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tv   Weekend News  Al Jazeera  May 2, 2015 7:00am-7:31am EDT

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a week on rebuilding from the rubble. we report from nepal, where 1.5 million are in need of food. and assistance: hello, i'm darren jordan. also ahead. six police officers are charged in connection with the death of a black man in the u.s. state of maryland. rescue from boko haram. nigeria's military frees women and children. no sign of kidnapped chibok school girls. does scotland hold the key to the outcome of the u.k.
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election. it's a week since nepal was devastated. search crews are looking for survivors or bodies. the cost of the damage makes up $10 billion. remote towns and villages yet to be reached. more than 6,800 have been killed. more than with bodies being recovered and aid trickling in, some nepalese are demanding the government do more hello, i'm martine dennis. you are with al jazeera, live from doha. also to come - six police officers charged with the death of a black man in the u.s. state of maryland fighting intensified in yemen's port city of aden. hospitals struggle to cope nigeria's military rescues women and children kidnapped by boko haram, but no sign of the chibok schoolgirls taken last year. >> well, it's been a week since a magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit nepal, and the death toll is continuing to rise. more than 6,600 are confirmed dead, and almost 14,000 are injured. while international help trickles in, rescue teams are searching the rubble, looking for survivors or bodies. the cost of the damage may top $10 billion, and remote towns and villages are yet to be reached, to assess the devastation there. nepal's minister of information told al jazeera that foreign aid is slow to arrive. >> as to now, in terms of help, received only $4 million. we have not received a penny beyond that. we are hoping we'll mobile as large an amount of $1.8 billion. >> al jazeera's sabine shrestha lives in nepal. she takes us around her home town and shows us how it devastated her neighbourhood. >> reporter: this is a square, one of the most beautiful places in kathmandu. generations of my family have grown up in this neighbourhood. this is where my children come
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to feed the pigeons, and run around the square, just as i did when i was a child. nobody is here to feed the pigeons now. a few hours before the earthquake struck, i was here talking about the importance of preserving our heritage, and now, as you can see, there's not much left. there has been major temples that have just gone down. up north, the ruins of temples are being cleared. >> up there is a very good friend responsible for saving many of the architectural sites over here. >> translation: we thought there was nobody buried, so we just cleaned the roads. there may be some underneath here.>eporter: my ho tn a tsereomofheces. anotr'old neborhod vel op buedn e bl. llsebudi, ocng >> reporter: this 8-year-old is very scared, and huddles with his mother. she tells me she lost her husband and other son. my aunt, my uncle, my cousin too. they have gone far away. >> and every morning i hope that it was a nightmare. but it's not. i mean you don't wake up. it's a continuation. we have no choice but to rebuild, and hopefully i can give better that moving account from sabine shrestha, al jazeera's correspondent from kathmandu. we can go to another correspondent there, sehail rahman. the heavy rains are on kathmandu, making the task onerous. >> indeed. don't be deceased by the lovely sunny weather. the clouds are coming in, we've had ra eryevng he enleared. how the teams make use of their skills and expertise is what we are working on. our challenge now it to get it better. two updates, the death toll in terms of civilians and police officers - in the process of trying to help civilians in the earthquake zone. what you have behind me is a famous monument, a tower, which collapsed on saturday. it's been a pile of ruins. we are live through the week. it is cleared. perhaps you can see behind me. what the ministry of archeology said is with all the historic sites around nepal, the day brie will be taken to secure areas, where it's protect by the police and the army, to where the archeologist can sift through and try to find the valuable relics. >> thank you for now. sehail rahman live in kathmandu now it united states a march in baltimore is being considered a victory march following the charging of six police officers or e at wawe fdd gayarng charges ranged from assault, misconduct. the officer caesar r. goodson is accused of second degree murder for gross negligence in how he handled gray and refusing to heed his cry force help. the baltimore police union issued a statement saying the officers were not responsible for gray's death, accusing them of a conflict of from and demanded it be turned over to a special prosecutor. >> i have never seen a heavy rush to fire charges which i believe are separate and apart from the application of law and the facts of this case as we know them. >> president obama said the
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federal government would help to see that justice was served. >> those individuals charged are also entitled to due process, and rule of law. and so, you know, i want to make sure that the legal system runs the way it should. >> in the neighbourhd ga ibraly,isndt, leasthne f ds. yemeni city of aden continues. houthi rebels and troops loyal to the exiled president are battling for control of the main airport. we have more. >> reporter: as fighting escalates there's few if any safe zones left. in this hospital, one of a handful open, staff are struggling to cope, while houthi fighters clash with committees loyal to country's president. as more injured arrive, news of the death of a doctor killed during an artillery site. two weeks earlier another during was killed by sniper fire. >> translation: the situation here in our hospital is miserable. we are under huge pressure. staff are also under pressure, we are no longer able to deal with this. there's a shortage of equipment and medicine. >> reporter: this boy is not one year old. he was with his grandfather when a bullet pierced his head. hit. there's no heavy lifting equipment. people use their bare hands to look for the dead and injured. >> pro-government forces are backed by the saudi-led campaign to restore abd-rabbu mansour hadi to power. as they battle the houthis for control of sanaa and other cities. ordinary people suffer. >> saudi arabia, and its partners said the air strikes will continue until the houthis military capabilities are diminished there's more to come on al jazeera, including connecting the past with the present through the canvas. plus, found out why the tourists are starring away from this holiday resort in senegal. hello again, you're with al jazeera, these are the top stories. it's been a week since the magnitude 7.8 quake hit nepal, and the earthquake is beginning to rise. 6,600 are dead, 14,000 injured. police in riot gear enforced a urw after poceer gray.3% iwaderid aicry custody is being treaeds tofden coitns stken syanilge alppronc. battles have been ongoing between kurdish forces and fighters from i.s.i.l. the romanian prime minister has been speaking to al jazeera, and told us that europe should do more to solve the ongoing migrant crisis. over 10,000 trying to reach the e.u. have been rescued in the mediterranean sea this year alone. >> i think that all the european countries can afford to take migrants, because migrants within the european union and outside are bringing added value to the society. this is my experience. extremist politicians use the migrants theme in political fights. i think it is against european values, whoever comes and lives and respect the european values, it's a good citizens of euroe. sea o thfrca pfoure dtitis. >>eptery dndiat-se alive ncarvi icyes subsidiary protection. it is not enough. >> translation: what can i do with subsidiary protection.
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i don't have a passport. i'm a prisoner. we live in insecurity. >> reporter: sub-sid ya yea protection means they have passport and can work.
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>> a march planned in baltimore in a few hours time is billed as a victory rally. celebrations followed the decision to treat the death of freddie gray as murder. the police union says the charges against six officers that arrested the african-american man is a rush to judgment. anne tabarant has more. -- tom ackerman has more. >> reporter: a day after police turned over finings into the death of freddie gray and after an autopsy revealed what called him. it was read out.
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>> mr gray suffered an injury as a result of being handcuffed. shackled by the feet. >> reporter: grey was arrested for carrying a night. manslaughter rsh, assault, misconduct and false imprisonment. officer caesar r. goodson, who drove the transport vehicle is accused of second degree murder for gross megements in how he handled gray. baltimore's police unit issued a statement saying the officers were not responsible for gray's death and accused the state attorney of a conflict of interest. >> i have never seen a hurried rush to fire criminal charges which i believe were driven by forces that were separate and apart from the application and facts of this case as we know them. >> reporter: president obama said that he would help to see
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justice was served. >> those individuals charged are entitled to due process, and rule of law. and so you know, i want to make sure our legal system runs the way it should. >> in gray's neighbourhood residents welcomed the indictments, a move hoped would regain the loss of confidence in the justice system. these charges are an important step in getting justice for freddy. >> the mayor issued a warning to the police force. >> to those of you that wish to engage in brutality, misconduct racism and corruption let me be clear - there is no place in the baltimore city police department for you. >> the charges may help to diffuse some anger in the poor neighbour hoods, but the curfew and state of emergency remain in force for a few days.
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the nigerian military released pictures showing the rescue of 230 women and children held captive by boko haram fighters. they were freed as part of an operation and carried out by fighters in the nearby province. it's not clear if the rescued girls are from students kidnapped in chibok. we have more from abuja. >> they made requests to the military for further information about the circumstances in which this latest 234 people have been rescued from boko haram in the forest. in the last few moments we received information from the authorities, saying the usual circumstances - assaults on boko haram camps in which people were found and freed. that there are the attend apt casualties of fighters. not clear how many fighters may have been killed but the operation is going on. we understand from earlier in
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the week when others were rescued that there is a screening and profiling process taking place in which the identities of people freed will be ascertained. the campaigner for the chick okay girls, the 200 or so kidnapped from a school in pap, 219 are missing. the campaigners to find and rescue the girls are demanding the military confirm whether any of the girls are among those found, and demanding that the identities of all those rescued by the military be part of it. so far that call has not been heeded to yemen, where 27 people have been killed as fighting continues in the southern port city of aden. houthis rebels and troops loyal to the president battle for control of the main airport. neave barker has more. >> reporter: as fighting
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escalates in the port city of aden, there are few, if any, safe zones left. in this hospital one of a handful open staff are struggling to cope. houthi fighters clash with popular resistant committees loyal to the president. as more injured arrive news of the death of a during. two weeks earlier another was killed. >> translation: the situation in the hospital is miserable. we are under huge pressure. our staff is under pressure. we are no longer acialt deal with this. >> reporter: this boy is not one year old. he was with his grandfather when a bullet pierced his head. violence is part of his childhood. his family blamed houthi fighters. >> he was peacefully sitting at home. what should we do now. >> in yemen's capital, war led
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to in my opinion family homes. a saudi arabia-collision air strike helped reduce them to nothing. >> we heard the explosion. we found body parts of my uncle in another week. the whole family died. women, children and elderly died. >> the saudi military commanders say the air strikes targeted houthis loyal to those around the airport. the neighbourhood was hit. there's no heavy lifting equipment. people use their bare hands to look for the dead and injured. pro-government forces are backed by the audi -- saudi campaign to bring abd-rabbu mansour hadi back to power. however, ordinary people are suffering. saudi arabia and their partners
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said the air strikes would continue until the houthi military capabilities diminish. >> more to come on al jazeera, including... >> and every morning i hope that it was a nightmare, but it's not after the earthquake, a personal journey of an al jazeeran correspondent who calls nepal home. plus connecting the past with the present through the canvas. stay with us.
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>> the new al jazeera america primetime. get the real news you've been looking for. at 7:00, a thorough wrap-up of the day's events. then at 8:00, john seigenthaler digs deeper into the stories of the day. and at 9:00, get a global perspective on the news. weeknights on al jazeera america.
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welcome back, the top stories on al jazeera - it's been a book since a magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit nepal. 6,800 are confirmed dead 14,000 injured. a curfew has been enforced in baltimore after a federal prosecutor announced the death of freddie gray was being viewed as murder. charges have been filed against six police officers the nigerian military released pictures showing some of 230 women and children rescued from boko haram fighters on thursday. more than 680 have been freed this week during army operations to clear fighters from their forest hideout there were serious humanitarian problems in nepal before the earthquake. the government struggled to deliver health and sanitation at the best of times. in the heart of a crisis maybe nepalese are taking matters into
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their own hands. >> reporter: tired of waiting they decided to act. >> translation: our local volunteers use their own transportation, go to relief on their bikes, hitting the hard-hit areas. >> reporter: in this kathmandu college building they are charting the extent of the disaster collecting donations, deploying to deliver medical supplies food and more. what is happening here is truly remarkable. youth activists. they are taking matters into their own hands. now they are doing all they can to make sure they can deliver aid. going to areas the nepalese government and others have not yet reached. anyone is welcome to join. for one simple reason. >> translation: there's no proper mobilisation of youth ready to help. >> reporter: it's why the mission is so vital.
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even in the country's capital suffering can be seen almost anywhere you look. one reason anger is only growing. a sentiment this group resists. >> this is a disaster. we need to stick together and be optimistic regarding what is happening all around us. >> reporter: with street scenes like this a reality, it's a home-grown message of hope and resolve needed more than ever well al jazeera's sabine shesta lives in nepal, she takes us around her neighbourhood. >> reporter: this is a square,
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one of the most beautiful places in kathmandu. generations of my family have grown up in this neighbourhood. this is where my children come to feed the pigeons, and run around the square, just as i did when i was a child. nobody is here to feed the pigeons now. a few hours before the earthquake struck, i was here talking about the importance of preserving architectural heritage, and now, as you can see, there's not much left. there has been major temples that have just gone down. up north, the ruins of most beautiful temple has been cleared. >> up there is a very good friend responsible for saving many of the architectural sites that are here. >> translation: we thought there was nobody buried, so we just cleaned the roads. there might still be someone underneath here. >> reporter: my home town is a
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maze of narrow alleys. on the day of the earthquake our team went out to shoot in the neighbourhood. these are some of the scenes. my grandmother's old neighbourhood had several people buried in the rubble. we tried to go there now. the alleys are all blocked. we wander through the houses and gardens where people have taken shelter. on every other corner there is a collapsed building, blocking the alleys. they found 10 bodies in the neighbourhood. here it is really dark and scary. >> translation: there were many people here, including police.
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our sister-in-law, her arms full she's staying in a shed. >> reporter: this 8-year-old is very scared, and huddles with his mother. she tells me she lost her husband and other son. "my aunt, my uncle, my cousin too. they have gone far away." >> and every morning i hope that it was a nightmare. but it's not. i mean, you don't wake up. it's a continuation. nepal has no choice but to rebuild, and hopefully i can give better story next time
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52 people have been killed in air strikes in syria. syrian observatory for human rights says it was near the north-east. the area is close to the city of aleppo police in the maldives arrested three opposition leaders and 192 others after an anti-government protest turned violently. demonstrators demanded the resignation of the president and the release of gaoled former president. the government accused the organizers of trying to topple it by promoting violence. the former president was sentenced to 13 years imprisonment in march. the ruling party says it was arbitrary and disproportionate says the u.n. john kerry is the first diplomat to visit in a decade praising sri lanka's effort to diplomatic reform. the previous sri lankan government faced condemnation over war crimes.
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rights activists say the u.s. shouldn't press for a war crimes entirery. >> over weather warnings in eastern australia. five motorists killed when vehicles were washed away. a 6-year-old died after being swept away by heavy seas. brisbane was drenched making roads impassable cutting off power to many homes. it's the last weekend ever campaigning in the u.k. before the general election on thursday. scotland is predict to hold the key to the outcome, with the pro independence national party expected to dominate in the region. >> reporter: 6:30 in the morning and these protesters are trying to make the news. they are trying to make the case for a nuclear free scotland a national election issue.
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we need to cut triedent. those that thought the snp was dead have been proved wrong. the new leader led the party to a surge in support with the antinuclear campaign at its party. it has potential to cause spectacular upsets. in this constituency a 20-year-old university student leads the poll. if she win, she beat the foreign velentry. he is for triedent. she isn't. >> >> how can you advocate cutting health care and others. it seems the establishment has its priorities wrong.
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>> labour candidates in places like glasgow, the biggest city, which voted for independence now find their westminster seats at risk. this veteran mp denied her party was too right wing for scottish taste. >> there's an arguemnt about trident, but not an argument about whether to spend money on health and education. we are trying to have an economic plan, grow the tax base to protect public services. >> reporter: the nightmare scenario is the labor party is wiped out in scotland and has to rely on snp to have a majority allowing alex salmond deputy prime minister of the united kingdom. because the snp is antinuclear, the equation between a replacement for trident versus austerity is an important issue in the election in scotland. in england it is not at all. in westminster every political party, apart from the greens
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says they are in favour of spending $150 billion on nuclear weapons. the snp has committed scotland to an antinuclear movement, the like of which has not been seen since the 1980s. in burundi protesters are calling a halt to demonstrations for three days of warning. three policeman including a policeman were killed in a grenade attack. the attack took place in the capital where demonstrators burnt tyres and marched in the street. protesters are angry that president pierre nkurunziza is seeking a third term in office. a paraguayan government is allowing a 10-year-old to have an abortion. she was allegedly raped by a
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stepfather who is at large. abortion is illegal except in circumstances where the pregnancy endangers the mother's life people have been killed after a drug cartel was targeted. three were soldiers who died when their helicopter was shot down. >> floyd mayweather and manny pacquioa weighed in ahead of the most lucrative fight in boxing history. floyd mayweather hinting this will be his last fight. >> floyd mayweather. close to 12,000 fans packed into los angeles just to see the fighters take to the scales. manny pacquioa has won world tights of eight different waves, and floyd mayweather has gone through his career unbeaten. manny pacquioa lost five times and is slightly smaller and lighter. >> i have been fighting bigger
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guy like marga retto and others. doesn't matter to me. lot of people wandering if you can be the dynamic attacking knock out artist again. how do you feel about that? >> i feel tomorrow the lord is with me strengthen me and deliver him to my hands. >> i dedicated myself to the sport of boxing for over 20 years. i'll ready. >> do you feel that manny pacquioa may do something reckless that she'd be able to take advantage of. >> i can't say. but i'm ready to fight central asian artists rarely receive attention outside their homeland. now at an exhibition in singapore is attempting to put the spotlight on painters from the region. we have more on "the new silk roads." >> reporter: an inspiration for
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modern art from history. the silk road was a trade route through asia. it looks to see it through canvas and paint. >> we are trying to bring culture and art into asia. >> the show case includes 30 paintings from uzbekistan pakistan and turkmenistan giving a glimpse of light. >> it's to where artists is expressions considered that they want a peaceful life. peaceful world. >> reporter: investment in modern and contemporary art it minimal. works are rarely shown outside the region. >> more and more we have artists from central asia. it's kind of new approach to the painting. bringing explanation about the culture, about the environment. >> organizers say the 2-day section was well received in
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singapore, creating another path along the silk road. a quick reminder you can keep up to date with all the news on the website. there it is on your screen. the address aljazeera.com. aljazeera.com. commissioner william bratton. >> this is not race unfortunate. despite what the federal court says. it's his second go as head of the police force, and back when race dominates. >> when you have people chanting what do i want, cops. i'm sorry, that's too mar he says police arrogance,

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