Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 13, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

1:30 pm
despite their grief, one year on, the family is keen to create a legacy forjo. the family is keen to create a legacy forjo. going forward, build the children, they won't go away, but we have to be positive, and we are being. and jo's but we have to be positive, and we are being. andjo's children but we have to be positive, and we are being. and jo's children have got so much of her, and brendan, in them. that is a great legacy, and we do have that. that was catherine burns speaking tojo cox's parents and sister ahead of the anniversary this friday of her death. time now for a look at the weather, nick miller is here. useless weather factor lead, june 13 has a rather special place in uk weather history, it is the only summer day on record in the uk where the temperature has not reached 30 celsius. you know what? it is not doing it again today, better luck next year! tomorrow some of the us will get quite close, but by no means all, big weather contrasts across the uk at the moment. for some of us, it
1:31 pm
feels and looks like summer, but look at the cloud in scotland and northern ireland, the best of the sunshine for part of england and wales. you can see that all in play on the satellite picture over the past few hours. if you have got sunshine, you are closer to high pressure, weather more settled as a result. scotland and northern ireland, closer to low pressure, breeze, cloud, and breaks of rain, and that is the picture this afternoon. the best sunshine across southern england, where you are closest to that area of high pressure, so this is for a clarke, a range of temperatures, high teens in south—west england. —— bora clock. further north, some cloud around parts of wales and the midlands, some sunny belles too. you may catch a shower, most of us will not, but we have had showers already. closer to low pressure in northern ireland and scotland, some outbreaks of rain, brighter breaks in eastern scotland, temperatures nearer 20 celsius. this evening and tonight,
1:32 pm
lower temperatures in rural spots, fog patches developing, but not lasting long in the morning. high pressure exerted its influence a glass england and wales tomorrow, more sunshine, warm as a result, patchy cloud developing, isolated showers in northern england, but closer to that low pressure, many of us will be dry, but a weak weather system moving through with some outbreaks of rain. a big contrast in temperature, warmerfor outbreaks of rain. a big contrast in temperature, warmer for england outbreaks of rain. a big contrast in temperature, warmerfor england and wales, temperatures pegged back by cloud in scotland and northern ireland. the warmth comes with a price, high uv levels in places, high and very high pollen as well, so take precautions. wednesday evening, away from the rain, most of us tomorrow evening will be dry, but another weather system waiting in the winds in the atlantic, and that will bring outbreaks of rain to parts of scotland and northern ireland, pushing right through
1:33 pm
england and wales with a few showers, more breeze, more cloud, eventually feeling cool and fresher. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime: theresa may is meeting the leader of the democratic unionist party in downing street, as she seeks a deal to enable the conservatives to govern. that's all from the bbc news at 0ne, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. it is just after half past one. here is the latest from bbc sport. the british and irish lions have lost their latest tour match in new zealand. they were playing the highlanders in dunedin and it was an entertaining game. they have also been hit by injury. james burford responds —— reports.
1:34 pm
chance to leave everything on the pitch but they do so in the new stuart hogg has been ruled out of the rest of the tour because of injury. in the highlanders they had a side with grit, power and all blacks. just out of reach. after trading penalties, another gap, this time firmly in his grasp. the lions on the back foot. to add insult to injury and injury for courtney lawes. jonathan joseph scored injury and injury for courtney lawes. jonathanjoseph scored and eased nerves before tommy seymour jumped ata eased nerves before tommy seymour jumped at a chance to take the lion's share of the scoring. with tries coming at a premium and suddenly the opportunities were coming. the captains sam warburton first. liam coltman then for the highlanders. and so it came down the two cake. banks making no mistake with his to take the lead before elliot daly had a chance to win it with this enormous effort. just short of victory. everton have agreed to pay £30 million for
1:35 pm
sunderland's jordan pickford. it would be a record fee for a british goalkeeper if the england under 21 international signs the deal. pickford was one of very few bright spots in sunderland's season as they finished bottom and were relegated from the premier league. cristiano ronaldo has been accused of tax evasion. he is alleged to have used offshore companies to avoid paying almost £13 million in tax. antoine griezmann has signed an extension with atletico madrid. the french forward had been linked with a move to manchester united and is now tied to the spanish club until 2022. he is supposed to play against england in a friendly in paris tonight. a senior coach working with the british bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a toxic atmosphere in the sport. documents obtained by
1:36 pm
the bbc show athletes said their concerns were of the highest order, mentioning bullying, racism, sexism and discrimination. they were told the following month no disciplinary action would be taken. the six time paralympic champion david weir will compete in a track event for the last time in next month's anniversary games in london. he will continue road racing. he won the marathon for a seventh time in april. in january he marathon for a seventh time in april. injanuary he won four gold medals —— in january april. injanuary he won four gold medals —— injanuary he said he would never compete for britain again after an unsuccessful games in rio. it all seemed to collapse at one of the biggest stages of my career, and that was in rio. to be honest i try and forget about that week i had out there because it was quite depressing and quite hard to ta ke quite depressing and quite hard to take in that i did not come away with any medals. ijust wanted to prove i was still great when i turn up prove i was still great when i turn
1:37 pm
up on the marathon this year. david weir, who has announced his retirement from track racing. the golden state warriors of the nba champions again. celebrations clearly still going on in california, all wearing ski goggles to avoid champagne in their eyes. last year, they lost a 3—1 lead to the cleveland cavaliers and watched as lebronjames took all the glory. they got their revenge in the game five for a 4— series victory. you can find more on all of those stories on the bbc website. i am backin stories on the bbc website. i am back in the next hour with more for you. studio: thank you so much. let's return now to downing street, where theresa may is hoping to confirm a deal with the democratic unionist party today and secure her position in government. jane hill is there. we are still expecting a deal today, are we? we wait to see. we might find out quite soon, rebecca. welcome back to downing street.
1:38 pm
arlene foster and nigel dodds of the dup went into number ten one hour ago. there is no specific time for this meeting. they could emerge at any point from here on in. we think they will have something to say to they will have something to say to the many journalists they will have something to say to the manyjournalists waiting here. we will wait and see. certainly a deal needs to be done as far as theresa may is concerned. she does not have an overall majority in the light of last week's general election. she needs those dup votes to have any kind a working majority, in terms of the queen ‘s speech, which we believe is still next week, and the brexit negotiations, as well. in the last half an hour the former conservative leader sirjohn major has been speaking on bbc radio devon is the such a key architect of course on the talks around the northern ireland peace process. —— on radio. such a key... he has been
1:39 pm
expressing a good deal of wariness about any potential deal that might be done here in downing street behind me. let's listen to what some of sirjohn major has said.|j behind me. let's listen to what some of sirjohn major has said. i am concerned about the deal, i am wary and dubious about it. for peace process reasons but also other reasons, as well. that said, all my life i have been a conservative. i very much want theresa may to succeed and stay as prime minister. i understand why she wishes to shore up i understand why she wishes to shore up her parliamentary position. that is entirely understandable and i sympathise. but my main concern is certainly the peace process. a fundamental part of that peace process is the uk government needs to be impartial, between all competing interests in northern ireland. the good friday agreement
1:40 pm
says jurisdiction ireland. the good friday agreement saysjurisdiction shall ireland. the good friday agreement says jurisdiction shall be exercised with rigorous impartiality. that is entirely right. that was always the intention right from the start of the negotiations. the danger is that however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal at westminster with one of the northern ireland parties and you never know in what unpredictable way events will turn out. and we cannot know if that impartiality is going to be crucial and some stage in the future. very, very interesting comments from the former conservative leader, sirjohn major, speaking on radio four in the last half an hour. it is very noisy, if you can still hear me! helicopters are above. the meetings are still going on. we are keeping an eye on it. as soon as arlene foster emerges from number ten, we will be straight back with you. we
1:41 pm
wa nt to will be straight back with you. we want to hear what her response has been at a party's response. and whether indeed some form of deal has been struck. we will have more from downing street as soon as she emerges. studio: lovely, we will see them, thank you. we can now speak to liberal democrat mp alistair carmichael. hejoins us now. thank you forjoining us and good afternoon. what do you think of this potential deal between the dup and the conservatives? from the point of view of the peace process it is fraught with difficulty. your viewers will have heard the wise words of sirjohn major. i think theresa may would do well to listen. theresa may would do well to listen. the peace process in northern ireland is precious and should not be played with lightly. the difficulty is of course a deal with the dup only really gets to the starting line. she has five and a half years of negating every vote every day in the house of commons
1:42 pm
andi every day in the house of commons and i do not think the deal that, any deal she's going to do, we'll give her that. she still has enormous difficulties. the only way for her to get through this would be to a cce pt for her to get through this would be to accept the people told us last week that nobody is going to get their own way all the time and she should be reaching out to work with people in other parties across the political divide to deal with what is going to be one of the biggest negotiations this country is ever going to have to deal with. what are you suggesting? the liberal democrats have made it clear they will not go into any kind of coalition with the conservatives. this is not a coalition or even a confidence and supply arrangement of the sort the dup are talking about. william hague in the telegraph today talks about a cross—party commission, bringing in people of all parties. i think there is a lot of sense in that. if theresa may understood that she has landed us all in this mess, but her content to
1:43 pm
termination to rigorously control this from the centre, to make sure it is her way and nobody else given any credence, if she would undertake to reach out across the parties, actually we could have the makings ofa actually we could have the makings of a sensible way forward that would bring the different sides and parts of the political landscape all back together. there is already a cross— party together. there is already a cross—party committee which is discussing brexit. that is a select committee of the house of commons. that is a different thing. that is to give scrutiny to the action of the government. what we are talking about is a cross—party commission which would actually be managing the process. i would be interested in whether you had any words of advice for arlene foster and the dup as they embark on any potential deal with the conservatives, in the light
1:44 pm
of what happened to the liberal democrats. i think the only advice i would give to the dup is remember what is at stake. remember what it was like before we had the peace process. we do not want to risk that. if you are serious about promoting this deal in the national interest, the responsibility lies with theresa may and the dup to make sure that any deal does not put that peace process in jeopardy. do sure that any deal does not put that peace process injeopardy. do you think they will be another general election before the year is out?|j see very election before the year is out?|j see very little public at a pit —— appetite for another general election but he would be foolish to predict anything in politics at the moment. if she can accept that last week the people told us we are all minorities and we are not going to get our own way all the time, if she would reach out to other parties, that eventuality could easily be avoided. we must leave it there.
1:45 pm
thank you forjoining us. a summary of the business news in a moment but first, the headlines on bbc news. the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster is in talks with theresa may at downing street over a deal allowing the conservatives to govern. an inquest opens into the deaths of the victims of the london bridge terror attack — and hears five of them were stabbed. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will face questions about his dealings with russian officials when he gives evidence to the senate over alleged interference in the presidential election. in the business news this afternoon... uk inflationjumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may, tightening the squeeze on consumers. 2.996 2.9% last month. 2.7% in april. a lucrative part of the city of london's financial trading
1:46 pm
could be forced to move to continental europe after the uk leaves the eu. the european commission is expected to say later that it wants the eu to regulate what's known as the clearing of euro denominated transactions. at the moment nearly a billion dollars worth of such trades are done in london every day. we'll have more on this in a moment. and the company behind the london eye says visitor numbers are down. merlin entertainments says people have been put off by the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. uk inflationjumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may, tightening the squeeze on consumers. a weak pound and the rising cost of food and imports have been blamed. our business correspondent ben thompson has more. inflation measures the rising cost of living and that continued to rise last month. prices rose more than forecast and at the fastest pace in
1:47 pm
four years. going up 2.9% on average. that is a measure of increased prices for items we regularly buy. that is the highest rate since june of 2013. regularly buy. that is the highest rate sincejune of 2013. much higher than the 2.7% forecast. all of that means more pressure on household income, because we're not seeing wages rise by the same amount. here is what inflation has done in the law last —— in the last year. remember the governor of the bank of england warned inflation will keep rising this year before falling back slightly in 2018. half of 1% this time last year, going all the way up to today's figure of 2.9%. what has gone up and come down? these figures measure prices for all kinds of things we spend money on. there is a handy list, electricity is one of the biggest risers in this set of figures. a big jump of 7.7%. furniture and clothing rose, as
1:48 pm
well. transport costs were up as well, even though petrol and diesel prices actually fell. that is partly down to a recent fall in oil prices. the overall rise in inflation is already weighing down on the economy. chris inflation... we have reined back spending. —— gross inflation... this could mean we can't back further. what does it mean and what could it mean for your personal income? find out all the details on the website. the news of inflation, the measure of the cost of living, rising now by 2.9%. ever since the uk voted to leave the european union a year ago, business leaders in the eurozone have called for some of the city of london's most prized business to be moved to the continent. one of these segments of business — which generates millions of pounds a day for the city — is euro clearing. later today the european commission is set to release its proposals on whether euro denominated clearing should be moved away from london after brexit. explaining it is andrew walker.
1:49 pm
let's start with the basics. what is this and why is it so important to the city of london? it is especially about derivatives trading. by financial product based on some other asset, especially interest rates, or currencies. clearing is something that can be done through these agencies called a clearing house, bringing buyers and sellers together. the clearing house takes the risk. if you and i had some deal in one of these derivatives, it would be the clearing house taking the loss if one of us failed to pay what we were doing. it is an enormous business in london. including clearing done in euros and the european commission feels it is an important consideration in
1:50 pm
financial stability for the eurozone and it would like to have strong oversight of it. what are we expecting them to tell us? they are likely to say that it is ok to carry on as before with relatively small clearing houses. but larger ones, they will want more oversight. in they will want more oversight. in the case of london, some kind of financial regulation agreement with the european commission and central bank, and there is the potentialfor really large ones that have very potentially serious consequences for financial stability, if they did go badly wrong, in those cases the european commission may say they need to be done and actually be incorporated in the european union. that would only be enforceable for business that comes from within the eu. if it was doing business with british or american firms it would still be able to carry on. but there is the possibility that some
1:51 pm
business would have to shift to the eu, frankfurt, paris, orwherever, and somejobs eu, frankfurt, paris, orwherever, and some jobs might eu, frankfurt, paris, orwherever, and somejobs might go eu, frankfurt, paris, orwherever, and some jobs might go with eu, frankfurt, paris, orwherever, and somejobs might go with it. eu, frankfurt, paris, orwherever, and some jobs might go with it. we keep hearing somejobs might go. what is the worst—case scenario? if they said, you can't do euro clearing any more in london, what is the alt clearing? some people suggested if you take into account business related to this that would go with it in the most extreme cases, we could be looking at tens of thousands of jobs. cases, we could be looking at tens of thousands ofjobs. one estimate has 18 or 19,000 jobs. —— 80 or 90,000. it is a clear indication that the european union has some concerns about financial stability in all this and wanting to have eurozone financial stability more under its own control, but also i think it is fair to say there is a certain amount of envious gazes, looking at the city of london from frankfurt, paris and others, for many years. andrew walker, economics
1:52 pm
correspondent, thank you. the chief executive of crest nicholson has said he would struggle to run his company without migrant workers from the european union. he said among home—builders, european immigrants make up 12% of the workforce. british air race is in discussion with at about outsourcing some call centre operations. —— british airways. it is understood it would involve transferring two call centres, one in newcastle and one in manchester, who employ about 11100 people. baa has been criticised for aggressively cutting costs in the last few years. investors are seeking $399 million worth of damages from toshiba over an accounting scandal. two years ago the technology company admitted overstating profits for the last six yea rs. overstating profits for the last six years. it led to several senior executives standing down. the firm has been served with 26 complaints over the scandal and there are
1:53 pm
claims of $985 million. a quick look at the market. a lot of movement yesterday in text stocks, especially in the states. they really felt. they have mainly been driving a lot of the market. a lot of people are thinking investors are selling up because they think possibly they are overvalued and it is time to take a bit of profit. they recovered a bit this morning. the ftse 100 bit of profit. they recovered a bit this morning. the ftse100 is pretty much flat and the pound and dollar, 1.27, merlin, visitorfigures are down, share prices down byjust over 1.596. down, share prices down byjust over 1.5%. that is all from me, rebecca. studio: back now to downing street with jane hill. thank you, rebecca. we are back in downing street. we are still waiting for arlene foster and nigel dodds of the dup to emerge from that meeting. we do not know when it will be. we will get the thoughts of our assistant political
1:54 pm
editor, who has been following these events. very interesting and quite strong words from sirjohn major, the former conservative leader. extraordinary contrast. theresa may trying to nail down a deal with the dup. sirjohn major appears to be pulling it apart. saying that she ought to consider not going ahead with this deal and tried to just govern on her own without relying on the dup. two concerns from sirjohn major, the impact on the peace process , major, the impact on the peace process, and the impact on tory support. the peace process have concerns with the reading of the deal in northern ireland and the impact it might have on restoring the devolved government in northern ireland. and also in terms of tory strategy and support, he said the danger is this deal will look like cash for votes, his quotes. many other parts of the country will
1:55 pm
think, hang on, why is it the case northern ireland is getting all this extra money? there will be a reaction against that. he said he was concerned, reaction against that. he said he was concerned , angry reaction against that. he said he was concerned, angry and dubious about this deal. an extraordinary statement coming from sirjohn major. notjust a former prime minister and tory leader, but one of the key architects of the peace process in northern ireland. absolutely. he expressed sympathy and said he understood the plight, the mathematics of theresa may's situation but he felt he had to say that, which is interesting. what is interesting about it is that he is basically on the same side as pretty much every previous northern ireland secretary. we heard from peter hain. there will be other ones, as well. all saying, hang on, these are deep waters. it might be good at westminster and get you enough votes in westminster, but beware how this is read back in northern ireland. and the potential impact on trying
1:56 pm
to get sinn fein back into some kind of power—sharing executive. we have already said it with sinn fein saying they do not any longer regard the british government as neutral. they want an independent arbiter. they want an independent arbiter. the real danger is not only the legal difficulty in the belfast agreement, which says the british government must be rigorously impartial, it is more practicality in that sinn fein be very reluctant to go into any kind of deal with the dup if they are seen as being in cahoots with the british government. it would mean doing a deal with them, which they are not going to do. although the northern ireland secretary said that these are entirely separate things, restoring devolved government in northern ireland and the deal in westminster are entirely separate, that is not how sirjohn major sees it but how is it seen in northern ireland? norman, thank you for now. more from here in the next few minutes. as soon as they get back from number
1:57 pm
ten we will be back with the latest. let's pause in downing street. we will catch up with the weather prospects, coming from nick miller. some patchy cloud and blue sky above doubt dad —— downing street. high pressure, more settled and warm and sunny in some places compared to northern parts of the uk. parts of northern parts of the uk. parts of northern england rather cloudy. in wales as well for some of us. some showers and outbreaks of rain. these are the differences which exist now and for several days. southern part of the uk closer to high—pressure, not just for today but a few days, keeping things relatively scuttled. —— settled. cloud and breeze and fabrics of rain or showers in scotla nd fabrics of rain or showers in scotland and northern ireland for the rest of this afternoon. we see some good sunshine still to come across much of southern england, high teens south—west england, low teens in the south—east of england.
1:58 pm
some low cloud around, east anglia, midlands and northern england, the odd shower, but most places avoiding them and staying dry. some sunny spells. northern ireland and much of scotla nd spells. northern ireland and much of scotland cloudy with fabrics of rain. eastern scotland doing a little bit better. some breaks of cloud and nearer to 20 celsius here. rain pushing northwards across scotland. elsewhere it is looking drive. clear skies in england and wales. in rural spots, temperatures lower than this. single figures and may be the odd fog patches but nothing widespread. quickly clearing in the morning. more widespread sunshine across england and wales to begin the day. patchy cloud in especially northern england in the afternoon and maybe an isolated shower. it will feel warmer. scotla nd shower. it will feel warmer. scotland and northern ireland still close to low pressure. some breaks in the cloud here and there but not many. with the cloud cover, temperature contrasts between the sunshine and the cloud. near 28 celsius around south—east england.
1:59 pm
but with the warmth, relatively high to very high pollen levels and very high u b. a high to very high pollen levels and very high u b. a high price to pay with the sunshine and heat. many tomorrow evening hard drive but another system coming through into thursday, scotla nd system coming through into thursday, scotland and northern ireland more wind and cloud and rain and showers. pushing into england and wales on thursday, taking a few showers but more cloud after the wednesday sunshine, more wind and eventually feeling a bit fresher. the contrast will continue friday into the weekend with high—pressure to the south, lower pressure to the north. you can go online and look at the summary for what is to come and the weather for the week ahead. this is bbc news. i amjane hill
2:00 pm
live in downing street. arlene foster of the dup is still here inside number 10 discussing a deal to try to prop up theresa may's minority government. meanwhile, the former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, has warned of his concern about doing a deal with the dup. he says he is dubious. the danger is that however much any government tries they will not be seen to be impartial if they're locked into a parliamentary deal at westminster with one of the northern ireland parties. our other headlines: the european parliament brexit negotiator has told the bbc

68 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on