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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 8, 2017 7:00pm-7:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm: hurricane irma continues its path of destruction across the caribbean with widespread damage to several islands. more than one million people have been affected so far. everything just started to decay and crumble. what have you eaten in the last few days? hardly anything. because there is nothing to eat. you can't cook. a state of emergency is declared on the british virgin islands. three raf flights have been despatched to the caribbean as the government steps up the relief effort. the storm is on course to hit florida by the weekend. 500,000 people have been ordered to leave their homes after warnings parts of the state will be devastated. this is a storm of destructive potential. i ask nerve the storm's path to be vigilant and to heed all recommendations from government officials and law enforcement.
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mexico suffers its worst earthquake ina mexico suffers its worst earthquake in a century. dozens of people have died. a new review finds evidence of racial bias in the way courts treat black and ethnic minority offenders in england and wales. and at 7.45pm, we'll hear from viewers and listeners on the bbc‘s right of reply programme, newswatch. good evening and welcome to bbc news. hurricane irma has torn across the caribbean leaving death and destruction in its wake. so far at least 19 people have been killed and more than a million people affected. the massive storm, one of the most powerful atlantic
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hurricanes ever recorded, is still passing through the caribbean and is forecast to hit the united states over the weekend. and there's another hurricane coming up behind irma in the atlantic. jose has strengthened to a category four, driving winds of 125mph. forecasters warn it could strengthen still further. our correspondent laura bicker is the first journalist to reach barbuda, already devastated by irma, the islanders are racing to evacuate before hurricane jose makes landfall. the island of barbuda was once a caribbean paradise. now it is lost. hurricane irma has reduced it to rubble. homes are unrecognisable. the ruins lie scattered, torn and ripped apart. having survived the worst storm in living memory, and knowing another is on the way, people are exhausted, hungry and just desperate to leave. barbuda hasjust gone.
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what do you do now? i don't know, i'm just waiting to get evacuated from here and then i'm going to come back and try and salvage something and help. i don't know. my whole life is here, so... we're not coping. we're definitely not coping. everybody will tell you the same — they're not coping. everyone is in the same situation and nobody can help one another. we will get you off the island to safety and you will be taken care of. the prime minister has travelled from neighbouring antigua to provide some assurance. to provide some reassurance. he knows this is a race against time before hurricane jose arrives in a few hours. we heard him haggling for every boat, helicopter or plane to help with the evacuation. can it land here though? but fear starts to spread that not everyone will get out in time. this woman has been told she does
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not have a place on the next boat. the sheer horrifying scale of the devastation here means barely a building is salvageable. that means that the whole island will have to be rebuilt and the government has already admitted it simply doesn't have the money. the prime minister knows he'll need to find funds from somewhere. we're hoping that friendly governments and international partners will step up to the plate and assist us. they should not see this as a form of the prime minister and the people of antigua coming with a begging bowl, cap in hand. this is a disaster, a national disaster of epic proportions, and we really need external assistance. this is not a want, this is a need. the fragments of people's lives now lie in ruins. they can only hope that one day they will once again call the island home, but for now they must leave
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by any means possible, including this towed barge and they don't know when they will return. joining us is laura elliot hose husband and sons are on the british virgin islands. laura, you're miles and miles away. how is it that you're not together?” and miles away. how is it that you're not together? i left the island for work. i'm a dj and i was travelling to europe for a week to doa travelling to europe for a week to do a few gigs. we were in new york and andrew decided to take the kids back to the bbi and that was probably a week before we had any news that a hurricane was on the way. how old are your children? they are ten months old and 23 months old. when did you last contact them? it's about three days ago now. i
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last heard from them probably half an hour before it was going to hit ina very an hour before it was going to hit in a very bad way. what advice had the island had before the hurricane struck? nothing. i mean we were told, you know, a storm is coming. it isa told, you know, a storm is coming. it is a pretty big hurricane, but it was so it is a pretty big hurricane, but it was so blase. people are used to it there and there is such a thing as having hurricane parties and people we re having hurricane parties and people were just obviously, we were warned to prepare for this, but nobody was told to evacuate, nobody. people we re told to evacuate, nobody. people were talking about should we go? what should we do? a lot of the islanders off—shore, companies, and they were told, you know, in extreme danger that they had contingency plans and if it was really that bad the evacuation plans would be in
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place. they are off—shore companies, they have private jets and funds, to get these things. nothing. nobody was told anything. i heard of two friends that decided to go. they we re friends that decided to go. they were told they were being dramatic. i had were told they were being dramatic. ihada were told they were being dramatic. i had a woman that's a friend of mine, you know, herand her i had a woman that's a friend of mine, you know, her and her husband had an argument because she wanted to go and he was saying it was going to go and he was saying it was going to be fine. i begged andrew, please, please leave, get on a plane, go back to new york and he said, "i will go back there." he said, it's fine. we're going to ride it out. he just thought that, you know, his company might tell him to evacuate, but they didn't, nothing. nobody was told anything. how was he planning told anything. how was he planning to ride it out as he put it? well, this is just to ride it out as he put it? well, this isjust a to ride it out as he put it? well, this is just a term, to ride it out as he put it? well, this isjust a term, when people get their supplies in and they, you know, they make loads of food and
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obviously people gather together as much as they can. we have a generator in our house so we invited whoever didn't to come to the house and hoping that the generator would be all right and you know you'd be able to cook. people kind of thought yeah, you know, we're going to be in the house for two or three days afterwards, maybe maximum, but they didn't know their houses were going to blow away from them. i don't know how it happened, the nanny to the children in the bbi, i mean she has just called now and i have missed a phone call from her, so we have had a phone call from the bbi, i don't know how she is getting through and i don't know how she has reception, but her house blew away whilst she was in it. she said, "my house blew away. . was in it. she said, "my house blew away. shaofs traumatised on the phone. she look like she shook hands with god. it sounded like that. of course, there isjose following
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close behind irma ? course, there isjose following close behind irma? this is the other fear, i'm trying desperately with whatever avenue that i can, i heard that people are trying to get to my house to — i had more information that my family are ok, but i haven't had anything direct. there is no details to follow any other so we don't though. it is important for us to know do they have food? my son is ten months old, he needs formula. when they decided to do all these things, they didn't think to, they planned, you know, they planned that they would be in their homes, not that they would have to run to the bathroom and hide in there for hours and hours and hours and then everything would be blown away around them. so whatever supplies my family had, i don't know how much they have now in a tiny room that they have now in a tiny room that they maybe trapped in. we live on they maybe trapped in. we live on the top of a hill in a jungle. you
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can't imagine how difficult it is to get down into thatjungle to just eat on a good day, if it rains, it's, you know, the roads are messy. it's difficult to get anywhere. we area it's difficult to get anywhere. we are a very independent island. we don't have, we have one big supermarket. laura, i mean you're going to try and keep calling them and to contact them however you can... every minute. what is your inclin ination to try to do to try to reach them sth so we're trying to, the thing is we've registered their names at different embassies, my children are british. i am british and my fiancee is canadian, but he has dual nationality, he is british too. we're not told anything. we are just assuming where they might be evacuated to if they are, how, idon‘t they might be evacuated to if they are, how, i don't know, when we first had hope that ships were going m, first had hope that ships were going
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in, we thought that was an evacuation plan, but it's not, it is relief which is wonderful too, but if they don't know where the people are, i don't know how they will get relief to them. all the ex—pats live in the big houses on the hills and it's very local, lower down and to the east end of the island, it's a very local area and those are all the people now that are out on the streets and they seem to have, you don't see a lot of the ex—pats now in any of the videos that are being posted because they are stuck in their homes. they are truly stuck in their homes. they are truly stuck in their homes. they are truly stuck in their homes. i think i'm going to fly to new york as soon as i can and with the hope that wherever they get evacuated to, it is an easy flight for me to get there. i don't think they will let me back out. i want to go now, but it's marines and that's all we have. you don't know, do you, how likely it is that you will be allowed to try to make thatjourney? no one is telling us anything. we have no idea what to do. how about
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the foreign office? i have given their names. they said we will call you back with information. i don't have any information. i know they are on a list. i've had, luckily i have some friends that actually work in these different agencies and they have said yes, we have seen your children and your fiancee are on a list. laura, it's a desperate story and we're so, so sorry that you're in so much, obviously so much pain at the moment wondering what on earth is happening? we hope you manage to contact them soon and safe journey when you fly. thank you very much... we have to get out and this is why, in the beginning nobody cared about talking to the ins, but we realised that it's going to be oui’ we realised that it's going to be our struggle to get our families out and wejust our struggle to get our families out and we just had to tell you most importantly, please the government needs understand that an evacuation needs understand that an evacuation
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needs to happen, not relief, an evacuation is the only way forward. laura elliot, thank you very much for talking to us. we have got a letter that's been written. it's from the chair of the foreign affairs committee. it's been addressed to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson addressed to the foreign secretary, boris johnson and also addressed to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson and also the secretary of state for international development and it is a critical letter of the government's response so letter of the government's response so far to what happened in the caribbean. it says that they welcome the disaster relief of £32 million and the fact that personnel and the equipment and military efforts are being made to try and help the british territories in the caribbean, but it says, "we are concerned that many in the uk's
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overseas territories in the caribbean are still in grave need. our response still requires improvement. the arrival of hms ocean in two weeks later than any of us ocean in two weeks later than any of us wish. we would expect the uk government to take a role in the long—term reconstruction in the assets of these communities which have been devastated. with the imminent arrival of hurricane jose we ask you to report to the our newly formed committees to tell us to ensure the government is prepared. we hope those in the regions will be spared further damage, but should it be needed we hope you will ensure that the uk will do whatever it can to help those affected." todd van sickle a journalist at the bvi beacon newspaper. he is not on the island
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at present but has been able to contact people there. who have you contacted? the people i have contacted, my colleagues, friends, a lot of friends and family that i consider family, friends, a lot of friends and family that i considerfamily, they have lived there for more than 13 years and worked in the community and this is probably the most devastating event that people of the british virgin islands have experienced. so, they have been, it's really a dire situation. stores are not open. communication is very spotty there. the times that i am talking with people, you get cut off. there is no planes coming in or out of the territories. they are having trouble with clearance even though there is hope there. people want to help from puerto rico. they have a large shipment of relief coming and so
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they are facing a lot of challenges right now and it's a scary time. there is no electricity in a lot of islands. communication even to the sister islands nothing has really come out from them at this point. just social media has been a big factor in getting information out to a lot of people. that's the second largest island. what is left as far as people have told you? from what i have seen and what from what people told me, not much. i have seen a lot of pictures. i'm familiar with the area and it's devastating. my colleagues christina, she lives in the east end of the island. just to correct what one of your callers just told you,
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there are a lot of ex—pats that are displaced. the ex—pats are from all over the world and they're notjust up over the world and they're notjust up in big houses, they are all over the island and also the people that live there, they are homeless at this point. they are walking around the streets with just their bags. they don't know where to go and now they have a pending threat ofjose and just a little bit of rain can really affect them when you don't have a roof over your head. you may have heard that there is criticism of the poor response from the uk government. in the round, what's your view of how the authorities more widely have responded? and authorities more widely have responded ? and the authorities more widely have responded? and the warnings that we re responded? and the warnings that were given in advance?” responded? and the warnings that were given in advance? i think a lot of people have, they were warned and i'm sure the preparations were made bya i'm sure the preparations were made by a lot of the people there. they just, this storm was off the charts.
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i heard about people putting up boards on their windows and they we re boards on their windows and they were ripped off. so people were probably prepared. now the response from the uk, i don't know what kind of negotiations are going on with the british virgin islands government and the uk right now, but ican government and the uk right now, but i can tell you that conditions aren't safe at the moment. a lot of these ports people can't access them and there is a safety issue for people trying to get into the territories, i can imagine r only imagine they are trying to make sure that everything is safe for people to get in and then have a assistance. so without that safety, supplies can't land on the island? exactly. that's probably one of the biggest issues right now. they need help. they need it get people on the ground and get mobilised. as i said the virgin islands hasn't seen a disaster of this magnitude in recent yea rs disaster of this magnitude in recent years and everyone is affected and
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it's a big challenge and trying to organise and get people mobilised to make these ports safe so people can evacuate safely and supplies and relief can get in is probably a critical point at this juncture. i don't think anyone is trying to drag their feet. i can't don't think anyone is trying to drag theirfeet. i can't imagine don't think anyone is trying to drag their feet. i can't imagine that being the case. but there is safety. people can't walk around the island. there is also reports of people coming from the east end of the island to rogue towns and they are walking. this is a treacherous walk ona walking. this is a treacherous walk on a sunny walking. this is a treacherous walk on a sunny day and now they have to go over obstacles such as telephone wires and transformers. parts of the road look like the beach. it is a dangerous situation and people don't have food. they don't have water. and they don't have shelter. they have another storm coming and whether it is a direct hit or not,
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they will be affected. the ex—pat community, they don't have a lot of places to go. one, everything is destroyed there. but yes, their holes are elsewhere and they do want to leave, but again, you need to have a safe exit and entry into the territory. it isa territory. it is a truly horrifying picture that you paint. we appreciate you talking to us. thank you very much. he is not on the island at the moment, but clearly describing the picture there. three raf flights have been despatched to the caribbean — as the government steps up the relief effort to the british overseas territories that have been devastated by hurricane irma. a royal fleet auxiliary ship which has delivered six tonnes of aid to anguilla is now travelling to the british virgin islands, where a state of emergency has been declared.
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nick bryant is in the bahamas and sent this report. the turks and caicos, where the palm trees that usually attract people to these islands reeled under the violent onslaught of hurricane irma. a storm people here had been tracking through satellite images, a monster hurricane that has looked terrifying from space. now a horrifying, on—the—ground, reality. picture postcard holiday destinations like the british virgin islands, pummelled by i60mph winds. this uk territory has now declared a state of emergency. the bahamas is starting to be blasted. the only sightseeing this morning, from the relative safety of the balcony, watching the approaching storm. old imperial buildings that have stood for centuries in this former british colony are braced and shuttered, preparing for the worst. elton smith had onlyjust finished rebuilding his business from the last hurricane that caused such devastation less than a year ago. this is one of the worst
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storms in living memory, so you have to get as much together as you can and plan for the worst, hope for the best, you know. there are five low—lying islands in this archipelago which the authorities are particularly concerned about, which is why the government here has ordered the biggest evacuation in the history of the bahamas. but there are fears already for people who have stayed behind, people who have defied those evacuation orders, people who believe they can ride out this storm. in hurricane hit saint martin, this natural disaster has been exacerbated by the man—made problem of looting. which is why, in the dutch part of this territory, the streets are being patrolled by troops who could be helping the relief operation. as for britain, it has a ship loaded with aid off the island of anguilla, but the uk aid effort has been criticised as too slow. raf planes carrying equipment are now on their way. the constraint is about understanding
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the situation on the ground. what we don't want to do is rush in with the wrong kind of support, so from a military point of view, it's very important we understand the effects of the hurricane, where is open to us, where can we get to safely, and that is what we have been doing over the past 2a hours. now we are ready to make the right judgments about where we can most effectively deliver that aid. so far it is small caribbean islands like saint barts that have been hit and deluged, but all the time, irma is barrelling towards the american mainland, threatening destruction on a much larger scale. the governor of florida has warned its 20 million residents that they should all be prepared to evacuate in the face of hurricane irma which is wider than the entire state. around half a million people have already been ordered to leave their homes and the highways have been clogged with cars making their way out of the state. our correspondent aleem maqbool reports from miami. they are now calling this one of the biggest mass evacuations
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in american history. the roads heading out of southern florida are clogged, fuel in short supply. this is a storm of absolutely historic destructive potential. i ask everyone in the storm's path to be vigilant and to heed all recommendations from government officials and law enforcement. nothing is more important than the safety and security of our people. at miami's airport, people scramble for the last chance to get out by air including british tourists. we're leaving today if we can. basically most of the flights are sold out so we're not even sure we can go. the worst case scenario that we're going to get hit by a hurricane and it's terrifying and we're going to be stuck here for weeks, we felt a little bit lost. i had to purchase another ticket yesterday costing $8500 to go one way back to london and i've already paid once. so, i'm just hoping they're going to get me on this plane. the area of miami normally
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packed with tourists is within the evacuation zone and has been left all, but abandoned. it's just extraordinary to see miami's iconic south beach as deserted as this, but it is an indication ofjust how seriously people here are taking the warnings, particularly having seen the type of destruction that's been wrought by this hurricane already. if they are coming here, it's to fill pillowcases with sand to barricade their homes before irma hits. donald trump himself will be affected. his florida resort, mar—a—lago, has been forced to close and is in the projected path of the storm. the national guard has been deployed here. they're stockpiling commodities that could become scarce in the coming days like drinking water, but they're also preparing for what's likely to be a massive rescue operation. right across this state, there's a sense that time is running out to protect property and lives.
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the foreign and commonwealth office has set—up a telephone hotline for british nationals in the region, or anyone concerned about friends of relatives. that number is on your screen: 020 7008 0000. you can keep up with all the latest on hurricane irma on our website — at bbc.co.uk/news and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10.1i0pm this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are martin lipton, the deputy head of sport at the sun, and helen brand, who's the chief executive of the association of chartered certified accountants.
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and as if the destruction in the caribbean wasn't bad enough, an earthquake has hit mexico, it's being described as the worst there in a century. at least 3a people have been killed. it had a magnitude of eight and struckjust off the pacific coast to the south of the country. buildings shook in the capital, mexico city, hundreds of miles away. the tremor is reported to have lasted about a minute. sarah campbell has more. a bowling alley in chiapas, the closest state to the quake's epicentre. this is a country used to earthquakes, but not of that magnitude. 600 miles away, the tremors rocked mexico city. frightened, some people preferred to stay outdoors. many can still remember the earthquake of 1985 which was similar in magnitude, and which killed around 10,000 people. translation: it was horrible. i never felt anything so scary in my life. it was small at first, but then it started shaking a lot and it felt like we were getting thrown around.
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it was terrible. as pictures have emerged from the most severely hit areas, the death toll has continued to rise. the fear is there may be more shocks to come. translation: so far there have been 65 aftershocks. the strongest was magnitude 6.1. however, it's possible that over the next 2a hours we could see a shock that's as strong as the earthquake. in less than a minute, juchitan's town hall was reduced to rubble and at least 17 of its citizens were killed. daylight has revealed the extent of the devastation and the huge effort which will be required to rebuild. now the weather with nick miller. we are dodging some downpours, but
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some of us will be turning drier. we will keep a feed of showers coming into northern ireland and north—west epq into northern ireland and north—west epg and wales and parts of south—west england. central and eastern parts of the uk will turn drier with clear spells around. this is where we are likely to see the lowest temperatures. some rural spots dipping down into single figures. so we are on to the start of the weekend and already from the word go showers in the west. there could be prolonged downpours running into north—west england and elsewhere after a sunny start, the cloud will build and the showers break out. widespread showers into the evening, but going into the evening many western areas will turn drier and sunnier. windy in the west and the south. it is a cool weekend with the temperatures in the mid to upper teens. on sunday, with the temperatures in the mid to upperteens. on sunday, outbreaks with the temperatures in the mid to upper teens. on sunday, outbreaks of rain spreading eastwards across the uk and further blustery showers following on behind. that's your weekend. hello. this is bbc news.
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the headlines: hurricane irma continues its path of destruction across the carribbean with widespread devastation on several islands. thousands of people have been left without shelter and power. the british government has been criticised for its aid effort to the british overseas territories — the british virgin islands. three raf flights have been despatched to the caribbean. in florida, half a million people have been ordered to leave their homes with the storm due to hit their this weekend — the rest are hunkering down. president trump has warned that it has historic destructive potential. a powerful earthquake has hit southern mexico and killed at least 3a people. the country's president said the tremor was the strongest to hit mexico in a century. a review of the criminaljustice system in england and wales has concluded that people from black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are still facing bias and overt discrimination. three raf flights have been despatched to the caribbean — as the government steps up
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the relief effort to the british overseas territories that have been devastated by hurricane irma. a royal fleet auxiliary ship which has delivered six tonnes of aid to anguilla is now travelling to the british virgin islands, where a state of emergency has been declared. it follows criticism that the uk hasn't respond quickly to the disaster. duncan kennedy reports from raf brize norton. the first raf flight from britain left at lunch—time, ahead a nine hourjourney to the caribbean as the world's military response to the crisis gets underway. the loading operation at brize norton included tents, water and medical supplies. 30 pallet loads at first with more to come. everything from readymade meals to an industrial refrigeration unit. around 70 royal marines are also on board with a range of skills and experience of working in disaster areas. the base commander rejects claims that britain has been slow to respond. it's very important
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that we understand the effects of the hurricane, where is open to us, where we can get into safely and that's what we have been doing over the past 2a hours. so i think now we are ready to make the rightjudgments about where we can most effectively deliver the aid and we will be doing that as quickly as possible. the french have already established a base on guadeloupe and its military operation does appear more advanced than britain's. british naval helicopters have been in anguilla working off a naval fleet auxiliary vessel, but it's the speed and scale of britain's input that's been criticised today. what we definitely need to see is a sustainable, if not continued and permanent commitment to support the development of anguilla. at present we have had precious little support of significant quantities and we need that now. but britain says it has responded as rapidly as possible and is now offering more than £30 million of help. the fact is we had a royal naval vessel mounts bay in
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the region because we knew the hurricane was coming. this is hurricane season and we are always prepared. this is one of a number of rafjets heading to the region. in all there will be something like 300 royal marines on the ground over the space of the next two or three days. but even when they arrive there, no one is fully clear yet what their operational role is going to be and where they can get to. the race to get help to the people of the caribbean now involves operations from more than a dozen countries. a review of the criminaljustice system in england and wales has found bias and discrimination in its treatment of people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds. the inquiry, commissioned by the government and led by the labour mp david lammy, raises particular concerns about the treatment of young people. the report calls for some prosecutions to be dropped, if suspects complete a drug
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or alcohol rehabilitation programme. elaine dunkley reports. noel williams was 11 when he first got involved in gangs. in and out of the system, and the lack of prison staff, don't pick up on certain things. people are self—harming. staff, don't pick up on certain things. people are self-harming. he has now turned his life around but believes race and ethnicity plays a pa rt believes race and ethnicity plays a part in how you are treated and punished within the criminaljustice system. i feel it is unjust. punished within the criminaljustice system. ifeel it is unjust. if punished within the criminaljustice system. i feel it is unjust. if you look at the sentences, they are longer, sentences are harsher and people are coming out, not rehabilitated, sometimes they are coming out are reoffending in an accelerated rate than their counterparts. the lammy review makes some key recommendations which
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includes allowing some prosecutions to be deferred and possibly dropped if courses for drug and alcohol problems is complete. removing identity of race so bias is not noticed. i am concerned about the youthjustice system. noticed. i am concerned about the youth justice system. it noticed. i am concerned about the youthjustice system. it is the pipeline into our adult prison system. it is very serious that the figures are quite as bad as they are. i figures are quite as bad as they are. lam figures are quite as bad as they are. i am very worried about our prison system where i do think there are prisons where it is clear there is over discrimination going on and some of the treatment isjust acceptable. the government says it would look very carefully at the review‘s findings. would look very carefully at the review's findings. what struck me about the report was the reality that very large numbers of british people from our black and ethnic
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minority communities lack confidence in the criminaljustice system. minority communities lack confidence in the criminaljustice systemm is one of the largest reviews of its kind and highlights radical reform is urgently needed to bring fairness to the justice system. elaine dunkley, bbc news. the use of potentially addictive painkillers across england has doubled in the last 15 years, according to a leading health group. 50,000 patients were studied who were prescribed at least one of four types of potentially addictive drugs. opioid painkillers, such as codeine and tramadol, were the most commonly prescribed. in 2015 they were issued to one patient in 20, double the rate in 2000. the length of time people are being prescribed opioid pain killers has also increased, from just over two months in 2000, to a peak of over three months in 2014. our health correspondent dominic hughes has been meeting some of those whose lives have been shattered by a growing dependence on prescription drugs. get your shirt out of the way. a few months before, i was this normal guy, and then all of a sudden,
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i'm basically a drug addict. a routine prescription drug led james to the brink of destruction. we'll have a look at your urine test. he's now getting help to deal with a crippling addiction to powerful opioid painkillers, commonly prescribed drugs like codeine, morphine or tramadol. james' problems started with severe stomach aches. and the painkillers he was prescribed quickly stopped working. desperate for pain relief, he was soon spending £400 a month on additional supplies from online pharmacies. he went from taking eight pills a day to 50, and almost before he knew it, his life had spiralled out of control. i thought it would be fine, i would be on the tablets short—term. before i knew it, i couldn't get off them. forjames, the side—effects were terrible. headaches, nausea, constipation, and then a series of seizures he feared would end his life. it can ruin your life without you knowing, because i do believe that probably within a year if i had carried
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on taking the same amounts, or increasing, it probably would have killed me. research in just a handful of gp practices injames' town alone identified more than 100 people dependant upon painkillers. but responsibility for helping them falls between the nhs and local councils, and schemes like the one thatjames is on are rare. the key seems to be a better understanding of the nature of pain. that's what they are trying in gloucestershire. has anybody had pain today? talking to doctors and pharmacists about pain management, as well as identifying and helping patients who are struggling. most people with persistent pain will describe it as severe. no one should stop their medication before seeking the advice of their gp, but one of the country's leading pain experts says it is clear that patients using opioid drugs for a long time are often getting little benefit but suffer all the side—effects. i'm not suggesting that somebody who is benefiting should have their drugs removed, but out of a population
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who are taking these drugs, the majority will not be benefiting, and those patients should be supported to come off their medicines. playing jenga here at hergrandma's... stevenjones knows just how devastating it can be when the use of opioid painkillers is not monitored closely. an accidental overdose killed his 24—year—old daughter, sarah, after her use escalated dramatically. stephen took the call from a paramedic. my heart just sank. i had never felt like that ever in my life. it was literally the worst day of my life, that. i hope i never have to go through it again. the children... no father expects to be at their child's funeral. a 13—year—old girl who died from a brain aneurysm has helped
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a record eight people, including five children, through organ donation. jemima layzell, from somerset, died in 2012, her parents said she was clever, compassionate and creative — and would have been "very proud of her legacy". jon kay reports. ready? yes. dear mum, happy birthday. it was just before her mum's birthday party five years ago that jemima suddenly collapsed. # a girl who has everything.# she had an aneurysm that had never been diagnosed. doctors tried to save her life, but her parents were told it was impossible. we had seen the scans and there was such a huge shadow on the left side of her brain and she would never ever recover. by chancejemima had spoken to her parents about organ donation just a few days before she collapsed. when she died they felt they had to follow the schoolgirl‘s wishes. she did specifically say that she wanted
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to be an organ donor. how did that help you then make the decision when you knew that she wasn't going to survive? it made that decision so much easier. it's like an automatic thing yes, absolutely because that's what her wishes are. five years onjemima's family have now been told that her organs including her heart, lungs and kidneys have helped more people than any other single donor. what kind of comfort does it give you to know that there are eight people out there whose lives have either been saved or changed byjemima? that's hugely comforting and it is exciting to know that life is continuing because of her. her legacy, her name, will continue because she hasn't died in vain. freddie is one of those jemima saved. he had been givenjust weeks to live before he received her liver in a transplant. this week he started secondary school.
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his family's message. thank you, but that just doesn't seem enough because you're grateful that they actually stuck to jemima's wishes and let her donate her organs which allowed our child to live, but for our child to live, their child had to die. so it's really tough, but we can never be thankful enough. this month the two families will meet for the first time at a charity ball organised in jemima's memory. her parents know that not everyone would make the decision they did, but with more than 6,000 people waiting for transplants, they're now campaigning for more of us to register as donors. jon kay, bbc news, somerset. lecturer turned to the action ——
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let's return to the reaction to hurricane irma. boris johnson let's return to the reaction to hurricane irma. borisjohnson is responding to criticism of the government's response to help those in the path of the storm. we always have preparations for the hurricane season in the caribbean. we had raf mounts bay in the area the whole time. if you draw a proper comparison to what the french and the dutch have achieved, the british response has been very good. what we are trying to do is get those islands back upon bare feet. they have had a terrible time. don't forget, we have another hurricane to go through, hurricane jose. forget, we have another hurricane to go through, hurricanejose. we need to make sure we don't put in supplies and kit and bring in more aeroplanes at a time when those huge winds are building up again. it has
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been an event on a scale i don't think we have had since the 1850s, two huge category four hurricane is moving to the caribbean in that way. it has, as you know, cause substantial devastation and it is now on its way to the turks and ca icos now on its way to the turks and caicos islands the florida is in the path of the storm. you have the foreign office crisis centre, they have been running the many days now, working to get the messages out to holiday—makers, the people on those islands about what they need to do. you have across government, a group coordinating with the mod, the response of this government to the crisis. it took 24 hours before help reached those islands, is it fast enough? they had to deal with
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hurricane winds blowing through. it was difficult to deliver helicopters and

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