter inside the locker room the cowboys and giants are buying into the hype surrounding sunday's meeting in new jersey. >> they brought it up. we need it badly. >> the giants team is a good football team that is playing really good. they'll be ready to go. we hear about all the stuff they are saying. i think it will be a great test. we'll be ready to go. >> i feel like this time it will be the determinative outcome of our season. i think this is a game that we
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can't walk away with a loss. >> we know the challenge and have respect for the football team and what they have done. we have to play our best. >> playing games and another. should have a great crowd. an important game. >> despite a 5 and 5 record, jason garrett is on the hot seat bus the cowboys are struggling. they are giving up the most yards per game and the last game ended in a 49-17 drubing at the hands of the saints. >> we don't have a better record. but we have a team that has the ability to be a better playing team. >> that goes out the window. you look at the guys. they are coming full head of steam here. >> the giants won four and a row starting 0 and 6.
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no team started that slow and made the play-offs. >> we fought off a miracle. i don't think you'll see the football team envelope too much. >> we won the super bowl. it was do or dive. it was late november. we made the push for the play-offs and needed the jets game. >> the cowboys won their week one meeting 36-31. the giants know what needs to change. >> the giants cut turnovers from 4 per game to 1. they'll test the giants ability to hold on to the ball. some players have had two weeks to rest of the. >> they'll go out and play. he'll be on both sides of the ball. we have to do our job.
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>> two additional injury. the cowboys expect leading tacklers shaun lee to miss a second straight game with a hamstring. giants leading, according to the team they'll play an sunday. that makes both of these teems healthy going into what promises to be a pivotal mfce match up. >> thank you that is a look at the sport. >> thank you. man on a mission. we'll introduce you to a guy who is on a guest to create a league of kid coders.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera ameri america. just ahead one man's mission to teach underprivileged kids to code computers. metrologist ebony dion. we are seeing rain in places
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where we don't need it. grounds are saturated. we are looking for flooding concerns around preston. we are looking at a closer view of the rain coming down. most on the lighter side. an area of low pressure will track east ward bring bringing 1-3 inches of rain. more sleet in dallas. >> u.s. students are falling behind when it symptoms to stem education - science, technology engineering and maths. it ranked 17th in math and science. we are shown how a teacher is trying to change that. >> good afternoon. >> good afternoon. >> chelsea is about to teach the class at the fredrik davis academy, a public school in harland how to write computer
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code. >> he is president of elite. a nonprofit organisation. his mission - to teach stem - science, technology, engineering with maths. >> stem is powerful. what is the first step. i'm trained as an engineer. we are taught to raise questions, analyse and think critically and come up with solutions. >> stem education is expensive. the u.s. government budgeted $3.1 million. >> it's a lot of money. in the grand scheme it's less than 1%. >> this is a senior advisor for stem for the department of education, and says schools across the u.s. need entrepreneurs like chelsea because there are not enough resources to teach stem. >> the private sector needs to help us think at the u.s.
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government level how to leverage scarce resources. >> it's an exciting day. we'll use the computers i talked about. >> chelsea and his team invented an inexpensive laptop that they bring to schools that want to teach but may not have a computer lab. >> we use a $35 single board col computer in combination with a motorola laptop, putting together a $100 laptop, an entire lab for the cost of a macbook pro to teach a class of students. >> he's finding commissional and creative ways to bring something as powerful as coding and computer science to a young age group. >> i was especially interested in president douglas academy.
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it has a population that is underrepresented in stem fields. the school is predominantly african american. 5% of black fourth grade student scored above the 75th percentile in maths, a small slice come paired to 75% of white scores. >> it's not about sixth grade coders. he's teaching robotics and megatronics. today they are hacking pumpkins, tricking them out with motion senses, led lights and blood. >> he's using fredrik douglas academy as a site for what he hopes will one day be a national program. >> we are focused on sharing models as sort of more of an open source platform that school
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leaders or passionate teachers can adopt into classes and curriculum. >> there's a lot of the things you don't realised... >> the ability to create is one of the most powerful things that can happen to an individual. >> twitter says it will now be tougher to spy on its users. the microblogging site said it stepped up encryption standards allowing forward secrecy technology. it's the latest efforts after leaked n.s.a. reports revealed spying. >> original art from canada originated from a ham the in the north. works by the inuit artists are coveted by collectors around the world and pieces are going for record prices.
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we report from a place many call canada adds most artistic community. (rhythmic drumming). >> into up here a barren land with no trees, where winter lasts eight months and the wind blows all the time. it's a land of legends with a sparseness of life, feeding the imagination, and inspiring art. >> this one is called the seaman. it lives under - well, beneath the ice. once someone falls into the water, it pick up the person and carry it back down to the ocean. >> cape dorset clings to a rocky shore line 2000km north of the canada's capital ottawa. >> government official started a
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cooperative society in 1959. for 54 years many have made a living. each artist ce items work. those picked are sent out or shown. this year elders give way to the younger artists. >> i work on my imagination. that, for example - i was trying to make it flying bird, but it looked like it was walking. i said it was a walking bird. i enjoyed drawing that one. very much. >> today's sculptures carve with power tools, their work is contemporary, not folk art, but a statement from the cusp of change. polar bear, dance, fish, men and machinery take on new forms in stone. >> you walk into a room and see their work on a wall.
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it doesn't smack - it's new, raw, edgy, productive. it's enjoyable. >> in canada's north a hunting and gathering lifestyle gave way to settlements and supermarkets. think of art as a bridge of the past to the future. and a welcome source of income and pride in a community in need of both. >> inuit is an indigenous group living in the arctic regions of canada, the u.s. and greenland. that will do for this edition of al jazeera america. much more news after the break. one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about
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the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete? >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america.
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every sunday night, al jazeera america presents... eye opening films from the worlds top documetary directors. tomorrow, >> there's probably about a hundred people living in the extreme tiny houses... >> is going small part of a big movement? >> part of the reason for moving into a tiny house is to get rid of all this "stuff"... >> what you gain by having less... >> let's think about giving up mcmasions... >> a tiny american dream, al jazeera america presents... tiny: a story about living small premiers tomorrow 9 eastern.
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