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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 28, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and mega munchetty. tensions rise after spain imposes direct rule on catalonia just hours after politicians there declare independence. as crowds celebrate, spain's prime minister sacks the region's leader and chief of police and calls snap elections. good morning. it's saturday the 28th of october. also this morning: we'll hear from the family who say their severely autistic son was failed by the system designed to protect him. it makes you feel like the whole thing is a joke. people like my son are deemed worthless in society. i feel like they are all being betrayed. jeremy corbyn says a culture which
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tolerates the abuse of women is thriving at westminster. in sport, world champions again. could it be the year in which england become football world champions twice? the under—17s take on spain in their world cup final later today. and do not try this at home! i'll be testing my nerves as i have a close encounter with the british team gearing up for the bike trials world championship in china. and louise has the weather. good morning. a cloudy and windy saturday for some. gales in the far north. the best of any sunshine is likely to be in the south and east. more details coming up in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. it's been a night of both celebration and protest in barcelona, after the catalonian parliament voted to declare independence from spain.
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the spanish government furiously retaliated, sacking catalonia's president and his entire cabinet and taking the region back under central control. prime minister mariano rajoy said his country could not stand by while part of its territory was stolen. andrew plant reports. the streets of barcelona, catalonia's capital, where crowds have been celebrating through the night after the regional government here declared its independence from spain. translation: every citizen is clear about the goal. the price we will pay perhaps is expensive. but here we do things well, we work well here, and we respect everybody. si, si, si! this was the moment the government of catalonia voted to declare itself an independent state. 300 miles away in madrid, spain's national government
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was also voting to take away catalonia's regional powers and sack its leader after refusing to recognise catalonia's independence. translation: normality starts with law. in order to return institutional legitimacy and give a voice to all catalans, i have now dissolved the catalan parliament to hold regional elections on the 21st of december. it is a confusing picture, even within catalonia itself. many people don't want to be separate from spain. the spanish government says it will now take back control. but how will that work? and what about the tens of thousands of catalonian people today who believe they're already living in a separate state, one they would argue spain no longer has any power to control. andrew plant, bbc news. nine service personnel on a nuclear submarine have been discharged
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from the royal navy after testing positive for drugs. the ministry of defence confirmed the departures from hms vigilant, one of four submarines that carry the trident nuclear deterrent. kathryn stanczyszyn is here to tell us more. good morning. this is an interesting story. the daily mail reports all nine of these submariners allegedly had been taking cocaine. that is why they failed the drug test. hmas vigilant was docked in the us. there was a period of shore leave. all nine of them have been dismissed and the royal navy says it will not tolerate any kind of misuse of drugs. this vessel is part of the uk's defence firmament, one ofjust four submarines with nuclear
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missiles on board. but it is not the first scandal to hit hms vigilant. earlier this month, the captain was removed from this post for having an allegedly incorrect relationship with a member on board. thisjust raises more questions about exactly what has been going on one of the nuclear submarines of the uk. thank you very much. jeremy corbyn says a "warped and degrading culture" where the abuse of women is accepted and normalised is thriving in the corridors of power, including in westminster. in a speech this afternoon in the scottish highlands, the labour leader is expected to say any mp who is involved must be held accountable. his comments follow several newspaper reports of allegations of inapropriate conduct by unnamed mps. we can talk to our political correspondent. good to see you. this is so interesting. we have been embroiled in this harvey weinstein scandal and talking to people in various industries about where this abuse takes place. now we are hearing it is in the corridors of power at westminster! yeah. strong
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words from the labour leader this morning, saying misogyny and sexism have been allowed to thrive in the corridors of power and are widespread in society. he says there needs to be a turning point now. any mp engaged in such behaviour needs to be held to account. that comes amid serious allegations made in the sun newspaper yesterday that parliamentary aides and others were using whatsapp to discuss inappropriate behaviour by mps. no mp has yet be named. allegations are being taken seriously. thank you for bringing us up—to—date. being taken seriously. thank you for bringing us up-to-date. thank you. british overseas territories damaged by hurricanes could get access to official foreign aid in the future, under plans being considered by the world's richest nations.
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there was controversy last month when it emerged that some caribbean islands hit by hurricane irma were considered too rich to receive overseas help, as our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, reports. when british overseas territories like anguilla, turks and cacos, or the british virgin islands were hit last month, none of the assistance they got was from the £50 million aid budget from the uk. that's because they were considered too rich under international rules these rules are laid down by the oecd nations. they are meeting in paris on monday. i have been told they will consider a proposal to allow countries to requalify for aid if they suffer long—term economic shock. at the moment, there is no procedure for countries to get back on the list of eligible aid recipients. a second option to allow countries hit by hurricanes a short—term waiverfrom the rules is not expected to get support.
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james landale, bbc news. it's been reported the first charges have been filed in the investigation into alleged meddling by russia in last year's american presidential election. a former head of the fbi, robert mueller, is leading the inquiry. it hasn't been revealed who has been charged, but us media claim at least one person will be taken in to custody on monday. the number of people regularly working night shifts in britain has increased by 260,000 in the past five years, according to new analysis from the tuc. it says the late—night workforce has now reached over three million and is most common in security, manufacturing, and healthcare sectors. three out of five night workers are men. the prime minister, theresa may, has again called on companies to reveal the difference between what they pay male and female staff saying "sustained action" was needed to tackle the issue. companies with over 250 employees have to publish gender pay gap data from april 2018 and mrs may
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is urging smallerfirms to do the same. the latest figures show on average men are paid almost a fifth more than women. england could round off a year of success for its junior sides by winning the fifa under—17's world cup this afternoon. england face spain in the final which is being held in kolkata in india. rahul tandon is outside the salt lake stadium for us this morning. we are excited here. could we win it? of course we are going to win! the way england dismantled brazil on wednesday, 3—1, why are at the spanish and even bothering to turn 7 spanish and even bothering to turn hey spanish and even bothering to turn up? they will have woken up and started eating breakfast. as you can see behind me, many indians are desperate to get their hands on the
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tickets for the semi—final, a day before half a million people will support england, because they are all obsessed with the premiership. forget barcelona and real madrid, it is about chelsea and manchester city! for the english players, what an amazing day this could be for them. writing names in history, and more importantly, sending a strong message to premiership clubs, forget about foreigners, play us instead. excitement is building up in kolkata. this is the biggest football match in the world today. sorry, old trafford and the emirates, this is it! i am so with you on that. what a brilliant buildup to that match as well. coverage of the final begins on bbc two at 3:20. and going to repeat my sad joke. go on. man who? there have been a number of astrological events to witness
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around the world in recent months, from meteor showers to solar eclipses, but tonight, nasa is encouraging everyone to look at a day—to—day wonder. this evening is international observe the moon night, a celebration of lunar science and exploration. events will take place around the globe. we'll be talking about it more later. and if any of you are taking part, we'd love to see your pictures tomorrow. hopefully we will get some on the television tomorrow. that is the good thing about nights being longer. you don't have to stay up later to see the moon. clocks go back two o'clock this morning... one o'clock tonight... but in the morning... i can't do this! basically, tomorrow morning you will have another hour in bed. officials in madrid and catalonia are considering what to do next this
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morning after the catalan parliament voted to declare independence from spain. in what's become an escalating constitutional crisis, the spanish government announced it was taking control of catalonia, sacking its president, dissolving parliament, and organising new regional elections. let's speak now to our correspondent, tim willcox, who's in barcelona. thank you forjoining us. let's speak now to pedro schwartz, a spanish economist, whojoins us from turin in italy. we arejoining you we are joining you from skype. we canjust we are joining you from skype. we can just see you. tell us what you make of the latest moves from the president. they were inevitable because if the catalan parliament declares independence, they are going against the constitution.
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there are powers in the constitution for the central government to take over autonomy of catalonia. that is what the president has done. he changed the chief of police, dissolved parliament... apologies to viewers we are having problems with the technology. you were talking about what the president's next move will be. changing the chief of police and dissolving parliament and calling for elections on the 21st of december. and then the people of catalonia will say what they think in legal elections. it will be a ha rdfoug ht in legal elections. it will be a hardfought election but an interesting one. it is interesting,
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your view of independence. do you think this could be successful in terms of the economy for catalonia? we understand that some businesses are considering moving headquarters out of the region. more than 150 businesses have moved! they moved out of catalonia. apart from the businesses, the eu also says they will not recognise it if they become independent. there will be a border between catalonia and the rest of spain and france, a border with tariffs, external tariffs. i spain and france, a border with tariffs, externaltariffs. ithink it isa tariffs, externaltariffs. ithink it is a bad dream, what the
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independence is following. thank goodness there is a government calling for elections to see what the people of catalonia really want. thank you very much for your time with us this morning on bbc brea kfast. with us this morning on bbc breakfast. apologies to viewers for the quality of that. hopefully you caught all of it. tim wilcox is in barcelona, you've been following what's going on. can you give us an idea of the mood in barcelona, people are wondering if it is safe and if physical tensions are rising? it depends really where you are in barcelona and obviously who you're with. the separatists we re who you're with. the separatists were celebrating last night, we were out with some of carles puigdemont‘s inner circle, the catalan president, and they were euphoric. they couldn't believe, some of them, that there hadn't been any response yet from madrid. mario nar rajoy, the
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spanish prime minister, has sacked the head of the local police —— mariano rajoy. he has effectively decreed the head of the parliament and the whole parliament should be sacked as well but nothing physically has happened on the ground and their equation is until something like that happens, the better the chances they have of maintaining this autonomous state, then of course there are the people who never wanted independence from spain. the people who want to be pa rt spain. the people who want to be part of spain. they didn't take part in the referendum and they agree with madrid that this whole process is illegal and unconstitutional and they are shocked and bewildered. they simply can't believe that they are living in this area which is declaring independence. madrid's responds tactically will be interesting on the ground, we haven't seen anything yet ——
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response. there are national police va ns response. there are national police vans driving around. where we were last night in strong separatist areas where people were celebrating, they were whistling and booing the national police vans as they drove past. we're getting reports of some clashes between pro— unionist and separatist groups, which the police had to break up, but not widespread drama in terms of any violence between the two groups. good to hear. tim, we're going to be talking to you hopefully through the morning. tim has been keeping an eye on morning. tim has been keeping an eye o n eve nts morning. tim has been keeping an eye on events in barcelona as the cata la n on events in barcelona as the catalan independence drama continues. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. you've got a picture with frost, louise? i'm doing it again, three times in a i’ow i'm doing it again, three times in a row if you didn't watch earlier, we got told off for using the f—word and the c—word, frost and christmas.
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chipping norton in oxfordshire, temperatures down to around one degree, cold enough for ice frost. that's not really the main crux of the story today but it's chilly across central and southern areas. the real crux of the story is actually from this cloud where they're seeing gusts in the north and nuisance rain around west facing coast of scotland and northern ireland today. fairly persistent but the winds will be the real story further north. if you get sunshine to the south it will feel relatively mild, but by the middle of the afternoon we could see gusts of a0 to 50 mph. that said, in a bit of shelter in eastern scotland, we could see the mid—teens. we could have gusts in excess of 50 mph through the afternoon and early evening across the pennines, that's worth bearing in mind but again, a bit of shelter into the east, warm if you get the sunshine, 17, 60 three fahrenheit, above the average for the time of year. more cloud on
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west facing coasts due to the west facing winter driving in plenty of cloud. the persistent light rain will sink south overnight, so cloudier skies. no frost in chipping norton and windy conditions overnight. here we keep double figures first thing on sunday but further north, the colder air starts to arise because the winds are swinging round to a northerly. we've been telling you about it for a couple of days, noticeably colder on sunday, the winds lighter but a colder air force, sunday, the winds lighter but a colder airforce, lots of sunday, the winds lighter but a colder air force, lots of sunshine, a scattering of showers running down through north sea coasts but it will feel noticeably chillier. maximum temperatures around seven to nine into the north, maybe into the faster west we won't see the real cold air until we move through the night. high pressure stays with us sunday night into monday morning and because the winds are quite light 110w because the winds are quite light now we could see those temperatures falling quite sharply before the arrival of another weather front into the north—west. that basically
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means monday morning is going to be a chilly start, you will need a coat i suspect first thing on monday. towns and city centres just above freezing, so in rural spots we could see temperatures just below or hovering around freezing so our first significant widespread frost likely across the country. it will lead to a beautiful day on monday for most of us. in the north—west, the cloud, wind and rain arrives later in the day but it also brings a south—westerly airflow for something that the milder set to return. there you go, so you don't need to use those awful words! just to get them! they will be back again through the middle of the week so it's going to last very long. through the middle of the week so it's going to last very longlj ee, it's going to last very long.|j agree, what goes around, comes around! thanks very much! and there's nothing awful about the word christmas by the way! the family of a young man with learning disabilities say they've been denied justice after what they describe as multiple failings with the care system that was designed to protect their son.
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the 26—year—old, who has severe autism, was punched in the face by a nurse at his care home, but a tribunal found the nurse acted in self defence. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to meet his family. her report contains some details you mind find upsetting. every mother holds their baby and says i'm not going to let anything happen to you. every mother. i failed. i can't protect my sun, i can't protect my sun in this society. claire tells me ben's ortiz was manageable when he was very little but when this behaviour became increasingly challenging and he had to receive specialist care it was first in winterbourne view then an atlas care home, both names now synonymous with brutal, cruel regimes. this is where the teeth were. . . regimes. this is where the teeth were... the x-ray shows the damage inflicted by a nurse at winterbourne
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view. dental reports show ben's jaw was fractured, two keys knockout. at a nursing and midwifery council hearing last week a nurse categorically denied punching ben. the panel ruled that he had. but he had acted in self defence after ben bitten him. there was no misconduct. you know, an injury that was described to us as something that would normally be in a car accident. why does it matter? because it doesn't seem to matter. it's all one sided. there's only one voice here. ben hasn't got the voice he needs. after winterbourne, ben moved into what looked like an idyllic home in devon for a fresh start but inside he and others spent hours locked in seclusion rooms, no furniture, no toilet, no food, no heat, punishment for minor infringements. a number of staff and managers were convicted earlier this year. but on thursday paul hewitt, the man who the jury accepted as being at the top of the
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company, went to the court of appeal. he had been convicted on health and safety breaches. the very first time a manager had been convicted of running a business that was institutionally abusive but the barrister argued the judge had failed to properly direct the jury to prove that not only was here in charge but he knew what was happening. this conviction was overturned on a point of law. happening. this conviction was overturned on a point of lawm makes you feel like the whole thing was a joke, people like my sun are deemed worthless in society and i feel that they've been du betrayed. two leading disability charities have complained. it feels as though people with learning difficulties are significantly let down by the system in a whole range of ways, so they're system in a whole range of ways, so they‘ re letdown system in a whole range of ways, so they're letdown in terms of the support and care that we provide for them. when that goes wrong, it still feels as though there's no justice.
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do you have anything to say today to the families involved ? paul hewitt may now face a retrial. in court police officers who led the case told me they were heartbroken. how is he doing now, how is ben doing? he has a dog, he has this own house... today ben is living happy with the support of the community. a significant piece of information that was not allowed to be shared at the atlas trials. he proved every single day that it's possible. it just should have been possible from the start. and jayne is here with us now. some people will be quite shocked by that decision, what's the reaction been from the nursing and midwifery council? they've given us a statement which says we recognise there is a significant public interest in this case, we've already beenin interest in this case, we've already been in touch with the professional standards authority who have the power to appeal the decision at the high court if they believe it
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doesn't protect the public. if it is right, the psa will consider the case carefully. the psa say they will make a decision within 56 days of the original decision, at the end of the original decision, at the end of the original decision, at the end of the november month or december. what's the context? the figures we looked at from the learning disability centres, in 2015, relates to england, only people in treatment units like winterbourne view, 17% of people experienced visible assault, 56% of people experienced self harm, and accident, household restraint or isolation. —— an accident. that was the last time that was published by the last time that was published by the government. mencap want to see that date are made available again, they say it's really important. in terms of broader government policy, home not hospitals is absolutely what the focus has been. —— data. but progress is slow and there is
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still over 3000 people in places like winterbourne view today. you can see from the film that ben is 110w can see from the film that ben is now doing really well and that's why that focus is so important. thanks bromance for that. —— thanks very much for that. we'll be back shortly with the headlines. this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: it's been a night of both celebration and protest in barcelona after the catalonian parliament voted to declare independence from spain. the spanish government furiously retaliated, sacking catalonia's president and his entire cabinet and taking the region back under central control. prime minister mariano rajoy said his country could not stand by while part of its territory was stolen. nine service personnel on a nuclear submarine have been discharged from the royal navy after testing positive for drugs. the ministry of defence confirmed the dismissals from hms vigilant, one of four submarines that carry
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the trident nuclear deterrent. according to the daily mail, the men are alleged to have taken cocaine during parties while the submarine was docked in the united states. a royal navy spokesperson said it does not tolerate drugs misuse. jeremy corbyn says a warped and degrading culture where the abuse of women is accepted and normalised is thriving in the corridors of power, including in westminster. in a speech this afternoon in the scottish highlands, the labour leader is expected to say any mp who is involved must be held accountable. his comments follow several newspaper allegations of inapropriate conduct by unnamed mps. downing street has described the allegations of sexual harassment in politics as deeply concerning. it's been reported the first charges have been filed in the investigation into alleged meddling by russia in last year's american presidential election. a former head of the fbi, robert mueller, is leading the inquiry. it hasn't been revealed who has been charged, but us media claim at least one
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person will be taken in to custody on monday. british overseas territories damaged by hurricanes could get access to official foreign aid in the future under plans being considered by the world's richest nations. there was controversy last month when it emerged that some caribbean islands hit by hurricane irma were considered too rich to receive overseas help. but new rules from the organisation for economic cooperation and development would allow countries to requalify for aid if they suffer long—term damage. residents of a coastal town in east sussex were told to stay inside last night and keep their doors and windows shut because of a noxious odour. emergency services said they were investigating complaints of a smell that was described as being like burning plastic. some people complained of stinging eyes and feeling sick. the incident happened close to a beach that was hit by a toxic haze in august, although sussex police says it doesn't believe the two events are linked. the prime minister, theresa may,
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has called again on companies to reveal the difference between what they pay male and female staff saying "sustained action" was needed to tackle the issue. companies with over 250 employees have to publish gender pay gap data from april 2018 and mrs may is urging smallerfirms to do the same. the latest figures show that, on average, men are paid almost a fifth more than women. over the years, the oval office in the white house has played host to a number of high—profile dignitaries from around the world. yesterday, president trump's guests were not only young but also a little spooky. halloween came early to washington when the children of the white house press core gathered round the commander—in—chief. along with witches, princesses, gouls there was a batman, a darth vader and a princes leia.
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mr trump who has what could be considered a love hate relationship with the media joked that he couldn't believe "the media produced such beautiful children." that is quite funny. quite witty. we have different tasting humour. -- taste in. a great costume. that is a good one. what were you like when you were 16— 17. good one. what were you like when you were 16- 17. geeky. imagine playing for the world cup at that age! and doing so well! some of the players, you read their bios, and they are real talents! we talk about this talent, and what is frustrating
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is that it does not seem to come through to the national team. we will have to see where they are by the 2022 world cup. the premier league is such a beast they do not get any time to play in it. many top clu bs, get any time to play in it. many top clubs, the young english players do not get the pitch time, the playing time. whether this class is so good they have to get played, we have to wait and see. this could be the year in which england become football world champions twice. the under—17 team will try to follow the under—20s who won their world cup in june. the match be the biggest of their young lives with more than 66,000 in the stands in the indian city of kolkata but this england team have shown they can handle pressure. striker, reean brewster, has been their star, scoring seven goals in the tournament so far including a hattrick in the semi—final against brazil. we believe in ourselves. it is more like adrenaline before the game rather than nerves. we believe in how we play. we are confident
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in our style of play. you can see it on bbc two at 330 this afternoon. this lunch—time, second—place manchester united take on tottenham, who are only behind them on goal difference. spurs have won four in a row in the league, but will be without harry kane, who's scored 17 times this season for club and country. kane has a minor hamstring strain so isn't being risked. sheffield united have gone top of the championship, at least for this morning, after they beat yorkshire rivals leeds 2—1 in front of 3a,000 at elland road. substitute, david brooks, who's only 20, got the winner they deserved in the last ten minutes, and the blades, who's entire squad is made up of british and irish players, are one point clear of wolves, who play qpr this afternoon. lewis hamilton is aiming to become
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world champion for a fourth time at the mexican grand prix this weekend. if he finishes fifth or better on sunday, the title is his no matter what happens to his closest rival sebastian vettel. red bull's daniel ricciardo went faster than hamilton in a closely contested second practice last night. vettel was fourth fastest as the ferrari driver clings to his fading title hopes. if vettel is second in the race, hamilton needs only ninth to clinch the championship. if the ferrari driver finishes anywhere else, hamilton takes the crown regardless. how anthonyjoshua are you? for fun, on the bbc website, you can see which boxer you are. i was colin mcgregor. what would make you like anthonyjoshua mcgregor. what would make you like anthony joshua you have mcgregor. what would make you like anthonyjoshua you have to answer the questions. no ego, being a role model. i guess i am just a lot
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tougher. i would not pick a fight with him. now the world heavyweight champion, anthonyjoshua, says he has no ego, and feels like the challenger, as he prepares to defend his titles against stand—in opponent, carlos takam in cardiff tonight. joshua was due to face the bulgarian kubrat pulev, but he withdrew, because of injury. alex gulrajarnee, is in cardiff. the greatest year in the boxing career of anthonyjoshua continues. now a household name, he is known as well outside the ring as in it thanks to one night in april. in front of 90,000 people, he confirmed his status as one of the biggest draws in world boxing. his victory over wladimir klitschko had it all. but that famous win needs to be left to history, for now. i know my era doesn't last forever. everything has a beginning and end. while i'm doing it, i have to remain focused. if i don't have that motivation, boxing is hard as it is,
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so i might as well give up. i stay hungry and focused on myjob and i will try to stay on top as long as possible. thatjourney continues in cardiff. the principality stadium is getting ready to welcome him and 70,000 fans. there is no denying being the heavyweight champion of the world is big business. and only winning will keep him there. carlos takam wants to be the first man to get the better of him. joshua has different ideas. he has been at championship level before and is here again. if you keep on knocking and knocking, sooner or later you'll get in. ijust have to keep booting him back out. but he always remains open for his fans. in his own words, a man of the people, always finding time to give something back. i do it because that's who i am, and i fight because that's what i do. i know how to separate what i do. thejob, the belt, it does not represent me, it goes out, my coach goes out. all i have in there is my gum protector and my gloves.
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that's what i am focused on. and he will, as he always does, with a smile on his face. bbc news, cardiff. i will bring you the results of the test soon. england captain, joe root, thinks australia have underestimated his side ahead of the ashes. root and his team fly out today but their preparations have been undermined by all—rounder ben stokes' arrest outside a bristol nightclub. stokes is still waiting to hear if he'll be charged and won't travel but root thinks others can fill his place. it is a great opportunity for someone else to come in. he is a fine player. but there is a squad of players that is more than capable of going over there and doing something special. we spoke about it quite a lot in the last week. if you don't believe you can go over there and do something, and win, then there's no point getting on the plane. the rugby league world cup
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is continuing this morning. england's campaign got off to a losing start yesterday against australia. this morning wales are making their tournament debut. they're taking on co—hosts papua new guinea and they're getting well beaten. the latest score is a0—0. you can listen to commentary on bbc radio 5 live. exeter chiefs are top of rugby union's premiership this morning after they came back from the long trip to sale sharks with a 10—6 victory. the decisive moment of the match came when lachie turner burst through to score the only try just after the break. second place saracens play london irish later. seven games, seven wins, for glasgow in the pro 1a, and they took a bonus point last night against southern kings. the warriors ran in seven tries in a a3—13 victory. elsewhere, there were wins for ospreys and connacht. when it comes to cycling, it's not always about speed. and for the british team gearing up for the bike trials world championship in china, it's more about skill, precision and getting over higher and higher obstacles. i've been to cambridgeshire
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to see them in action. they look more like kangaroos rather than cyclists, but these are some of the top bike trial competitors of the uk. it is the ultimate obstacle course for bicycles. that is how it started in the late ‘70s. you can get your bicycle over anything, no matter what's in your path, just using pedal power. i think the think it relates to most is free—running or climbing, you look for the hardest thing to get over and get over it. there's no limit to what you can do. football is limited in that you score and that is it. this is like higher, bigger, faster. it boomed after the stars of this bbc programme, junior kickstart, used pushbikes to refine cycling skills. some needed it.
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it takes months of daily practice to get these heights, but you can learn the basics at as young as three. this is where it all starts. you have to go around the cones. it's weird, the first thing you notice is there is no saddle. i keep wanting to sit down. it is quite strange. when you are bouncing it is like you are on a trampoline, but, like, you're not. going over rocks and things is hard, but you can't sit down. ifeel like i'm using every muscle in my upper body and my back. in a competition, you can put a foot down five times as a maximum, but it costs you a penalty each time. it uses all different parts of the body, for the core, the arms, the legs. you see some of the young guys that have been practising, the guys and girls, they're strong. it's very, very good for fitness. you can literally start very simple,
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get a flat piece of floor with a white line. you can learn the basics nice and safe like that. then you can do everything else. what a feeling up on one wheel! you can let go now. i don't know how long i can hold it for. i will leave it to the rest of the british team to show what they can do against the best riders on the planet in the world championships in china. and while i could not get over the obstacles here, i could be one in another part of the routine. please do not try this at home. these are highly skilled riders, and this is why i was holding my breath. but i could smell the rubber. there was actually no contact
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between the bicycle and my nose. i would have had a rough time if there was. it is incredible. they make it look so easy and smooth. hopping like that takes 3—a months. look so easy and smooth. hopping like that takes 3-4 months. it is all core strength. they do 3-4 days at the gym at least and many more days practising cycling. i did a slow bicycle race at school and that is hard going slowly and controlling it. but the bike federation website is where you need to go. it. but the bike federation website is where you need to golj it. but the bike federation website is where you need to go. i am looking at this test. there is a
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fight with anthony joshua looking at this test. there is a fight with anthonyjoshua tonight and on the bbc there is a test to see what kind of boxer you like. i got colin mcgregor. does that mean you are more aggressive?|j got colin mcgregor. does that mean you are more aggressive? i am a distant cousin of the boxer anthony joshua, almostjust like. it is only a bit of fun. don't read into it. you can do it quickly we did it during the sports bulletin. there you go. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, imposes direct rule over catalonia in response to its declaration of independence. nine british servicemen have been thrown off a nuclear submarine after testing positive for drugs. the servicemen were dismissed from duty from hms vigilant. need your layer is ready? you do, it
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is chilly. but beautiful yesterday. started off really foggy but then really sunny. we are in that season, typical autumn. the early bird has certainly caught the worm this morning, a glorious shot for those up early enough in is born, east sussex this morning. blue sky and sunshine. central and southern parts of england and sheltered eastern areas will see some sun but that's not the whole story because you can see where the best dry weather is at the moment, thicker cloud north and west and gale force wind is developing. persistent nuisance rain in western scotla nd persistent nuisance rain in western scotland, maybe clipping northern ireland, but in sheltered areas of the east, not too bad. a contrast in
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scotland, 50 mph gusts with light rain in the west, 15 or 16 in eastern scotland with some sunshine and we could see 50 mph plus in the latter stages of the afternoon in the higher ground of the pennines but had further south into the midlands, wales and further south, some sunny spells continuing with the wind not as strong. with some sunshine we could see highs of 1a and 17. as we go through the evening, the winds and the cloud and rain are going to descend slowly south, the rain very light and patchy, certainly more cloud. i'm going to stop the clock at 2am, why? just in case you have forgotten, i'm going to remind you that the clocks going to remind you that the clocks go back an hour so we all get an extra hour in bed, and so that means first thing tomorrow we're going to see a bit of a north—south divide. the cloud and mist areas will see ten to 12, but further north under clearer skies, temperatures falling away because the northerly wind
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kicking in. not particularly strong tomorrow compare it to today but a cold sores, ecole direction, so cold air filtering across the country —— not particularly strong tomorrow compare to the eighth cold source, a cold direction. —— compare the two today. high pressure stays with us on sunday and with those light winds that means temperatures are going to continue to fall away quite sharply on sunday night into monday morning so those of you up early for a start ofa so those of you up early for a start of a new working week, you've been warned, it will be pretty chilly. in towns and city centres these are the overnight lows. in rural spots we will see temperatures just below freezing in one or two places. we could see our first widespread frost of first thing on monday. a beautiful day for many, crisp and sunny with the exception of the far
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north and west, thicker cloud, milderairand the north and west, thicker cloud, milder air and the arrival of rain. all change, turning milder through the middle part of the week. thanks very much, louise, see you later. it's not too bad, chilly and frosty but... what's good about it? i don't know, i like the change of seasons and the chill and putting your layer is on and getting ready for christmas but i know i'm not allowed to say that word —— your layers. another month or two! headlines at 8am, we'll have a little argument about the weather in between, but now time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch. the new series of blue planet starts on sunday. good news for viewers, but is it news, as such? theresa may's shoes make another appearance during a report on her news conference from brussels. why? and should bbc news be interested in what president macron‘s dog did in the fireplace of the elysee palace? what exactly is going
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on in the negotiations over the uk's departure from the european union? that can be hard to discern, but damian grammaticas — in brussels for bbc news last friday — was trying to get some answers. enter the man who sits in that negotiating room. bonjour, monsieur barnier. from bbc. no, no, i'm sorry, but i... your recommendation today is sufficient progress? we are going to work now, hard. sorry. how's it going, monsieur barnier? it's michel barnier who the uk has to satisfy first. today, he was here to brief eu leaders on how the negotiations have progressed. mr barnier... no, no, i'm sorry. i don't want to answer your question now. i'm sorry. we are going to work. let me, let me work, please. david roberts was troubled by that encounter and got in touch with us to explain why. and another aspect of that summit
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report at the end of last week caught the attention of a number of viewers — a shot used during a clip of theresa may's news conference. nobody need be concerned for the current budget plan that they would have to either pay in more or receive less as a result of the uk leaving and that we will honour the commitments that we have made join our membership. mrs worrall was watching that and left us this telephone message. there was an important article with theresa may and the european union and, halfway through it, bizarrely, we shot to a picture of her shoes. why is this?
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at no other point in the news that i've watched any day this week do we suddenly have an important person now talking, with a shot of their shoes. what is going on? and mel hunt from york e—mailed us on the same subject, asking: well, we put that point to bbc news and they told us: fans of high—quality natural history programmes have been looking forward
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keenly to the start of blue planet ii, and there's a good chance you'll have heard that it starts on sunday on bbc one. sneak previews of what the david attenborough—fronted series will be bringing us appeared in several of monday's newspapers and widely across bbc news too. it's now 16 years since the ground—breaking blue planet programme appeared on our screens. for the first time, millions of viewers here and around the world could see the wonders of the deep ocean. now blue planet is back for a second series — presented, of course, by sir david attenborough. for the last four years, the bbc‘s natural history film crews have been scouring the seas in search of new casts of aquatic animals. our science editor, david shukman, has been speaking to sir david about his new series. but some viewers questioned whether what followed justified its place in the running order. tony francis thought: and hugh mckinnon agreed.
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it's certainly not the first time we've heard the charge of self—promotion. and that same day, breakfast featured items not just on blue planet, but on several other bbc programmes too. almost two decades after it first aired, sir david attenborough's blue planet is returning for a second series. we're talking about wildlife. yeah. because the team from autumnwatch are back. let's speak to the programme's presenters of autumnwatch, chris packham and michaela strachan, who are at the national trust sherborne park estate in the cotswolds for us this morning. doctor who's first female time lord is going to be joined
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by three new companions. jodie whittaker, who takes over as the 13th doctor next year, will be joined by new cast regulars. and something else to talk about over the weekend, strictly was good. did you see strictly? i saw strictly. 0k. i won't tell you who's gone, but it was very interesting. and also, there's been plenty of debate about the new gunpowder plot drama on the bbc. how much gore... ..is too much. is too much gore? so is the bbc using its news service to advertise its other programmes, or are items like that editorially justified? with me to discuss all that is richard burgess, who's the uk news editorfor bbc news. welcome to newswatch. we know david attenborough... let's start with david attenborough. he's an important documentary maker, his programmes are a big event, but really, is it news? i think it is news. i mean, i think it's a significant moment notjust in television, but really in the culture of the uk, and across the world, in truth. his last series, planet earth ii, was one of the most watched natural—history documentaries of all time. there were a couple of amazing sequences of the iguana trying to escape from the snakes, which i looked before i came here and it's been watched nearly
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five million times on youtube. so these are significant kind of television events. i think a new series by attenborough is a big moment in uk life and people are really interested in it. however, you dress it up, the top line in the way the bbc reported it was, there is a new bbc tv programme on. there was no news line out of that. actually, within the interview that we did with david attenborough, we did get quite a few news lines. we sent our science editor to do the interview, david shukman. it gave us the opportunity to talk about pollution in the oceans, the acidity of the oceans, the bleaching of the coral reef, climate change. i mean, there was actually a big report out about the increasing acidity of the oceans that day and this gave us an opportunity to get into that subject, on a major bit of output. it may have come out of it because of the interview, but the interview was booked first, and all the tv bulletins ran this,
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from breakfast to the six. and what newswatch viewers really resent is the time it takes up — more than three minutes on the six — that's probably two other stories that didn't get covered properly as a result. look, we did cover a lot of important stories that day. brexit, the rohingya muslims... chopped off the end as a result. well, you made the point yourself, you know, every newspaper covered blue planet i! that morning as well, so we weren't alone in covering it. and we don'tjust cover bbc programmes. i mean, if i think about recently, we covered the start of the crown on netflix, the grand tour on amazon, bake—off on channel a. so we've been... it's judged on editorially, like we make any other decision. we're not making a decision on whether it's a bbc series or not. we know there are a lot of budget cuts affecting bbc news right now, this is cheap telly, isn't it? no, i don't think so. i think there's a lot of interest in david attenborough. i think in his views, he's a significant figure within british life. and his views on the environment and on climate change, which came across in this interview, i think are of a lot of interest to our audience.
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we showed you in the clips several items just from one day, just from breakfast on monday, doctor who, autumnwatch, the blue planet. that was just monday. can you see why viewers are frustrated? do you... does the bbc really realise how much of its news airtime is filled with what look like promotions for other bbc programmes? well, i don't think they were all promotions for other bbc programmes. effectively, they were. a news series of autumnwatch... well, if you think about the gunpowder story, i mean, that was as much a criticism... which i deliberately didn't mention. it was in passing, it was a newspaper thing. but the actual items that were set up... mmm. that's a lot of bbc programmes. i think in a programme like breakfast, which is quite a long programme, it's a mixture of news and of chat and discussion, you would expect a programme like breakfast to reflect upon what people are talking about. and people do talk about programmes like strictly. it's an extremely popular programme, more than ten million people watch it. you know, people like to discuss, you know, who did well, who didn't do well, and a programme like breakfast i think absolutely, you would expect to reflect that. but it isn'tjust bbc programmes. you know, breakfast covers
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and discusses other programmes as well. i distinctly remember when broadchurch was coming to an end, it was a major feature on breakfast and across bbc output. so it's notjust bbc. no, although i'd say a lot of newswatch viewers complain about that too. they want news events happening around the world. will you take away the concerns that newswatch viewers have raised — because they raise them regularly — and discuss them with news editors and think about how many programmes, like three on one day, are getting airtime? of course. and i think that is a fair point and you do have to think about the prominence and the amount of times bbc programmes get mentioned within one particular news programme. i think within the mix, generally, i think it's ok, and i think it's reflecting what our audience are talking about. but of course, you're right, we need to be careful we don't overdo it. richard burgess, thank you. finally, on monday, footage emerged from the elysee palace of a meeting between president macron and three junior members of his government. did it contain some revelation about the french negotiating position on brexit, or the president's plans for economic reforms? no. amusing, certainly, but sj mcnabb was concerned about the prominence
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the bbc gave the story on its new newsfeed, tweeting: and jerome agreed. thank you for all your comments this week. we welcome all your opinions on bbc news and current affairs. if you'd like to share them with us, or even appear on the programme, you can call us on 0370 010 6676. ore—mail us at newswatch@bbc.co.uk. you can find us on twitter, @newswatchbbc. and do have a look at our website, where you can search
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for and watch previous discussions. the address for that is bbc.co.uk/newswatch. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and naga munchetty. tensions rise after spain imposes direct rule on catalonia — just hours after politicians there declare independence. as crowds celebrate, spain's prime minister calls snap elections after sacking the region's leader and chief of police. good morning it's saturday 28th october. also this morning. the family of a severely autistic boy, whose nurse was cleared of misconduct after punching him in the face, says the system failed to protect him.
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