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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 19, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at six. iraqi forces say they have captured several villages on the first day of their offensive to re—take western mosul from so called islamic state. save the children warn that three hundred and fifty thousand children could be trapped in the city. iraq's last city held by the islamic state, but the assault on that last redoubt of the islamic state is now under way. thousands of prison officers in london and the south east of england are to get a pay increase of up to £5,000. the american company, kraft heinz, says it's withdrawn its proposed takeover of unilever — a joint statement between the two companies said the decision was "amicably agreed". white house chief of staff reince priebus echo‘s donald trump's claims that he receives unfair treatment in some parts of the media. we don't believe everyone is lousy in the media, we don't believe everything is bad,
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but there are some things that are a really bad. and we've tried... he categorizes that as fake news. nail—biting times in the lincoln city dressing room, as they wait to find out who their opponents will be in the quarterfinals of the fa cup. their last minute—winner made them the first non—league club to reach this stage for more than a century. watch the draw live on the news channel in half an hour. good evening and welcome to bbc news. iraqi security forces have started a major new offensive against the so—called islamic state in mosul. iraq's second—largest city was seized by the extremist group over two years ago as they took control of northern
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and western iraq. last month they recaptured the eastern part of mosul. but round three—quarterers of a million civilians remain the western half where there will be will be stiff resista nce where there will be will be stiff resistance from is. just after sunrise, iraq began what it hopes is its last major battle against the so—called islamic state. thousands of men and hundreds of armoured vehicles in a line of attack that is spread for miles. attack that spread for miles. the iraqi army are starting their assault on western mosul. they have reached their own defences. armoured vehicles are lining up, getting ready for islamic state. they are only a couple of kilometres over that way and they know these men are coming.
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they have dug in on their assault in western mosul. leading the attack, iraq's emergency response division, police special forces. some of these men were surrounded by is two years ago. theyjust escaped with their lives. today they threw everything they had at is. gunfire. we are now above the village which is their main target. they were laying down fire. there were about to call in some artillery strikes. the captain tells me there are three is fighters in a yellow building down there and car bombs.
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he says they are targeting them now. soon government forces were inside. they killed 13 is fighters without taking any casualties. here they discovered is weapons. this village is small but it's important, it's the gateway to mosul proper and the city's airport. hidden inside another house, away from surveillance aircraft, another car bomb disguised as an ambulance. the bomb inside was still live. in these streets, though, a critical advantage, no civilians. and in western mosul there are three quarters of a million people at is fighters. they took their target. they made progress but with overwhelming force. the next town over overlooks the city airport and the city itself. from here, the going will not be quite so fast. thousands of prison officers
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atjails in london and south—east england are to get a pay increase of between £3,000—5,000. ministers have made the offer to try to boost recruitment and to retain workers in prisons — which are under pressure from violence and staff shortages. but there'll be no extra pay for senior officers. here's our home affairs correspondent, june kelly. this is how many officers it takes to contain one violent prisoner. every working day, staff are fighting simply to keep control. the £12 million in extra pay announced today is aimed at bringing in new recruits and paying some existing staff more. here in wandsworth jail in south london, officers will benefit. the offer is limited to prisons in the capital and the south—east. a divisive move, according to the prison officers association,
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who compare it to trying to put a plaster over a gaping wound. we're going to welcome additional money for our members, of course we are. but we don't think this goes far enough to solving the present crisis. we believe it needs to be a national issue. the offer is for standard grade 3 prison officers. not for more senior supervisors or specialists. each will receive a pay hike of at least £3,000. for new recruits, their pay package will be increased by £5,000. the sweetener to bring people in. the panorama programme recently went undercover at northumberland jail, showing inmates high on drugs. and on the floor, a prison officer suffering a seizure after accidentally inhaling the synthetic drug, spice. there is no more money in today's announcement for him or his colleagues here. the justice secretary, liz truss, has already announced plans to boost officer numbers.
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it is not something you can sort out in weeks or months, it takes time to recruit people, it takes time to bring those people on. but i am absolutely determined to deal with that. but prison reform campaigners, including those who have been inside, say there has to be more focus on holding onto experienced hands. there is a peculiar, invisible chemistry of wary mutual respect between experienced prison officers, who know how to keep difficult prisoners under control, from inexperienced prison officers, who don't quite understand that you don't need to take out your truncheon to sort out a fight between two prisoners. eventually, the plan is for 2,500 extra officers in england and wales. but they won't all be in place until 2018. june kelly, bbc news. with me is ed boyd, managing director at the centre for socialjustice.
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do you accept there are serious problems in the country's prisons? there absolutely serious problem, andi there absolutely serious problem, and i think the reality is there has been for decade, back 23 years ago john major said he would have a blitz on prisons in 1994, john major said he would have a blitz on prisons “119911, because john major said he would have a blitz on prisons in 1994, because of the drug abuse that was going on inside them. labour said the same in 97 for their manifesto and are saying the same again now. it is great there is a recognition there isa programme, great there is a recognition there is a programme, it has got worse but it has been there for generations almost and this is is a great opportunity to try and tackle that, because if we intervene well in prisons this affects notjust the lives of people in there but the communities they will go back to, theirfamily, who communities they will go back to, their family, who would communities they will go back to, theirfamily, who would benefit hugely from these places being places of #2ce78ion, turning people's lives round and giving people's lives round and giving people a second chance. people's lives round and giving people a second chancel people's lives round and giving people a second chance. i think eve ryo ne people a second chance. i think everyone accepts that £12 million to
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help boost the salaries of certain section of the prison workforce, is not going to be the silver bullet of reform, but what do you think about other things that liz truss talked about digitising prisons and running them in different ways, will that help, if so by how much? if you look at the research it is simple to turn someone's lives round in terms of what you need do, doing it is slightly harderer. what you need do, doing it is slightly ha rderer. we what you need do, doing it is slightly harderer. we need to tackle drug problem, people are in because they were committed offences to pay for drug, you help someone connect with their.. if somebody knows they have a loved one to go back to, waiting for them, that makes a massive difference in whether they invest in changing their lives and helping someone get a job as well, it is hugely important, to say there is isa it is hugely important, to say there is is a better life you can get out there. whether she embeds these three things in the heart of the criminal justice system three things in the heart of the criminaljustice system will make
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the difference about whether people come out of it reformed or not. the prison 0fficers' association has said of her plan to give the pay increase simply to those prison 0fficers working in london and the south—east. they say that is very unfair. do you think it is a good idea to have targeted it simply as officers working in those areas in it makes business sense, where do you need to boost the number of high quality graduates coming into the prison system, if you found the particular area where that needs to be done, that is the place to inrest. it is not, it is not about prison 0fficer, you want to make sure it is secure the violence comes down, it is about changing people's lives in there. they are the people who affect so much crime, when they come out, and at the moment, go on to reoffend, that is the thing we have to focus on, that is what she is doing, i think by making those targeted investments. do you think liz truss has the stomach to take
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the system on in the way you are suggesting many before her haven't. it is early days in what she is doing, so far she said in a speech last week, that this is her big thing, she will make a legal requirement for her to invest in rehabilitation in prisons, for the first time. so, there were good signs but but the proof will be in the pudding, does the money, does the pudding, does the money, does the investment, the media end political focus come down on the criminal justice system political focus come down on the criminaljustice system to make sure that we don't accept what has gone on for generations and we do change things this time. many thanks. at least 19 people have been killed and dozens others injured in an explosion in a market in the somali capital mogadishu. the car bomb ripped through shops and stalls in the madina district. it comes days before the country is due to inaugurate the new president mohamed abdullahi mohamed. no group has claimed responsibility for the attack. the body of a missing two—year—old boy has been found in a river in perthshire.
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he was reported missing from a property near the bridge of cally shortly after eleven this morning. an air and ground search was launched and the child was found close to the property, in the river ericht, an hour later. his family have been informed. 0ur correspondent is there and what more do we know about what happened today? well, as you say, it was quarter past 11 this morning, that the alarm was raised. emergency services were told a two—year—old boy has gone missing from milton down the river and across the valley from where i am at the bridge. a full scale search of the area was quickly launched, involving the police scotland helicopter and scottish fire and rescue crews and at 2.35, an hour and 20 scottish fire and rescue crews and at 2.35, an hourand 20 minutes after the alarm had been raised the boy was found in the river, he was rescued from the water by a scottish
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fire and rescue team and treated at the scene by paramedics who arrived in the airambulance the scene by paramedics who arrived in the air ambulance but police scotla nd in the air ambulance but police scotland say tragically he did not survive, they say his family is currently being supported by police officers. has there been any reaction from the local community? well, milton is a very small area, and in fact, a lot of the access is currently still cordoned off by police scotland. as you imagine, in a ruralarea like this, in rural perthshire people wa nt to this, in rural perthshire people want to pull together and support one another, rather than talking to us, but deputy first minister of scotla nd us, but deputy first minister of scotland john swinney has expressed his sympathy for the family, tweeting heartbreaking news, my deepest sympathy to erne involved and the local councillor liz can grant who is provost of perth and kinross say this is devastate forking the family and the community. she says the river is fast, all the rivers are fast coming through that area, particularly at this time of year. —— devastating for.
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up to 480 police investigations could be reviewed after a criminal probe was launched into the actions of two people at a forensics laboratory. randox testing services, based in manchester, analyses samples for drugs. two men who worked at the laboratory have been arrested. earlier i spoke to our reporter phillip norton, who's in manchester. yes, well, randox testing services provides a scientific analysis of samples to be used in criminal cases for police forces across the country. that's samples such as hair, blood, and saliva, which are tested for traces of alcohol, and drugs. now, that evidence is then used in court proceedings. up to 500 drug test results carried out since november 2015 may have been compromised due to what randox says is due to the manipulation of quality control data which supports test results. now this might have an impact on criminal cases which have already been concluded, and this was brought to light by this company's own internal inquiries, and as a result greater
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manchester police have now launched their own investigation into what has taken place here. philip, what are randox saying about these arrests? well, we understand that they have issued a list of potential cases which have been affected to all the police forces who have been affected by this. randox testing services said that there is no evidence that the samples themselves were subject to any interference, and in a statement, the company has said these actions were in contravention of our well established, robust practises and procedures. randox testing services, they say, are working tirelessly to fully assess the impact and implications for each case. where possible, they say, and when viable, samples will be rerun to provide robust uncompromised results. two men have been arrested on suspicion of perverting the course of justice, and they have been released on police bail. thousands of prison officers in london and the south east
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of england are to get an instant pay increase of between three and five thousand pounds. ministers hope it'll ease the pressure on the service. save the children say that 350,000 children are trapped in western mosul as iraqi troops, supported by american air strikes, have begun their assault to recapture the city from islamic state militants. ing for the family and the community. she says the river is fast, all the rivers are fast coming through that area, particularly at this time of year. —— devastating for. craft heinz says it has withdrawn its proposed take over of unilever, a joint statement between the two companies say it was amicably agreed. more on that story now.
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unilever owns many familiar brands including household names such as marmite and persil. joe, how much of a surprise is this an amazing surprise, extraordinary, that such an amazingly out of blue offer which was published on friday should be withdrawn almost within 48—hours, this is a major volte face by kraft. to make this incredible bid for a larger british dutch company, unilever, and then to withdraw within two days is a mark of the fa ct within two days is a mark of the fact they really misjudged the mood. the statement hints at that, they talk about unilever and kraft hold each other in high regard. regard. it sounds like a bromance. kraft heinz has the utmost respect for unilever, i suspect the pr mandarins insisted on that sentence being
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inserted because it is saying, we kind of misjudged the mood. we thought you might be open to this generous offer, it looks as if you are not open to any offers whatsoever. because briefly joe, kraft came in for criticism a few yea rs kraft came in for criticism a few years ago with its take over by cadbury. do you think it was stung by that? this with was then and this is now. kraft bought cadbury but spun it off. it is not part of their company at the moment. there was a lot of political heat as you recall, because kraft promised not to shut down a cadbury factory in bristol, which they promptly did within six weeks of taking over the company, so a lot of people were watching this, whether there was there was going to be another repetition of such promises that may not have been seen through. i am sure more will emerge in the next few hours, thank you joe. malaysian police are hunting for at least four more suspects in the death of kimjong—nam, the half brother of north korea's
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leader kim jong—un. he died on monday after apparently being poisoned at kuala lumpur airport. four people have already been arrested over the death but many questions remain unanswered, including what will happen to his body. celia hatton reports. thesis thes is non—of this man thesis non—of this man appears to have involved a widening cast of characters. four have already been detained in the poisoning of kim jong—nam. including a woman holding a vietnamese passport who could be this person from the crime scene and this person from the crime scene and this woman who says she was tricked into participating. she says she thought she was on a television prank show. 0ne prank show. one north korean citizen is in custody, thought to be the man escorted here by malaysian police. and now, the authorities have asked for interpol‘s help to find at least four more north koreans, who all entered an exited malaysia using regular passports. ican regular passports. i can confirm today they have left
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oui’ i can confirm today they have left our country the very same day the incident happened. and more suspects are also wanted. people of interest who might know how kimjong—nam's killing was carried out. four suspects has been identified. which could assist us very much on the investigation. still the question of what will be done with. kim jong—nam's body. malaysian law requires his family to come in person to claim his corpse. the next of kin has to come forward. i have given a time frame. if still they don't come forward, we have to look for the next option. for the next option. i don't discuss it at the moment. we wait and see. it is unclear whether mr kim's children could travel to the morgana but the autopsy was conducted or perhaps the law requires the presence of this man, the victims
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half sibling north korean leader kim jong—un. south korea's unification ministry say they believe pyongyang orchestrated the poisoning of kim jong—nam. the man once poised to rule north korea before falling out of favour with his father. while kim jong—nam was alive the thinking goes he remained a threat to his half brother and to kim jong—un‘s fragile grip on power inside north korea. i have had some rather contentious times with the press, but no, the press as far as i am concerned are a
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constituency we deal with, and the, i don't have any issues with the press, myself. speaking to nbc meet the press reince priebus defended the press reince priebus defended the president's statements about media, insisting mr trump believed ina media, insisting mr trump believed in a free press. i can assure you this, the president believes in the first amendment, in the free press, we don't believe everyone is loutsy in the media, we don't believe everything is bad but there are some things that are really bad and we have tried to he categorises that as fa ke have tried to he categorises that as fake news, what we have been through over the last ten days has been unbelievable. the leak, the fake stories, the anonymous accusation, that stuff is bad. the chief executive of sainsbury‘s has intervened in the row about the revaluation of business rates, which takes effect in april. mike coupe says the current system is archaic and needs fundamental reform, because it favours online businesses. some high street retailers say they will see rates rise dramatically, though the government
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says the majority of firms will pay the same or less. here's our business correspondent joe lynam. the effects will be felt and business groups have been asking for help. the government says the majority of firms will pay the same 01’ majority of firms will pay the same or less, authorities in scotland and wales have also undertaken revaluation, the effects of which will also be felt in april. revaluation, the effects of which will also be felt in april. lord mandelson, a former labour cabinet minister, has urged peers to not "throw in the towel early" when they debate the process of triggering brexit. the government has warned lords not to block the legislation which will start the uk's withdrawal from the eu. the house of lords will begin debating the article 50 bill tomorrow and earlier, our political correspondent tom bateman, told me the process will be taken very seriously. we expect nearly 200 meres of the realm to talk in this debate. that is approaching record numbers and that gives you a sense, i think, the way in which many of the peers want
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to influence this process, as this bill now passes for the first time, to the house of lords, now the government's intention is for it so go through parliament unaltered. a clea n go through parliament unaltered. a clean bill, a simple bill, that says the government has the right to begin the brexit process, but many like lord mandelson and other peers are slapping amends on to the books as fast as they can. there will be pages of these that potentially will be debated in the lords in the next couple of week, the two areas i think where people like lord mandelson are hoping for most success , mandelson are hoping for most success, firstly in trying to get the government on the statute book, so in law, to have to come to particle, to give mps and peers a vote on any deal before it is signed off by theresa may. now the government has given a verbal agreement to that in the common, they want this in law. the second area is the right of eu citizens in the uk. 0n area is the right of eu citizens in the uk. on both fronted lord mandelson was confident that they
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could get somewhere. here is what he had to sayen the andrew marr programme this morning. had to sayen the andrew marr programme this morninglj had to sayen the andrew marr programme this morning. i think there a strong body of opinion that both these issues are very serious, of course when it comes to the eu citizen, the british government is not negotiating with itself. there will be people among the member states who say, no, we don't want to ta ke states who say, no, we don't want to take this issue now, we will take it later on during the course of the negotiation, because it is as much a negotiating gambit for them as it is for britain. the government doesn't have a majority in the house of lords, and it was interesting after the house of commons vote some of the expressions, one government source on the night of that vote saying, if the lords try to medal with this or block it, they could face an existential threat that the public might be calling for the peerses to be established. downing street rowed back on that and said there was no such threat at all and it was the right of peers to scrutinise this, but i think it is interesting, the
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government knows it still could face some opposition, this could be a time where some peers may try to delay things so i think they are taking no chance, we heard from the justice secretary liz truss this morning. the fact is it was voted for conclusively in the house of commons, the leader of the lords said on your show last week that they wouldn't be holding it up, that they wouldn't be holding it up, that they were looking at scrutinising, they were looking at scrutinising, the fact is it is a simple bill op do we trigger article 50? the british people have voted for that, they were clear in the referendum and the house of lords now needs to get on with it, with i is what i understand they will be doing, despite what peter mandelson claims. we might, it is possible, there could be parliamentary ping—pong over this. i think the government will try to avoid that. that is probably a worse case scenario, theman isters remain confident they will get it through and they will be ina will get it through and they will be in a position to trigger that article 50 process during the course of march. that was tom bateman.
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more than 5,000 people have travelled on the first timetabled steam train service on the settle to carlisle railway line in half a century. tornado, the newest steam locomotive in britain, pulled 12 northern services between the 14th and 16th of february. northern rail said the event as "a remarkable success" and has not ruled out running similar services again. the three day event was part of celebrations to mark the upcoming reopening of the line after landslides closed a long stretch. in a few minutes, live on bbc news, we'll have the draw for the quarter finals of the fa cup, when amongst others giant killers lincoln city will find out who their opponents will be. that's at 6.30, but first here's helen willetts with the latest on the weather. good evening. it is the influence of the atlantic wind flow that kept us so mild and it has kept us with a lot of cloud. you can see the weather fronts lining up, lot of cloud. you can see the weatherfronts lining up, so lot of cloud. you can see the weather fronts lining up, so that is pretty much the set up for the
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weekend ahead with a few significantly windier and wetter spells. at the moment the rain peters out southwards, we have that breeze coming in off the atlantic so with the cloud and breeze it will be a mild night. a wet one for the far north—west of scotland and increasing amounts of coastal and hill fog as we head towards dawn, so grey to start with, monday morning, gusty winds with that hill fog and that rain, across the eastern parts of the pennines, east of scotland. the rain eases away later on so fresher but brighter weather here, eve ryo ne fresher but brighter weather here, everyone where we have the cloud it is ten, 11, in some sunshine if it brea ks is ten, 11, in some sunshine if it breaks out of the south, we could have 16 degrees, stilljust about breaks out of the south, we could have 16 degrees, still just about as mile on tuesday at least in the south and wednesday too, but something wetter and windier on the way by then. good evening, welcome to sportsday.
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i'm hugh woozencroft and our focus is once again on the fa cup with the draw for the quarter—finals coming up very shortly indeed. we'll see the action from today's fifth round games striaght after that. one of them, involving the holders manchester united has just ended. they came from behind in the north west derby at championship side blackburn rovers, marcus rashford's equaliser cancelled out danny graham's opener. they'll be in the draw, as will spurs who put out a very strong side to face fulham, also of the championship. harry kane scored all the goals in their 3—0 win at craven cottage. so to the draw — all eyes on the non—league sides. sutton play arsenal tomorrow and of course lincoln city who shocked burnley yesterday are in it. let's join jake humphrey and his guests at ewood park. greetings, good evening. thank you
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for joining greetings, good evening. thank you forjoining us wherever you are around the world, watching on television or listening on the radio. this is the draw for the quarterfinals of the fa cup. we are live out ewood park, blackburn rovers have just been dispatched by manchester united. zlatan ibrahimovic came off the bench to score the winner. that means manchester united are in the draw, along with lincoln, and sutton who are yet to play arsenal. you cannot do this on your own, i'm pleased to say two premier league winners are here, chris sutton and owen hargreaves. having managed lincoln if you years ago, you are taking the credit for this? absolutely not. haven't they been sensational? brilliant win yesterday, i hope they get a

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