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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 13, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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coverage again next week. goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the nhs faces a weekend of disruption following a large—scale cyber attack which has caused hospitals to delay treatments and cancel appointments. around a0 nhs trusts and some gp surgeries were hit, but there's no sign that patient data has been compromised. iamat i am at saint barts. it runs five hospitals in east london and all have cancelled outpatient appointments today. organisations around the world have been affected by the malicious software known as "ransomware", with reports of infections in dozens of countries. good morning, it's saturday the 13th of may. also ahead. labour's deputy leader tom watson warns his party faces a "margaret thatcher style" landslide defeat, if it doesn't
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improve its ratings in the polls. in sport, chelsea the champions. they can finally celebrate after a late winner at west brom secured the premier league title in antonio conte‘s first season in charge. and you just can't stop a brownlee. johnny refuses to give up in the world series triathlon — after a nasty crash, he picks up his bike and runs with it. from horse heads to monkeys, it can only be eurovision. but will the uk feel the brexit backlash? we'll look ahead to tonight's event. and helen has the weather. good morning, despite low pressure gci’oss good morning, despite low pressure across the uk, there is a lot of dry weather. i will have more in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. routine appointments and operations at some hospitals remain cancelled this morning after nhs organisations across england and scotland were disrupted by a global cyber attack. some doctors have been unable to access patient records, while a number of hospitals
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are asking patients not to attend unless it's urgent. there's no evidence that patient data has been stolen. the first indication that something was wrong was mid—afternoon yesterday, when some hospital trusts and gp surgeries reported being locked out of their computers. vital information such as patient records and appointment schedules, were inaccessible. it meant operations were cancelled, patients were sent home and ambulances were diverted. the bbc understands that by late yesterday around a0 trusts and some surgeries in england and scotland had been affected. the prime minister, theresa may, said the incident was not an attack on the nhs, but part of a wider problem affecting up to 100 countries. work to restore nhs computer systems will continue throughout the weekend, as andy moore reports. he is outside saint barth —— barts
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hospital. here at barts the message has gone out to anybody with an outpatient appointment that it will be cancelled and they should not come along today. there are large parts of the nhs is not affected. for example, wales and northern ireland have not been hit. about a0 nhs organisations affected in england and scotland, but large parts of the country not hit. i think the message from nhs england is the national health service is up and running and you should use it as normal unless you hear otherwise. problems will continue in some areas, like at this hospital, and others run by barts nhs trust. we know the problems are continuing today. we do not know the situation tomorrow nor the day after that and it is likely problems will take some time to fix where they are experience. thanks. the nhs is not the only victim
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of this international attack. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellanjones. it looked at first like an attackjust on hospitals in the uk. but it's now becoming clear this malicious software has run riot around the world. russia, the united states and many points in between have been hit by what is now a common form of cyber crime. ransomware has become the tool of choice for a lot of criminals simply because it's very easy to make money very quickly. you can buy ransomware online for as little as $39. so how does it work? it often arrives in the form of a link in an innocuous looking email. when you click on that link the malicious software is downloaded and spreads rapidly through your network, locking up all the files on it. then a message flashes up on the screen warning that if you want your data unlocked, you will have to pay a ransom, often in bitcoin, a virtual currency. the irony is that security experts think a hacking tool allegedly leaked from america's national security agency
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in april may have been used by the attackers. microsoft warned about the threat that this vulnerability posed, and said anybody who had installed a security update to windows software the previous month would be ok. the health service will point out that it is just one of many organisations around the world affected by this attack, but it now faces what could be a lengthy process of cleaning up its computers and making the network safe again. just a note in half an hour, 8:a0am, we will speak to the home secretary and find out the latest on the situation. labour's deputy leader, tom watson, has urged voters to support their local labour mp to prevent the conservatives winning a "margaret thatcher—style landslide". speaking to the guardian, mr watson admitted that it would be very difficult to turn the poll numbers around, and that labour had a mountain to climb.
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0ur political correspondent leila nathoojoins us now from our london newsroom. tom watson is a significant figure in the labour party, what has he been saying? hears and this is a candid admission weeks away from the general election of the scale of labour's task ahead. the polls put the conservatives in front by as much as 20 points and we know we must take them with a pinch salt but still the picture does not look good for labour and tom watson says if things carry on like this theresa may could be on course for a majority of more than 100 conservative mps in the commons which he worries will allow her to push through policies without having much parliamentary opposition. he says, our manifesto is packed with ideas, vote for your local candidate. 0ne reading of this is a rallying cry in warning to say if you do not vote this is what could
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happen and another possible reading is he is resigned to the fact labour will only be in opposition and he is trying to damage limitation, saying we can at least hope for a stronger position. jeremy corbyn campaigning like he will win and saying the election is not a foregone conclusion and he is in it to win it. the conservatives talking about internet security today and about whether you have the power to delete things, that may have happened to you. they are picking out the age of 18. explain what they are saying. it isa 18. explain what they are saying. it is a coincidental announcement by the conservatives as part of their campaign on internet security as nothing connected to the cyber attack on the nhs but the conservatives say social media users should have the right to demand any posts they have made, any photographs, comments, they made before they were aged 18 can be
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deleted and that social media companies should have a legal obligation to do that. there are other proposals bound up in this, asking social media companies to do more to protect children from harmful content online and making it easier to do business online but the proposal to delete this content made under 18, that will be tricky to enforce, because many companies are based abroad. it is worth saying labour are based abroad. it is worth saying labourare campaigning based abroad. it is worth saying labour are campaigning today on pensions and promising pensions should go up by 2.5% per year and the lib dems are talking about housing today, so plenty more from the campaign trail over the weekend. drayton manor theme park will reopen today, four days after an 11—year—girl died after falling from a ride. evha jannath, from leicester, fell from a boat on the splash canyon ride. the park's owners say the ride will remain shut, along with ones that overlook it, as a mark respect to her family. italy's highest court has upheld the 16—yearjail sentence imposed on the captain of the shipwrecked
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cruise liner costa concordia. 32 people died when the vessel hit the rocks off an italian island in january 2012. the captain was also convicted of abandoning his ship, before the passengers and crew. pope francis will canonise two portuguese children at a mass today on the spot where they reported seeing the virgin mary exactly 100 years ago. the service is expected to attract1 million worshippers. it was 100 years ago today that three children tending sheep near the village of fatima said the virgin mary had appeared to them. two of the children, jacinta and francisco marto, died young. they are to be canonised by pope francis today becaue of the case of a boy in brazil who recovered from injuries after his family prayed to the fatima visionaries.
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the third little shepherd, lucia dos santos, later wrote down three so—called secrets that mary had told them. over the decades, fatima has become one of the world's most important catholic shrines. we must be here to make stronger our faith, and to show other people that, if you want, you can do anything. this is an excellent opportunity to see him drive by, to celebrate mass with him. 0n the eve of his trip, the pope described himself as a pilgrim of hope and peace. at the shrine, he prayed with the faithful before the traditional candlelight procession. francis is the fourth pope to visit fatima, but the centenary and the canonisation of the two little shepherds give this year's ceremony a special significance for catholics in portugal and around the world. those are the main stories this morning and the sport and weather is
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coming up. the uk's multi—million—pound national cyber security centre will be leading britain's response to yesterdays hack to yesterday's hack on the nhs‘s computer systems. the health service was amongst tens of thousands of organisations to have been caught out by a computer virus which locks systems until a ransom is paid. brain lord is the former gchq deputy director of intelligence and cyber 0perations. good morning. i imagine in your former role this sort of incident is something you would have dreaded happening. yes, i think any kind of large—scale offensive cyber activity is always something one dreads but what is most important at this point is to put it into perspective, because some of the headlines can be quite dramatic. this was not an attack, an attempt to bring the nhs down, it was not an attack to steal
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patient data. this was an organised criminal attack for large—scale extortion and i think we need to keep it in that perspective. one thing we hear suggested is the actual virus might be leaked, a lea ked actual virus might be leaked, a leaked hacking tool from the american security agency. is that something you have heard? yes, that has been widely reported on all kinds of media. it is worth saying vulnerability to systems are developed all the time, by nations and on the dark side by criminals and on the dark side by criminals and hackers. what is worth bearing in mind with this strain of malware is microsoft themselves had issued a patch, halfway through march, which would have protected organisations with up—to—date operating systems from this virus. we are aware a ransom is being demanded. is it a simple case of you pay it or lose
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the information? once again, it depends on the organisation attacks. if the nhs has good back—up systems and can restore data from a healthy back—up regime, the amount of data thatis back—up regime, the amount of data that is lost could well be limited. however, if the back—up regime has a big delay from back—up to current vulnerability, there are no back—ups, people then have to make a decision. do they not pay, do they pay in order to get back critical data? i pay in order to get back critical data ? i would pay in order to get back critical data? i would not rule out the fact there may be targets globally who will now be paying to have data restored. is that something you would think the nhs might be able to countenance? it is not for me to determine what advice they are given from the national cyber security centre and what they will
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countenance. paying any kind of ransom provides an emboldening action for crime groups. that said there is always a tactical decision to be made about the restoration of data and services affected against permanent loss of data. i am probably fairly sure the national health service probably does for wider it purposes have a healthy back—up regime to allow data to be restored without that kind of extortion being met. that may be the case, but for this to happen, the system case, but for this to happen, the syste m m ust case, but for this to happen, the system must be vulnerable. do you think there are areas of the nhs system that are perhaps out of date and should have been patched and we re and should have been patched and were not? i think that is very much the case. one has to bear in mind the case. one has to bear in mind the nhs is a wide, complex it systems supplied by a number of suppliers and older systems such as
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windows xp, though longer supported, will be vulnerable. this kind of sustained, wide attack on an organisation, forces it to look at its it update regime making sure its operating systems are up to scratch but it's protected regimes are up to scratch and it is properly worth the nhs and national centre to look at that to make sure there were not basic health measures that could have been put in place that could have been put in place that could have stopped this before they look at the longer term investment necessity for an organisation that is it dependent. you work as an adviser. what would you advise the nhs to do today in this most critical situation to try to restore order? i would ensure that it continues to safely patch all the systems it can. from this particular
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device. restore the back—up data safely. in a critical order. and certainly ensure that poor example all unnecessary ports, in effect the doorways in and out of computers, all quite often a number of ports are all quite often a number of ports a re left all quite often a number of ports are left open and should be shot. there are basic security health regimes that can be put in place —— they should be shot. and the messaging out to the service user is, balanced and explains what has not happened just as much as it explains what has happened. let's look at the weather. good morning. it is a mixed bag with a lot of dry weather today. this was sunrise in suffolk and we have seen lovely photos coming through. thank you, everybody. those pictures, in contrast, this is aberdeen city, and
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it will stay great in north—eastern parts of scotland and england for much of the day, slowly brightening up. we have rain. that is around low pressure which is why i say it is not plain sailing weather wise today. showers will tend to fade across southern today. showers will tend to fade across southern areas. today. showers will tend to fade across southern areas. the rain taking longer to clear from across southern areas. the rain taking longer to clearfrom northern ireland, the north—west of england and northern wales. in scotland, the north—west seeing decent weather, the east is score. further south, rain. the showers will migrate south later. we have super sunshine coming up later. we have super sunshine coming up across later. we have super sunshine coming up across the —— across england and wales. this will break up anywhere across scotland into big, thundery showers later. there will be sunshine in between. more rain in
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the south—west of england and northern ireland later in the day. for many, it will feel warm with increasing amounts of sunshine compared with recent days. as we lose the easterly wind and behind the brief spell of rain, we pick up the brief spell of rain, we pick up the south—westerly. many areas will have rain overnight which is good news forfarmers, at have rain overnight which is good news for farmers, at least dampening the ground. tomorrow, the rain is hit and miss in the form of showers. areas will see showers, others will escape. eastern coasts, a lot of sunshine here. showers close to the low pressure in north—west scotland. in the sunshine, up to 20 degrees. it could potentially get warmer next week across southern and eastern areas with humidity rising. for most of the uk, wind and rain moving in, it is how far south and east it will come and how quickly. as for this
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weekend, a mixed bag, but a lot of dry weather. thanks. we will chat to you later. for patients who need palliative care in the final days of their lives, the option to be cared for, and die, at home, isn't something that's always available. a new survey suggests that one of the main barriers is a shortage of specialists who can also offer the right training to family members. breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. my husband, roger, i'd be married to for a7 years and he was raf aircrew. a brave man. 13 years ago, he was diagnosed with cancer. when his condition was terminal, the only thing he wanted to do was to die in his own house, with his own things and me looking after him. ok, so we'll practise with some water. we'lljust draw out 1mm of water. zilla took part in a trial project.
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with the help of a district nurse, she was trained to give controlled doses of pain relief to her husband at home. how easy did you find this process? yes, it was easy for me, with your adequate instruction. zilla didn't have to actually inject the pain relief into her husband's arm — a thin tube or cannula was already in place and the dosage was controlled. it allowed her to relieve her husband's pain in the dying days, without relying on a nurse, who could be several hours away. this was such a godsend to me, to be able to do that. it took away all of the helpless feeling you have to see someone you have loved for so long in pain, and it was wonderful. it is so important for people to have the death they want, where they want it to be. it has a lasting effect on the family they leave behind and i think that if that family can see they died
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peacefully and pain—free, at home, where they wanted to be, then that's the overriding factor. and we just secure that... according to the national council for palliative care, most people would prefer to die at home, but a survey of 370 health care professionals suggests, for many, it's not happening. more than one third of nurses and gps who support dying people at home say staffing levels are not sufficient to meet pain management needs. 20% said their caseload was not manageable and nearly one third said the availability of end of life care training in their area was inadequate. our study shows that we are really failing people who want to spend their final days and weeks at home. we know that pain is people's greatest fear and if it is not controlled, that will lead to emergency admissions to hospital and bad memories for the families who live on. the department of health in england says everyone should be involved as much as they want in plans around their death. having family members administer pain relief won't be for everyone,
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but it is becoming one option in the final days of life. it certainly gave me such a feeling that i'd been here to the end with roger and made his last days completely pain free. and he died with me and both his sons here, holding his hand, just as he would have wanted. very moving hearing that story. 0ur thanks to zilla for taking part and explaining how it affected her and her husband. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. paul horrocks is here. there is really one story. in the daily telegraph, hackers on the
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front page. from page of the guardian, actually a story about tom watson saying do not let theresa may have a landslide victory equivalent to that of margaret thatcher. and again, the nhs hacked service. same story again. this story is everywhere today. you could not make it up. it is like a film script, something out of the sci—fi drama. i was taken with the front page of the financial times. this story is elsewhere also. these hackers have used stolen cyber security weapons from the us spy agency. apparently a system called eternal blue, developed by us spies to supercharge
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an existing form of criminal malware. that is something brian lord was talking about. do we understand it? no, it is a complicated subject but this targets older systems, systems where files are shared. if nhs users, and they use different types of systems, if some of them are older, they are more vulnerable to attack because the security systems built in are not as robust. this spreads. it has spread across europe and apparently there are a5,000 different attacks. it is worth saying on the issue of what this malware is, there is no official line, because we cannot trace it at this point. this is speculation around who or what might be responsible. i talked to a seung ju —— toa
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be responsible. i talked to a seung ju —— to a cyber security expert who said cybercrime will become the new bank robbery, because the rewards are as great. the chances of getting caught are slim, and the penalties are low. that is what has happened. we are speaking to the home secretary amber rudd in about 20 minutes and we'll find out more from her. from new problems to old problems and one that happens over again. the weather, don't we love the weather? it appears we have had the weather? it appears we have had the driest winter in 20 years. some of the rivers are drying up. we have rain this weekend and baby thunderstorms on monday. ten rivers in england have been designated as having exceptionally low flows and the highest number since the drought prompted hosepipe bans in 2012. nobody is saying hosepipe bans are on the cards but the water companies
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are trying to warn people to use water sensibly, to shower not bath, to use a full dishwasher load. 18 months ago, storm desmond devastated much of people in northern england, and people in carlisle are still affected. the summer looks like it will be pretty dry. consumer choice, comparing things, price comparisons, particularly with insurance. this is in the daily mail. these are shocking statistics as to how you pay and how much it costs. the daily mail have done an investigation into the cost of car insurers. they say drivers and homeowners are being charged up to £a50 more a year for insurance, if they choose to pay monthly, which a lot of people do. if you pay annually, you might get a
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good rate, but paying monthly, you have to read the small print. apparently, typically an interest rate between 25 and as much as a5% and people don't realise that. they look at the monthly payment and do not add up the 12 months. most people do pay monthly. car insurance is expensive and the chances of people paying a lump sum. and have each change, if you pay monthly, it just rolls and have each change, if you pay monthly, itjust rolls on. you have to use the price websites. if you check, you can get it much lower. you will come back in an hour. the story, avocados. the avocado crisis we will be talking about. coming up in the next half hour. luciejones is hoping to be britain's golden ticket to the top spot at tonight's eurovision final. the fans think she's got what it takes —
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but what are her chances? we'll have more before 9. the headlines now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. coming up before nine helen will have the weather but first a summary of this morning's main news. routine appointments and operations at some hospitals remain cancelled this morning after nhs organisations across england and scotland were disrupted by a global cyber attack. the first indication that something was wrong was mid—afternoon yesterday when some hospital trusts and gp surgeries reported being locked out of their computers. there's no evidence that patient data has been compromised. britain's response to the attack is led by the national cyber security centre. we are working around the clock with collea g u es we are working around the clock with colleagues and policing the health service internationally and with experts to lead our response to those cyber attacks as they affect the uk. labour's deputy leader, tom watson,
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has warned of the conservatives winning a "margaret thatcher—style landslide" if they maintain their current lead in the opinion polls. mr watson told the guardian that it would be "very, very difficult" to turn the poll numbers around, and labour had a "mountain to climb". mrs thatcher won majorities of 1aa in 1983 and 101 in 1987. the conservatives want to give people the power to demand that social media companies delete any embarrassing content they posted online before the age of 18. labour has questioned whether the legislation would be enforceable, given that most of the largest companies are based abroad. drayton manor theme park will reopen today, four days after an 11—year—girl died after falling from a ride. evha jannath, from leicester, fell from a boat on the splash canyon ride. the park's owners say the ride will remain shut, along with ones that overlook it, as a mark of respect to her family. pope francis will canonise two portuguese children at a mass today
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on the spot where they reported seeing the virgin mary exactly 100 years ago. tens of thousands of pilgrims gathered in fatima to welcome the pontiff last night and today's mass is expected to attract a million worshippers. francis is the fourth pope to visit the shrine. have you ever been to paris and seen many padlocks with messages on a bridge? yes, i have. a selection of padlocks — or so called love—locks that are famously attached to a bridge in paris are being put up for sale at auction today. many of them were removed because the parisian council did delight —— decided to remove many of them. the padlocks, engraved with couples' initials, were attached in an act of romance, before the keys were thrown into the river.
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but they had to be removed two years ago after a part of the bridge collapsed under their weight. today clusters of the locks will be sold as pieces of street art, with the proceeds going to charity. does that feel right? i feel they are beautiful. i would like one. you can geta are beautiful. i would like one. you can get a whole section. it has featured in many films, sequences where they throw the keys. maybe a goodidea where they throw the keys. maybe a good idea for chelsea fans at the gates of stamford bridge. that is a good link. they certainly love antonio conte eight, as they were in a bit of disarray afterjose mourinho started. it is all about the attention to detail, changing the diets of the players even before pre—season friendly matches and giving every staff member with a bottle of prosecco with the words, we will either find bottle of prosecco with the words, we will eitherfind a
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bottle of prosecco with the words, we will either find a way. —— we will find a way. so chelsea have done it — a 1—0 win at west brom made them premier league champions with two games to spare. 0ur sports editor dan roan looks at antonio conte's, remarkable achievement. glory was within their grasp. chelsea's stroll to the title almost complete. west brom have also enjoyed their season, however, and victory here at the hawthorns would have to be earned. the visitors enjoying more chances, but failing to break down a stubborn defence in a cagey first half. added urgency after the restart, victor moses denied by ben foster. chelsea's frustration beginning to show. then, in the final ten minutes and with the game seemingly headed for a draw, the pressure finally showed. michy batshuayi with the crucial touch. the substitute barely played this season. now he scored the goal that would seal the title. we started the season with a lot of problems. but i think in the problems, we found the right way
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to be stronger together. yeah, to fight in every game. and now i think that they deserved to win the league. from the moment he arrived in england last year, the italian has been a passionate and animated presence on the touch line. but his team's march towards the title has been calm and assured. when chelsea play watford here at stamford bridge on monday evening, they and their fans will be able to celebrate a second premier league triumph in just three seasons — re—establishing this club as the dominant force in the english game. when you consider what went on here last season, it's an achievement that should not be underestimated. jose mourinho was sacked after a chaotic defence of the title, the club finishing 10th and failing to qualify for europe. chelsea hired conte but had to wait until the end of the euros before the italy manager was free to join them.
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there were one or two big signings, like midfielder n'golo kante, but the new coach has largely transformed an underperforming squad. i thought we deserved it. we worked very hard and i think we have been a very good team. there could yet be more success. conte has also guided chelsea to the fa cup final. other managers may have grabbed more headlines and created more controversy, but the italian has eclipsed them all. what a great achievement. congratulations to chelsea. there was one other game last night — everton beat watford, 1—0 thanks to ross barkley‘s goal. dan is here with his football focus head on. we will concentrate on chelsea winning the title once again. you paid tribute to antonio conte and remember when they lost against arsenal, and they switched to a back three. after that game he said they
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are only a good team on paper, it is time to be a good team on the pitch, and after that they went on to a great run. in a pre-season match against rapid vienna, they thought they had gone into a different room, because there were lots and dried fruit and they realise this was the new diet. i always have porridge. what about the bottom, things are still to be settled? this will be fascinating. we know sunderland and middlesbrough have been relegated, and we have hull and swansea in a perilous position and crystal palace need one more point to be safe. crystal palace take on hull this weekend. you can feel the nervous already. we have been speaking to
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sam alla rdyce and already. we have been speaking to sam allardyce and we asked him whether he will be in the dressing room ranting and raving before the game. i won't be there. most of the staff won't be there. we will have done our work before we get there, andl done our work before we get there, and i don't like screaming and shouting in the dressing room, i never liked it as a player. we don't need it. do the warm up as normal and thena need it. do the warm up as normal and then a —— then we will be ready. maybe a future trips to the toilet. —— a few trips. maybe a future trips to the toilet. -- a few trips. he is saying is all about the build—up, and then you let the players do the rest. we have the women's fa cup final? manchester city against birmingham. manchester city against birmingham. manchester city are the overwhelming favourites. that should be a
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cracking game. tom cairney at fulham. yes, i went into a cryo chamber with him earlier in the season and i could see the difference it was making. can you do the face? laughter we have huddersfield against sheffield wednesday in the play—off semifinal. we have martin keown on the programme. and we have predictions from sir andy murray. and tottenham's last game this weekend at white hart lane and we are with garth crooks, who takes a trip down memory lane. that will be some of his goals? no doubt. we are on at midday. celtic are two matches away, from completing an unbeaten season, in the scottish premiership,
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after winning 3—1 at aberdeen. all the goals came in a frantic first 12 minutes — lee griffiths with celtic‘s third — and that took their league tally to 100 points. celtic will be going for the league and cup double — and a domestic treble — in two weeks' time, when they take on aberdeen, again, in the scottish cup final. have you seen these pictures? carrying the bike? yes. what a dramatic day it's been forjonny brownlee, in the world triathlon series race in japan. in treacherous conditions in yokohama, he was caught up in a crash, on the last lap of the bike leg and was sent flying over the railings — but he refused to give up, carrying his damaged bike, to the transition point, to get his running shoes on before eventually finishing down in a2nd place — but what determination. you can see highlights tomorrow at one o'clock on bbc two. worth watching. that is proper determination. this
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gloucester, lost to stade francais, in rugby union's challenge cup final, at a rainy murrayfield, going down, 25—17. an interception from gloucester and england man, johnny may, gave the english side, a 10—0 lead and they were racing towards, this trophy for a third time. but stade, are fed up being runners up — as in four previous finals — and they scored 3 tries to finally win the cup. try telling them, this, is european club rugby's second—tier competition. today, it's the turn of saracens, who'll be hoping, to retain their european champions cup title when they take on french side, clermont auvergne. in rugby league, salford red devils were given a scare by hull kingston rovers, but they came from behind, to make it into the quarter—finals, of the challenge cup. they were losing at half time, but salford scored 18 unanswered points, to win 2a—1a. this try from ben murdoch masila, ensured salford advance to the last eight, along with last night's other winners, wakefield and holders hull. we have castleford against saints
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live today on the bbc. tomorrow it is the british basketball finals at the 02 is the british basketball finals at the o2 arena in london, live on the bbc red button and through the website. nottingham against sevenoaks in the women's. there is also this match which i will be playing in. who is your money on? you. we have got players like lauderdale. great player, legend of the basketball game. i can go through players legs, i have looked it up. he is seven feet four inches. it isa it up. he is seven feet four inches. it is a competition? no, it is a match. there are players including
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david james, former england goalkeeper. take plenty of pictures, mike. laughter see you later. medical services across england and scotland will be disrupted today as work to restore nhs computer systems continues. planned operations and appointments at around a0 trusts have been cancelled after a cyber attack struck the health service yesterday afternoon. we've been hearing some patients' experiences, including this man who had major heart surgery cancelled. i've been waiting for it for many many months now. they only do it on a friday. morning, lunchtime, afternoon. so, yeah. you expected to haveit afternoon. so, yeah. you expected to have it today? yes, indeed. i was ready, and i've been shaped down the front because they are going to open me up. i was already to go, nil by mouth, and then at 130 the surgeon turned up and said we've been hacked and there's nothing we can do, we
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can't operate full stop not the only one for the operation. it is inconvenient and very frustrating for my fellow patients. the nurses are fabulous and the doctors, but also it is a heinous crime, this hacking, because they are putting people's lives at risk. they were very good and they kept with it well. we had to wait a bit longer and it is a dreadful situation. some of the patients caught up in this. let's talk to the home secretary, amber rudd. this is the sharp end of this problem. these people would have had their operations by now. yes, as they said, it is very inconvenient, a disruption to individual lives and it isa a disruption to individual lives and it is a heinous crime as the lady said. we are working very hard to make sure that we help the nhs but their systems back in order and so far we have had reassuring trombone, no patient data has been compromised. the national cyber
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security centre is working with them to end and contain the disruption and to make sure we learn lessons. hammond hospitals and trusts were affected ? —— hammond hospitals and trusts were affected? —— how many. hammond hospitals and trusts were affected? -- how many. we understand a5 have been affected out of several hundred and most of them are being very cautious. some of them are making changes and some of them aren't. some of them are carrying on with their daily work. can i point out that this particular attack, this cyber attack, hasn't been especially focused on the nhs, it has been a worldwide attack, affecting a hundred countries and different organisations, but in the uk it has impacted on the nhs. what do you know about who is responsible? we don't know the a nswer to responsible? we don't know the answer to that, but i've spoken to the national crime agency to find out who might be, but it will take a few days. we have to make sure we
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are very clear about what information we have and we tracked it down. we are talking to international partners because this is an international attack, so we have good relationships with different countries who have been impacted and we are sharing information to find how best to address this and how to find out who has done it and how to make sure we have the right defences going forward. they -- there are some straight questions people want answered. the nhs backed up? they are supposed to be backed up, that is partly to defend against this kind of incident, and this ra nsomwa re kind of incident, and this ransomware is kind of incident, and this ra nsomwa re is about kind of incident, and this ransomware is about getting money off people to access data. if those files are backed up that attack is worthless, because people can download the backed up information and work from that, so i hope the a nswer and work from that, so i hope the answer is yes was the those of the
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instructions everyone has received in the past and that is good cyber defence. but i expect and we will find out in the next few days if there are any holes in that. people would be hoping for reassurance from the home secretary regarding the question. the information you are seething at the moment is that it may be that some of these hospital trusts do not have the details of patients backed up, is that my understanding? i don't have that information, but what i can say, all of the nhs trusts have been asked to review their data overnight. jeremy hunt is in touch with them and they are working with the national cyber security centre. there may be lessons to learn. the important thing is to disrupt the attack, and we will come back afterwards as to whether there are lessons to be learned. the threat is that these
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details will be lost and destroyed within the space of a week, so if these aren't backed up, this is potentially a very difficult situation? we don't underestimate the difficulty, this is a dangerous cyber attack. the kind that we have been expecting in a way because that is why we have invested £1.9 billion ina is why we have invested £1.9 billion in a national cyber security centre. that is why we have high levels of expertise in the area and why we have been training police and investing inside the skills but in terms of the outcome of this attack, we will have to wait for the dust to settle to see what the impact has been, but most hospitals are not affected and most are getting on with their daily work. an american hospital that was affected by similar ransomware hospital that was affected by similar ra nsomwa re recently hospital that was affected by similar ransomware recently paid a ransom of some $17,000, in order to get the material back. they made the
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decision and we understand some commercial organisations will make that decision. what... is there a government policy in relation to advertising nhs trusts in this situation? because one option is to play. not surprisingly, our clear advice is not to play. we don't believe we should be paying ransoms, and the advice we give is about protecting your data and there are ways, very effectively, of doing that and having very up—to—date antivirus software. and making sure you don't fall into the trap of pressing on certain links. that is your advice. are you telling nhs trusts not to play? that is what they have been told officially? —— pgy- they have been told officially? —— pay. yes, that is the advice, they
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should not be plain, that is government advice, yes. —— paying. regarding advice given out by microsoft, and this is a fast developing situation, i got quotes from the professor of security at cambridge, he says microsoft issued critical notices in connection with security a couple of months ago. the suggestion is nhs organisations might not even have known this. or ignored advice to update what was relatively old computer systems. i'm not sure if you have heard these stories, but many people will think thatis stories, but many people will think that is not acceptable. we know how important this information is, everybody is aware, anyone who works in the nhs, especially at the senior level, is aware of how important it is to have cyber defences which is
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why the cqc inspection makes cyber pa rt why the cqc inspection makes cyber part of the regular inspection. they have been given, and most nhs trusts work within those guidelines to make sure that they do have up—to—date softwa re sure that they do have up—to—date software and they do have the bright platforms and they back up appropriately. —— right platforms. we have been ready to this kind of attack and we have been giving advice and assistance to organisations like the nhs for many yea rs organisations like the nhs for many years to make sure we are ready for that. our focus is years to make sure we are ready for that. 0urfocus is making sure that we end the disruption of being caused by this particular attack. afterwards we won't hesitate to learn lessons and see where we can improve. thanks forjoining us. amber rudd, the home secretary. we will talk about this in further detail. we have new information coming out from microsoft and their suggested updates. we have got a technology expert in the studio in
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the next hour. here's helen with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, this is a lovely shot that has been sent in from plymouth. blue skies. we don't have blue skies by everyone, we have quite a bit of cloud around and it is likely to stick around in eastern scotland. this is the view from aberdeen. there is some sunshine. plenty of cloud further west. coming into northern ireland, north—west england and northern wales and south—west scotland, this is all close to the area of low pressure. the low pressure is just moving area of low pressure. the low pressure isjust moving north. the rain will clear away from northern ireland in the afternoon but at the moment it isjust ireland in the afternoon but at the moment it is just across the south west areas. it will be turning damp, northern ireland. as you can see
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from the pictures, we have sunshine elsewhere, waiting in the wings, and temperatures are starting at 13—1a and they will respond to the strong sunshine. they should be more of it today, especially in eastern areas. —— there should. the next rain man coming in during tea time. —— rain band. heavy downpours in scotland, evenin band. heavy downpours in scotland, even in the north west, where b could see 19—20 but also some intense downpours that we could see. as we go through the evening and overnight, we might see some rain across the london area and eastern areas. good news forfarmers across the london area and eastern areas. good news for farmers and growers , areas. good news for farmers and growers, enough rain to dampen the ground and that brings the low pressure further away tomorrow. feeding in showers. across many areas. a large part of the day will
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be dry, but some areas will have a shower after shower. and other areas will escape scot—free. there will be an abundance of sunshine and also some big showers in the north and west. moving into monday, it goes downhill with wet and windy weather sweeping back. good news where we need the rain but not a good start to the week and it is debatable how much rain we will see in the south and east of the uk. sally, thanks for joining sally, thanks forjoining us. this more than 80,000 people go missing in britain every year — and the anxiety of those they leave behind is made worse by strict rules which mean their financial arrangements cannot be altered. now a new law will help their loved ones to take control of things like mortgage payments and standing orders.
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paul lewis from radio a's money box programme has been looking at the new law. he's in our london newsroom. paul, why is this law needed? i knew nothing about this until this week, but if somebody goes missing, even their closest relatives are not allowed to manage their finances. i spoke to peter lawrence, his daughter went missing eight years ago and he spoke to me about some of the problems caused by this for the relatives of people who have gone missing. any adult who goes missing will almost certainly have a bank account and insurance policies and maybe a mortgage. and the relatives very soon find within a few weeks of their loved one going missing, when they are feeling very low, that they cannot deal with any of these financial matters. i've met one lady who would have lost the house if her family had not gathered round and help her out financially. many stories like that. this law will apply in england and wales and it will allow a close relative to be
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appointed by the court to manage the missing person's financial affairs, a lwa ys missing person's financial affairs, always in their best interest, so if they return their financial affairs will be in order. when might this happen? eight years has been campaigned for, and it was thought it might be lost when parliament was dissolved before the election but it sneaked through in time. the government said as it was going through parliament that it would probably be another 12 months to sort out the fiddly bits so it will be in place, and it will be a little while before it is enforced but 2500 people, are likely to be helped by this, according to one charity, so this, according to one charity, so this is very good news indeed. thanks forjoining us. tonight it's the eurovision song contest and, after failing to make
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it into the top 10 for the past seven years, could this be the year britain bounces back? i don't think brexit is going to help. i do feel a bit sorry for our entrance. it is always political —— entrant. 0ur moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg, is in kiev, and has been to meet some of the contestants ahead of tonight's competition. it's eurovision 2017, and it's all rather confusing. take azerbaijan's entry. a horse head on a ladder. why? the audience is not understanding it. i am leaving the whole meaning to them. oh, well, that's clear, then. and what is going on with one of the favourites, italy, this year? why the monkey? why the ape? "the monkey," francesco gabbani tells me, "is a symbol that
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at the end of the day we are all naked apes." among the frontrunners are bulgaria and portugal. but what about the united kingdom? you know, there was a time when the uk was always a contender in eurovision. we always seemed to be in with a shot at the top spot. more recently we have been propping up the table. but could this be the year that britain is back? at rehearsals, lucie jones has been impressing everybody with her power ballad, never give up on you. i am hoping that i will go home with the respect of the nation that watched the show at home. i work iwork in i work in theatre. it will be nice to greet people at stage door and for them to say, you have done us proud. she has got the fans excited.
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this is our best chance for many yea rs. if the uk wants success in eurovision, this could be our golden opportunity. maybe there is a message in the title of the song? never give up on you? maybe. winning masterchef is also a big tv moment. we have got the winner in the last hour of the programme. stay with us. the headlines are coming up. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the nhs faces a weekend of disruption following a large—scale cyber attack which has caused hospitals to delay treatments and cancel appointments. around a0 nhs trusts and some gp surgeries were hit, but there's no sign that patient data has been compromised. i'm at barts, the largest nhs trust
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in the country, running five hospitals in london and all of them cancelling routine outpatient appointments. organisations around the world have been affected by the malicious software known as "ransomware", with reports of infections in dozens of countries.
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