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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 13, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'mjane hill live in downing street where talks have taken place between the leader of the democratic unionist party and the prime minister. we understand the parties are finalising a deal to prop up theresa may's minority conservative government. but former prime ministerjohn major warns of the consequences of a deal, saying the ‘fragile‘ peace process in northern ireland is at risk. i am concerned about the deal. i am wary about it i am dubious about it both for peace process reasons but also for other reasons as well. as the uncertainty continues, mps return to parliament to re—elect the speaker and reflect on the election. mr speaker elect, on behalf of the whole house may
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i congratulate you on your reelection — at least someone got a landslide. and i'm sure we all look forward to welcoming the queen's speech just as soon as the coalition of chaos has been negotiated. also this hour: inflation hits a nearfour—year high — continuing the squeeze on consumers as prices rise faster than wages. and the european commission will rule shortly on whether brexit means euro clearing houses should be moved out of london. talks between theresa may and the leadership of
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the democratic unionist party at downing street — aimed at securing support for a minority conservative government — have finished for the day. arlene foster and nigel dodds arrived here to speak to theresa may, and they were inside for some time. quite lengthy talks. the bbc understands there are no issues outstanding from the negotiations — and that a deal has been largely agreed. we hear that considerable progress has been made. we have also heard that arlene foster, the leader, is prepared to stay in london tonight. some suggestion that those talks may be continuing. we will have more from all our correspondence in a
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moment. but first this assessment of where we are, from chris mason. the sun is shining from northern ireland ‘s democratic unionist party. just ten mps and their leader, who now wield huge power. big smiles. look how excited they are. future is bright. arlene foster arrived in downing street to meet with the prime minister. are you ready to drive a hard bargain? what's your price? what price to keep mrs may in power? a few hours later there was still no deal, as theresa may swaps downing street for the commons. mr speaker elect, on behalf of the whole house may i congratulate you on your reelection — at least
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someone got a landslide. i'm sure she will agree with me that democracy is a wonderful thing and can throw up some very unexpected results. and i'm sure we all look forward to welcoming the queen ‘s speech just as soon as the coalition of chaos has been negotiated. so, what might the dup want to return for what is expected to be an informal arrangement with the conservatives? where they promised to back them on the most important votes in parliament. it could involve money, extra investment in hospitals, or roads. the dup are also against limiting those pensioners who can receive the winter fuel allowance. we have interesting times ahead. i look forward to playing a full role in the proceedings of this parliament
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over the course of the next five yea rs over the course of the next five years and i wish you well in your office during that time. for the prime minister, brickbats but also bouquets. chin up. the message says. we also had a remarkable intervention from john major, a key architect of the good friday agreement and former conservative prime minister. he had some strong words about the idea of theresa may doing a deal with the dup. he expressed quite considerable concerns that this could cause problems in relation to the northern ireland peace process. he was talking on radio 4, let's hear some of what he had to say. i am concerned about the deal. i am wary about it, i am dubious about it, both for peace process reasons but also for other reasons as well. that said, all my life i have been a
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conservative. i want mrs may to succeed as promised and stay as prime minister. i understand why she wishes to shore up a parliamentary position, that is entirely understandable and iphone buyers. but, but. my main concern, certainly is the peace process. a fundamental pa rt is the peace process. a fundamental part of that peace process is that the uk government needs to be impartial, between all competing interests in northern ireland. the good friday agreement says the power of... rigorous impartiality. that is entirely right. that was always the intention from the start of the negotiations. the danger is that however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal at westminster
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with one of the northern ireland parties. you never know in what unpredictable way events will turn out. we cannot know if that impartiality is going to be crucial at some stage in the future. if the government to form a deal with the dup, andi government to form a deal with the dup, and i conceded that they will might feel they have two, then it is doubly important, terribly important, to consult on brexit widely, both in and out of parliament. i think if that were a joint announcement with any deal with the dup, it would be very helpful. people would see there is not going to be that portion of proper two pressure on one party but that the government really are going to consult. with others who have a direct interest in it. i think we have to recognise that the election changed if not everything, then a very great deal. the government are going to have to respond to that. the views of the 48% cannot be
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brushed aside as some of the more rigorous hardline brexiteers wish. that wasjohn rigorous hardline brexiteers wish. that was john major talking rigorous hardline brexiteers wish. that wasjohn major talking on the world at one on radio 4 earlier. i wa nt to world at one on radio 4 earlier. i want to bring you some news intimacy at the bbc the judges in the european court of human rights said that charlie garde, the terminally ill little baby, they have decided he should keep receiving life—support treatment. until midnight on june 19th. while life—support treatment. until midnight onjune 19th. while they continue to consider his case. let me remind you of the background. the european court of human rights have been deliberating on whether doctors treating charlie garde can turn off his life support. that would be against the wishes of his parents. they want to take their son to the us for experimental treatment for a red and attic disorder, last week, the uk supreme court agreed with
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specialists at great ormond street hospital. —— a bare genetic disorder. that he should be allowed to die with dignity. as i say, judges are with you european court of human rights are going to carry on with their deliberations. they have said that charlie gard should keep receiving life—support treatment until midnight onjune the i9 treatment until midnight onjune the 19 while they continue to consider his case. that newsjustin to us here at the bbc from the european court of human rights. let us return now to our colleague jane court of human rights. let us return now to our colleaguejane hill in downing street. thanks, we have been talking about those discussions between theresa may and the dup today. recently that intervention from john major, former conservative prime minister expressing considerable concern about imprecations of doing any kind of deal despite the parliamentary mathematics that is fixing the prime minister. let's get her assessment
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of everything that we have seen today with our correspondent vicki young. worth starting with those comments from sirjohn major. such a key figure in the good friday agreement. his words, his anxiety, really carries weight here?m agreement. his words, his anxiety, really carries weight here? it does. and it's not just really carries weight here? it does. and it's notjust about the power—sharing and what is going on in northern ireland that is bothering him. that's obviously a big part of it. he says he is wary about it. he says the peace process is fragile, you have to take care with it. his concern is that if the conservatives here are in some kind of agreement or deal with the dup, one side of that of course, what are the other side going to thing? there are sinn fein, the sdlp. they will be wondering how we can be the honest broker in all of this. he had a lot of other concerns as well. if there is more money pumped into northern ireland, for schools and hospitals there, he says that local grievances elsewhere in the uk. you have scotland, wales, many places in
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england banking, our school of money, i want a new hospital as well. he is thinking in the longer term that will be seen as cash for votes first of all. in the long term, it could cost the tories votes at the next general election, whenever that covers. the concern we have heard from tory mps hear the views of the dup when it comes to 93v views of the dup when it comes to gay and lesbian rights, for example, last night theresa may was asked about that and said there was no way we are watering down any equality legislation. that's not on the table. we're pretty sure it's not on the table. she has managed to pacify that but there were lots of other things people are concerned about. john major's point is she could have had a minority government. it only gives a majority of about six, and he seems to suggest it is actually a price which is too high potentially, long—term, for the conservatives. interesting. what do we know as well about the states of these talks? how much have we heard? we were
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expecting arlene foster to come out and talk to journalists but she disappeared from another entrance. what are we hearing? that tells us it has not concluded. if it had been, she would have come out. the microphone was ready to go but she went out the back way. it was cut short because theresa may had to go to the house of commons as did nigel dodds, they went for the election of the speaker, where we are told talks continue in the house of commons. but then theresa may is off to paris. she has a meeting at prearranged with emmanuel macron over there. it does not mean the talks cannot go on. it does not have to be arlene foster and theresa may in the room at the time, but the suggestion we are getting is they are suggestion we are getting is they a re pretty close suggestion we are getting is they are pretty close to a deal. it will go into tomorrow, it looks like, but it does sound as though the para meters it does sound as though the parameters of a deal there. it's worth saying this is not a coalition in the same way david cameron have the liberal democrats. it's likely to bea the liberal democrats. it's likely to be a much looser arrangement, enough so that they can get the
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queen ‘s speech through whenever that comes. the budget will go through, but crucially in a no—confidence situation. in a vote, in the house of commons, if it was, do you have confidence in this government, the dup would back theresa may and that's what keeps in power ultimately. what could lead to another general election it was if she were to lose a confidence vote. back tojohn she were to lose a confidence vote. back to john major, she were to lose a confidence vote. back tojohn major, his point was, the dup would not bring down a conservative government with the possibility thatjeremy corbyn, who they really do not like, that he could be prime minister. it simply would not happen. while the tories jumping the gun here, he says? thank you vicky. we know arlene foster has been tweeting after that meeting and we think we might hear some comments from her on camera in the next little while as well. we will bring you that when we get it. let's turn oui’ you that when we get it. let's turn our attention is to paris though. that is the reason theresa may had to leave here. it was the election of the speaker, the re—election of the speaker as it turned out. that's
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why theresa may had to leave here at a specific time. now of course goes to paris for that prearranged meeting with emmanuel macron. she is in paris for that. let's had their will our political correspondent, tom bateman, is in paris. we know mr macron had invited theresa may here. whether before the election after, downing street did not want to comment, we can only assume it will have been in the planning for a while. she will arrive here in a couple hours' time after that extraordinarily busy day in london, for an evening here in paris with president macron. they will be bilateral talks, there will bea will be bilateral talks, there will be a working dinner, then the pair will head to the star to france where there is a friendly between england and france where they will both watch the game. on the agenda,
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the bulk of these talks taken up by counterterrorism measures. particularly the two countries want to do more to force social media firms to remove content that could be encouraging extremism. as you would expect, foreign policy will also be on the agenda. as i understand from downing street, brexit is likely to come up as well. as you have been hearing, as theresa may finds herself facing these gathering forces, asking her to change the tone and the shape in a way of brexit, she arrives here to a very pro—european french president who has perhaps unlike her thumping great mandate from his country, and over the weekend his party having done incredibly well and the parliamentary elections here. she knows she comes to face one of the two key power brokers when it comes to brexit discussions, as in france and germany. what sensible to get from president macron, a man who it
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should be said, when he strode to the stage after his election did sing an ode tojoy, the anthem for the european union? —— he did so to an ode to joy. the european union? —— he did so to an ode tojoy. mrs may will find herself to that discussion, the opening stages of that brexit negotiation, trying to get a sense perhaps of flavour from president macron as to exactly what the european position will be. thank you. more from you may gets to paris. we have just you. more from you may gets to paris. we havejust had in now that comment, so statements from arlene foster. let's hear what she has been telling journalists. we have had some good discussions again today. those are continuing into the afternoon. i hope we can reach a conclusion sooner rather than later. can you give us any more on that? i'm not going to negotiate over the
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airwaves but there has been a lot of commentary around the issues we are talking about and it won't surprise anyone we're talking about matters that pertain of course to the nation germany. bringing stability to the uk government. in and around issues around brexit, obviously, around counterterrorism. and then doing what is right for northern ireland in respect of economic matters. brief comments that from arlene foster using the word stability, a word we heard a lot during the election campaign. we will keep an eye on that. also worth telling you that after 5pm we will be talking to peter hain, who was of course at one time in the secretary of state for northern ireland. we will get his thoughts on all this, particularly in light of the comments made at lunchtime bursarjohn major. more from here to come. for now, back to rebecca and julie. just me actually, jane! but good to
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see you. more now on that breaking news that the european court of human rights has extended an interim measure requiring doctors to continue to care for the terminally ill baby charlie gard until midnight next monday. with us is our correspondent, what more can you tell us? a bit of background to give you some context. charlie gard was born in august last year with a rare progressive genetic condition which essentially wastes his muscles and damages his brain. he is severely brain—damaged, he cannot see, here, move, or swallow unaided. brain—damaged, he cannot see, here, move, orswallow unaided. he brain—damaged, he cannot see, here, move, or swallow unaided. he is being kept alive at great ormond street hospital with a ventilator and feeding tube. his parents want the right to take trolley to america, where there is an experimental therapy available. they say that offers some slight chance of improving his condition. —— to ta ke of improving his condition. —— to take charlie to america. the courts here say that is not in his best
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interest, that he cannot be cured, he is severely brain—damaged. but nothing would change even where this therapy were successful and he should be able to die with dignity. his parents, chris god and connie yates have now taken their court to the european court of human rights. they have ruled that while they consider whether or not to take the case, the care that is being given to charlie at great ormond should be continued until midnight tonight. they now say it should be extended until midnight on june 19 they now say it should be extended until midnight onjune 19 while they continue to consider his case. this is the very last legal avenue that is the very last legal avenue that is available to charlie's parents. the european court of human rights say today they want a little more time to look at it before they make a decision. there may be people listening to those who wonder, though the parents just get what they want? yes, and certainly their lawyers have argued that it really is extraordinary for the states to decide a case like this, when the pa rents a re decide a case like this, when the parents are there and probably the
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pa rents, parents are there and probably the parents, they believe, should be in a position to have the final say. but human rights law is very clear. ultimately, what is regarded to be in the best interest of the child ta kes in the best interest of the child takes precedence over all the pa re nt‘s takes precedence over all the parent's wishes. that is the situation at the moment as far as the british courts are concerned. thank you. the headlines on bbc news: the dup leader meets the prime minister for talks the dup leader meets the prime ministerfor talks on the dup leader meets the prime minister for talks on supporting a conservative minority government— the bbc understands the parties are finalising the details. former prime ministerjohn major warns of the consequences of a deal deal, saying the ‘fragile' peace process in northern ireland is at ireland is at risk. courts say that the terminally ill child charlie gard should continue to receive treatment while they consider his case. in sport, the british and irish
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lions have lost again on their tour to new zealand. they went down by a single point to the super rugby side highlanders. a senior coach with great britain's bobsled squad has been accused of racism and multiple complains of a toxic atmosphere have been made against the sport. jordan pickford is set to become the most expensive british goalkeeper ever. everton have agreed to pay a sunderland £30 million for the under 21 player. i will be back with more on all those stories in about ten minutes. see you then. one of the european union negotiators, guy verhofstadt, has said britain must quickly end the uncertainty over brexit talks caused by a ‘chaotic election result‘ . he told our europe correspondent gavin lee the eu was growing impatient as it waits to learn the uk government's negotiating position. i don't know if it's the
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responsibility of the uk government, whether they take the decision of the hard brexit described in the letter of the 29th of march, or will they adapt their position because of they adapt their position because of the outcome of the election? that's the outcome of the election? that's the responsibility of the uk government. what i want and what we wa nt government. what i want and what we want in europe is that we can stop this. the whole debate about brexit started three years ago. remember that. one year ago there was the outcome of the referendum, three minutes ago the letter —— three months ago the letter from march, and we are still not negotiating. the uncertainty for the citizens and businesses has to stop as fast as possible. you talk about being impatient. for myself! my impatience is mainly driven by the uncertainty that creates a lot of trouble for euro citizens, uk citizens living on the continent, businesses working on
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the continent, businesses working on the continent. in britain, that's the continent. in britain, that's the problem. it's my impatience —— my impatience is only the translation of the impatience of the ordinary citizens and businesses. translation of the impatience of the ordinary citizens and businessesm there still part of you that thinks article 50 could be on triggered? brexit my not actually happen? no. we are on the course of article 50. it has been triggered. the only reason we have to start hopefully next week is that we have only had time frame of less than two years. everything has to be behind us on the 29th 2019. a lucrative part of the city of london's financial trading could be forced to move to continental europe — after the uk leaves the eu. the european commission is expected to say that it wants the eu to regulate the clearing of euro denominated transactions. at the moment, hundreds of billions of euros move through the capital every day. the vice—president of the european commision has been
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speaking in the past half hour. brief comments that from arlene foster using we need to herfrom we need to her from taking action to present financial stability and provide certainty to businesses. this is why today we are introducing a more european approach to the supervision of cp. we want to ensure cooperation between banks and currencies. we are empowering european securities and market authorities with the task of ensuring a more coherent and consistent supervision of ccp ‘s. both in the eu and outside. both our countries. third party operators for non—systematically important ccp is, not much will change. they will continue to operate under the
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current system. systematically important ccp is outside the eu, they will be subject to supervision, by home authorities and asthma. this is in line with an approach taken by others such as the united states. in some specific circumstances, and as a last resort, authorities may require individual cities to be established within the eu. that was the vice president of the european commission now. let's go live now to the city and our correspondent. john c, help us make sense of this. what does this all mean? the important bit was right at the end there when he said in exceptional circumstances, the european commission could insist that clearing houses moved into the eu. that's important because in the city behind me, they clear something like 70% of all euro transactions around the world every day. that runs into billions of pounds. it's a huge business. but in a couple of years'
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time, we will no longer be in the european union. now, the rest of european union. now, the rest of europe has had its eyes on that business for quite some time. they tried to get those clearing houses to move to the eurozone two years ago. they were blocked in the european court. once we leave the eu, if they do not like what they see here, if they do not think the regulations are working, they are taking the right upon themselves to force those companies to move to the continent. how likely is that? well. they say it is an exceptional circumstance, but what they are basically saying is, they will insist these companies are regulated by them, even though they are based in london, they want the regulated by authorities in the rest of the eu. in exceptional circumstances, if they think those companies are so important that there is a systemic risk to the euro if they are not in the eurozone, they will insist on a moving. they do not say they will do that, but they are basically taking the power to do that. that is a big
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threat to the city. the city is the biggest financial centre in europe. it employs hundreds of thousands of people. clearing is only one small pa rt people. clearing is only one small part of that business but the city is worried that brexit means it is dominance —— its dominance in europe is under threat as places like frankfurt and paris tried to lure business there. this particular decision would make it easy for them to do that. thanks for now. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to a senate committee this evening about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr sessions, who has removed himself from thejustice department's investigation into the same issue, is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the intelligence committee. our correspondent is in washington. high stakes, jane. how nervous will donald trump be? he has already been treating today saying that fake news
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is becoming even more wrong and dirty. he has not said specifically what he meant by that but one can assume the hearing withjeff sessions comes into that bracket as far as he is concerned. really, i think this isjust far as he is concerned. really, i think this is just another indication of how this whole russia probe refuses to go away. a lot of republicans had hoped the james comey‘s testimony would lay to rest these issues. donald trump suddenly feels it vindicated him because it confirmed that he is not personally under investigation. but now you have one of the most senior figures in the trump administration, the attorney generaljeff sessions, having to go before lawmakers to a nswer having to go before lawmakers to answer some of the questions that james comey raised in his testimony. why did he not do more to protect the relationship between the fbi and the relationship between the fbi and the trump administration? that separation that is necessary for the fbi's independence. are there any
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other meetings that mr sessions had with russian officials that have not yet been disclosed ? with russian officials that have not yet been disclosed? tough times ahead certainly forjeff sessions. yes, mrtrump i'm ahead certainly forjeff sessions. yes, mr trump i'm sure we'll be watching. you say this comesjust days afterjeff sessions, the former fbi director, appeared before a committee last week. i wonder what effect this is all happening on the trump administration? it means that republican congress basically cannot get anything done because nobody wa nts to get anything done because nobody wants to talk about anything except the russia probe. all eyes are on these hearings. everybody, orat least democrats, are using the opportunity to try and call into question the trump administration's ability to tell the truth. whether or not there was actual collusion with russian meddling back in the campaign. all these questions continue to grind and china. meanwhile, republicans say they want to get on with things like tax
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reform, health care reform, and they just cannot do it. we will bring you news of his appearance later on. for now, and cute. —— for now, thank you. now let's take a look at the weather. just been checking the latest temperatures. glasgow 16, london just been checking the latest temperatures. glasgow16, london 23. arrange other. some cloud, some brain, showers in scotland and northern ireland, for england and wales mostly dry. quite a lot of cloud mind you. southern parts of wales are the highest temperatures. england and wales overnight stay dry, mainly clear. temperatures will dip away. lover in fact than this in rural spots. single dip away. lover in fact than this in ruralspots. single figures dip away. lover in fact than this in rural spots. single figures for some, the odd bug patch. once that clears away, into northern ireland. the day rather cloudy. sunshine in
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england and wales. some cloud will be old. most will stay dry. despite the cloud in scotland and northern ireland, some sunny breaks. outbreaks of rain, range of weather, range of temperatures, even walmart in the sunshine in england and wales but a south—east england 20 degrees. get some sunshine. it will feel quite pleasant. highs of pollen levels in england and wales, and in the sunshine, some high uv, particularly south wales and summoning them. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at a.31pm: the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster has held talks with theresa may in downing street on a deal to support a conservative minority government. the bbc understands there no
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outstanding issues left and the deal is largely agreed. but former prime ministerjohn major warns of the consequences of a deal saying the "fragile" peace process in northern ireland is at risk. meanwhile, new and returning mps are back in parliament for the first time since the election. john bercow has been unanimously re—elected speaker of the house of commons and in time honoured tradition was dragged to his perch above the commons. judges in the european court of human rights say terminally—ill baby charlie gard should keep receiving life support treatment until midnight on 19th june while they continue to consider his case. sport now. the british and irish lions record in new zealand now reads played 4—2. they went down 23—22 to the super rugby side
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highlanders in dunedin. they also picked up a couple of injuries with the first test against the all blacks just 11 days away james burford reports. for the lions, a chance to leave everything on the pitch but they do so in the new stuart hogg has been ruled out of the rest of the tour because of injury. in the highlanders they had a side with grit, power and all blacks. just out of reach. after trading penalties, another gap, this time firmly in his hands. the lions on the back foot. to add insult to injury and injury for courtney lawes. jonathanjoseph scored and eased nerves before tommy seymourjumped at a chance to take the lion's share of the scoring. and with tries coming at a premium and suddenly the opportunities were coming. the captain sam warburton first. liam coltman then for the highlanders. and so it came down the two kicks.
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marty banks making no mistake with his to take the lead before elliot daly had a chance to win it with this enormous effort. just short of victory. the guys are disappointed that we put our self in a position 22—13 to control that game and win it and the u nfortu nate control that game and win it and the unfortunate thing is we probably shot ourselves in the foot, haven't we, with you know some turnovers and some penalties towards the end of the game and have allowed them the opportunity to sneak it from us. england's cricketers are in cardiff for their icc champions trophy semi—final against pakistan tomorrow. it looks as though they've run out of patience with jason roy. the opener has made just 51 runs in his past eight one—day international innings and he is likely to be dropped. jonny bairstow — his likely replacement — took to the nets first in training today.
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there is a chance that there is going to be a change. we can't announce the team until tomorrow and we're looking to put out our strongest team. for the last two yea rs strongest team. for the last two years we've built towards this tournament and we want to win this tournament and we want to win this tournament or certainly get to the final and part tournament or certainly get to the finaland partand tournament or certainly get to the final and part and parcel of that is picking guys who we feel are in our best 11. a senior coach with great britain's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. confidential documents obtained by the bbc show that athletes contacted the chief executive anonymously to raise concerns over bullying, racism, sexism and other discrimination. no disciplinary action was taken at the time. the british bob and skeleton association say they conducted an internal review, but no formal complaints were made against individual staff. they say they will look to address
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the issues. ben mccullough young was part of the bobsleigh set up, but left describing his time there as "an amazingly unpleasant experience". i don't have a history of mental health problems, but i got to the point where i was experiencing what i could only describe as bouts of anxiety and depressive episodes every single day. ijust had for someone that loves my training. i love training every day, i love my sport, ijust really didn't want love training every day, i love my sport, i just really didn't want to be there. i didn't want to be doing sport. i was kind of sometimes i had my fingers crossed that i would sustain some kind of injury that would like put me in a category where i definitely couldn't slide. it was that bad. a couple of football stories for you. jordan pickford is set to become the most expensive british
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goalkeeper everton have agreed to pay sunderland £30 million for the england under 21. he played 32 times for the black cats last season, and received much praise despite their ultimate relegation cristiano ronaldo has been accused of tax evasion. spanish prosecutors allege that the real madrid and portugal star used offshore companies to avoid paying £13 million in tax. and antoine griezman looks like staying put this summer. the frenchman has signed a a one—year taking him through to 2022. contract extension with atletico madrid, taking him through to 2022. a move to manchester united had appeared likely at one stage. more now on the news that the leader of the democratic unionists, arlene foster, has said talks with theresa may on a deal with the government have been constructive and are going well. however, it's thought that a final agreement might not come until tomorrow.
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the former prime minister, sirjohn major, has told the bbc that he's wary and dubious about a deal with the dup because the peace process in northern ireland is fragile and under stress. we'll hearfrom sirjohn shortly but first — theresa may and jeremy corbyn have both been speaking in the commons in the past hour asjohn bercow was re—elected speaker. let's hear what they both had to say. it is clear that our country faces some of the greatest challenges of our time. the challenge of keeping our time. the challenge of keeping our nation safe including by defeating the perverted ideology of islamist extremism. the challenge of securing the best possible brexit deal and delivering the will of the british people in taking the united kingdom out of the european union. and the challenge of spreading opportunity and prosperity to every pa rt opportunity and prosperity to every part of our united kingdom so that no one and no community is left behind. in meeting these challenges what we have seen from the election is that there are parts of our country that remain divided. divided between young and old, rich and poon between young and old, rich and poor, those who are whom the future offers a sense of opportunity and those for whom it brings worry and concern. some people blame politics for these divisions. or say there is too much politics. but politics can
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be an incredible force for good. conducted in the right way, it can be how we resolve our differences, how we deal with injustice ast how we take, not shirk the big decision, it is not always glamorous or exciting, but the duty we serve as politicians to serve others in confronting these challenges is a truly noble calling for us all. into mr speaker it is customary to congratulate the returning prime ministerandl congratulate the returning prime minister and i absolutely do so and i congratulate her returning and i'm sure she will agree with me that democracy is a wondrous thing and can throw up some very unexpected results. laughter and i'm sure... and i'm sure we all look forward to welcoming the queen's speechjust look forward to welcoming the queen's speech just as soon as the coalition of chaos has been negotiated. snooze mr speaker, i
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just let the house know and the rest of the nation know that if that's not possible, the labour party stands ready to offer strong and sta ble stands ready to offer strong and stable leadership in the national interest. i want to warmly welcome mr speaker all new members to this house. there is as you have said and others have said, no greater honour than being elected here and it is an amazing day when you first come and take your seat here. the honour of representing your constituents and taking decision that will help people's lives, that's why we're elected here. to represent those that have put us here to try and make their lives better. the former prime minister, sirjohn major, has expressed concern about theresa may's attempts to secure support from the democratic unionists for her minority conservative government. sirjohn told the world at one the agreement being hammered out at downing street could mean the uk government was no longer seen
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as impartial when trying to uphold the northern ireland peace process. sinn fein have warned that it could undermine attempts to restore power—sharing at stormont. let's hear what the former prime minister had to say. iam i am concerned about the deal. i'm wa ry i am concerned about the deal. i'm wary about it. i'm dubious about it both for peace process reasons, but also for other reasons as well. that said, all my life i have been a conservative. i very much want mrs may to succeed as prime minister and to stay as prime minister. and i understand why she wishes to shore up understand why she wishes to shore up her parliamentary position. that is entirely understandable and i sympathise, but, but my main concern certainly is the peace process. a fundamental part of that peace process is that the uk government needs to be impartial between all the competing interests in northern ireland. the good friday agreement
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says the power of the sovereign government can jurisdiction there should be exercised with impartiality? that's entirely right and that was always the intention right from the start of the negotiation and the danger is that however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they're locked into a parliamentary deal at westminster with one of the northern ireland parties. and you never know in what unpredictable way events will turn out and we cannot know if that impartiality is going to be crucial at some stage in the future. if the government do form a deal with the dup, andi government do form a deal with the dup, and i can see that they well might feel that they have to, then it is doubly important, trebly important, to consult on brexit widely, both in and out of parliament. i think if that were a joint announcement with any deal with the dup i think it would be very helpful because people would see that thrnt isn't going to be
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disproportionate pressure from one pa rt disproportionate pressure from one part of the uk, but the government will consult with parliamentary parties and with business and others who have a direct interest in it. i think we have to recognise that the election changed, if not everything, a very great deal and the government are going to have to respond to that, the views of the 48% cannot be brushed aside as some of the more rigorous hard—line brushed aside as some of the more rigorous ha rd—line brexiteers brushed aside as some of the more rigorous hard—line brexiteers wish. meanwhile a lucrative part of the city of london's financial trading could be forced to move to continental europe after the uk leaves the eu. the european commission has said that it wants the eu to regulate the clearing of euro denominated transactions. at the moment, hundreds of billions of euros move through the capital every day. the vice—president of the european commission has been speaking in the past half hour. with me is mark boleat, deputy policy chairman of the city of london corporation.
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thank you for coming in to talk to us. perhaps you might give us a sense of what the european commission said this afternoon and what it means? well, what the commission has said is partly very reasonable. that central counter parties are central parts of the infrastructure and they need to be properly supervised and this requires supervision teen central banks and supervisors and nobody will quarrel with that, but then they say that a central counter party outside the european union could be important and pose a risk to financial stability and therefore, it reserves the right for therefore, it reserves the right for the commission on the recommendation of the financial services regulator to require euro clearing to be moved somewhere in euro land. so it could still be moved. therefore, the threat to the city of london hasn't gone away? whether it can be moved is another matter. currently governments don't stipulate where clearing is done. so dollar clearing
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is done in london. the american government hasn't stipulated that and nor has the british government. that's where the market is and the market for euro clearing is in london and it's there because that's where the best facilities are, the liquidity and the bulk of the market is there. it is there because the united kingdom is part of the european union. in two years, we will not be and the vist ta changes? t—doesn't explain why yen clearing and dollar clearing are done in london. london is the world centre for derivative trading and it benefits all participants to have that liquidity. you can't clear euros independently of clearing dollars and yen, it would be a nonsense if that's where we finished up. part of what the commission is saying is reasonable and it would require the european securities markets authority to recommend to the commission that steps are taken to move euro clearing. we can't ever see the justification for that. we don't see it's going to happen.
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is that just you don't see it's going to happen. is thatjust you crossing your fingers and hoping for the best? well, i think it's the market view. it is possible that the european union could take steps to impose requirements on banks that encourage pa rt requirements on banks that encourage part of clearing to move. now, that would be a political act and this shouldn't be a political act. it's about what is best for the financial markets and notjust the about what is best for the financial markets and not just the financial markets, derivatives are used by industry, used by government, to protect against risk. it would be risky to forcibly move the market to somewhere where market participants don't want to be. we shall see and look with interest. thank you for coming in to talk to us. thanks. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first the headlines on bbc news: the dup leader meets the prime minister for talks on supporting a conservative minority government. the bbc understands the parties are finalising the details. the former prime ministerjohn major
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warns of the consequences of a deal saying the fragile peace process in northern ireland is at risk. judges at the european court of human rights say terminally—ill baby charlie gard should keep receiving life support treatment until midnight on 19th june while they continue to consider his case. hello, i m rachel horne. let s take a look at the markets. the pound regaining a bit of strength today against the dollar. the ftse is down. the oil price brent crude is up slightly. it dipped earlier today after opec complained that an increase in output from us shale producers was hampering its efforts to balance supply and demand, but it has tipped back up again. we are going to start
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with euro clearing — do you know what that is? well, you will soon because it's a business that's worth billions to the city of london and today the european commission will announce new regulations. after brexit, that would mean out of london. next up inflation — analysts were expecting an increase of 2.7% for may — it's actually up 2.9%, and with the latest wage growth figures given as 2.1% it means the squeeze on uk consumers is getting tighter. but those higher inflation figures did give a bit of strength to the pound. we'll explain why in a minute. and tech stocks — in the last week they have been falling — possibly investors just deciding to bank a bit of profit — but given the role tech stocks have played in driving the markets up most will be relived to see tech shares on their way back up today. let's start there with tom stevenson, investment director,
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fidelity international. tom, thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. i want to start with the tech stocks. why did they start to fall over the past week and why have they had a rebound today? well, technology stocks have been the major driver of the markets. since the beginning of the year they've appreciated at roughly twice they've appreciated at roughly twice the rate of the wider market. this has been going on more about a year—and—a—half or so and the reason is that investors have come to prise the reliability of technology stocks earnings growth in a world where growth is just hard to come by, the likes of apple and amazon and google owner alphabet, those kinds of stocks are delivering real growth and investors are prepared to pay for it. however, they have got quite expensetive and that's what happened in the last couple of days, markets have become worried that we have become too expensive. now, let's
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talk about euro clearing. we have been hearing from the politician saying that some euro clearing operations maybe of such systemic importance that they will have to ta ke importance that they will have to take place within eu borders. now, given that euro clearing is worth millions to the city of london, it supports thousands of jobs, millions to the city of london, it supports thousands ofjobs, given that after brexit, london will not be within eu borders. what is the reaction to those new plans just announced ? reaction to those new plans just announced? well, i think the reaction will be one of nervousness really because as you say, euro clearing is a very important function within the london market. a recent report suggested that maybe more than 80,000 jobs are either directly or indirectly impacted by the clearing business which is an essential part of the financial plumbing of the system. so, if there is an order for some of these activities to move back to the european union then that clearly will be a problem for the city of london.
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now, inflation figures, higherthan expected, driven up largely some say bya expected, driven up largely some say by a weakness in sterling. now, usually if inflation is going up, we might expect to see an interest rate rise to try and help curb it, we are due to hearfrom rise to try and help curb it, we are due to hear from the rise to try and help curb it, we are due to hearfrom the bank rise to try and help curb it, we are due to hear from the bank of england on thursday. do you think we will see an interest rate rise? almost certainly not. and the reason is that the bank of england is going to look through this temporary rise in inflation because i think it will be a temporary increase. it was certainly higher than expected. higher than the bank of england expected inflation to peak at, but i think what the bank will be looking at is concerns about the underlying growth of the economy, concerns about the growth in household incomes which is much less than the inflation rate and so i think they realise that actually this is a short—term issue, inflation is going to come back and the worst thing they could do is exacerbate the problem by raising interest rates.
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thank you very much for your time. let's look at the states and see how markets are trading over there. and really it's all eyes to the fed. the fed reserve are announcing their interest rate decision tomorrow. recent data, well it has been mixed at best, but the fed seem to be stick to go a view that the q1 slowdown was a blipment markets are putting a 96% chance on an interest rate rise tomorrow. let's wait and see. we will bring it to you when we hear. the dow trading up. the nasdaq trading up and that's how europe closed. that's it from me. there is a round—up of all the other top business stories on our website — bbc.co.uk/business inquests have been opened and adjourned into the deaths of five of the victims in the london terror attacks. eight people were killed and dozens injured when three attackers drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge and then stabbed people in nearby borough market. tom symonds reports
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from southwark coroners' court. they were young, they'd come from around the world to make their lives in london. now a coroner will have to decide how they came to be murdered by three young men with knives on a warm summer's night. sara zelenak was 21, an au pair from australia. the court heard she was found with a stab wound in her neck. james mcmullan, 32, was an entrepreneur from london. he was found in the street with a stab wound in his chest. kirsty boden was 28, another australian victim, a staff nurse at a london hospital. she died from a chest wound. sebastien belanger was the fourth victim. he was 36, french, a chef. he was stabbed in the chest. ignacio miralles de imperial was 39, a spanish analyst for hsbc, who is said to have fought back against the attackers. he died, stabbed in the back. the family of sara zelenak were in court to hear the coroner offer his condolences.
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he said it was a terrible time. he'll consider in detail the causes of all eight deaths. now, the police investigation is in full flow, and the coroner, as is normal in these cases, said that he would suspend his inquiry until the police had finished. but he said the families of the victims would be given full details about how their loved ones died. britain's most senior counter—terrorism officer today made a further call for help in dealing with the threat. assistant commissioner mark rowley told the times, "we need communities to be more assertive at calling out extremists and radicalisers among us. we need to be communications and internet—based companies to show more responsibility. in the wake of the three attacks, the government's now considering further powers to force them to take more action. to my mind, that is a measure of last resort. what is more important is that we develop ever greater co—operation between security
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and intelligence services and tech companies within the confines of the law to ensure that this material never reaches the internet in the first place. traders hope to reopen borough market tomorrow, a show of defiance against the men who brought terror here. before we watch up with the weather forecast. i want to update you with the very latest news on those talks between the conservative government and the democratic unionist party. we're hearing from our political editor laura kuenssberg that the final meeting to sign a deal on the dotted line is now expected tomorrow. that is arlene foster, the leader of the democratic unionist party who went to number ten downing street with nigel dodds. he is the dup leader in westminster. they went to number ten at about 12.30 this
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afternoon and spent an hour—and—a—half, two hours, perhaps inside, for talks with theresa may in downing street. at one point we thought that a deal would be announced today. we understand that the details are still being ironed out, but that there is broad consensus for an agreement and the deal will be signed on the dotted line and that will enable theresa may and the conservatives to rule with a very slim majority. that's the latest news from westminster. let's catch up with the weather news now and join nick miller on the other side of the newsroom for the forecast. hi againks nick. we've got 20 celsius in edinburgh right now. we've got 21 celsius in cardiff and 18 slles in belfast. quite range of weather to talk about. some of us have had some
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really pleasant sunshine to go with the warmth. i know, it's cloudy, but doesn't this look lovely from belfast. here is the reason. this strip of cloud here has been producing some outbreaks of rain in scotland. we have had showers around elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland. so, scotland and northern ireland. so, scotland and northern ireland closest to low pressure. relatively unsettled. england and wales closer to high pressure, relatively settled. it's going to continue like that for sometime. heading out this evening, you may encounter outbreaks of rain in scotland, turning drier in northern ireland, where we have had showers, overnight in england and wales, it will be dry. clear spells here allowing it to turn cooler than this in rural spots in england and wales. some spots into single figures. perhaps the odd patch. most of us in england and wales tomorrow starting with blue skies. some cloud building though. it is not going to be clear blue sky all day long. perhaps an isolated shower. more cloud around in scotland and northern ireland compared to england and walesful these are your afternoon
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temperatures and there will be some pegged back into the teens. inland though, low to mid—20s. some spots in south—east england, upper 20s. again, an isolated shower possible. high uv again, an isolated shower possible. high uv and high pollen. still, some sunny spells. very few showers to talk about. some outbreaks of rain in the far north of scotland and more breeze. you can see the ex—at any time of a lot fine of weather going into wednesday evening. this weather system will come in. behind that for scotland and northern ireland, on thursday, there will be quite a few showers around. some of those could be heavy. we will take a very wea k those could be heavy. we will take a very weak band of cloud and showers through england and wales early in the day. lots of sunshine to follow. just isolated showers, but it will bea just isolated showers, but it will be a little bit fresher, breezier for england and wales, compared with tomorrow afternoon and those are thursday's temperatures. looking ahead to friday and into the
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weekend, the weather pattern is going to stay very much the same. some moisture pushing into the far north—west of the uk with rain hills and breezy, but the best of the sunshine will be across southern parts of the uk. so quite a few differences to talk about, there is the forecast for where you are or where you're going on the website or through the app. today at 5pm: there are hopes that a deal can be done between the prime minister and the dup to support a minority government. have you done a deal, prime minister? it's thought that a final agreement might not come until tomorrow. the dup's leader — arlene foster said discussions were "going well" . as she left by the back door. the prime minister addressed mps as they return to the commons for the first time after the general election result. as we face difficult challenges ahead, let us come together in a spirit of national unity to keep our country safe
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and build a stronger, fairer, and more prosperous future for everyone in every part of our united kingdom. john bercow has been re—elected as the speaker of the house of commons, saying he was delighted to take up the post, despite difficult political times.

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