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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 28, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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here. i'm sure i've missed someone in my excitement for which i apologise. we would like to thank the wider media for keeping al's story alive and for your fair reporting. please can i ask you that you now allow the two of us sometime together to readjust? we fully recognise that you will want to speak to us and especially to al and we will arrange for that soon enough. but in the meantime may i ask that you give us some space? thank you very much. the debate in parliament fired the
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public‘s interest in this case, and we wouldn't be here without him, so richard drax. the sun is shining and clearly on the righteous. justice has been seen to be done. i have a message for our armed forces. those who serve in thepline have put their lives at risk. indeed, even brave police officers back here — and we remember keith palmer who was killed just the other day — all those who serve between us and evil deserve out serve between us and evil deserve our support all the time. and my message to those out there who serve in sucha message to those out there who serve in such a way is — you will not... we will fight forjustice to ensure
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you get home as quickly as you can to your loved ones. i pay tribute, huge tribute to the legal team, the family of the royal marines and i'm am so proud to be standing here today to the royal marines. all the senior officers who stood by us and there are many and all of you, the press and of course all the royal marines who have come down, right around the country to support every time we've appeared in court. thank you to everyone who has played a pa rt you to everyone who has played a part in today's victory. and i for one, i know all of us, cannot wait to enjoy a glass of champagne with alexander blackman, a hero, who served this country in an exemplary fashion and finally, and finally, justice has done the main thing, which is to get a good, decent and
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brave man home to his wife. the lioness, so aptly described, who is the most remarkable woman. you've heard of three attempts to slay her. a“ heard of three attempts to slay her. a—— to marry here, there might be a fourth, ijoke, of course. well done, claire and thank you all. thank you. well done. studio: glowing tributes there to claire blackman who has fought for her husband, sergeant alexander blackman to be freed from jail. cheers originally convicted of murder, his
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conviction was reduced to manslaughter and today we have just heard that he has been sentenced to seven years, but with time already served, he has already spent almost three—and—a—half years in prison. he will be released. we were hearing there from his lawyer, in about two weeks‘ time at most. and the smile on claire blackman‘s face says it all. let‘s bring in our correspondent at the court, daniel boettcher. a long battle but happiness finally on the faces of all of those who have supported alexander blackman throughout yes, you have heard the cheers and you can probably hear the horns of the taxis sounding their support in support of sergeant alexander blackman. it has been a long battle for his supporters and his wife to
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get to this court. he was convicted by court martial in 2013. during that court martial he was known as marine a. it was for shooting a person in helmand. he was convicted of murder and sentenced to ten yea rs. of murder and sentenced to ten years. he then appealed and even though the appeal did not succeed, the minimum term was reduced to eight years. and it came before the criminal cases review commission, the independent body which looks at potential miscarriages ofjustice and it referred it back to the court of appeal and during that time, the court was told that alexander blackman suffered from a mental disorder at the time and the five
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judges quashed the conviction and replaced by one of manslaughter by reason of diminished responsibility and you have just saw that manslaughter reduced to seven years. the maths are that that seven—year term, half way through that term he can be released on licence and because he has already served almost three—and—a—half years in prison, that means he can be released imminently. the lawyers, members of his legal team think that it would be within the next two weeks or so, ultimately it is up to the prison service to decide. but certainly, within the next few weeks he is expected to be freed and he will then be reunited with his wife, claire, who has fought this long campaign to get him free. and the appeal centred on his mental state at the time of what happened. that's right. there was evidence from three eminent psychiatrists who had all told thejudges eminent psychiatrists who had all told the judges that they had found that he was suffering from this
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condition known as adjustment disorder. the court also heard some of the factors that they believed had led to that, including the conditions, during that gruelling tour of duty in afghanistan. and it it is because of that, that the judges decided that his initial murder conviction was unsafe, that it should be quashed and it should be replaced, substituted by the alternative conviction of manslaughter by reason of diminished responsibility. quite extraordinary scenes behind you outside the court where they are just remaining, just with smiles on their faces in front of the media. not now actually saying very much. claire blackman saying very much. claire blackman saying that the family just now wa nts to saying that the family just now wants to be able to have some time together now. she understands the appetite for the media to speak to them but they really are bask at the
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moment now in the moment, hearing that alexander blackman will be out in two weeks‘ time at most, we heard from his lawyer. we will be back with you for more reaction from the court but i want to bring in ian grainger, conservative mp from bridgwater and west somerset who has served in the military. thank you for joining served in the military. thank you forjoining us. what is your reaction to this? well, i'm obviously very pleased, any soldier, it doesn‘t matter which part of the armed forces, and has a situation like this, needs support, not only when from the armed forces but also the british public. sergeant blackman has gone through hell and black. he has been in a dark and difficult place. he made a mistake, that has been accepted, but i think the court system has done what it should do, that this is a tragic mistake and i‘m delighted that he is out to see his family and society $0011. out to see his family and society soon. you have taken a close
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interest in this, but how much contact interest in this, but how much co nta ct have interest in this, but how much contact have you had with the family? well, i know that richard drax has had it. with mps you need one to head it. there are a lot of ex—servicemen and airmen on this who got together to say — we have to get this man out, he has been in a bad place and needs our support. i‘m very glad and also so proud of his wife, who has steadfastly fought this from beginning to end. it is a wonderful accolade notjust for this from beginning to end. it is a wonderful accolade not just for her but for the rhyl marines and the british military which show it can have keith when one of its own are in terrible trouble and needs our help. what do you think when it did ta ke help. what do you think when it did take quite a fight? i think it is difficult. combat stress is a very ha rd difficult. combat stress is a very hard thing. we all operate under different stress levels. you saw it last wednesday in tragic circumstances. last wednesday in tragic ci rcu msta nces. stress last wednesday in tragic circumstances. stress does things to people which just is still being
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understood in many ways, even though there has been so many laws. it is difficult for people it grasp but you can make a mistake which is not normal, not something a normal person would do and therefore you need that care and understanding and it is easy to say — we‘ll throw the book at them because it is the law. there is a grey area between the law and common sense which i think in this case we let down sergeant blackman but it is something we have to keep on studying, this is why people like myself and hundreds of other colleagues, say — you have to have a better understanding of what stress does to people in circumstances, in a situation like that. thank you very much. let's go back to the court, back it daniel
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boettcher with more reaction from there. daniel. yes, this campaign was led by claire blackman and many, many supporters and in court the case was brought byjonathan goldberg qc who is with me now. your reaction to the sentencing? thrilled. it's a day i'm afraid i never thought i would see. now, just explain, in terms of how this works, because it is still a seven—year sentence. he does still remain convicted of manslaughter. but you believe that he will be released imminently. how is that? well, you see, he has already served three—and—a—half years and a seven—year sentence equates to three—and—a—half years actual time served. i'm afraid. my maths are a little bit out, it is about another two we e ks little bit out, it is about another two weeks and then he will be released from prison whereas previously he was subjected to a life sentence of imprisonment for murderand life sentence of imprisonment for murder and people don't understand the meaning of the eight years. it means he could not even apply for pa role means he could not even apply for parole until at least eight full years had elapsed. that eight years would have been eight years minimum. it could not have been halved or released on licence, so this is a significant reduction in the sentence. well, it is from a life sentence, potentially, because it is only if and when they would give him
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pa role only if and when they would give him parole which couldn't happen until after eight full years, to being released in two weeks. yes. have you had any recent communications with alexander blackman in terms of how he would see this sentence? of course in the sense that my team and i visited a few days ago in prison. i think he would've been happy to serve a couple of years if he had to, bag royal marine, he has shown incredible fortitude and resourcefulness. he is doing an open university degree. he teaches maths to other prisoners who are illiterate. this sort of thing. of course, he is going to be over the moon but he prepared himself for a lot worse than this now it was initially, of course, a murder conviction, that was quashed and replaced with this manslaughter conviction. explain the basics, in simple terms of what the judges heard. what persuaded them that the original conviction was not safe. with pleasure, i will explain in this way. murder we know when that is. it is when you kill fully
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intending to do so. manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, as has happened here now, is when you are so — you've had a mental breakdown and you are not fully responsible for your actions. and the mental breakdown here, as the judges found, was brought about by these hellish combat conditions that he was in for fully six months before this happened. so, the balance of his mind was not right. his responsibility in law is much less, so a much lower sentence. jonathan goldberg qc, many thanks. as you can probably hear behind, supporters are still here, some of those cheering, cars sounding their horns as they drive around in front of the royal courts of dues ti.s a lot of very happy faces here, for those supporters who have been here throughout this legal process. —— the royal courts of justice. we‘ll keep bringing you more
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reaction to that ruling. britain‘s largest retailer, tesco, has agreed to pay a fine of £129 million plus costs, following a two—year investigation by the serious fraud office into false accounting. the agreement — if approved by a crown court — means tesco will avoid prosecution for market abuse by inflating its profits by millions of pounds in 2014. with me is our business presenter, ben thompson. tell us more of what was done? the feign is a slop on the wrist for test cope and reflects —— this fine. is a slap on wrist. and it affects what the serious fraud office thinks. the picture given was of the retailer looking better than it was, because soon after they updated the market and said trafts had been updated by £250 million. later they revised that up. so it pointed an organisation of a picture which was in a much more, much
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healthier financial position than it was. the crux of this was people bought shares on the basis the retailer was doing well. it turns out it was doing £326 million less well. so the share price fell as a result and therefore tesco has subsequently apologised and said it wasn‘t the intention to mislead the market. we should be clear, this is what is known as a deferred prosecution agreement. that relates only to the potential criminal liability of test doe stores. now thatis liability of test doe stores. now that is a sub—— liability of tesco stores. that‘s a subsidiary of the overall group. they say the parent company are liable. this relates just to the stores bi.s as you said in the introduction, this fine means it avoids prosecution but there are a whole range of other things they will be looking at. that was exactly what i was going to ask you, what could unfold from here? as we said, tesco has apologised for this and
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they made it clear, the new boss came in, at the time he has been trying to draw a line under all of this. it was a real baptism of fire for him when he arrived. so for them it is absolutely — the end of the story as far as that accounting problem is concerned. but we should 110w problem is concerned. but we should now say that money has been set aside to compensate investors who bought shares or bought bonds in the retailer on the basis that they thought the retailer was in a better financial position and we should also say the amount of money they‘ve had to pay for this fine will appear in their result for this financial year, 2016—17. they are due to be published in april. we‘ll get an independencation of what it means for the overall financial health of tesco when we see that appear on the balance sheet in april. a rape victim whose case led a judge to warn women that they are more likely to be targeted when drunk, has defended the comments, saying the judge was "right". megan clark was raped by a man she met during a night out in manchester. the trial sparked controversy after the judge said the drunken
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behaviour of some women was putting them at risk. in an exclusive interview, miss clark told the victoria derbyshire programme that she didn‘t believe thejudge was "victim—blaming". i think she was absolutely right in what she said, but it was taken out of context. she put the blame massively on rapists, not the victims. she just simply said to be careful, basically, which is smart advice. we need to be careful. but she wasn‘t at all victim blaming. she said a woman would be less likely to report a rape "because she was drunk or could not remember what happened or feels ashamed to deal with it or, if push comes to shove, a girl who is drunk is less likely to be believed than one who was sober at the time". is that how you felt at the time? yeah, that is definitely true. you didn‘t think you would report something like that because you had had a few drinks? yeah, definitely.
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it is not the way it should be. that is the harsh reality. that is the way things are. are you saying you wouldn‘t have gone to the police that night unless somebody had videoed it? i wouldn‘t have. really? but you had been raped. but it probably wouldn‘t have gone anywhere. it‘s just my word against theirs, without the evidence. rape crisis did criticise the judge‘s comments, they said they were outrageous and misguided. they said, as a judge and a woman, she should know better. the only person who is responsible for rape is the rapist. women are yet again being blamed for rape. that is true. only the rapist is responsible, but that was the point the judge was making, it was just taken out of context. did you everfeel shamed or blamed? at first i did, yeah. a few people i told, they kind of put it down to my behaviour. i thought it was true.
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i guess everybody blames themselves. i know it is not my fault, but it is hard not to blame yourself, especially when you are in that situation. what is your message to other women when they‘re out and about with their mates in the summer, having had a few drinks? don‘t live in fear of rapists and being in danger. look after yourself, of course. know that it is not your fault, whatever happens. i guess i‘d still encourage people to report it, because you have a better chance. even though you feel if it ever happened to you again you wouldn‘t report it? i don‘t think i would. from the experience i have had. that was megan clark who waved her right to anonymity to speak to vic to havia derbyshire. a royal marine who was jailed for shooting a taliban prisoner in afghanistan will be released from prison within two weeks following a long campaign by friends and family. tesco agrees to pay £129 million for overstating profit in two,00014. and a judge prompted controversy during a judge prompted controversy during a rain trial is defended by the victim. in sport. cricket could have an
quote
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annual city—based twenty20 tournament. the aim is to attract younger audiences. former team sky doctor richard freeman has yint to mps explaining what was in the mystery medical package delivered to sir bradley wiggins in 2011. he said it was a legal decongestant. and in the miami finals, juania konta is through to the finals —— johanna konta. the wife of the westminster attacker has issued a statement condemning the actions of khalid masood saying she was "saddened and shocked". rohey hydara also sent her condolences to the families of the four victims who died and has asked for privacy for her family — especially her children. with me is our correspondent, wyre davies. it is now nearly a week since the awful attack when masood drove his
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4x4 killing the people. this is the second statement from a family member of his, expressing anger and shock from what happened. we heard from his mother yesterday and today we heard from his wife, rohey hydara, who lives in the midlands and she has issued this statement through the police saying she‘s shocked, saddened by what happened. expressing condolences to those who died but also expressing, wishing a speedy recovery for those who are injured. what is interesting in this, it show that is khalid masood again, according to the police, acted alone. nobody knew what he was up acted alone. nobody knew what he was up to. the statements and the fact his family members are no longer being detained show that is they still very much believe that despite what he may have been radicalised in prison but the actual act, the criminal act itself was an act he committed alone and nobody else knew about it. what is the latest on the police investigation? they are still going into his background. we know he lived in various places around the country. the interesting thing to find out, if he was radicalised
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in prison, he had several criminal offences and they‘ve investigated him on the fringes of terror offences but nothing specific and it is digging deeper into his background but they are confident he wasn‘t linked to anybody else and they are not expecting any further incidents, although security has been stepped up around certain parts of london. thanks. security is to be increased at windsor castle during changing the guard, which takes place several times a week. new barriers will be put in place along the route of the procession. thames valley police said although there was no specific threat, last week‘s attack in westminster had highlighted the need for the changes. the nhs in england is to consider whether gps should stop prescribing a range of medicines and treatments. the list could eventually include painkillers such as paracemotol, and cough and cold treatments that are widely available over the counter, often for less than the cost of a prescription. the proposals — intended to save millions of pounds — will form part of a major announcement on the future of the health service later this week by the head of nhs england, simon stevens.
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our health editor, hugh pym, reports. the nhs is under increasing financial pressure. now, service leaders are set to closely scrutinise what‘s available on prescription. local health commissioners in england have drawn up a list of items which they say are unnecessary and inappropriate for prescription on the nhs. the medicines and treatments listed include omega—3 and fish oils, some muscle rubs and ointments, gluten—free food, and travel vaccines, still allowed on the nhs. there could be savings of £128 million a year. nhs england has agreed to carry out a review and introduced new guidelines. longer term, the future of cold and cough treatments, indigestion and heartburn medication, and paracetamol on prescription will be considered. health officials say hundreds of millions of pounds more could be saved. nhs england argues they are widely available over the counter at pharmacies. a spokesman said there was a need to ensure that the best value from resources.
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the move will form part of a major strategy announcement by the head of nhs england, simon stephens, later this week. hugh pym, bbc news. live to our studios in central london and we are joined by gp, claire garada. what do you think? is ita claire garada. what do you think? is it a good idea? it is a good idea. asagpi it a good idea? it is a good idea. as a gp i have been saying this for a number of years. the cost of some of these medicines are significantly cheaper when you buy them over the counter, than they cost the state to dispense them. so, for example, a packet of pain killers might be 69p, a bottle of simple remedy for coughs and colds might be £1.20, yet to the state you may have to be paying continue times that amount once you factor in all the costs. and, to be honest, i think we are all in this together around saving money for the nhs and to me, as long as we discuss
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some fted issues around the edging, this is a very sensible way forward. people might be surprised to hear that sun scream, paracetamol, vase lynne, strepsils are amongst the sort of things prescribed.|j lynne, strepsils are amongst the sort of things prescribed. i was surprised. i went into my pharmacist on the way here. i had no idea that strepsils could be available on the nhs. we are now enitering hay fever season. we will are queues of people wanting their tablets where they can buy alongside coffee and tea and all the other things at a fraction of the other things at a fraction of the cost that the state will have to pay to give them on a prescription and many other things that are vale ona and many other things that are vale on a prescription that we, as a gp, ifi on a prescription that we, as a gp, if i start arguing, as i do with some patients, i gets complaints against me or worse still, being a victim of abuse, patients abusing me saying it is their right. this has to be led through nhs england. i‘m surprised they said this is only
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£100 million saving, in my area alone, £1 million could be made, that‘s about enough to fund 12 new health visitors to go and help with the work that‘s needed so desperately in patients‘ homes. thinkties a good move forward. when i was young and my father was a gp you could prescribe washing powder on prescription. we have moved a long way and i think we should move more. you say you have complaints and abuse for trying to talk about this. people feel strongly about 2 tflt they say it is their right. i say this is going to cost the state £10. it is going to cost you 69p or £1. less than a paect of crisp. we are all in this together. of course there are big savings made elsewhere but this won‘t cause much harm to anybody, we can make it for the edges for people who are very, very poor but we are in this together. those are the sorts of things you
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really should be buying alongside your coffee, tea, nappies, whatever and should be part of your home remedy, they shouldn‘t be available on the state, except if they are repeat medicines, of course if you require it for a long—term condition we may have to adjust that but for short—term symptom relief, i think the state shouldn‘t be funding this. thank you very much. the scottish parliament is expected to give its backing today to calls by the first minister, nicola sturgeon, for a second independence referendum. the vote had been due to take place at holyrood last wednesday, but was postponed because of the attack at westminster. the snp leader wants a referendum by the spring of 2019, but theresa may has rejected that timetable. the australian state of queensland is being lashed by torrential rain and very high winds. a cyclone has flooded streets and toppled trees on the whitsunday coast. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from coastal areas, with warnings of dangerous tidal surges. caroline davies reports. battered and broken
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by cyclone debbie. boats have been smashed, streets flooded, trees ripped up and buildings torn apart. debris lines the coast of queensland as the storm moves across north—east australia. wind speeds have already reached 270 kilometres an hour. this is the city of bowen. it‘s been locked down. popular tourist resorts like here in airlie beach and the whitsundays have also been hit. 30,000 people were told to evacuate low—lying areas that are at risk of tidal surges. it‘s the biggest evacuation in australia since is cyclone tracey in 197a. i think i‘m now feeling i‘m glad i‘m going, because i‘d been sort of thinking i could stay, so i‘m happy to go. well, i saw it in the news that airlie was going to be hit more with the cyclone, so i thought — i have to find a way. authorities had time to prepare.
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sandbags have been filled. schools have been closed. shop windows boarded up and airports shut down in what has been a four to five day operation. the public had been told to charge their phones. power outages have already affected some towns. the slow—moving storm is expected to last for many hours and cause major damage. queenslanders will be familiar with the risk of cyclones. now all they can do is wait. let us catch up with the weather. nothing so dramatic on our shores.
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let‘s ta ke nothing so dramatic on our shores. let‘s take a look at the latest satellite sequence. it shows low cloud, fog lingering worked on into the morning. western areas have seen cloud thickening, bringing rain. there will be persistent rain in northern ireland, following on with a line of showers and the possible rumble of thunder. it is warm, possibly getting up to 15 degrees. cloud and rain moving northwards this evening. very little rain gets into the south east, but with a southerly breeze overnight, it will be mild. double figures for many places. it will be chilly in shetland. midweek, low pressure in charge. breezy out west. there will be rain in the north and west, but the south eastern corner should stay dry.
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this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: a royal marine, jailed for the fatal shooting of an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan, will be freed from prison within weeks. it comes after the court martial appeal court sentenced him to seven years for manslaughter. his wife welcomed the decision outside court. we are overjoyed at the judge‘s decision to significantly reduce
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our‘s sentence that he can be released imminently. —— al‘s sentence. this is what we have been fighting for and it is hard to believe that the day is finally here. ajudge who a judge who attracted controversy at a rape trial by saying that women put themselves in danger has been defended by the victim. megan clarke says that the judge was right. i think she was absolutely right in what she said, but it was taken out of context. she put the blame massively on rapists, not the victims. she just simply said to be careful, basically, which is smart advice. the wife of the westminster attacker khalid masood condemns his actions, saying she is saddened and shocked. a statement from rohey hydara says she expresses her condolences
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to the families of the dead and wishes a "speedy recovery" to those injured. time now for the sport. the england and wales cricket board are pushing ahead with their plans for a city based t20 tournement to be launched in the summer of 2020. eight franchises will operate outside the county structure. the ecb are looking to attract new younger audiences. cricket does need to change, i think that s been the key behind this. only 2 percent of children cite cricket as their favourite sport and that‘s pretty poor in a country which has the access so something needs to be done. but there are a few concerns, counties will be nervous about the future but i think some of the exciting prospects coming out of this, looking to attract new audiences will be very exciting. mps on the select committee investigating doping in sport have heard from the
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doctor who received the mystery package for sir bradley wiggins in 2011. richard freeman has provided written evidence, maintaining that the parcel contained a legal decongestant. all parties deny any wrongdoing and the allegations that it was a banned steroid. damian collins, chair of the culture, media and sport select committee, wants more answers, uk anti doping are still carrying out their own investigation. england‘s under 21s won 4—0 last night in denmark in their international friendly match. chelsea‘s ruben loftus—cheek scored twice in a convincing performance by aidy boothroyd‘s side. it‘s part of their preparations for this summer‘s under 21 european championship in poland. there are no more world cup qualifiers but there are a few international friednlies tonight. there are no more world cup qualifiers but there are a few international friendlies tonight.
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the republic of ireland face iceland in dublin — sadly no seamus coleman to skipper the republic. the everton defender broke his leg in two places against wales last friday night. great players have broken their legs, and come back. and seamus should take — i mean, obviously, it is very early for him to start considering all of those things, but he is positive. naturally, as i mentioned earlier, at the start, he is down, as he would be, as the realisation that he is go to be out of action for quite sometime has dawned on him. so those types of things take, don‘t just take five minutes to get over. a friendly match in paris between the ivory coast and senegal was abandoned last night when fans invaded the pitch.
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the teams were level at one all after 88 minutes when a handful of fans came onto the pitch, one of them seemingly giving senegal‘s lamine gassama a rugby tackle. more fans then appeared to leave the stands giving the referee little option but to abandon the game. a match between the two sides during the african cup of nations in 2013 also had to be abandoned. we will find out if andy murray is able to play in the davis cup next month. that should be within the next half an hour. johanna konta is into the quarter finals of the miami open for a second successive year.the british number one beat spain‘s lara arruabarrena in straight sets overnight to set up a last eight meeting with simona halep. manchester‘s world lightweight champion terry flanagan makes the fifth defence of his wbo belt against russia‘s petr petrov a week on saturday but he is already looking forward to a possible unification bout against the star of the divisionjorge linares. the venezuelen outpointed fellow mancunian anthony crolla for a second time last weekend but flanagan thinks he can beat him. ican i can beat him. styles make fights.
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anthony crolla was made for the la rez. “— anthony crolla was made for the la rez. —— lina res. anthony crolla was made for the la rez. —— linares. i anthony crolla was made for the la rez. —— linares. lam based in the division and i will beat anyone. that‘s all sport for now. the government will trigger article 50 tomorrow, the start of divorce proceedings from the european union. talks are expected to begin later this year and ministers will soon have to face the question of whether the uk owes money to the eu to cover past spending commitments. there have been suggestions that britain could owe brussels as much as £60—billion, but the brexit secretary, davis davis, told the bbc last night that he did not expect to see "that sort of money change hands". so what might the brexit bill be? chris morris has been investigating.
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i work reality check question, could the uk‘s divorce bill be as high as 60 billion euros? that figure is being floated in brussels, but is it realistic? 60 billion euros is about £52 billion at current exchange rates. it‘s what we can call the european commission‘s opening gambit. how has this eye watering lay large number being calculated? well, let‘s go to our blackboard. basically, if you take a value for the eu‘s liabilities, that‘s the money it owes, and you then subtract value for the eu‘s assets, the balance you take, and you divide it by the average uk share of eu budget contribution, which is roughly 12% and that can get you to this figure, 60 billion euros. but the details, surprise, surprise, are complicated and contentious. let‘s break them down. first of all there are the liabilities, the biggest chunk, what you can call the eu‘s credit card.
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money already committed by the eu for which the bills haven‘t yet been paid. by the end of next year, the eu‘s credit card bill could be as high as 240 billion euros, so the uk‘s share would be substantial. then there is money which is due to be spent over the next few years, a lot on big infrastructure projects in poorer eu countries and in the commission‘s view, the uk has already made a legally—binding promise to fund all of this, even projects that get paid for after the uk has left. what else? well, there are pensions, the eu‘s pensions currently more than 60 billion euros for eu staff and the uk is on the hook for a share of that, too, says the commission. then there are other smaller liabilities that will all be part of the negotiation. what about on the other side? the assets. well, there are things like eu buildings, there are a couple the assets. well, there are things like eu
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buildings, there are a couple of satellites in space, there‘s even a nice wine cellar, all sorts of things that can be used to bring the bill down and of course the uk will haggle over how much all of it is worth. what if there is no deal, though, no deal at all? well, according to the house of lords, their report has said we can walk away without paying anything and there are those in the brexit camp who say that‘s what we should do, come what may, leave without paying anything. the pro—leave organisation, lawyers for britain, they also argue that the government should demand £9 billion back to cover its share of funds held by the european investment bank. so let‘s face it, this will all start as a legal argument but it‘ll end as a political one. the eu will try to get as close as possible to that 60 billion euros figure, while the uk will try to bring it down as close to zero as it can. what‘s the likely outcome going to be? they‘re going to have to try and find a compromise. well, even a bill of tens of billions of euros spread over a decade and more would not be that significant in economic terms but politically it could be dynamite. welcome to bbc ask this,
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where all this week we‘ll be putting your questions to the bbc‘s editors ahead of the triggering of article 50 by theresa may. you can send in your questions to use using the hashtag bbc ask this or text on 611211. with me is our home affairs correspondent mark easton. it is amazing that we are almost there. tomorrow article 50 will be triggered. let us kicked off with some questions on immigration and rights of eu and uk citizens. we will start with one that has come in saying the main reason for brexit is immigration. when we take control again of our borders, as it is described, will be when we finally leave the eu. we are still in the eu
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and will remind the until we leave. article 50 is about telling the eu we intend to leave. we know the eu has said there can be no cherry picking and that if we want to be in the single market and trade freely with the rest of the eu then you have to have free movement. as far as the prime minister is concerned, she has been equally clear that we are not prepared to accept free movement. control of our borders is a red line for her and therefore we won‘t be part of the single market, we won‘t be part of the customs union. for the moment, we won‘t be part of the customs union. forthe moment, we we won‘t be part of the customs union. for the moment, we are in a position where things are exactly as they have been, and will be until we formally leave the european union. there are concerns as to whether it can all be done in the time. some people already talking about transitional arrangements beyond the two years, but the moment when we
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will be able to control eu migration, because we already have control over non—eu migration will be at the point when we leave. can any retrospective dates be put on it? the argument is that people could come here in the period before we leave to make the most of the current situation. there is a separate issue about residency. who can rightfully live here. those questions are hugely complicated and certainly there is concerned there might bea certainly there is concerned there might be a rush of people to come in, as you say, before some sort of barrier comes down, but actually, across the two years and within the negotiations and beyond, i‘m sure there will be, well the hip —— well there will be, well the hip —— well there will be discussions about those people‘s status. will brexit affect jobs for
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immigrants and if yes, how? the prime minister is clear that she wa nts prime minister is clear that she wants the net migration reduced to tens of thousands. the evidence is that a substantial proportion of those people who voted to leave are expecting to see a very significant reduction in the amount of immigration to britain. as i said, the government has made it clear that that is where it wants to go. however that process of moving to a low migration economy won‘t be that straightforward or necessarily that quick because as we have just heard, we have millions of eu workers who work in our health service, our businesses, our hotels, construction, agriculture and so on. if they were all to leave, that will present is clearly with a difficult situation. so we have already heard
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from david davis, the brexit secretary, that there will be migration. he said it last night on the bbc that sometimes it will go up, sometimes it will go down. he said ina up, sometimes it will go down. he said in a speech in estonia a few weeks ago that the idea we are suddenly going to see a big reduction in the number of low skilled workers in the eu coming to the uk may not be the case. there will be opportunities for people with low skills to come to the uk, even after brexit. it is unclear as to how britain will make this clear move to being a much lower migration economy and there is clearly going to bea economy and there is clearly going to be a lot of discussion and negotiation on the way. ian says while scotland is part of the eu, can they stay in the eu alone? interesting question, a lot of discussion about that. technically,
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when the united kingdom these the european union, scotland, as part of the uk, will leave the european union as well. it is conceivable, although very unlikely where we stand, that scotland will be an independent country before that happens. so there needs to be a referendum in scotland for them to be independent from the uk. word that to happen and scotland was independent, if it happened before the uk finally left the european union, i think there are real doubt as to whether the eu would be happy to welcome them back into the eu, although it has never been done, so who knows? if it happened after the uk left, so there was a gap between scotla nd uk left, so there was a gap between scotland being out of the eu and then negotiated as an independent country to go back in, they would have too satisfied or other 20s are the members that they were an
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independent country. that is not necessarily going to be straightforward because the spanish in particular are concerned about the idea of breakaway states becoming independent and then wanting eu membership. of course in spain, the catalans in catalonia have always argued that they should be an independent country and the spanish government are opposed to that. lots of politics involved and it won‘t be easy. that. lots of politics involved and it won't be easy. none of it is simple. john asks what is the situation regarding job also, and northern ireland. there is a question —— and the irish republic. there is an open border between the north and south. whatever happens, there should be some border there, perhaps with customs posts. david
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davis has talked about it not being a hard border. the prime minister says she wants a frictionless border. it is quite difficult to see how this is going to work because if we are outside the single market and the republic of market is inside the single market, there will have to be some sort of control. we will see more control at airports and sea ports on the island of ireland, if you like, in order to make it possible for us to have not too hard border within the island itself. mark, thank you very much. if we did not get to your question, don‘t worry, because we will be coming back to this later in the day. in a moment, a summary of the business news, but first the headlines. a royal marine jailed for the fatal shooting of an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan will be freed
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from prison within weeks following a long campaign by friends and family. tesco agrees to pay 129—million pounds to avoid prosecution the wife of the westminster terror attack khalid massood says that she is saddened and shocked. tesco stores ltd has agreed to pay a fine of £129 million to avoid prosecution for overstating its profits in 2014. the deferred prosecution agreement with the serious fraud office after a two—year probe. the new £1 coin becomes legal tender from today. it has got 12 sides, two different colours and a whole host of security features to cut the number of fake coins in circulation. and red row has pulled out of
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ta keover and red row has pulled out of takeover talks with bovis after a cash offer was rejected. redrow said it is not in the shareholders‘s best interests to increase the proposal. tesco has been hit with a fine of £129 million by the serious fraud office for overstating profits in 2014. it follows a two—year investigation into false accounting at the supermarket giant. the supermarket chain has consequently agreed with the financial conduct authority to spend £85 million on compensating investors. joining me now is laith khalaf, senior analyst at hargreaves la nsdown. good to talk to you. just explain this. it is a severe punishment for tesco and we have heard from the fso
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that this is about recognising they did wrong. that is right. it was a huge accounting scandal. the good news for investors is that the sca is asking tesco to paint a two £5 million in compensation. —— fca. will we see this fine appear in the figures they will publish in april? it's figures they will publish in april? it‘s up for debate, but analysts know this is coming down the road. it is because for tesco, obviously. this is during a period when they have been staging a bit of a recovery and also proposing to take
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over the booker group. dave lewis has come in and came injury in the midst of the accounting scandal. he will be hoping to draw a close to this. they are looking to the future and there is this a good deal. just explain that because there has been mixed responses from investors. it's a £3.7 billion takeover. tesco is the biggest uk supermarket and booker are the biggest food suppliers. there are issues over the takeover. one is that tesco is steadying the ship and is this the time to launch aggressive takeover activity? there are also big shareholders who are opposed to the deal and they represent about 9% of the share capital of tesco. also the
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competition in markets authority will look at the deal as well. they may throw a spanner in the works if they decide that the combined group reduces competition in the uk foods market. good to talk to you as always. thank you for explaining all of that. it has been a busy morning for tesco. there is a new quid on the block — britain‘s new £1 becomes legal tender today. it‘s designed to cut the soaring number of fake pounds in circulation. it‘s the first new £1 coin to be introduced in more than 30 years and will be the most secure of its kind in the world. but is the uk ready for this change? it means all sorts of changes for businesses, things like lockers, vending machines, parking meters. let‘s speak to the chief executive of the royal mint. good morning. if
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the uk ready? it is a flashy new coin, it looks cool, but will it work? we are in good shape. we have between 85 and 90% of the machines ready to take the new coin and the old one. as we see more of the new one point coins coming into circulation, the rest of the machines will be converted. we are in good shape at the moment. machines will be converted. we are in good shape at the momentm machines will be converted. we are in good shape at the moment. it took us in good shape at the moment. it took us through the transition period and give us an indication of how long people have got because we all have those £1 coins down the back of the sofa, ina those £1 coins down the back of the sofa, in a drawer at home, winter we need to use them? whatever the 15th is the final day, but we are encouraging the public to empty the coin jars encouraging the public to empty the coinjars and do encouraging the public to empty the coin jars and do something with them quickly. we can recycle the crimes make new £1 coins with the old ones as well. took us through some of the security features. the main reason you are doing this is to cut the number of fake coins in circulation.
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there are features you can talk about someone you can‘t. there are features you can talk about someone you can't. the obvious ones are the ones the public can see, which is the 12 sides, the hologram on the reverse of the coin, the two materials. there are features that kashia ‘s should look for, the weight, the diameter. there are other features for the royal mintand law are other features for the royal mint and law enforcement, just in case someone wants to copy them. so how many counterfeit coins are there at the moment? it's about one in 30. the current pound coin has been out there for 34 years, but it‘s becoming easier to counterfeit with the increasing technology. adam lawrence there, the chief executive of the royal mint. good to talk to
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you. let‘s have a look at the market and see what you can buy with that coin. not a lot in tesco. the pound is up against the dollar, but the ftse 100 against the dollar, but the ftse100 is in wait and see mode. markets are really moving because of what‘s going to happen tomorrow. markets will be watching and waiting and keeping a close eye on what happens. you are up—to—date, i am off to spend this pound. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, will make a statement to mps today, about the continuing political deadlock at stormont. a senior civil servant is due to take over responsibility for northern ireland‘s public finances tomorrow,
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after the democratic unionists and sinn fein failed to strike a deal to resume power—sharing. we are hearing that two patients treated at st thomas ‘s hospital following the terror attack on wednesday have been released from hospital. we will say goodbye to viewers on bbc two, but we will leave you with a look at the weather. the fog and mist is clearing away for most of us. persistent rain for a time in northern ireland, pushing into scotland. behind that a line of shower. warm in the south—eastern corner, could reach 19 degrees. cloudier and cold in scotland. this
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evening, rain in the south and west. the fair bit of cloud and rain across the north and west of the uk. the south east might see some trips and droughts, but largely dry and with the southerly breeze, it will be mild. turning a little bit cold in the far north east of scotland. through the middle of the week, low pressure to the west is in charge of our weather. it will be quite breezy. rain in the north and west, it should stay dry in the south—east. this is bbc new and these are the top stories developing at midday: free within weeks, a royal marine jailed for shooting dead an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan is told he will be leaving prison soon. alexander blackman was resentenced after his original murder conviction was replaced with manslaughter following a campaign by friends and family. we are overjoyed at the judges‘
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decision to significantly reduce our sentence, such that he can be released imminently. tesco agrees to pay £129 million to avoid prosecution for overstating its profits. a judge who attracted controversy at a rape trial by saying drunk women were putting themselves in danger is defended by the victim. the wife of the westminster attacker, khalid masood, i think she was right in what she said but it was taken out of context. she put the blame massively on rainists, not the victims. she just simply said — be careful, basically, which is smart advice. which is smart advice. the wife of the westminster attacker, khalid masood, condemns his actions, saying she is ‘saddened and shocked‘. also... cyclone debbie batters the australian state of queensland. high winds and torrential rain cause major damage and cut power to tens
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of thousands of homes. and the nhs in england is to consider whether gps should stop prescribing a range of treatments, including gluten—free food. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. a royal marine, who was sent to prison for killing an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan, is likely to be released in the next two weeks. sergeant alexander blackman had his murder conviction reduced to manslaughter earlier this month, on the grounds of diminished responsibility. he‘s now been sentenced to seven years , but has already served three and a half.
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!we canjoin ! we canjoin daniel boettcher. . they were cheers inside and outside court as this sentence was handed down. it is a seven—year prison term but he is eligible to be considered for release half way through that at the. he has served three—and—a—half yea rs the. he has served three—and—a—half years so his legal team believe he will be freed within weeks. initially convicted of murder that was quashed on appeal earlier this month. thejudges replaced it with a sentence, a conviction for manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility and it is for that manslaughter conviction that he has now been sentenced. there were further cheers outside court as his wife claire blackman came out and she gave this statement. we are overjoyed at the judges' decision to significantly reduce our sentence, such that he can be released imminently. this is the moment we have all been
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fighting hard for. it's hard to believe that this day is finally here. there are so many people that we must thank for helping us to get here. they include of course our brilliant legal team, jonathan goldberg qc, jeffrey israel and sengin. kong they richard drax mp. i must thank a former royal marine, john davies who had never met my husband but who captained the campaign and the supporters from the start with tireless energy along with sue scam childs, major —— childs...
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and our thanks to all who have supported us through this journey, our own friends and familiar li, the royal marines familiar li, especially the royal marines mums, all serving and former servicemen and women, members of the public and the daily mail readers, without whose generosity we would not be here. i'm sure i've missed someone in my excitement, for which i apologise. we would like to thank the wider media for keeping our story arrive and for your fair reporting. please can i ask that you now allow the two of us sometime together to readjust. we will fully recognise that you will want to speak to us and especially to al and we will arrange for that soon enough, but in the meantime may i ask that you give us some space, thank you very much. this has been a long legal process. alexander blackman was convicted in november
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of 2013 by a court marshal. it was sentenced to 10 years, reduced to eight years, there was an appeal which didn‘t succeed but the second appeal led to his murder conviction being quashed and substituted by one of man slaughterer. my colleague has the background to the story. as a marine sergeant, alexander blackman had ban decisive accomplished leader of troops, someone who‘d killed 30 times for his country but on this tour of afghanistan in 2011 he and his men went through what was called a tourfrom his men went through what was called a tour from hell. his men went through what was called a tourfrom hell. they his men went through what was called a tour from hell. they were his men went through what was called a tourfrom hell. they were provoked and violently targeted incessantly by the taliban n this field they found an injured taliban insurgent. sergeant blackman was recorded saying this: he then pointed his gun at the
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insurgent. he then added: in 2013, sergeant blackman was found guilty of murder a decision that thousands of military colleagues believed was a moral outrage. earlier nonth that conviction was reduced to manslaughter on grounds of diminished responsibility. rob driscoll served alongside al blackman and said the decision to release him is the right one, given what they all went through your a nswer to what they all went through your answer to your question s was it right for me what he did? my answer would be — absolutely. you know when you are surrounded by absolute lunacy, then a little bit of lunacy, kind of doesn‘t seem so bad. prosecutors argued that alexander blackman broke the rules of war that separate civilised armies from others, but his supporters saw a man tormented by the horrors of combat.
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now he is to be reunited with his wife. for her, for him, he is the last casualty of the afghanistan conflict. now, this campaign has been led by claire blackman, alexander blackman ‘s wife but also many other people in many different walks of life, one of them is richard dchl rax mp who is with me now. your response to the sentence today? i'm absolutely delighted that after three years justice has finally been served and that —— richard drax, and that a good, decent, courageous man can go back to his wife, where he belongs. why have you been involved in this campaign from the start? why did you feel it was important that you and others fought for this case? well, asa others fought for this case? well, as a comrade in arranges because i was a soldier once, ijust thought this whole thing, three—and—a—half yea rs this whole thing, three—and—a—half years ago seemed strange to me, the case of murder, sentencing him to so
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many years in jail. case of murder, sentencing him to so many years injail. i went to case of murder, sentencing him to so many years in jail. i went to see him,| many years in jail. i went to see him, i listened to his story, as i drove home i rang his wife and i said — something is wrong she said it was. it has spiralled and we are where we are today, justice has been done. the battle was worthwhile. this all hinged in the second appeal where the murder conviction was quashed and replaced by one of manslaughter. what were the important elements there? what led to that change? the psychiatric reports from three top psychiatrists certainly i think tipped the scales. they gave evidence in front of the judges and the judges wrote a very lengthy report and in that report they concluded, sensibly and rightly in my view, of course, that the verdicts should be changed from murder to manslaughter with diminished responsibility. that comes with remission of 50% on any sentence whereas a murder conviction does not. but he is still convicted of manslaughter and the judges said in sentencing remarks although
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responsibility was diminished he still maintained a substantial responsibility for the deliberate killing? someone is saying and no—one ever has said that what he did was right and alexander blackman, who i got to know well over the last few years, will also say that, i‘m sure. that‘s the no the point. the point is he was placed under circumstances that no—one back here can fully comprehend. none of us can. it is very easy tojudge, comprehend. none of us can. it is very easy to judge, from the comfort ofan armchair very easy to judge, from the comfort of an armchair with the comfort of a gin and tonic in your hand. all the mitigating circumstances that weren‘t fully heard in the first case have been aired along with mental illness that was agreed by three top psychiatrists and the right sentence has been handed down. thank you very much. so ap seven—year sentence but we are told by his legal team that he is eligible for release within the next few weeks. the exact date hasn‘t been set yet, it will be down to the prison service thank you very much,
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daniel. britain‘s largest retailer, tesco, has agreed to pay a fine of £129 million plus costs, following a two—year investigation by the serious fraud office into false accounting. the agreement, if approved by a crown court, will mean tesco avoids prosecution for market abuse after inflating its profits by millions of pounds in 2014. our business presenter, ben thompson explained the background to the danchts came about at the end of august in 2014, tesco issued a trading statement. it gave a picture of the retailer looking much better than perhaps it was, because then soon after they updated the market and said the profits had been overstated by £250 million. they later then revised that up to £326 million. so it really did paint a picture of an organisation that was ina much picture of an organisation that was in a much healthierfinancial position than it actually was and the problem, the crux of this is that people bought shares on the basis that they thought the retailer
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was doing w it actually turns out it was doing w it actually turns out it was doing w it actually turns out it was doing £326 million less w the share price fell as a result and therefore tesco has subsequently apologised and said it wasn‘t the intention to mislead the market. but we should be clear — this is is what is known as a deferred prosecution agreement that. relates only to the potential criminal liability of test doe stores. it is a subsidiary part of the overall group. —— tesco stores. it crucially doesn‘t address whether it was the parent company, an poliee of tesco or an employee of the parent company of tesco is liable here. an employee. it relates just to the stores. and this fine means it avoids prosecution but there is a range of other things we will be looking at. that‘s what i was going to ask you, so what could unfold? tesco as apologised for this and they have made it clear. the new boss who came in at the time, he has been trying to draw a line under all of this, it was a real baptism of
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fire for him when he arrived. for them, it is absolutely the end of them, it is absolutely the end of the story as far as that accounting problem is concerned but we should now problem is concerned but we should now say, of course, that money last been set aside to compensate investors who bought shares or bought bonds in the retailer on the basis that they the thought the retailer was in a betterfinancial position. we should say the amount of money they have had to pay will appear in the results for this year, 2016-17. appear in the results for this year, 2016—17. those are due to be published on #19 april. so we‘ll get an independencation of what it means for the overall financial health when we see that appear on the balance sheet in april. a rape victim, whose case led a judge to warn women are more likely to be targeted when drunk, has defended the comments, saying the judge was "right". megan clark waived her right to anonymity to speak out. megan clark was raped by a man during a night out in manchester. the trial sparked controversy after the judge said the drunken behaviour of some women was putting them at risk.
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in an exclusive interview, miss clark, told the victoria derbyshire programme that she didn‘t believe the judge was "victim—blaming". i think she was absolutely right in what she said, but it was taken out of context. she put the blame massively on rapists, not the victims. she just simply said to be careful, basically, which is smart advice. we need to be careful. but she wasn‘t at all victim blaming. she said a woman would be less likely to report a rape "because she was drunk or could not remember what happened or feels ashamed to deal with it or, if push comes to shove, a girl who is drunk is less likely to be believed than one who was sober at the time". is that how you felt at the time? yeah, that is definitely true. you didn‘t think you would report something like that because you had had a few drinks? yeah, definitely. it is not the way it should be. that is the harsh reality. that is the way things are. are you saying you wouldn‘t have gone to the police that night
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unless somebody had videoed it? i wouldn‘t have. really? but you had been raped. but it probably wouldn‘t have gone anywhere. it‘s just my word against theirs, without the evidence. rape crisis did criticise the judge‘s comments, they said they were outrageous and misguided. they said, as a judge and a woman, she should know better. the only person who is responsible for rape is the rapist. women are yet again being blamed for rape. that is true. only the rapist is responsible, but that was the point the judge was making, it was just taken out of context. did you everfeel shamed or blamed? at first i did, yeah. a few people i told, they kind of put it down to my behaviour. i thought it was true. i guess everybody blames themselves.
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i know it is not my fault, but it is hard not to blame yourself, especially when you are in that situation. what is your message to other women when they‘re out and about with their mates in the summer, having had a few drinks? don‘t live in fear of rapists and being in danger. look after yourself, of course. know that it is not your fault, whatever happens. i guess i‘d still encourage people to report it, because you have a better chance. even though you feel if it ever happened to you again you wouldn‘t report it? i don‘t think i would. from the experience i have had. megan clark who waived her right of anonymity to speak to victoria derbyshire. a domestic abuse charity has criticised a judge who said he would not be jailing a man who admitted attacking his wife with a cricket bat.
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the judge said the victim wasn‘t a vulnerable woman because she was intelligent and had friends. campaigns and public affairs manager for the charity, women‘s aid. thank you forjoining us. what is your reaction? i think it is fair to say that there is universal outrage at the decision made this noe this case and at women‘s aid we are absolutely appalled at the sentence that thejudge has handed down and the message that conveys to the general public about judicial attitude about domestic abuse. what message do you think it sends?|j message do you think it sends?” think it is clear the judge message do you think it sends?” think it is clear thejudge in this case has lame ited understanding on the impact domestic abuse can have. it can have an incredibly long—standing impact and someone‘s vulnerability and the abuse it‘ll have isn‘t determined by the amount of friends they have or their educational status. what factors should be taken into account in sentencing in a case like this, do
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you think? well, it's really important that the judiciary understand that domestic abuse can cut across all kinds of social boundaries, any woman, regardless of class, race, ethnicity and their backgrounds and education can be severely impacted by domestic abuse and actually that has no bearing on the sentence that should be hand down and the perpetrator of these crimes committed incredibly, incredibly serious and dangerous crimes and they should be delted with just as seriously. looking at what thejudge said with just as seriously. looking at what the judge said as we have reported, thejudge said "she is plainly an intelligent woman with a network of friends and did go on to graduate from university with a 2—1 and a masters, although this has had and a masters, although this has had an ongoing affect on her." the judge said he was also not convinced of the defendant‘s remorse and took his
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employment prospects in when sentencing: and he said he took it all in consideration when sentencing. the implication was that it was the employment prospects of the defendant that were taken into account. well, the fact that the employment status of this individual and that his potential future jobs‘ role was considered as a mitigating factor is completely appalling and com pletely factor is completely appalling and completely undermines this woman‘s experience of domestic abecause and the incredibly dangerous, physical assaults that he perpetrated against her, as well as a long—term coercive and controlling behaviour within the relationship and his job and controlling behaviour within the relationship and hisjob prospects should absolutely not be considered as part of the sentence. thank you very much. the main headlines: a rhyl marine jailed for the fatal shooting of an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan will be freed from prison within weeks following a long campaign by friends and family. —— a royal marine.
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tesco has agreed to pay £129 million to avoid prosecution for overstating its profits in 2014. ajudge who provoked controversy in a rape trial is defended by the victim. and now the sport. andy murray won‘t be fit to play in great britain‘s quarterfinal against france. that starts a week on friday. he has a tear in his elbow and needs rest. no decision has been made about when he will return to action. the david cup captain says his absence will be a big loss to the team. the winners will play serbia or spain in the semifinals. johanna konta is into the quarter finals of the miami open
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after a straight sets win over spain‘s lara arruabarrena. the england and wales cricket board are proceeding with their plans for an annual city—based twenty20 tournament starting in 2020. eight franchises will take part, seaparte from the county system the ecb are aiming to attract new audiences. only 296 of children cite cricket as their favourite sport and this is‘ pretty poor in a country where cricket has the access. so something needs to be done but there area something needs to be done but there are a few concerns. there are no doubt counties will be nervous about the future but, i think some of the exciting prospect coming out of this, looking to attract a new audience will be very exciting. the culture media and sport‘s select committee, investigating doping in sport have heard from the doctor who received that mystery package for sir bradley wiggins in 2011. richard
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freeman has written to the committee about the package saying it was a a legal deconguess tact a match was abandoned last night when fans invaded the pitch. a happenedful came on to the pitch and one rugby tackle a is engol player. more fans left the stands giving the referee no option but to abandon the match. a game by the two teams in the african hey of nations in 2013 had to be called off also due to crowd trouble. i will be back after the 1 owe delok news. —— one o‘clock news. the wife of the westminster attacker
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has issued a statement, condemning the actions of her husband, khalid masood. rohey hydara said she was "saddened and shocked", and sent her condolences to the families of the four people who died. ource our ce spopd wyre davies told us more. it is now nearly a week since this awful attack on westminster bridge, where khalid masood killed those people and in the grounds of the palace. this is the second statement from a family member of his, express anger and shock. we heard from his mother yesterday and today we heard from his wife, rohey hydara who lives in the midlands we believe and she has issued a statement from the police saying she is shocked and saddened and expressing condolences to those who died and wishing a spedsy recover friday those who are injured. what is interesting, is that it shows, khalid masood, according to the police, acted alone, nobody knew what he was up to, the statements the fact his family members and they
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are no longer being detained show that despite that he may have been radicalised in prison, but that the act, the criminal act was something that he committed alone and nobody else knew about it. what is the latest in the police investigation? they are still going into his background we. know he lived in various places around the country. the interesting thing is if he is — they‘d invested him on terrible offences in the past but nothing specy. they are digging deeper and deeper into his background but they are confident he was not linked to anybody else. and they are not expecting any further incidents although security has been accepted up although security has been accepted up around certain parts of london d security has been stepped up around security has been stepped up around security places in london. security is to be increased at windsor castle during changing the guard, which takes place several times a week. new barriers will be put in place along the route of the procession. thames valley police said
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although there was no specific threat, last week‘s attack in westminster had highlighted the need for the changes. the nhs in england is to consider whether gps should stop prescribing a range of medicines and treatments. the list could eventually include painkillers such as paracemotol, and cough and cold treatments that are widely available over the counter, often for less than the cost of a prescription. the proposals — intended to save millions of pounds — will form part of a major announcement on the future of the health service later this week by the head of nhs england, simon stevens. our health editor, hugh pym, reports. the nhs is under increasing financial pressure. now, service leaders are set to closely scrutinise what‘s available on prescription. local health commissioners in england have drawn up a list of items which they say are unnecessary and inappropriate for prescription on the nhs. the medicines and treatments listed include omega—3 and fish oils, some muscle rubs and ointments, gluten—free food, and travel vaccines, still allowed on the nhs. there could be savings of £128 million a year. nhs england has agreed to carry out a review and introduce new guidelines. longer term, the future of cold and cough treatments, indigestion and heartburn
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medication, and paracetamol on prescription will be considered. health officials say hundreds of millions of pounds more could be saved. nhs england argues they are widely available over the counter at pharmacies. a spokesman said there was a need to ensure the best value from resources. the move will form part of a major strategy announcement by the head of nhs england, simon stephens, later this week. hugh pym, bbc news. with me is professor helen stokes—lampard, chair of the royal college of general practitioners. is this a good idea? it is in they ary. what will be important is how it is enacted. the devil will be in the detail. concept of saving the nhs money is important. we know it is in the a difficult situation and do sensible, straightforward things to save money where we can is great but we mustn‘t have vulnerable
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patients suffering as an unintended consequence. so when you say the devil is in the detail, i mean you‘ve obviously said you are concerned about vulnerable patients, speu concerned about vulnerable patients, spell it out a bit more? this is a consultation, first of all, so some things are going to be standardised across the country. already in the area where i work there are certain products we are not allowed to prescribe, we have stopped prescribing what we would call more luxury items for gluten—free, like pizza bases and biscuits, which are not necessary for health. so they have gone. but let‘s take paracetamol for an example. this can only be sold in pack sizes of 16 at a time so 32 is a limit. that‘s a four—day supply of paracetamol for someone taking the maximum doze, so it‘ll cause inconvenience for people. so there are things we have to work through, about the detail. overall it is a good thing to save money for the nhs where we can, there are so many calls for it and
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we are so in debt. so many things that are prescribed, people will ask why it is happening, sun cream, gluten—free food, strep stills, vaselin. people won‘t real rise some are available on prescription. —— strepsils. you are right. there are for some for whom every penny is a struggle. as a doctor we are there to help people who are struggling. why is it so expensive for the nhs? drugs cost money. and for every item dispensed a fee is to be paid it the pharmacist. it is notjust about the medicine. when you are talking about a prescription which is £10 to the nhs whereas somebody can buy it over the counter for 60 p. the nhs pays the counter for 60 p. the nhs pays the true cost of the druchlingted the true cost of the druchlingted the patient might have the prescribing charge but the nhs has to pay the handling cost and pay the pharmacist. and there is a cost along the system. more widely, thinking about t some things like
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sun screams, actually factor 50 sun screams for people who have delicate skin problems, actually those are really quite expensive to buy so there are things we need to think about very carefully, we must not cause unintend harm through a well—intended policy. cause unintend harm through a well-intended policy. thank you very much. the plans are being announced on friday. right, let‘s catch up with the weather with phil. thank you very much. good afternoon. not looking too bad through my window here in central london, around about 16. not like that everywhere, though. yet again, underneath this mist and murk across parts of the midlands, eastern england only seven degrees, something of a change beginning to show across the south—west. increasingly we will see showery bursts moving up through wales to the midlands, perhaps some more persistent stuff getting out of northern ireland, towards south—west scotla nd northern ireland, towards south—west scotland the south of england cool in the eastern quarter. further south, we could be looking up to 20. we are all in with a shout of seeing something wet from the skies overnight, save perhaps for the
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northern isles and bar the northern isles it will be a relatively mild night. on those mild southerly and south—westerly breezes, we import more cloud and a greater chance of something a bit more persistent by way of rain for wales, eventually going towards the north—west of england through northern ireland and up england through northern ireland and up towards central and southern parts of scotland. the east midlands, east anglia and the south—east could be dry throughout the day. the top temperature around about 17. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: a royal marine, jailed for the fatal
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shooting of an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan, will be freed from prison within weeks. it comes after the court martial appeal court sentenced him to seven years for manslaughter. his wife welcomed the decision outside court. we are overjoyed at the judge‘s decision to significantly reduce al‘s sentence that he can be released imminently. this is what we have been fighting for and it is hard to believe that the day is finally here. tesco agrees to pay £129 million to avoid prosecution for overstating its profits. the retailer will also spend £85 million on compensating investors. a judge who attracted controversy at a rape trial by saying drunk women were putting themselves in danger is defended by the victim. speaking to the bbc‘s victoria derbyshire programme, megan clark, who‘s waived her right to anonymity, said the judge was right. i think she was absolutely right in what she said,
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but it was taken out of context. she put the blame massively on rapists, not the victims. she just simply said to be careful, basically, which is smart advice. the wife of the westminster attacker khalid masood condemns his actions, saying she is saddened and shocked. a statement from rohey hydara says she expresses her condolences to the families of the dead and wishes a "speedy recovery" to those injured. lets get more now on our top story — the news that a royal marine convicted of killing a wounded
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taliban fighter in afghanistan has been jailed for seven years. alexander blackman will be freed in weeks as he has already served more than three years in jail. joining us now from westminster is mp and former army officer adam holloway. thank you joining us. what do you think of the case as it has unfolded. obviously it is good news for him and his family. i don‘t know what the reason is behind the differentjudgment, but what the reason is behind the different judgment, but the what the reason is behind the differentjudgment, but the wee —— but we need to be clear. if british soldiers execute or murder prisoners of war, they are murderers. today they clearly think something else was going on here and that is why the sentence has been reduced. either you are a murderer or you are mentally ill. i don‘t think there is much in between. clearly the court
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has decided there was more of the latter involved in this than the previousjudgment. latter involved in this than the previous judgment. that latter involved in this than the previousjudgment. that is latter involved in this than the previous judgment. that is what latter involved in this than the previousjudgment. that is what it centred on, the fact that his judgment, the court heard, was impaired. he was an exemplary soldier before his deployment to afghanistan in march 2011, but he had suffered from quite exceptional stresses in that deployment. you are in the military. do you understand the pressures described ? in the military. do you understand the pressures described? well, i have not been under the sort of pressure these guys clearly were. in my own experience, one of the soldiers i was with was keyed to execute a prisoner of war, but it did not happen. people do get stressed and upset and sometimes they do lose their minds, but we have to be really clear. just before
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coming on, i was speaking about this with a colleague in my office, a former army officer. she said that when marine they said it was nothing that they would not do to ask, she said that this is exactly the point. that is why we are fighting. presumably we are fighting for something better, otherwise why do we bother? i am pleased that the judgment from the perspective of the family, but we do need to be very clear. he did say that he knew he was breaking the geneva convention. he did say, keep quiet about it, lads. all the stuff is there on the tape. clearly the court knows more than we do and that is why they were able to come to the judgment that he was more than usually impaired. once they have been doing that sort of thing in helmand province. they said the incident was not a cold—blooded execution, as the court—martial had concluded. you mentioned talking to
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another mp concluded. you mentioned talking to anothermp in your concluded. you mentioned talking to another mp in your office. other mps have been involved in this case, amongst them richard drax, who spoke outside the court earlier. he said those who serve on the front line and put their lives at risk between artand and put their lives at risk between art and evil deserve our support all the time. is that a sentiment you would echo? the fact that the person gave me that opinion was not another mp. she served in afghanistan and was captain of the logistics corps. a court has found in the direction that richard has always been at. all i would say is that i listen to the tape andi i would say is that i listen to the tape and i drew clearly the wrong conclusion, but i would urge viewers to google what was said by marine a. lam glad to google what was said by marine a. i am glad for him and his family that this has finally come to an end
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for them. thank you very much, adam holloway. marine a is expected to be released in the next two weeks. let‘s cross live to the house of commons because the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, is about to make a statement. with permission, i‘d like to make a speech on recent events in northern ireland. i have been involved in intense talks with political parties and the irish government in line with the well—established three stranded approach. there has been one clear purpose, to re—establish an inclusive devolved administration at stormont in accordance with the 1998 belfast agreement and its
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su ccesses . 1998 belfast agreement and its successes. progress has been made on a number of issues. this includes the budget, a programme of government and ways of improving transparency and accountability. progress was made around how the parties might come together to represent northern ireland in our negotiations to leave the eu, which is so important in the context of article 50 being triggered tomorrow. that said, it is also clear that significant gaps remain between parties, particularly over issues surrounding culture and identity. throughout this process the government has been active in making positive proposals to try and bridge those gaps and help the parties to move things forward. in law, the period allowed to form an executive from the date of the first sitting of the assembly after an election is 14 days. that 14 day period expired at 4pm yesterday with no agreement and therefore no executive. this is
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and therefore no executive. this is a source of deep disappointment and regret to me and many and i know there is widespread dismay across there is widespread dismay across the country. from all my extensive engagements across northern ireland, with business, civil society members of the public, i am with business, civil society members of the public, lam in with business, civil society members of the public, i am in no doubt devolved government is what the overwhelming majority of the people wa nt to overwhelming majority of the people want to see. working for them, delivering on their priorities and continuing the positive progress we have seen in northern ireland over recent yea rs. have seen in northern ireland over recent years. devolved institutions up recent years. devolved institutions up and running and serving the whole community. yet following the passing of yesterday‘s legal deadline in northern ireland, northern ireland has no devolved administration. this also means other elements of the belfast agreement, including the north south bodies, cannot operate properly. the consequences of all of this potentially extremely serious.
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at the most immediate, we are rapidly approaching the point at which northern ireland will not have an agreed budget. from tomorrow, a civil servant, the department of finance permanent secretary, will exercise powers to allocate cash to northern ireland departments. this is an interim measure designed to ensure services are maintained until such time as a budget is agreed. we are keeping in close contact with ahead of the northern ireland civil service on these matters and i understand the department of finance will be setting up details later today. let me be clear. this situation is not sustainable and beyond a short period of time will have an impact on public services. what we are talking about here is the health service, schools, volu nta ry the health service, schools, voluntary groups and services for the most vulnerable in society. this isn‘t what people voted for on the 2nd of march. during the course of
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the past 24 hours i have spoken to the past 24 hours i have spoken to the leaders of the five main northern ireland parties and the irish government. i‘m encouraged that there remains a strong willingness to continuing —— to continue engaging in dialogue with a view to resolving outstanding issues informing an view to resolving outstanding issues in forming an executive, and that must absolutely remain the priority. but the window of opportunity is short. it is essential therefore that the intensity of discussions is that the intensity of discussions is that up with renewed intent and focus and i believe that a positive outcome remains possible. to that end, i will continue overcoming —— overcoming days to work with the government and parties and i will keep the situation under review. if these talks are successful, it will be my intention quickly to bring forward legislation after the easter recess to allow an executive to be
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formed, avoiding a second assembly election, for which i detect little public appetite. i‘m also determined to table would be legacy bodies in the stormont house agreement in accordance with our manifesto commitments and i will be involving a range of interesting parties, including the victims commissioner. but in the absence of devolved government it is ultimate for the uk government to provide political stability and good governance. we do not want to see a return to direct rule. as our manifesto set out at the last election, it stated, local policies and local services should be determined by locally elected politicians through locally accountable institutions. but should talks not succeed in their objective, the government will have to consider all options. i therefore wa nt to to consider all options. i therefore want to give the house noticed that following the easter recess, at a minimum, it would be my intention to
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bring forward legislation to set a reasonable rate to allow local councils to carry out the functions and to provide further assurance around the budget for northern ireland. mr speaker, it is vital that devolved government and all the institutions under successive agreement is returned to the northern ireland as soon as possible and the government‘s unrelenting focus is on achieving that objective. northern ireland need strong devolved government to deliver for teachers, doctors and nurses, businesses, industry and the wider community. to ensure that it plays a full role in the affairs of our united kingdom while retaining its strong relationship with ireland. and to continue the work of the past two decades to build stronger peaceful and put —— and a prosperous future for all. that needs to be the focus of everyone. we are approaching crucial days and
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weeks ahead. i commend this statement to the house. the northern ireland secretary there saying the government does not want to see a return to direct rule, but all options have to be considered as of tomorrow. —— or options have to be considered. as of tomorrow, a civil servant will be appointed to allocate cash to northern ireland. he said it will have an impact on public services beyond a short period of time, so he is urging political parties in northern ireland to continue talking and step up ireland to continue talking and step up their efforts to try and get an executive formed. that he says remains the priority. the government will trigger article 50 tomorrow,
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the start of divorce proceedings from the european union. talks are expected to begin later this year and ministers will soon have to face the question of whether the uk owes money to the eu to cover past spending commitments. there have been suggestions that britain could owe brussels as much as £60—billion, but the brexit secretary, davis davis, told the bbc last night that he did not expect to see "that sort of money change hands". so what might the brexit bill be? chris morris has been investigating. our reality check question — could the uk‘s divorce bill be as highes a 60 billion euros. that‘s the figure that‘s been floated in brussels but is it politically realistic? well, 60 billion euros, that‘s about £52 billion at current exchange rates, is what i think we can call the european commission‘s opening gambit. so how has this eye—wateringly large number been calculated ? well, let‘s go to our blackboard. basically, if you take a value for the eu‘s liabilities, that‘s the money it owes, and you then subtract value for the eu‘s assets, the balance you take, and you divide it by the average uk share of eu budget contribution, which is roughly 12% and that can get you to this figure, 60 billion euros. but the details, surprise, surprise, are complicated and contentious. let‘s break them down. first of all there are the liabilities, the biggest
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chunk, what you can call the eu‘s credit card. money already committed by the eu for which the bills haven‘t yet been paid. by the end of next year, the eu‘s credit card bill could be as high as 240 billion euros, so the uk‘s share would be substantial. then there is money which is due to be spent over the next few years, a lot on big infrastructure projects in poorer eu countries and in the commission‘s view, the uk has already made a legally—binding promise to fund all of this, even projects that get paid for after the uk has left. what else? well, there are pensions, the eu‘s pensions currently more than 60 billion euros for eu staff and the uk is on the hook for a share of that, too, says the commission. then there are other smaller liabilities that will all be part of the negotiation. what about on the other side? the assets. well, there are things like eu buildings, there are a couple of satellites in space, there‘s even a nice wine cellar,
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all sorts of things that can be used to bring the bill down and of course the uk will haggle over how much all of it is worth. what if there is no deal, though, no deal at all? well, according to the house of lords, their report has said we can walk away without paying anything and there are those in the brexit camp who say that‘s what we should do, come what may, leave without paying anything. the pro—leave organisation, lawyers for britain, they also argue that the government should demand £9 billion back to cover its share of funds held by the european investment bank. so let‘s face it, this will all start as a legal argument but it‘ll end as a political one. the eu will try to get as close as possible to that 60 billion euros figure, while the uk will try to bring it down as close to zero as it can. what‘s the likely outcome going to be? they‘re going to have to try and find a compromise. well, even a bill of tens of billions of euros spread over a decade and more would not be that
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significant in economic terms but politically it could be dynamite. a royal marine jailed for the fatal shooting of an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan will be freed from prison within weeks following a long campaign by friends and family. tesco agrees to pay 129—million pounds to avoid prosecution for overstating its profits in 2014. ajudge who provoked controversy at a rape trial, by saying drunk women were putting themselves in danger , is defended by the victim. residents of western mosul say many civilians remain buried under rubble following recent air strikes. the intensity of the attacks, both from the iraqi army
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and the coalition, is controversial. there is an alternative to this kind of very difficult street by street, room by room fighting and that is the call in air strikes and levelled the call in air strikes and levelled the neighbourhood. that is something they are not doing. i think most of they are not doing. i think most of the civilians around here probably got out. there is daybreak of civilian life, but i haven‘t seen any civilians themselves. but there is another issue. destroy the city to save it. politically that is a very bad idea and winning wars in any era, especially in this modern era, it is a question of trying to win the political battle, the media battle as well as winning the military battle. it is notjust a
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question of how many of the enemy can be killed. it is a question of persuading all of the iraqi people that this is a good idea and it is a legitimate use of force and that these men deserve the back—up. jeremy bowen, bbc news, mosul. more must be done to address a sharp rise in the number of suicides among women prisoners in england, according to the prisons watchdog. self—inflicted deaths among female inmates almost doubled in the last year. the prisons and probation ombudsman says that reforms recommended a decade ago haven‘t materialised, as marc ashdown reports. for many years, the number of women who took their own life in prisons in england was one or two a year. in 2015, that figure rose to seven, and last year, 12 women. this stark rise prompted the prisons and probation ombudsman, nigel newcomen, to examine 19 cases of suicide over a 4—year period. he has identified crucial areas of practice where he says that the service could be improved: better assessment and management of risk, improving suicide and self—harm procedures, and addressing how mental health issues and bullying are dealt with. a second report out today identifies similar issues. well, the huge rise in deaths, it is complicated, but there
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are two main reasons. first, there are fewer staff in prisons, fewer people to learn and listen, and the other thing is unmet mental health needs. so women who are vulnerable and who need mental healthcare, need treatment for drug or alcohol addictions are not getting it. ten years ago, the prisons ombudsman published a landmark report, making a series of 43 recommendations aimed at improving the care of women in custody. the current ombudsman said it was disheartening that the sweeping reforms had yet to be implemented, and blamed a lack of concerted and sustained action. the ministry ofjustice said the safety of prisoners is a priority, and a range of measures has been introduced to increase the support available. mark ashdown, bbc news. one in six local roads in england and wales are at risk of becoming damaged beyond repair because of a growing problem of potholes.
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a survey of local councils says some roads have less than five years before they have to be replaced or closed. here‘s our transport correspondent, richard westcott. crumbling away faster than they can repair them. our local council—run roads carry a third of the traffic, but this survey says decades of underfunding, coupled with wetter winters and more cars, have left them in a sorry state, all over england and wales. it found that one in six roads is so bad it may need to be replaced within the next five years. councils are already filling a pothole every 19 seconds. and it would take £12 billion to bring them all up to scratch. the government says it‘s chipped in an extra £1 billion, recently, to help fill the holes. but campaigners aren‘t impressed. every so often, the government gives out a "pothole fund". it‘s kind of reacting to a crisis. but i think we need to actually plan longer term funding and have a greater proportion of what drivers actually pay
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in motoring taxes ring—fenced just for maintenance. because if you ask drivers, it is their number one concern. he says around £6 million is paid out every year for cars broken by potholes, whilst more bus passengers are also making claims, saying they‘ve been hurt by the bus jolting about on poor roads. as councils feel the financial squeeze, many fear our local roads are only going to get worse. richard westcott, bbc news. the new twelve—sided one pound coin comes into circulation today. modelled on the old thru‘penny bit, it‘s designed to be harder to forge. but some vending and ticket machines may not accept it straight away. the old coin remains legal tender until october. we are in good shape. we have between 85 and 90% of machines prepared to take the new £1 coin,
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most prepared to take the new £1 coin, m ost ta ke prepared to take the new £1 coin, most take the old £1 coin. as we see more of the new pound coins come into circulation, we will see the rest of those machines converted as well. we are in good shape at the moment. what‘s being described as a "monster" cyclone has begun lashing north—east australia. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from coastal areas, with warnings of dangerous tidal surges. caroline davies reports. battered and broken by cyclone debbie. boats have been smashed, streets flooded, trees ripped up and buildings torn apart. debris lines the coast of queensland as the storm moves across north—east australia. this is a severe weather system. move now. don't wait until tomorrow because you won't be able to move.
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overnight the storm is upgraded to a category four. only one level before the most violent level possible. this town has been locked down. popular tourist resorts have been hit. wind speeds reached 250 kilometres per hour were. 30,000 people were told to evacuate low—lying areas. it‘s the biggest evacuation in australia since cyclone tracy in 1974. the authorities had time to prepare. sandbags had been filled, schools closed, shop windows boarded up and the airports shut down. the slow—moving storm is expected to last for several hours and cause major damage. queenslanders will be familiar with the risk of cyclones. now all they can do is wait. caroline davies, bbc news. in a moment the news that one, but first,
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the weather. the western isles are close to the main driver of our weather which is this area of low pressure. it will be the most dominant influence across all parts of the british are also the next few days. but fearing —— nothing happening quickly. the ca cloud is moving across, possibly bringing heavy spells of rain. the far north of scotland is on the cool side, but elsewhere, relatively mild. quitea side, but elsewhere, relatively mild. quite a bit of cloud around. one or two hefty showers, the odd rumble of thunder in the mix, but
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towards the midlands and south is temperatures close to 20 degrees in a number of spots. further west, underneath the cloud, 11th — 13, something like that. wednesday, there is a chance of the heaviest rain to be found across western parts. overall, a slightly cooler day for some. wednesday into thursday, we still have this weakening weather front across the western side of the british isles, threatening to bring prolonged spells of rain onto the hills across wales and the north—west. the blow ahead of that weather front is from south. relatively mild. underneath the cloud and rain, not a spectacular day, but at least the temperatures aren‘t too bad for this time of year. you will be looking at
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13, 14, possibly 15. could be the warmest day of the week with 20, 20 1 degrees in the south is. by friday, the low pressure in the atla ntic friday, the low pressure in the atlantic will give us a wet friday and an unsettled start to the weekend. conviction‘s quashed. three cheers! cheers outside court as sergeant alexander blackman is given a seven—year prison sentence — but told he will be freed in two weeks. the 42—year—old was jailed for murder in 2013, but his conviction was reduced to manslaughter earlier this month. his wife is overjoyed. this is the moment we have all been fighting hard for. it‘s hard to believe that this day is finally here. we‘ll have the latest from court.
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also this lunchtime... a shake—up of prescriptions — holiday jabs, gluten—free food and fish oils may no longer be available on the nhs to save money. a rape victim says she agrees with thejudge in her case who was criticised for warning that drunk women put
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