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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 1, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. a former scotland yard detective tells the bbc he was shocked by the amount of pornography viewed on a computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green nine years ago. speaking for the first time, the technology specialist says thousands of images containing legal pornographic material were on a device in his westminster office. mr green has vehemently denied looking at pornography at work. good morning, it's friday the 1st of december. also this morning, a review is launched into nhs radiology services in england after the health watchdog is told thatjunior doctors at one hospital were asked to examine x—rays without the right training. prince harry and meghan markle head to nottingham for first public engagement together since they announced their plans to marry.
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to mark the end of our amazing week about special educational needs, we're at piper hill high in manchester. today we're at this outstanding special school to hear what can be done to ensure every child fulfils their potential. this is fergus, a classroom assistant. i'm in the sensory room here, which helps children understand the world around them. today we're reporting that 1.4 million kids have speech and language difficulties — but far too many of them are not getting the help they need. good morning. there is no stopping the vinyl revival, after a decade of increasing sales we are still on course to buy 30% more this year than last year. i will have more on that later. in sport, the world waits as the draw for the 2018 world cup in russia takes place at the kremlin this afternoon. england are not one of the top
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seeds, so we will be hoping to avoid the likes of brazil, argentina and germany. and matt has the weather. good morning. it is the meteorological start of winter today. icy across parts of eastern england, and plenty of ice behind me here in brighton. over the next few days it will actually get milder. i will have the full forecast in net —— in the next 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story. a former scotland yard detective has told bbc news he was shocked by the amount of pornography on a parliamentary computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. neil lewis examined the device during an inquiry into government leaks in 2008. mr green, who is in effect theresa may's deputy, has vehemently denied looking at pornography at work, initially describing the allegations as "disreputable, political smears. " mr lewis, a retired computer forensics specialist who hasn't spoken out before said analysis of the way the computer had been used left him in "no doubt whatsoever" that the material had been accessed by mr green, who was then an opposition immigration spokesman. here's theresa may's oldest and most
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trusted political ally. now damian green is facing a battle for little survival, amid claims he viewed pornography on his work computer. damian green has vehemently denied the allegations. i had an exemplary record. now the detective who examined the device has given me his account. the shocking thing was that asl account. the shocking thing was that as i was viewing it, i noticed a lot of pornography thumbnails, which indicated web browsing. but a lot, there was a lot of them. sol indicated web browsing. but a lot, there was a lot of them. so i was surprised to see that on a parliamentary computer. how many images did you see? thousands. thousands of pornographic images? thumbnail images. the computer had been seized in 2008 after police raided damian green's officers. the mp, then in opposition, was the
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subject of an unrelated enquiry into home office leaks. he was never charged. how can you be sure it was damian green who was accessing the pornography? there is that phrase, you can't put fingers on a keyboard. i can't say that. but the computer was in mrgreen's i can't say that. but the computer was in mr green's office, on his desk. login, his account, his name. —— log in. —— logged. in between browsing pornography he was sending emails from his account, his personal account. reading documents, writing documents. the cabinet office is examining the pornography claims as part of a wider enquiry into mr green's conduct. but neil lewis has not been asked to give evidence. a spokesperson for damian green said it would the inappropriate for mr green to comment while the cabinet office investigation was continuing.
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however, the spokesperson said that damian green had: mrgreen maintains his mr green maintains his innocence. health inspectors have ordered a review of all nhs radiology services in england after a hospital in portsmouth failed to spot three cases of lung cancer. the investigation by the care quality commission also found that 20,000 chest scans had not been assessed correctly at the queen alexandra hospital. the portsmouth hospital nhs trust has apologised to the families affected. mark lobel reports. an alarming backlog of unchecked medical scans has been found at the queen alexandra hospital in portsmouth by the health services regulator, after a member of the public raised concerns. the care will decommission found between the first of april 2016 and the 31st of march this year, 26,3115 chest x—rays
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and 2167 abdomen x—rays had not been formally reviewed by a radiologist 01’ formally reviewed by a radiologist oran formally reviewed by a radiologist or an appropriately trained clinician. some had been checked, but byjunior doctors, clinician. some had been checked, but by junior doctors, who complained that they had been asked to do so without appropriate training. in some cases where x—rays had been declared clear, radiologists went on to spot cancer on later scans. in a statement, the ca re on later scans. in a statement, the care quality commission said: portsmouth nhs trust said: the health regulator has now written to all trust in england to build up a national picture of how quickly patients' x—rays are viewed. but tackling the problem will be tough. experts have warned of a desperate
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shortage of radiologists across the country, and a backlog of hundreds of thousands of x—rays and scans. mps scrutinising the government's brexit plans says border controls between northern ireland and the irish republic are inevitable if the uk leaves the eu single market and customs union. the commons brexit committee says ministers have failed to explain how the issue can be resolved, and that the proposals they've come up with — such as the use of technology — are "untested" and "speculative." survivors and those who lost loved ones in the grenfell fire say the public inquiry into the disaster will be a whitewash unless a diverse panel is appointed to oversee the proceedings. the government says the process is ongoing, but campaigners are urging the prime minister to intervene, and say the chairman, sir martin moore—bick, should sit with a range of people who understand the issues facing those affected by the disaster. without our involvement, without us being listened to, without
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co—operation from us, what type of enquiry is this, you know? this is what we have to remember, this is oui’ what we have to remember, this is our enquiry, our public enquiry. we are the ones who lost families and we wa nt are the ones who lost families and we want a fair crack atjustice and we want a fair crack atjustice and we wa nt we want a fair crack atjustice and we want to be listened to, we don't wa nt to we want to be listened to, we don't want to be ignored. we want a panel of people to understand us and our concerns. the argentine navy has abandoned efforts to rescue the 44 crew members of a submarine that disappeared two weeks ago. thousands of people have been involved in the search for the sanjuan, covering a 40,000 square kilometre area of the south atlantic. the authorities say they will still try to locate the wreckage. disruption is expected in parts of the uk this morning, after temperatures dropped as low as minus eight overnight. yesterday eastern england, kent and parts of scotland saw the first widespread snowfall of winter, and another 5cm could fall in some areas today. prince harry and meghan markle will carry out their firstjoint royal engagements later,
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just days after announcing that they're to marry in the spring. they will visit a number of charities in nottingham, as our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. it was only on monday that prince harry introduced to the american actress meghan markle as his new fiancee. this photo call was held in the controlled environment of the garden at kensington palace but miss markle made it clear in the subsequent interview that she was keen to get out and about and meet the british public. in these beginning few months and now being boots on the ground in the uk, i'm excited tojust really get to know more about the different communities here, smaller organisations, working on the same causes i've always been passionate about under this umbrella. and also being able to go around the commonwealth, i think it'sjust the beginning... there's a lot to do. their first engagement together will highlight an issue prince harry has become a prominent campaigner on behalf of, aids and hiv awareness.
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they will then visit nottingham academy through the royal foundation he has supported. full effect, a programme attempted to tackle youth crime. this was prince harry meeting the public in nottingham earlier this year. according to his spokesman, it's a community that's become very special to him and one he's looking forward to introducing to his new fiancee. born and raised in california, meghan markle has already agreed to make the uk her home and the people of nottingham will be the first to publicly welcome her. sarah campbell, bbc news. time now, ten minutes past six, time to talk to mike. good morning. lots of foot ball to talk to mike. good morning. lots of football fans are talking about this as though it is christmas eve, because today, all of those world cup finalists find out where, which is important in russia because it is so is important in russia because it is so big, and who, they will be playing. once the draw is made you can start looking at the places, learn about the geography, learn about the countries you will be
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facing. it might be panama or iran we re facing. it might be panama or iran were australia against england, how amazing would that be? in rehearsal, england drew brazil twice. and argentina. but the real thing takes place today inside the kremlin at three o'clock. england and the other 31 teams which have qualified will find out who and where they will be playing. russia has something like three or four different time zones. england have already picked a base near saint petersburg and will be hoping to avoid long trips to the far east and side of russia. the former england manager, sam allardyce, is officially back in the game. he's signed an 18—month deal to take over at everton. he's been out since february after more back surgery, but tiger woods described his opening round as "great" as he made his latest return to golf in the bahamas. he shot a 3—under par 69. and at the wheelchair tennis masters in loughbrough, britain's gordon reid kept his hopes of a semi—final place alive with victory in his second group match. i've got more for you in a moment in
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the papers. there are warnings commuters might face disruption today because of ice and snow. lots of pictures in the papers of lots of frost and snow around. matt is keeping up with the chilly theme, he is in brighton. it is icy there, to say the least. at a gorgeous view. very gorgeous, isn't it? it is the meteorological start to winter, the first of december. i have come in search of some ice. i didn't need to this morning, there is some ice around, and you might be seeing it out there in the uk as well. we have had an early taste of winter, do could say, across the country, with temperatures lower than they should eat for this time of year. quite a bit of snow across eastern england. if anything, across the next few days, temperatures will be on the rise. it is set to get a bit milder. let's look at the forecast of this weekend. not only is it set to turn milder, but it will also turn
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cloudy, would not as much sunshine around us this morning. temperatures rising across the hebrides, with patchy rain. central and southern scotland will be lovely and southern scotland will be lovely and sunny but with a frosty start. a little bit of ice. sunshine out across parts of north—west england as well. and northern ireland. east of the pennines and all the way down into eastern england, much more cloud around. a few showers of snow around, but mainly turning to rain and sleet now. because the pitches have only been a few degrees above freezing there has been ice. take it easy on the pavements. the western half of england and wales, a different story altogether. 12 isolated showers in western wales. clear and frosty later, with a lovely sunny day to come. not as windy as yesterday. reasonably dry and sunny and northern ireland, with temperatures below freezing. here, the best of the sunshine will be this morning. through the day, that cloud in the far north—west of scotla nd cloud in the far north—west of scotland is going to slowly push its
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way south and east. turning cloudy across scotland and northern ireland and by the end of the day, in the far north—west of england, we will see patchy rain. most places will stay dry. showers confined to east anglia and the far south—east later. temperatures still on the low side, but up about one degree on yesterday. and you can take away the strength of the wind so it will not feel as chilly. but it is still cold. called into tonight as we go across england and wales, a touch of frost arriving quite quickly. cloud pushing down across the north. lifting temperatures through the night, cloud breaks later, especially east of high ground in the east of scotland and eastern england, and also in the far south—west. a touch of frost, and some ice to begin saturday morning. much more cloud uk wide on the weekend, a bit of patchy rain at the top and tail of the country. the best of the brightness will be a ci’oss best of the brightness will be a cross the north of scotland and north—east england. double temperatures in some parts, still quite chilly across eastern england,
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but by sunday all of us will be into that milder air. probably brighter across the country on sunday after overnight rain. still some patchy rain in the west stop the best of any rain on sunday will be towards the east. —— west of any sunshine. the pitches could get up to around ten of —— ten or 11 degrees. chilly again today, but a little less cold as we go into this weekend. thank you, matt. we were just wondering, how many layers are you wearing? i am on a four lay a day this morning. thermals, i hope. you have to do. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. many of the images dominated by president trump after the various
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twitter messages. the daily mirror makes its views very clear. not wanted. taking a look at the idea that the president has been rowling over social media with the prime minister —— rowing. some say he is not welcome in the uk. this is the front page of the telegraph. it is quite interesting. lots of people work on the bank of england and one of the policymakers on the financial policy committee was doing a speech, saying size of oui’ was doing a speech, saying size of our debt relative to the economy is still pretty big. and even though they said in a budget it is expected a portion of our economy will come down so on, we still can't be too casual about it. they say there
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needs to be some wriggle room. you can't forget about debt. if you start borrowing more, it is one to keep an eye on. on the front of the ft. keep an eye on. on the front of the ft, an interesting one from... a bit ofa ft, an interesting one from... a bit of a dingdong betweenjeremy corbyn and the big banks. so a few days ago, one of the big american banks morgan stanley said the prospect of ajeremy corbyn morgan stanley said the prospect of a jeremy corbyn government could be a jeremy corbyn government could be a bigger risk to the financial economy in the uk than brexit, depending on how his policies might play out. because he is seen as being less favourable in terms of tax breaks. yes. but jeremy corbyn has hit back, saying, yes, the banks we probably would be a bit of a threat. fa cup second round tomorrow and a star midfielder who certainly likes an aerial challenge has also
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done all of the washing. for the rest of the team? yes, for gateshead. you wouldn't get cristiano ronaldo doing that? it ta kes cristiano ronaldo doing that? it takes ages to dry all of the staff. who is he? jj o'donnell. you need to do the washing the august and september games. i wonder if he has any good laundry tips. the mud stains and everything. lots of puns in this article. about different washing powders. and of course england pay australia in the i’ug course england pay australia in the rug elite world cup final. i wonder if england's secret weapon is because he sings on the pitch every time he gets the ball. he sings a little song. do we know what he sings? different songs. he has a hold to
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box repertoire. i wonder if it puts the opponents. —— jukebox repertoire. all this week we've been shining a light on special educational needs, looking at the challenges faced by disabled children and their families. it's prompted so many personal and powerful stories from viewers. many of you have been in touch with tales of your struggles, but also your stories of hope and success. louise is spending the morning at a very special school in manchester, seeing how teachers there make sure every child fulfils their potential. that is certainly a feat to be taken on. good morning! good morning. good morning, everybody, and thank you so much for all of those messages this week. for the final day of our series we are in this outstanding special school.
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it is piper hill high in manchester. we are delighted to be here. this morning we have joe, we are delighted to be here. this morning we havejoe, linda jones, head teacher, fergus, a classroom assistant. i now everyone is really excited to have us here today. so excited to have us here today. so excited that you've all been for a sleepover last night. how was it? excited that you've all been for a sleepover last night. how was mm was really good, louise, really. really good to do it with my friend. we give debt any sleep? yeah. that's good. i know you've been here for a while. what's your favourite thing about this school? it is peer-like, with rugby. and they like doing my work experience with tesco. which has gone really well. you have been telling me how good the work experience went. and he went back and volunteered on holidays? yeah. and people came in on —— especially
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in the morning to see you, because you were in the morning to see you, because you we re so in the morning to see you, because you were so popular. in the morning to see you, because you were so popularlj in the morning to see you, because you were so popular. i helped people out sometimes with some jobs. and i know people came back especially to go to your till, which is brilliant. thank you for coming in. we are staying here all morning, which is fantastic. we will find out how everything is the same, but as you can see just a little bit different. we know lots of people are trying to get places for their children in schools like this in england. in scotla nd schools like this in england. in scotland the emphasis is really on mainstreaming those children. our correspondent went to find out how that works. singing it is morning at this primary school in edinburgh. the time of —— timetable for these children in the fourth europe by marie is music, spelling, storytime and their daily mile of exercise. un has cerebral palsy and takes part in all of the classes and activities. he has
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really good friends here. —— ewan. and he has 1—to—1 help throughout the school day. you spend a lot of time together? yes. we are together every morning. we've been together every morning. we've been together every morning. we've been together every morning for about three years. he isa every morning for about three years. he is a happy boy and he enjoys the school. in scotland, the aim is to keep children with additional needs in mainstream schools. in england has been an increase in special schools and fewer children kept in mainstream ones. ewan‘s mumjane says the scottish system has worked well for her son. it has given him a sense of belonging in the community and a sense of worth and respect. he is with his brother and sister. his independence has increased. and he really seems to enjoy it? loved school. a quarter of children in scotla nd school. a quarter of children in scotland have what's called additional support needs, about one in seven, there is a much broader definition here which includes family circumstances, health,
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disability. and although the number receiving extra help in scotland has in recent years gone up, the number of specialist support teachers has dropped. there are certainly is a squeeze and there is pressure on the workforce in schools to meet the broad range of needs of their pupils. there is also exceptionally good practice and so it is the exceptionally good practice taking place that we need to really learn from. these mums who take their children to the yard in a play centre for disabled children told me their priority is the right to choose. i want an autism school for my son, which has the small classes of about six that he will get the best education because at the moment when he is in a mainstream environment he is depressive and he is overwhelmed. for our daughter it was clear that she got a lot more from mainstream because what they we re from mainstream because what they were offering was more appropriate to how she learns and what she wanted to learn about. the scottish government says children should be schools where their needs are best
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match. either in special schools or mainstream ones. the local school has worked out well for ewan. his family wouldn't want it any other way. so some people clearly enjoying school. i want to know a little bit of background about the school. tell us of background about the school. tell us about the pupils you how. this is a school for young people, children and young people, with significant additional learning needs. some stu d e nts additional learning needs. some students have more severe learning difficulties, some have a profound learning difficulty, and many have associated difficulties such as autism. you told me little bit earlier that everything is the same but a little bit different. what do you mean by that? obviously we've got fergus. we think all the time about what we do for each individual child in school to make it a little bit more unique and a little bit more personalised than he would do ina more personalised than he would do in a mainstream school and really think about the environment, the
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curriculum we offer and how we can get this tiny steps of learning to really build up so that all children make outstanding progress. white we can't ignore this young man. you look after him. tell us about his job here. he is here to do what linda wants us to do. we are guided very much by the teachers in terms of which students he should be with and he just loves his time here. and there are all sorts of different ways he's used ? there are all sorts of different ways he's used? it can be as a therapy dog, as a traditional way of being calm and enjoying the company of the animal, and for all the people who have maybe fears of animals and dogs it's a way of ensuring that overtime they become used to that and can manage to say walked past it on the street, which will have a massive impact on their life or the life of their family. all sorts of different reasons. and you celebrate difference here? we
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celebrate difference. it is a core value. different is fantastic, being unique is fantastic. and you are a three times outstanding school. this is no easy answer, you've got about 20 seconds, at howdy you do that? hard work, teamwork, east river the leadership, everyone understands their role, are accountable. good is never good enough and it's really important that the child is at the centre of every single thing we do every day, every minute. and your enthusiasm is literally infectious. and you so much. i know you will be hit throughout the morning as well. thank you. and fergus has competition. another therapy dog will be here later! you are really getting a treat this morning with all of those lovely animals! absolutely. back with lou throughout the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a 17—year—old has been arrested
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on suspicion of murder following the death of teenagerjason issac‘s in northolt earlier this month. the boy was arrested on thursday and taken to a west london police station, where he remains in custody. 18—year—old jason was fatally stabbed nearly two weeks ago. the police continue to appeal for witnesses. today is world aids day and a new collaboration has been launched in the capital to tackle hiv in an area with some of the highest levels of infection. the eltonjohn aids foundation with lambeth, southwark and lewisham councils and the nhs, will to try and reduce hiv transmission in south—east london. our government hasjust our government has just gone through a period of heavy austerity. the nhs isa a period of heavy austerity. the nhs is a strange resource and we've taken on an economic model that says if we invest in hiv now it actually saves the nhs money in the long run.
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we are bringing in investment up run the look after the costs of doing that and want someone is on treatment and we've protected them it benefits the pay—out much more. boroughs across the capital have until mid—day today to bid for the mayor's london borough of culture competition. two winning boroughs, to be selected by sadiq khan, will be announced in february next year. one will take up the title in 2019 and the other in 2020. they'll each receive more than one million worth of funding. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a relatively good service on the tubes this morning, with just the district line having minor delays between wimbledon and parsons green. on the roads, the a13 is slow heading into town, from rainham towards dagenham. by russell square, southampton row is closed between bloomsbury place and guilford street because of a burst water main. and a211; streatham common north is closed between streatham high road and leigham court road. a water main has burst. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we are now into
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december, the first day of the meteorological winter. ironically it is not going to feel as cold as it did yesterday, but still a chilly feeling day. we've still got the northerly wind. there will be brightness and sunshine at times and temperatures to stop the morning are above freezing across the board. some early showers around. the small chance of wintriness on high ground. all of this will fall as rain. showers fade in the afternoon. rightness and sunshine emerging. top temperatures between 5—7 celsius. the northerly wind will ease through the day, so not feeling as cold. temperatures will dip away quite readily at first. those of 2— three celsius overnight, but then we start to see milder air celsius overnight, but then we start to see milderairand celsius overnight, but then we start to see milder air and perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle coming through. that's a warm front, so it will drag with its milder air. it will take some time to feel the benefit of this tomorrow. there will be a westerly wind, taps a few outbreaks
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of drizzle, otherwise mostly dry. it will feel quite damp and called for much of the day tomorrow. overtime to the sunday there should be more brightness and we have highs of 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, as we continue to shine a light onto special educational needs, we'll look at the 1.4 million children who have speech and language difficulties — and ask why so many are struggling to access help. just days after announcing their engagement, prince harry and meghan markle are to carry out their first joint royal visit. we'll speak to the hiv charity which is welcoming the happy couple later today. sleep! it's one of our favourite topics here on breakfast. as a suvey reveals more than half
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of us struggle to get enough, we'll get some top tips from an expert. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. a former scotland yard detective has told bbc news he was "shocked" by the amount of pornography on a parliamentary computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. neil lewis, a computer forensics specialist, examined the device during an inquiry into government leaks in 2008. mr green has vehemently denied looking at pornography at work. mr lewis, who's now retired, said he has "no doubt whatsoever" that the images containing legal pornographic material had been accessed by mr green. health inspectors have ordered a review of all nhs radiology services in england, after a hospital in portsmouth failed to spot three cases of lung cancer. the investigation by the care quality commission found that 20,000 scans had not been assessed correctly at the queen alexandra hospital, and thatjunior doctors had been left to interpret the results
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without the appropriate training. the trust has apologised to the families affected. mps scrutinising the government's brexit plans says border controls between northern ireland and the irish republic are inevitable if the uk leaves the eu single market and customs union. the commons brexit committee says ministers have failed to explain how the issue can be resolved, and that the proposals they've come up with, such as the use of technology, are "untested" and "speculative." survivors and those who lost loved ones in the grenfell fire say the public inquiry into the disaster will be a whitewash — unless a diverse panel is appointed to oversee the proceedings. they are urging the prime minister to intervene, and say the chairman, sir martin moore—bick, should sit with a range of people who understand the issues facing those affected by the disaster. andy moore reports. all the victims of the grenfell tower fire have now been
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all the victims of the grenfell towerfire have now been identified. the work to cover up the charred remains of the building isjust beginning. welcome to the opening session of the enquiry. there has been a brief formal opening of the official enquiry, led by retired judge sir martin moore—bick. he is due to resume again with procedural hearings later this month. those who have lost loved ones say the prime minister needs to appoint a diverse panel around sir martin that would more truly represent them. let's have openness and transparency. we are not asking foreign eating that is difficult. we are asking for a level playing field. i don't think we've got that so far. her uncle died in the fire. —— is uncle. he says families may not co—operate with the enquiry unless they are listened to. we are the ones who lost families and we want a fair crack at justice and lost families and we want a fair crack atjustice and we want to be listened to, we don't want to be ignored. and we want a panel of people to be able to understand us and our concerns, and to assist with thejudge in and our concerns, and to assist with the judge in making and our concerns, and to assist with thejudge in making the decisions and reporting back to the prime minister. the families have launched
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an online petition calling for the appointment of panel members and better legal representation at the enquiry. the government says sir martin is still deciding what expert help he needs, and that after that, a decision will be made about any possible panel. the government also says the lawyers representing the families will be allowed to play an active role in the proceedings. the argentine navy has abandoned efforts to rescue the 44 crew members of a submarine that disappeared two weeks ago. thousands of people have been involved in the search for the sanjuan, covering a 40,000 square kilometre area of the south atlantic. the authorities say they will still try to locate the wreckage. prince harry and meghan markle are to carry out their firstjoint official visit later. the couple, who announced their engagement on monday, will meet members of the public at a charity fair and a school in nottingham later. they're due to get married at windsor castle in may. one other story for you this
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morning. a little girl has been reunited with her favourite cuddly toy, after images of it were shared around the world. 10—year—old eve was distraught when her stuffed labrador, basil, was lost during a trip to canada injuly. luckily her mother spotted him in a video, which was made by glasgow airport in a bid to track down the owners of 21 cuddly toys that ended up in their lost property. eve says she's delighted to have basil back, and hopes the other people who lost their teddies get them back too. i've remember my first world cup draw. once they drew iran and peru i was looking at the countries and cities. also it was holland but i knew a bit more about them. it's like christmas for a lot of football
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fans. it's really interesting. russia is the biggest country in the world, 11 different time zones. incredible. so england could travel 10,000 miles if they get the worst draw, or 3000 if the draw is kind to them. it's not just draw, or 3000 if the draw is kind to them. it's notjust about the teams they draw with. usually we talk about altitude being the problem. now it isjetlag. and also the heat in somewhere like sochl and also the heat in somewhere like sochi. and the language problems in the far east of russia. an incredible mixture of culture. the draw is taking place inside the famous kremlin at about 3pm this afternoon. our sports correspondent reports. it is russia's moment in the spotlight. the final rehearsals for the world cup draw ensuring nothing is left to chance. some of the biggest names in the game as you to lend at hand to. among them
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england's1960s heroes lend at hand to. among them england's 19605 heroes who hope lend at hand to. among them england'519605 heroes who hope the current squad can england's19605 heroes who hope the current squad can make their mark next summer. if they can get this thing together, playing with each other and for each other, then there's always a chance. england will brace themselves in a village north of st petersburg. the manager is looking forward to what lies ahead. we don't have many players that have won major trophies. but the future is very exciting and there is a great challenge for this group to see how far they can go. star attractions both on and off the pitch will draw thousands of fans here to russia next summer. organisers say everyone will be welcome for what they say will be a festival of football, nevertheless the game has had problems in the recent past, specifically with racism and violence, but campaigners are cautiously optimistic that things may be improving. we've moved from a position of denial to a state where the russians understand that they need to clean up the stadiums,
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deal with some of the fans who are the hard—core, deal with some of the fans who are the ha rd—core, otherwise deal with some of the fans who are the hard—core, otherwise people won't know when to come and it may come back to them in the world cup will stop the david the focus is on the big draw with all the teams keen to discover their foot all in fate. —— foot all in fate. in rehearsals, england drew against brazil twice. let's have a look at what we think based on the fifa rankings would be the best draw for england. russia according to the rankings are the weakest team in the whole cop edition. but it has the home advantage. —— competition. but they qualify as one of the top seeds because they are the host. the dream draw would be russia, senegal who aren't going through a very good time at the moment and saudi arabia. is that based on the ones that are in theory the worst teams?
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yes and if you got russia you couldn't draw another european side. the worst laws would be germany, the world's top team at the moment, and the likes of costa rica, knocked england out of the last world cup, and nigeria, who are going really well. that would be the worst case scenario. but you've got to take into account the travel as well. what would you prefer, to watch england play really good teams and this really good football, or watch them play lesser teams in terms of rankings and just get through? you have to go for the second, without a shadow of a doubt! i would love them to get russia or saudi arabia or senegal and get through to the knockout stage. i'd rather see good football. you just want your team to get through the first group stage. a5 through the first group stage. as you know, i'm no expert on foot all knowledge, but in line with naga's thinking, it's not always a good thing to play people who are
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worse than you early on because your standards possibly drop and you start on a lower level than you might of the hill have played if you start against one of the big guys. you would probably make a much better foot all a manager than you would probably make a much betterfoot all a manager than me. do you will be celebrating if they draw brazil? maybe it wouldn't do them any harm. the bottomline is you've got... if you win everything you are all right. you can win the world cup! simples! only six months ago, sam allardyce left crystal palace saying he had no ambition to take anotherjob in football management. but he's signed an 18 month deal to take over at everton. he says he is "enthused and energised" and that the ambition of the club was key to him taking thejob. there's been a big blow for england overnight, with the rugby league world cup final little more than 24 hours away. england captain sean o'loughlin has been ruled out with a thigh strain. that means sam burgess
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will lead the side. he captained england in last year's four nations series and assistant coach dennis betts said burgess was a "d " and the natural replacement. britain's paralympic champion gordon reid can still reach the semi—finals of the wheelchair tennis masters in loughbrough, after winning his second pool match. he came from a set down to beat nicolas peifer. andy lapthorne also won to qualify for the semi—finals. tiger —— tiger woods said he thought he "did great" in his latest comeback to competitive golf. he's been out since february after more back surgery and he shot a three under par 69 in the first round of the hero world challenge in the bahamas. he'sjust three behind the clubhouse leader england's tommy fleetwood. and finally to the freestyle canoe world championships in argentina this week, where great britain's canoeists have been flipping their way onto the podium. the sport is described
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as gymnastics in a boat, with paddlers performing as many tricks, spins and somersaults as they can within their timed run and bonus points are awarded if they can get their boat completely out of the water. great britain have picked up three medals so far, with claire o'hara winning her ninth freestyle world title. the event continues over the weekend. it's like being in the washing machine. amazing. take a deep breath! i was getting all nostalgic. i can almost smell the dust. it's a good insight into your music taste, because these are yours. i think people's collections are not necessarily their taste. they can be theirfamilies‘... this was a recent charity purchase. the beach boys is mine. this was inherited. anyway, the story, why
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have we got a load of vinyl? is that who you model yourself on? you model yourself on bobby darren. we've figured it out! why are we talking about vinyl? it's a good question. sales are up, but we've been saying that year after year and they are still up. we are on course this year to buy1 million lps in december, which would take us to4 lps in december, which would take us to 4 million over the year. that would be up more than a third on 2016. sewage you go back to 4 million this year, in 2007 we were buying about 200,000 a year. so once we start talking about that revival it really escalates. it's not just buying it really escalates. it's notjust buying older artists as well, artist in bygone eras, because they are all new albums. up until a couple of years ago, i should say it is still a very small
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pa rt should say it is still a very small part of the market. 2.6%. but loads of people are still streaming. but that's streaming has made people like ed sheeran and the arctic monkeys and people like adele become the top—selling vinyls. 70 people who were streaming are starting to buy vinyl as well. nearly half of the vinyls, people say half of the people who buy them, buy them. it's just that. there is an album on that. which way is he going? charlie's christmas crooners. beautiful. arguing control of your
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mobile disco? a5 mobile disco? as we saw them, no is the answer. shall we try again later? we can give it a good go. it's almost like i was interested in what you were saying, wasn't it? it's a good story! let's talk about the weather. it has got pretty cold. yesterday parts of the uk saw first snowfalls. but is dropped to —8 in some parts of the country and these are some of the images that we've seen across the images that we've seen across the last 24 hours or so. some pretty grim conditions in some places. be careful out on the roads today. many people are experiencing ice on the roads. in brighton this is an ice rink and it is it meet weather. good morning! good morning. welcome to brighten's royal pavilion. professional ice skaters. i've been
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practising all year but still need a bit of help. i've got my friend snowy. it is the first day of the meteorological winter in the uk. a slight change on the way as well. if you take a look at the forecast, things are set to get milder through the coming days and temperatures are on the rise. also turning cloudy. the first changes to the northern areas of scotland. the rest of scotland, clear and icy. areas of scotland. the rest of scotland, clearand icy. but areas of scotland. the rest of scotland, clear and icy. but a sunny start. in the east of england a couple of snow flurries. it's all turning patchy rain as temperatures lift. still a chilly winter towards east anglia and the south—east, where we again have some rain and sleet showers during rush—hour. the west not as many showers in western parts wales. a couple of isolated ones. rest of england and wales, a
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lovely and crisp start to friday morning. sunshine overhead, a frost on the ground. the same to northern ireland, where temperatures dropped to minus for the night. a sunny start. there will be changes throughout the day. in northern ireland, scotland and later northern england it will turn cloudy. a bit of patchy rain. temperatures on the rise. showers in eastern england are confined to east anglia. most will have a dry and reasonably sunny afternoon and it is still cold. temperatures around 3— eight degrees for many, but it will start to feel a little less colder than yesterday. through the night we will start to see cloud in scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england. with it a bit of patchy rain. the chance of icy conditions. that is to take us into saturday morning. it will be a frosty start. frost mainly where there are cloud
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brea ks to frost mainly where there are cloud breaks to the east of high ground and the far south of england. a chilly day still in england tomorrow. the warmer air will take longer to get here. patchy rain in southern parts of the glen and wales and to the north of scotland. in between a lot of dry weather. a few cloud breaks. notice the temperatures. potentially up to double figures in the north of scotland. still a touch on the chilly side in eastern england. in the sunday the milder air is with all of us. temperatures at or above they should be. quite a lot of cloud again in the west, with patchy rain, but most places will be dry. brighter on sunday. sunnier in the east. the slightly milder conditions will remain in the next week as well. back to you. they are known as hidden disabilities and they affect 1.4 million children across the uk.
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as our series into special educational needs continues, today we're looking at speech, language and communication needs. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been investigating the issue. explained the room you are in. this is specifically designed to help people who have those kinds of issues with communications? this is kind of a full immersive experience. we are in the rainforest. we are transported. what can we hear? the rain tinkling through the leaves. back ground song. and this brings all of your geography lessons to life. give away if to everybody. i know you have lots of family watching. hello, mum and dad. hit the blue beam. this is how immersive it is. watch this. we did that before. he nearly fell off his
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chair. more on this in a minute. 1.4 million kids... are you ok? 1.4 million kids... are you ok? 1.4 million kids, two to three in every class, have speech, language and communication problems. the question is, are they getting the help they need? report out today says they are not. that report is from the royal couege not. that report is from the royal college of speech and language therapist and the communication charity that gave us exclusive access to these new figures that is access to these new figures that is a problem out there and it needs fixing. have a look at this. harry is happy and helpful but with profound orders and he struggles to communicate. despite being twice assessed as having a problem, he has never been under the treatment of an nhs speech and language therapist. you have pushed and pushed, haven't you? pushed and pushed. we have a multiagency meeting every 12 weeks for harry. each time we've attended there is never a speech therapist, whereas a speech therapist... the
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same thing as happened for 18 months. rather than therapy for harry the nhs has offered training, which they tell me can be very beneficial. she now pays for private therapy. iming a good position because i can do that but a lot of say it's -- they can't. here in birmingham they also feel badly let down. a5 class starts the teacher tries to hold their attention. a bit more interested in our camera. most are eventually able to follow the song and joining the action is. but some really struggle. notjust to speak but to pay attention, to understand and follow instruction, all part of a speech, language and communication needs. it's frustrating for us because we get children that almost feel they've been written off because sometimes pa rents been written off because sometimes parents have already noticed there isa parents have already noticed there is a problem and they've tried to get help, they've gone and nothing
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has happened. this is why the school brought in diana. she was part of a speech and language team in the nhs before being laid off with a number of colleagues five years ago. developing speech and language in children is in the target, like cancer or heart or diabetes. children is in the target, like cancer or heart or diabetesm children is in the target, like cancer or heart or diabetes. if you do get the speech and language right, what else goes wrong? you don't learn to read and write. ten yea rs don't learn to read and write. ten years ago, the government commissioned a report which flagged problems here and led to promises to deliver better services for children is like this. the department of health says there are around 160 more therapies today and the government has an extra 2 million into therapy. but look at this from a recent ofsted and qc due report. today a new survey finds only 15% of
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pa rents today a new survey finds only 15% of parents and therapist believe there are enough services in their area. they say this will have consequences. data shows that over 60% at least have communication difficulties in the youth justice system, but made any vulnerable group of children, children with mental health issues, children that are excluded or on the fringe of the excluded, and the youth justice system, the majority have communication difficulties. communication underpins everything, from reading and writing to making friends and making a future. get it wrong and many kids will flounder. we know resources on the nhs are stressed and there is an increased demand across the board and a problem recruiting. let's chat to the kids. thank you so much for waking up so early to talk to us. what time will you up this morning? 5:47am. what time do you normally
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wa ke 5:47am. what time do you normally wake up? seven a.m.. a big thanks for doing this. tell me what you love doing and learning about in this room, sophie? i love learning about the forest and everything. did you learn about the tribe that hugged the trees to try and save them? yeah. can you imagine doing that? what about you, charles? its interactive and fun. what's your favourite subject at school? maths. you are —— are you very good at it? yes. rachel, thank you for letting us in this morning. so good to speak to you. what are the kids working towards ? to you. what are the kids working towards? hywel is the education here different to education in the mainstream? —— different to education in the mainstream ? —— how different to education in the mainstream? —— how we as. different to education in the mainstream? -- how we as. we cover all the same subjects. we have
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science, history, citizenship, everything. what happens when they go to stage four is they work towards their entry—level gcses and other core vocations. no child leaves the school without the next debby miller being sought out for them, whether that be an internship, employment or going on to college. —— the next step for them. employment or going on to college. -- the next step for them. and the aim is to foster lots of independence? i think we need to remember that independence? i think we need to rememberthat our independence? i think we need to remember that our students have the same aspirations as other students, to go on and live independent and fulfilling lives in the work force and to achieve the goals they set for themselves. william. we'll chat more later —— brilliant. you all had a sleepover last night here. what did you have to eat? mcdonalds. are you going to make a first formulated? no. sophie! you let me down! back to you. no breakfast for you!
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they are going to starve me! thanks. we will see lou later as well. she loved that irish wolfhound, fergus. she will have another therapy dog with her later. josh, the great dane. they will talk about how they are helping the children interact, be more calm and where of animals and how to react to animals. very much in keeping with the coverage this week, looking at the problems people are facing and also the success stories, people who have achieved amazing things and overcome real problems. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a 17—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death of teenagerjason issac‘s in northolt earlier this month. the boy was arrested on thursday and taken to a west london police station, where he remains in custody.
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18—year—old jason was fatally stabbed nearly two weeks ago. the police continue to appeal for witnesses. today is world aids day and a new collaboration has been launched in the capital to tackle hiv in an area with some of the highest levels of infection. the eltonjohn aids foundation with lambeth, southwark and lewisham councils and the nhs, will to try and reduce hiv transmission in south—east london. our government has just gone through a period of heavy austerity. the nhs is a strained resource and we've proven to them and taken on an economic model that says if we invest in undetected hiv now it actually saves the nhs money in the long run. we are bringing in investment to look after the costs of doing that and want someone is on treatment and we've protected them it benefits the pay—out much more. boroughs across the capital have until mid—day today to bid for the mayor's london borough
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of culture competition. two winning boroughs, to be selected by sadiq khan, will be announced in february next year. one will take up the title in 2019 and the other in 2020. they'll each receive more than one million worth of funding. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a relatively good service on the tubes this morning, with all lines running a good service. the a13 is slow heading into town, from rainham towards dagenham. the a40 has queues out of town towards the polish war memorial in ruislip, following a collision. the a204 is closed in part due to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we are now into december, the first day of the meteorological winter. ironically it is not going to feel as cold as it did yesterday, but still a chilly feeling day. we've still got the northerly wind. there will be brightness and sunshine at times and temperatures to start the morning are above freezing across the board.
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some early showers around. just the small chance of wintriness on high ground first thing. but all of this will fall as rain. showers fade in the afternoon. brightness and sunshine emerging. top temperatures between 5—7 celsius. the northerly wind will ease through the day, so not feeling quite so cold. temperatures will dip away quite readily at first. lows of 2—3 celsius overnight, but then we start to see milder air and perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle coming through. that's a warm front, so it will drag with it some milder air. but it will take some time to feel the benefit of this tomorrow. there will be a westerly wind, perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle, but otherwise mostly dry. it will feel quite damp and quite cold for much of the day tomorrow. by the time we get to sunday there should be more brightness and we have highs of 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website
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at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a former scotland yard detective tells the bbc he was shocked by the amount of pornography viewed on a computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. the technology specialist says thousands of images containing legal pornographic material were on a device in his westminster office. mr green has vehemently denied looking at pornography at work. good morning, it's friday the 1st of december. also this morning: concern that untrained staff have been left to check x—rays in nhs in nhs hospitals. the health watchdog launches an england—wide review. prince harry and meghan markle head to nottingham for first public engagement together since they announced
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their plans to marry. for the end of our amazing series on special educational needs, we are at piper hill high in manchester, where they are ready for christmas. we've been given unique access to this outstanding special school this morning. with me is the head teacher and wendy and fergus. good morning. i know you read to fergus. what do you read to him? presence to mum. we have been preparing everybody. we've been asking the questions as though he were really here. what do you like about fergus? i like touching him. you like stroking him. amazing. wonderful to see fergus and throughout the morning we will see that everything in this school is the same, butjust a little bit different. as it is in the kitchen. good morning! this is where everyone learns about leaving an independent
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life, and to do that you need communication skills. this morning, news of a report which says too many children are getting the help they need to deal with communication problems. more later. the royal bank of scotla nd problems. more later. the royal bank of scotland has announced it will close 2000 branches which will affect almost 700 jobs. more details shortly. in the sport, the day of destiny for 32 nations. we discover who and where they will play in the world cup finals where they will play in the world cupfinals in where they will play in the world cup finals in russia. england are not one of the top seeds. they could play brazil, argentina or germany. and over to the weather. good morning. it is the start of the meteorological winter, so i've come to the royal pavilion in brighton to get into the mood. after a frosty and icy start to friday it is set to get milder. the forecast coming up in15 get milder. the forecast coming up in 15 minutes. the forecast on ice skates, who could want more? good morning, first our main story. a former scotland yard detective has told bbc news he was shocked
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by the amount of pornography on a parliamentary computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. neil lewis examined the device during an inquiry into government leaks in 2008. mr green has vehemently denied looking at pornography at work. mr lewis, a retired computer forensics specialist, who hasn't spoken out before said analysis of the way the computer had been used left him in "no doubt whatsoever" that the material had been accessed by mr green. he's theresa may's oldest and most trusted political ally. but now damian green is facing a battle for political survival, amid claims he viewed pornography on his work computer. mr green has vehemently denied the allegations. i had an exemplary record. but now the detective who examined the device has given me his account. the shocking thing was that, as i was viewing it, i noticed a lot of pornography thumbnails, which indicated web browsing.
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but a lot, there was a lot of them. so i was surprised to see that on a parliamentary computer. how many images did you see? thousands. thousands of pornographic images? thumbnail images. the computer had been seized in 2008 after police raided damian green's offices. the mp, then in opposition, was the subject of an unrelated enquiry into home office leaks. he was never charged. how can you be sure it was damian green who was accessing the pornography? there is a phrase, you can't put fingers on a keyboard. so i can't say that. but the computer was in mr green's office, on his desk. logged in, his account, his name. in between browsing pornography he was sending emails from his account, his personal account. reading documents,
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writing documents. the cabinet office is examining the pornography claims as part of a wider enquiry into mr green's conduct. but neil lewis has not been asked to give evidence. a spokesperson for damian green said it would the inappropriate for mr green to comment while the cabinet office investigation was continuing. however, the spokesperson said that damian green had: mr green maintains his innocence. we can speak now to our political correspondent, iain watson. i understand you have more on some of what is coming out from damian green's side, we saw the statement a
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moment ago? yes, effectively, damian green is not commenting on tour this cabinet office enquiry, this whitehall enquiry into his conduct, actually reports. but friends of his are speaking this morning and they are speaking this morning and they are saying to make things, fundamentally. first of all, they are gobsmacked that senior police officers, former police officers, are putting into the public domain confidential information which was obtained by undertaking a completely separate enquiry, not an enquiry into pornography. they believe they have breached a duty of confidentiality and they believe there is a campaign to get damian green. secondly, as far as i understand it, until that enquiry reports, i have been told that despite the new allegations this morning and the interview with neil lewis, who examined that computer, damian green is minded to stay in office. he is not going to fall on his sword simply because of these new allegations. and as we heard, officially, he will deny all of the
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allegations put to him. but also, his friends are saying, look, even the police admit that anything that was found was legal. it didn't break the law. so they are saying, do not expect their ministerial resignation. they want the focus to shift back onto the police and the motivation those police officers, putting this into the public domain in the first place. health inspectors have ordered a review of all nhs radiology services in england after a hospital in portsmouth failed to spot three cases of lung cancer. an investigation by the care quality commission found 20,000 scans had not been assessed correctly at the queen alexandra hospital and junior doctors were left to interpret the results without the appropriate training. the trust has apologised to the families affected. mp5 scrutinising the government's brexit plans says border controls between northern ireland and the irish republic are inevitable if the uk leaves the eu single market and customs union. the commons brexit committee says ministers have failed to explain how the issue can be resolved, and that the proposals they've come up with — such as the
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use of technology — are "untested" and "speculative." the argentine navy has abandoned efforts to rescue the 44 crew members of a submarine that disappeared two weeks ago. thousands of people have been involved in the search for the sanjuan, covering a 40,000 square kilometre area of the south atlantic. the authorities say they will still try to locate the wreckage. in breaking news this morning, news about the royal bank of scotland, announcing it is closing 259 of its branches. sean has been looking at the details. yes, they have come through in the last few minutes. there is a bit of a breakdown between 60 to rbs branches and 197 natwest branches, with rbs owning natwest. we do not have exact details of those locations were, across the country, they have been closed yet. there is no stopping them branch closures stories. we heard the day before yesterday, lloyds ba n k heard the day before yesterday, lloyds bank closing some branches
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around the country as well. monkhorst around 800 range closures around the country. —— on course for around the country. —— on course for around 800 branch closures. more and more, customers are using everyday banking online or on mobile. 40% fewer customers are using branches. and actually, mobile transactions of whatever it is people are doing online have increased a 73% since to 14. so in the last three years they have nearly doubled the amount of transactions that customers are doing on their mobile phones. the concerns about all of this, it is always about our communities are affected when banks close down, and where they can afford to lose these doubling up of branches if they have done. so, the city, kind of, that perhaps absorbs those forces better than smaller areas? yes. definitely. urban areas, you are going to be more likely to have a branch to go to. the post office has tried to ta ke to. the post office has tried to take over a lot of those services.
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if you are in a small village and you have a post office, the chances are that you will be able to deposit money into your bank account through a post office and use lots of the service is there. but there is now a question around how many villagers have post offices. it will be interesting, we have heard so much about closures, if you actually see about closures, if you actually see a shift in accounts because people value banks. and of course those 680 potential redundancies, alongside these bank closures as well. which staff have been informed about. sean, thank you. the time now is 7:10am. all this week on the brea kfast we 7:10am. all this week on the breakfast we have been discussing special educational needs, looking at the challenges faced by disabled children and their families. thank you for getting in touch with us. you have told as many of your personal, powerful stories, and have spoken about your tales of struggling. but there have been positive stories as well, stories of hope and success. today, louise is spending the morning at a special school in manchester, seeing how teachers then make sure that every child fulfil their potential. you
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are next to the swimming pool now? good morning. yes, you know that if there is a swimming pool i am virtually in it, as you can see. this is an amazing school. it is a special school, piper hill high in manchester. we are here all morning, getting amazing access to what they are doing with children here. we know from our own research on has this week, and thank you to so many people who have gotten in touch, that many parents are trying to get their kids into schools like this in england. you can see this morning what kind of difference that can make to some children. that is what we've been studying this morning. amazing to see the work that is going on. one of the things we have in asking is, what about mainstream education? is an emphasis on that in scotla nd education? is an emphasis on that in scotland in particular. lorna gordon has been to investigate how that works there. # park the angels sing... it is
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morning atjuniper hill primer school in edinburgh. on the timetable for these children in their fourth year, timetable for these children in theirfourth year, music, spelling and storytime. and their daily mile of exercise. ewan, who has cerebral palsy, takes part in all the classes and activities. he has really good friends here. what is a name? that's phoebe? and he has 1—to—1 help throughout the school day. you and you spend a lot of time together? we are together quite a lot, every morning, forever three years now. he isa morning, forever three years now. he is a happy wee boy. he enjoys himself at school. in scotland, the aim is to keep children with additional support needs in mainstream schools. in england, there has been an increase in special schools and fewer children keptin special schools and fewer children kept in mainstream ones. un's mother jane says these cottage system has worked well for her sun. —— of the scottish system. it has given him a sense of belonging to his community, a sense of worth and respect. he is
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with his brother and sister. his independence has increased. and he seems to really enjoy it. he loved school. a quarter of children in scotla nd school. a quarter of children in scotland have what is called here additional support needs. in england, one in seven. but there is a broader definition here, which includes family circumstances, health, disability, and though the number receiving extra help in scotla nd number receiving extra help in scotland has in recent years gone up, the number of special support teachers has dropped. there is absolutely a squeeze. there is pressure on the workforce in the schools, to meet the broad range of needs of people ‘5. but there is also exceptionally good practice. exceptionally good practice taking place which we need to really learn from. these mothers, who take their children to be yard and adventure play centre for their children, say that their priority is the right to choose. i want an autism school for my son, which has a small classes of about six, so he will get the best education. at the moment he is in
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the mainstream environment. he is depressive. he is overwhelmed. for our daughter, it was clear that she got a lot more from mainstream, because what they were offering was appropriate to how she learns and what she wants to learn about. the scottish government says children should be school where their needs are best met, either in special schools in mainstream ones. the local school has worked out well for you and. his family would not want it any other way. lovely to see ewan enjoying school. it is connor, who is swimming with his teacher. also rowan. we are in the therapy school pool. adam, can i interrupt with a second? we say about this school that everything is the same but a little bit different and this is a really key
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illustration of that. tell us a bit about this room and this pool. it's brilliant. it is a therapy pool, so it's really warm. all our students get different benefits. some stu d e nts get different benefits. some students get benefits for their muscles and joints. other students like connor and rowan, we work on basic swimming skills and confidence skills, getting them used to the water and comfortable. obviously it's a really sensory environment for them as well. they all absolutely for them as well. they all a bsolutely love for them as well. they all absolutely love it and the staff enjoy it. it's a really good experience for everybody. a perfect environment for us to work towards the swimming targets and communication targets and physiotherapy targets. of course winning is a really important life skill, isn't it? —— swimming. winning is a really important life skill, isn't it? -- swimming. it is. i'm very keen swimmer as well. it is important that students are co mforta ble important that students are comfortable in the water and
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developing these basic skills, so that they can even just access pools outside the school and enjoy themselves in local facilities and things as well. i am a really keen swimmer and pools... rowan, things as well. i am a really keen swimmerand pools... rowan, it is lovely to see you, rowan. i was just saying that pools can in some ways be quite intimidating places, so presumably that's another reason why they are here getting used to the environment? absolutely. and by getting used to this environment we can getting used to this environment we ca n ofte n getting used to this environment we ca n often ta ke getting used to this environment we can often take them out of school, some of the more independent learners do well go into the local pool fulsome in lessons as well. so there's a really good slimming programme across the school —— swimming. you talked a bit about the physiotherapy. that is presumably an important part of the school as well? very important. the physios
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worked with the school and they set targets and, like i said before, this is the perfect sensory environment. there's the heat for the muscles, so they can achieve those physio targets. and it's great fun. it's been lovely watching you. i'll let you get on with it. we are here all morning and this really is an extraordinary school. it's wonderful to see what's going on. we've been really touched by the many messages you've sent us. do keepin many messages you've sent us. do keep in touch this morning. hopefully we can answer some of your questions as well. thanks very much. lovely hearing those stories. and it is very much concentrating throughout the week on some of the success stories, because huge impacts can be made on young people in particular. very encouraging, knowing that 40% of all children at some point in their lives will need some kind of educational needs. you can still get
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in touch, as lou said. e—mail us or twitter as using the hashtag bbc send. matt's in brighton with the weather. he is reflecting on the weather. he is reflecting on the weather. he has been skating! brilliant! i taught them everything i knew. thank you very much. it is my annual jaunt on the ice, which happens once a year, and of course it had to be at the start of the meteorological winter, which is today. it is a cold start, but it has become a little less cold over the next few days. i am in brighton at the royal pavilion. ice rinks are popping up uk wide at the moment and this one is here until the 14th of january. we've had a bit of rain this morning
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and that's a sign that things are starting to change. let's take a look at the forecast. this weekend it is set to turn cloudy and a little bit milder. not as chilly as the last few days. we start with a lot of cloud to the north of scotland. rain temperatures lifting already. a frosty start for the rest of scotland. east of the pennines and down across eastern england, still a few showers around. ice to watch out for, first thing after yesterday's snow. sleet and snow mixed in with the showers, mainly over the hills. mostly turning back to rain now. still windy towards east anglia and the south—east. the western half of england and wales, a different story altogether. just a couple of isolated showers. most start the david frost on the ground. a fine day for many, with winds than yesterday. a sunny start in northern ireland as well, where temperatures
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dropped below —4 overnight. in the sunshine it is set to turn cloudy. still cool, even with the cloud and patchy rain pushing on. in northern ireland and scotland, cloudy conditions moving down. being a bit of rain here and there. still a lot of rain here and there. still a lot of dry weather. much of england and wales, away from say the far east around coastal counties and east anglia, a few showers. still chilly, even though temperatures are up on yesterday. overnight we start to clear. temperatures rising for many. some patchy rain. there could be a bit of ice if you breaks later, especially to the east, but for most temperatures will be freezing to stop the weekend. a little bit cold on saturday... inaudible. lots of cloud around. patchy rain across the south to
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start saturday. heavy bursts in northern scotland. a lot of dry weather. the best of the cloud brea ks to weather. the best of the cloud breaks to the east of the hills. temperatures starting to warm up in northern scotland. still chilly towards the south—east. the milder airwill be towards the south—east. the milder air will be with us all by the time we get to sunday. rain overnight, which will clear away the patchy fog. patchy rain first thing in the south—east. most will have a dry day away from drizzle in the west. the brighter day of the weekend with the best of the sunshine in eastern areas. certainly a change after the cold conditions of autumn. winter arrives and the temperatures are on the up. back to you. thanks very much. shortly after their engagement was announced on monday, prince harry's fiance meghan markle revealed it was a shared passion for social change that got him a second date. later today, the couple will undertake their first joint royal visit in nottingham. we're joined now by allan bryce, editor of royal life magazine, and by dominic edwardes
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from the terrence higgins trust, one of the charities that the pair will visit. you must be very excited as this is the first high profile visit by a newly engaged couple? we are absolutely thrilled that prince harry and meghan markle have chosen to come to nottingham to ourfair this afternoon. it really underlines his great support for hiv as a cause. no one can underestimate the power of having such a high profile couple, where the media is interested and many people in the country and the world are watching. it raises the profile of the work you are doing. absolutely. it's invaluable. rinse harry has been fantastic at raising awareness around hiv —— prince harry. and highlighting the amazing progress that's been made in the fight against hiv in the uk. give us a sense of how you think since monday
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this news has been received and how they are already starting to make their mark betts it was obvious that they would hit the ground running --? it was obvious. she has already been involved in plenty of charity work and the fact that she has now got to get to know britain, her adopted country, so she will be doing stuff for the royal foundation. she is discovering the country now and she will be going around and taking part in engagements. she is immediately making her mark because she is so photogenic, she is camera savvy, she is really the dream. unlike princess diana or even sarah ferguson. she is used to the limelight and the paparazzi and everything else and she handles it so well. how much
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guidance will she be given, now that it has been officially announced that she will be part of the royal family? how much guidance will she get in terms of how to behave and how to speak? a5 get in terms of how to behave and how to speak? as an american she is perhaps more outspoken and more casual than we are used to. in an interview the other day i would say she probably said more than harry did. so she obviously knows her own mind and although she will accept the guidance i think there will be a change coming from her as well. she will influence them. she is not going tojust sit back and say, yes, i will do everything i'm told. i'm sure there will be a bit of quick quote —— back and forth. she is an independent woman and she already has the media exposure, and she knows how to work a camera. there will be things she has to learn
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about... she is learning. she will learn the geography of the country, for a start. she's also got this thing... public displays of affection and that sort of thing are out. once they are married, that's going to... so there will be protocol things. i'm sure they will do things on their own style. in some ways the visit today is very much on zero from prince harry to his mother. —— a nod. we will remember her involvement in hiv and how brave it was when she made her visits to various places and engaged in that discussion. absolutely. i think princess diana's compassion was really remarkable. but the situation for people living with hiv todayis
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situation for people living with hiv today is different and prince harry and meghan markle's focus is on combating the stigma people with hiv face and encouraging them to come forward to test. because the news is good for hiv in britain today. we've seen a 20% reduction in the number of people diagnosed with hiv in the last year, so this is really part of the good news story and their passion and commitment is vital in getting people to understand the new world of hiv. on a slightly more trivial but nonetheless fascinating note, have you been given any guidance on how... what terminology you should use around the new royal couple? do you know how to address them? i haven't. we haven't been given guidance and i think that's pa rt given guidance and i think that's part of their charm, that we've not been given protocol or guidance. so i've been referring to prints have —— prince harry and meghan markle, or m5 markle. if anyone can give me
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guidance, that would be wonderful. or m5 markle. if anyone can give me guidance, that would be wonderfullj guidance, that would be wonderful.” am sure if you arejust nice guidance, that would be wonderful.” am sure if you are just nice to them they will appreciate that! thank you very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. bereaved families and survivors of the fire at grenfell tower have launched a petition calling on theresa may to take urgent action to restore their faith in the public inquiry. some of those who lost loved ones say they have lost confidence in the inquiry, which is chaired by the retired appeals courtjudge sir martin moore—bick. a 17—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death of teenagerjason issacs in northolt earlier this month. the boy was arrested yesterday and taken to a west london police station, where he remains in custody. 18—year—old jason was fatally stabbed nearly two weeks ago.
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the police continue to appeal for witnesses. today is world aids day and a new collaboration has been launched in the capital to tackle hiv in an area with some of the highest levels of infection. the eltonjohn aids foundation with lambeth, southwark and lewisham councils and the nhs to try to reduce hiv transmission in south—east london. our government has just gone through a period of heavy austerity. the nhs is a strained resource and we've proven to them and taken them an economic model that says if we invest in undetected hiv now it actually saves the nhs money in the long run. so we're bringing investment in up front to look after the costs of doing that and want someone is on treatment and we've protected them it benefits the pay—out much more. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a relatively good service on the tubes this morning, with just the central line having issues. on the roads: the a40
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has queues out of town towards the polish war memorial in ruislip, following a collision. there are queues on the m25 clockwise towards qe2 bridge, following a collision. in the city, cannon street is closed outside cannon street station because of a gas leak. that's causing delays between monument and bank. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we are now into december, it's the first day of the meteorological winter. but ironically it's not going to feel as cold as it did yesterday, but still a chilly feeling day. we've still got that northerly wind. there will be some brightness and sunshine around at times and temperatures to start the morning are above freezing across the board. some early showers around. just the small chance of wintriness on high ground first thing. but all of this will fall as rain. showers fade in the afternoon. brightness and sunshine emerging. top temperatures between 5—7 celsius. the northerly wind will ease through the day, so not feeling quite so cold. temperatures will dip away quite readily at first. we'll see lows of 2—3 celsius overnight, but then we start
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to see milder air and perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle coming through. that's a warm front, so it will drag with it some milder air. but it will take some time for us to feel the benefit of this tomorrow. there will be a westerly wind, perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle, but otherwise mostly dry. an awful lot of cloud around. it will feel quite damp and quite cold for much of the day tomorrow. by the time we get to sunday there should be more in the way of brightness and we have highs of 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:30. -- 7:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. a former scotland yard detective has told bbc news he was "shocked" by the amount of pornography on a parliamentary computer seized
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from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. neil lewis, a computer forensics specialist, examined the device during an inquiry into government leaks in 2008. mr green has vehemently denied looking at pornography at work. mr lewis, who's now retired, said he has "no doubt whatsoever" that the images containing legal pornographic material had been accessed by mr green. health inspectors have ordered a review of all nhs radiology services in england, after a hospital in portsmouth failed to spot three cases of lung cancer. the investigation by the care quality commission found that 20,000 scans had not been assessed correctly at the queen alexandra hospital, and thatjunior doctors had been left to interpret the results without the appropriate training. the trust has apologised to the families affected. the royal bank of scotland has announced its to close 259 branches across the uk — meaning 680 job losses across the company the banks says it's due to more customers using mobile or online techology — the number of customers using branches has fallen by 40 percent since 2014.
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the location of those branches is unknown and will be revealed later this morning — but affected staff have already been told. mp5 scrutinising the government's brexit plans says border controls between northern ireland and the irish republic are inevitable if the uk leaves the eu single market and customs union. the commons brexit committee says ministers have failed to explain how the issue can be resolved — and that the proposals they've come up with, such as the use of technology — are "untested" and "speculative". the commons brexit committee says ministers have failed to explain how the issue can be resolved — and that the proposals they've come up with, such as the use of technology — are "untested" and "speculative". prince harry and meghan markle are to carry out their firstjoint official visit later.
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the couple, who announced their engagement on monday, will meet members of the public at a charity fair and a school in nottingham later. they're due to get married at windsor castle in may. those are the main story this morning. we will have the weather with matt, and the delightful spectacle of the weather on ice.” love it. he is good, matt. he is good at iceskating. i'm not bad, i'm actually getting older is a get better. what we are going to say, charlie? i was just better. what we are going to say, charlie? i wasjust saying, better. what we are going to say, charlie? iwasjust saying, he better. what we are going to say, charlie? i wasjust saying, he was telling us about the ice, he was on the ice, it is all about ice.” telling us about the ice, he was on the ice, it is all about ice. i have a spectacle for you. gary lineker inside the kremlin for bbc two, presenting the world cup draw to the world. it is not often that i envy gary lineker. but about... it is a christmas eve for football fans. kicking off notjust christmas eve for football fans. kicking off not just learning about
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the football on the teams they are going to play, —— but where you are going to play, —— but where you are going to play, —— but where you are going to play. i remember learning all about mendoza, was aria it is a geography lesson as well as about football. the russians will be hoping to turn it into a spectacle. it isa hoping to turn it into a spectacle. it is a set piece event, a marker ahead of what is a significant moment. yes, they were this to be a real selling point for their country, notjust real selling point for their country, not just in real selling point for their country, notjust in football terms, but is efficient, powerful, all the wonderful things you can find out about russia through football. they will hope to avoid what happened in spain in1982 when will hope to avoid what happened in spain in 1982 when it went badly wrong, but there are computers these days. it's the moment that really kicks off the countdown to the world cup — the draw at the kremlin begins at around 3:00 this afternoon, and our sports news correspondent richard conway will be watching. it is russia's moment in the spotlight, with final rehearsals for the world cup draw ensuring nothing is left to chance. some of the biggest names in the game are here to lend a hand too. amongst them, one of england's 1966 heroes, who hopes the current squad can make their mark next summer.
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if they can get this team together, playing with each other, for each other, then there's always a chance. england will base themselves in a village north of st petersburg, with the manager looking forward to what lies ahead. we don't have many players that have won major trophies. but the future's very exciting and there's a great challenge for this group to see how far they can go. star attractions both on and off the pitch will draw thousands of fans here to russia next summer. organisers say everyone will be welcome for what they believe will be a festival of football. nevertheless, the game here has had problems in the recent past, specifically with racism and violence, but campaigners are cautiously optimistic that things may be improving. we've moved from a position of denial to a state where the russians understand that they need to clean up the stadiums, deal with some of the fans who are the hard core,
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otherwise people won't know when to come and it may well rebound back at them during the world cup. today, though, the focus is on the big draw — with all the teams keen to discover their footballing fate. of course, they have been rehearsing this to be death to make sure that it is right. england drew brazil in rehearsal. i think we definitely won't get them. no, not now, that wasjust the won't get them. no, not now, that was just the rehearsal. won't get them. no, not now, that wasjust the rehearsal. let's look at what we think would be the best draw for england given the rankings. you think the dream draw would either host, russia, because they are the weakest team in the whole tournament, number63 in are the weakest team in the whole tournament, number 63 in the world. but they are in the top pot of seeds because they are the hosts. also in that dream group, the best case scenario would be the likes of saudi arabia and senegal. the worse case scenario, perhaps, would be the world's best team, germany. this would be the worst possible draw in
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terms of rankings. germany, costa rica, who of course helped dump england out of the last world cup. and nigeria. but as well as the teams drawn in this world cup, like never before, it is about where you play. a dream draw would be a 3000, to journey for play. a dream draw would be a 3000, tojourney for three play. a dream draw would be a 3000, to journey for three games. play. a dream draw would be a 3000, tojourney for three games. the worse case scenario would be going out to the likes of places like ekaterinburg,10,000 kilometres in just the space of ten days, three matches. so it is notjust to you play, it is where you play. but they are going to be flying everywhere they go, aren't they? apparently they go, aren't they? apparently they are going to make use of sleeper trains as well. you can't really sleep that well on the train, in that little bunk... why did you do that? i tend to sleep like a hamster. you sleep like a squirrel. i don't know, when i am on a train bed, yes. you do that funny setting noise as well? stop bit! well, my world is weird. yes, that is a fact. what else have you got? you
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distracted me with squirrels! this time tomorrow will be talking about one of the big stories and sport for the whole year, the world right relief —— rugby league world cup final. and overnight, we've heard the big news that, england's captain sean o'loughlin has been ruled out with a thigh strain. sam burgess will lead the side — he captained england in last year's four nations series, and assistant coach dennis betts said burgess was a "doer" and a "leader" and the natural replacement. britain's paralympic champion gordon reid can still reach the semi—finals of the wheelchair tennis masters in loughbrough, after winning his second pool match. he came from a set down to beat nicolas peifer. the reigning paralympic men's singles champion lost the first set against frenchman nicolas peifer, but came back strongly 6—4, 6—3 to win his first match of the tournament. andy lapthorne also won to qualify for the semi—finals.
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tiger woods said he thought he "did great" in his latest comeback to competitive golf. he's been out since february after more back surgery and he shot a three under par 69 in the first round of the hero world challenge in the bahamas. he'sjust three behind the clubhouse leader, england's tommy fleetwood. and finally, to the spectacle that is the freestyle canoe world championships in argentina. tricks, spins, somersaults, timed runs — bonus points for getting the canoe completely out of the water. great britain have picked up three medals so far, with claire o'hara winning her 9th freestyle world title. plus be like being a washing machine. sleep did you get last night? about four hours. not good enough. i was thinking about the bobsleigh next week. you are kept awake thinking about bobsleigh?m will all be revealed soon on breakfast. but yes. we are going to
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talk about sleep, and i think you need to listen to this. now on a frosty winter's morning like today most of us would love an excuse tojump back into bed. as it turns out, a few extra hours' sleep is exactly what some of us need! certainly we need longer than mike's four hours. not getting enough sleep can cause obesity, heart disease and diabetes, and it shortens your life expectancy too. james wilson is a sleep expert and hejoins us now. sleep. it is those things we talk about a third that this programme. at some of the key problems people face with sleeping issues? sometimes when people want to go to sleep, they try to force it. it is not like
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exercise. you can't make yourself to it. we need to relax ourselves into sleep. we need to wind down properly. to go to sleep, two things need to happen. a drop in core temperature and a drop in heart rate. many of us do things before bed that don't help us do that. we need to stop forcing ourselves to go to bed at a certain time. we cannot force ourselves to go to sleep at ten. but we can turn —— we can learn what being sleepy feels like, which is important. there are all these conflicting ideas about how to go to sleep. i have learned, over the yea rs, sleep. i have learned, over the years, being on shifts like this, i don't panic about sleep. i think thatis don't panic about sleep. i think that is one of the problems. you start thinking about it, you're not getting enough sleep, you wake in the middle of the night. you say, don't watch tv, don't look at your phone, but then people say, get into a routine and watch something that makes you feel relaxed.” a routine and watch something that makes you feel relaxed. i think we need to learn who we are as sleepers. we are all genetically different when it comes to sleep. we all need a different amount of sleep. just as importantly we need a
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different quality of sleep. you have learned to you are as a sleeper. that is what we are try to do my organisation, trying to understand. are you a morning lark? are you a night owl? are you typical? learn when you should go to bed, but don't force it. sleepiness comes by doing things which help us relax away heart rate drops. it doesn't come when we sit in bed thinking, i need to sleep. you have suffered from sleep problems yourself? yes, i had an insomniac. bad sleepers are bad sleepers. you can't change that. what was your sleep pattern? ie she knew have improved that now. when you had your problem, what was it? waking up early in the morning. as a teenager i didn't sleep at all. that often happens with teenagers. as i got older i struggled to stay asleep. i used to wake up at two o'clock in the morning and think, i'm not going to go back to sleep. and guess what, i never went back to sleep. now i wake up at two o'clock in the morning and i think, if i don't get back to sleep i will be 0k. because although i am a really
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bad sleeper i am brilliant at being tired. i cope well. sol bad sleeper i am brilliant at being tired. i cope well. so i changed the conversation in my head about sleep, and that was a powerful tool for me to sleep better. isn't that a myth, that you can be good at being tired? shouldn't you except that you are not functioning anywhere close to 100% during the day? —— accept. so your cognitive functions, your everyday functions, they suffer?” can get through the day fine. what i used to do, i would have a bad night's sleep, i would worry, i would wake up and think, i'm not going to sleep. i would go seven or eight weeks like that and i would crash and have a good sleep and start again. so what i do now, it is just one day, we can deal with one or two days of bad sleep. people play in the world cup final, people give presentations, people do amazing things with no sleep whatsoever. what if you were in a position where you can catch up on sleep. you arejust, that position where you can catch up on sleep. you are just, that was position where you can catch up on sleep. you arejust, that was it. you were destined to a lifestyle of five hours every night. is that damaging, physiologically? to get
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90% of our sleep needs, winning five and a half hours. so although a lot of it will have seven or eight hours and they feel better, for our overall health, about five and a half hours is enough. and that really, really helps. as a bad sleeper, i was getting two or three hours. eight hours was miles away. i couldn't get that. but five hours, i couldn't get that. but five hours, i could manage that. so when i got six hours i felt like i had had a good night's sleep. very interesting. thank you, james. have a session with mike, he is on four hours. and sleeping like a squirrel, as well. do you know what i don't like? cold bedrooms. it is a big argument. well but as long as you have a warm bed, it doesn't matter. it is cold when you get into it. that's the problem. and it's going to get colder. it has been very cold over the last few days and you have been sending your photos and videos in. who is that? somebody who has been enjoying the snow. but everybody, maybe. this is
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bridlington. the snow came down and people were enjoying it. that is in brighton for us. good morning from the royal pavilion in brighton. we have managed to stay on our feet. it is called in brighton this morning, with the ice underfoot. wintry conditions yesterday, especially in eastern england. frost elsewhere. there is a change on the way. we may be at the start of the meteorological winter, by temperatures are on the up in the next few days. into this weekend it turns cloudy and mild in parts of the country, but of course you start to lose the sunshine with had over the last few days. still sunshine this morning. cloud thickens up. the rest of scotland, frosty. down across the eastern counties of england, outbreaks of rain coming
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and going. a bit of sleet and snow over high ground force of turning mainly back to rain. over the next few hours it could be icy in a couple of spots after the sleet and snow of yesterday. the wind is not as strong as yesterday, but still blustery in eastern areas. in the west, a frosty and lovely staff are many and not a bad start for northern ireland. overnight it will start to cloud over as we go through the day. for the rest of the day northern ireland, scotland and later northern england, louder round increases from the north. still sunshine here and there, especially the east of high ground. showers in eastern england start to fade. maybe confined to the coasts, especially for sussex, six and kent. still windy, but not as windy as yesterday. with less wind it means it won't feel quite as chilly, but still temperatures down on where they should be. into this evenly and overnight, cloud in the northern
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half will move southwards. this will bring patchy rain, namely inner west. —— mainly in the west. there is the risk of temperatures dropping close enough to freezing. a touch of ice around. still be wary if you have clear skies overhead as it could be frosty tomorrow. but there isa could be frosty tomorrow. but there is a change on the way. more cloud on saturday uk wide. patchy rain in southern parts of wales and southern england to begin with. heavy bursts at times. farfrom a england to begin with. heavy bursts at times. far from a washout. dry weather for many at times. the best of any breaks in east of high —— over high ground. sunday will be a brighter day than saturday. any light rain or drizzle will remain to the west. the best of any sunny brea ks to the west. the best of any sunny breaks to the east of high ground and temperatures up to about 11 degrees at best. i still need a
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little bit of skating practice, but so far so good. let's hope that changes before the end of the programme! i thought you would like that, yes. see you later. we've been rather lucky this morning as we've been invited into piper hill high school, a special school. it's all part of our special series this week, looking at pupils who have special educational needs. we've been taking a look at the idea of communication and how to make that easierfor children of communication and how to make that easier for children who do have special educational needs. good morning, jayne. good morning. is there anybody in particular you want to say good morning to? i want to say good morning to? i want to say good morning to? i want to say good morning to my friends at tesco, if anyone can hear me! good morning.” think that's an advert. i don't think that's an advert. i don't think you can do that, but we will
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let you. we are down here and it's a special day because what's the name of today? butty day. today they all make them and it's a very special day. what is the one killer secret ingredient for any sandwich? salt and vinegar crisps. these are the information strips that helped them know exactly what to do with the savages. and look at this. they know exactly what will happen. —— savages. what we are learning today isa savages. what we are learning today is a bit more serious. 1.4 million children in the uk have speech and communications issues. report given to us exclusively today has new figures. report is by a royal and communication charity and they say there is not enough access for children out there. harry is happy and helpful,
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but with profound autism he struggles to communicate. despite being twice assessed as having a problem, he has never been under the treatment of an nhs speech and language therapist. you have pushed and pushed to see somebody, haven't you? pushed and pushed. we have a multiagency meeting every 12 weeks for harry. each time we've attended there is never a speech therapist, whereas a speech therapist, could she attend the next one? the same thing has happened for 18 months. rather than therapy for harry, the nhs has offered jane training, which they tell me can be very beneficial. she now pays for private therapy. i'm in a good position because i'm able to do that, but a lot of people say they can't. here at this school in birmingham they also feel badly let down. a5 class starts, the teacher tries to hold their attention.
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a bit more interested in our camera! most are eventually able to follow the song and join in the actions. but some really struggle. notjust to speak but to pay attention, to understand, to follow instructions, all part of a speech, language and communication need. it's frustrating for us because we get children and you almost feel they've been written off because sometimes parents have already noticed there is a problem and they've tried to get help, they've gone to doctors and nothing has happened. this is why the school brought in diana. she was part of a speech and language team in the nhs before being laid off with a number of colleagues five years ago. developing children's speech and language is not a target, like cancer or heart or diabetes. if you don't get the speech and language right, what else goes wrong? you don't learn to read and write. ten years ago, the government commissioned a report which flagged up problems here and led to promises to deliver better services
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for children like zacharia. better watch that! the department of health says there are around 160 more therapies today and the government has an extra £2 million into therapy. but look at this from a recent ofsted and qc due report. and today a new survey finds only 15% of parents and therapist believe there are enough services in their area. they say this will have consequences. data shows that over 60% at least have communication difficulties in the youth justice system, but name any vulnerable group of children, children in the looked after system, with mental health issues, children that are excluded or on the fringe of the excluded, and the youth justice system, the majority all have communication difficulties. communication underpins everything, from reading and writing to making friends and making a future. get it wrong and many
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kids will flounder. so serious, but we all know that resources a re really so serious, but we all know that resources are really stretched on the nhs. there are huge increases in demand for everything and there's quite a struggle to try to get the right of therapy is out there, to recruit them. meet my new best friend, joe. what's on the menu? we've got fla pjacks, friend, joe. what's on the menu? we've got flapjacks, home—made carrot ca ke we've got flapjacks, home—made carrot cake and home—made granola! all of this and the drink down at the bottom in a minute. i want to introduce you to the deputy heads. louise and adele. tell me, there's a really serious point to the business end of this. these help to support and develop our students' skills for life and living and promote independence. it's all about
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independence. it's all about independence and learning and also about trying to get independence and find ajob, about trying to get independence and find a job, because everybody gets work experience. it's very personalised, so for students it could be internal in school, in the office, all with local businesses. fantastic. and they don't get paid for the work experience, however, butty business friday? all of the staff have to pay for their sandwiches and then the money goes to the guys and they can choose what to the guys and they can choose what to do with the profits, like go on a day trip. we need to hear about how this money is spent. what's it going to be on? it's going to be on trips in a couple of weeks, like going to the cinema and that. and let'sjust go and see the other two. we've got 30 sandwiches to make. what are you going to spend your wages on? bowling! bowling, fantastic. i know
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you are very excited about this trip to? going out. going to wear? a meal? can i come? they do look convinced. from us, back to you. we've had enormous amounts of interest in this series throughout the week, but ijust want interest in this series throughout the week, but i just want to share... sophie has said, i think that school you are out today is amazing. it doesn't pay much, it's a ha rd amazing. it doesn't pay much, it's a hard job, people do it for the love of it. people are full of praise for the staff and i know this is just one place. it absolutely is. you can't hear but there's a whole army of cheerleaders out there, writing in two—hour programme right now, saying, you quys programme right now, saying, you guys rock. amazing! also the staff as well. you do a greatjob. do you
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wa nt to as well. you do a greatjob. do you want to say something?” as well. you do a greatjob. do you want to say something? i want to say thanks everyone for cheerleading as! -- us! i love it. absolutely fantastic. thank you for having us. lovely. a special thank you tojoe. a natural! is been hearing the comments. thanks for getting in touch and keep doing it. if you'd like to get in touch with us about your stories, email bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a 17—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death of teenagerjason issacs in northolt earlier this month. the boy was arrested yesterday and taken to a west london police station, where he remains in custody. 18—year—old jason was fatally stabbed nearly two weeks ago. the police continue
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to appeal for witnesses. today is world aids day and a new collaboration has been launched in the capital to tackle hiv in an area with some of the highest levels of infection. the eltonjohn aids foundation will partner with lambeth, southwark and lewisham councils and the nhs to try to reduce hiv transmission in south—east london. our government has just gone through a period of heavy austerity. the nhs is a strained resource and we've proven to them and taken them an economic model that says if we invest in undetected hiv now it actually saves the nhs money in the long run. so we're bringing investment in up front to look after the costs of doing that and want someone is on treatment and we've protected them it benefits the pay—out much more. boroughs across the capital have until mid—day today to bid for the mayor's london borough of culture competition. two winning areas to be selected by sadiq khan will be announced in february next year. one will take up the title in 2019 and the other in 2020.
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they'll each receive more than one million worth of funding. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a relatively good service on the tubes this morning with just the central line having minor delays between white city a west ruislip. on the 8040 there are queues out of town towards the polish war memorial, following a collision. there are queues on the m25 clockwise towards qe2 bridge, following a collision nearjunction 30 for lakeside. in the city, cannon street is closed outside cannon street station because of a gas leak. that's causing delays between monument and bank. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we are now into december, it's the first day of the meteorological winter. but ironically it's not going to feel as cold as it did yesterday, but still a chilly feeling day. we've still got that northerly wind. there will be some brightness and sunshine around at times and temperatures to start the morning are above freezing across the board.
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some early showers around. just the small chance of wintriness on high ground first thing. but all of this will fall as rain. showers fade in the afternoon. brightness and sunshine emerging. top temperatures between 5—7 celsius. the northerly wind will ease through the day, so not feeling quite so cold. temperatures will dip away quite readily at first. we'll see lows of 2—3 celsius overnight, but then we start to see milder air and perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle coming through. that's a warm front, so it will drag with it some milder air. but it will take some time for us to feel the benefit of this tomorrow. there will be a westerly wind, perhaps a few outbreaks of drizzle, but otherwise mostly dry. an awful lot of cloud around. it will feel quite damp and quite cold for much of the day tomorrow. by the time we get to sunday there should be more in the way of brightness and we have highs of 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a former detective tells the bbc he was "shocked" by the amount of pornography viewed on a computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. the technology specialist says he has no doubt that the images found on damian green's parliamentary computer in 2008 had been accessed by the minister himself — despite mr green's denials. good morning, it's friday 1st december. also this morning... news of some changes on the high street. the royal bank of scotland has announced it is to close 259 branches, affecting almost 700 jobs. i'll have all the details, shortly. the first official engagement for prince harry and meghan markle as a couple since they announced their plans to get married. to mark the end of our amazing week about special educational needs, i'm at piper hill high
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in manchester. iam i am with isabella and jess, and alsojosh. i i am with isabella and jess, and also josh. i know i am with isabella and jess, and alsojosh. i know you love working withjosh, alsojosh. i know you love working with josh, the alsojosh. i know you love working withjosh, the classroom assistant. what do you read to him? the cat in the hat! this is an amazing school, we are investigating what it means to the pupils, we will see why it is the same in lots of ways but different in others. when you asked me to join you on the programme i did not know i would be talking! we are in the forest school area, comeback after 8am and we will talk about what makes this place so unique. in sport, its the day of destiny for 32 nations, who'll discover, who and where they'll play, at next summer's world cup finals in russia — england are not one
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of the top seeds, and so could draw, the likes of brazil, argentina and germany. and matt has the weather. it is the start of the meteorological winter so i'm on the ice here in brighton but, if anything, things will get my other this weekend. the full forecast in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story... a former scotland yard detective has told bbc news he was "shocked" by the amount of pornography on a parliamentary computer seized from the office of the first secretary of state, damian green. mr green has denied looking at pornography at work. neil lewis, a computerforensics specialist, examined the device during an inquiry into government leaks in 2008. he's now retired, and he spoke to our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. how can you be sure that it was damian green who was accessing that pornography? there's a phrase, you can't put fingers on a keyboard. so i can't say that. but the computer was in mr green's office, on his desk. logged in, it's his
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account, his name. in between browsing pornography, he was sending emails from his account, his personal account. reading documents, writing documents. danny shawjoins us now from our london newsroom. danny, what more can you tell us? neil that this was an officer working on the counter terrorism command at the time of the inquiry. you have to remember this was about lea ks you have to remember this was about leaks from the home office, he was not looking for pornography, he was examining damian green's computers to look for evidence about the leaks and he came across these thousands of images, he says, thumbnail images of images, he says, thumbnail images of pornographic material and lots of website browsing of pornography. he said on sunday's pornography was being browsed, surged for all looked at for several hours and he checked
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over a three—month period and it was extensive, the amount of pornography that had been viewed on damian green's parliamentary computer. he claims there was similar computer on mr green's parliamentary issued la ptop on mr green's parliamentary issued laptop as well. what information is there about who was accessing this pornography? you heard him there said he cannot definitively prove that it was damian green, and that in a court of law, when barristers try to get you to say that coming he cannot say that with 100% certainty. but looking at the patterns of usage, in his opinion, it points towards damian green. mrgreen his opinion, it points towards damian green. mr green has vehemently denied the allegation, he is claiming he did not put pornography on his work computers or look at pornography on his work computers, that is what he has stuck with over the past few weeks since these allegations emerged. thank you very much. health inspectors have ordered
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a review of all nhs radiology services in england, after a hospital in portsmouth failed to spot three cases of lung cancer. the investigation by the care quality commission also found that 20,000 chest scans had not been assessed correctly at the queen alexandra hospital. the trust has apologised to the families affected. mark lobel reports. an alarming backlog of unchecked medical scans has been found at the queen alexandra hospital in portsmouth by the health services regulator, after a member of the public raised concerns. the care quality commission found between 1st april 2016 and 31st march this year, 26,345 chest x—rays and 2,167 abdomen x—rays had not been formally reviewed by a radiologist or an appropriately trained clinician. some had been checked — but byjunior doctors, who complained that they had been asked to do so without
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appropriate training. in some cases where x—rays had been declared clear, radiologists went on to spot cancer on later scans. in a statement, the care quality commission said: portsmouth nhs trust said: the health regulator has now written to all trusts in england to build up a national picture of how quickly patients' x—rays are viewed. but tackling the problem will be tough. experts have warned of a desperate shortage of radiologists across the country. the government points to an increase of radiologists undergoing training and a 10% rise in the number of
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diagnostic radiographers since 2010. survivors and those who lost loved ones in the grenfell fire say the public inquiry into the disaster will be a whitewash unless a diverse panel is appointed to oversee the proceedings. the government says the process is ongoing, but campaigners are urging the prime minister to intervene, and say the chairman, sir martin moore—bick, should sit with a range of people who understand the issues facing those affected by the disaster. the argentine navy has abandoned efforts to rescue the 44 crew members of a submarine that disappeared two weeks ago. thousands of people have been involved in the search for the sanjuan, covering a 40,000 square kilometre area of the south atlantic. the authorities say they will still try to locate the wreckage. a developing story this morning — royal bank of scotland is to close some of its branches. sean's here with more. branch closures is not a new thing but it seems to be never—ending, royal bank of scotland saying nearly 260 branches across the network. if
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you break that down, that is a quarter of their branches in scotla nd quarter of their branches in scotland will be closed as part of the announcement, a quarter of their remaining branches, quite a big hit for scottish branches. 62 are rbs, 197 of those branches are at natwest, which are around england and wales, that is owned by the royal bank of scotland. rbs are basically saying it is because they are continuing to see fewer customers use branches, down 40% since 2014, and way more mobile phone transactions being made, up 73% in the same period. we have spoken about how important they are, banks, to the strength of community and many people using it in terms ofjust personal interaction and feeling more co mforta ble interaction and feeling more comfortable with the traditional ways of banking. particularly for big financial decisions you might have to make, later in life those bigger financial decisions you are making about where
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you put your money might be more pertinent as well, so the post office in theory can provide a lot office in theory can provide a lot of services if you still have one in your village or town, but if you don't, we are getting onto these mobile banking trucks and lorries that we see going around to different villages that people start using but that is a very different way of banking to what we used to previously. we should add as well 680 jobs under threat here, rbs hoping there will not be compulsory redundancies but it remains to be seen. and the staff have been told that? the staff have been made aware. thanks very much. prince harry and meghan markle will carry out their firstjoint royal engagements later, just days after announcing that they're to marry in the spring. they will visit a number of charities in nottingham, as our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. it was only on monday that prince harry introduced the american actress meghan markle as his new fiancee. this photo call was held in the controlled environment of the garden at kensington palace,
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but m5 markle made it clear in the subsequent interview that she was keen to get out and about and meet the british public. in these beginning few months and now being boots on the ground in the uk, i'm excited to just really get to know more about the different communities here, smaller organisations, we're working on the same causes i've always been passionate about under this umbrella. and also being able to go around the commonwealth, i think it'sjust the beginning... there's a lot to do. their first engagement together will highlight an issue prince harry has become a prominent campaigner on behalf of — aids and hiv awareness. they will then visit nottingham academy. through the royal foundation he has supported full effect, a programme which is attempting to tackle youth crime. this was prince harry meeting the public in nottingham earlier this year. according to his spokesman, it's a community which has become very special to him and one that he's looking forward to introducing to his new fiancee.
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born and raised in california, meghan markle has already agreed to make the uk her home, and the people of nottingham will be the first to publicly welcome her. sarah campbell, bbc news. sport and weather coming up shortly. a return of border checks between northern ireland and the republic is inevitable after brexit, according to a group of mp5. the commons' exiting the eu committee says that if the uk pulls out of the single market and customs union, it will be impossible to maintain a frictionless border. the committee's chairman, the labour mp hilary benn, joins us now from westminster. why would it be impossible, in the simplest sense, technology is advancing, could there not be a electronic border? it seems to work at the moment. on the 200 crossing points between the republic of
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ireland and northern ireland, goods flow freely at the moment, there is no infrastructure because we are pa rt no infrastructure because we are part of the european union, the customs union, the single market. what we have said is currently we don't see how it will be possible to reconcile on one hand the object of the government has set out that there should be no border and no physical infrastructure after we leave, an objective that we all support and share, including the government of the republic of ireland, and on the other hand the has reached to leave the customs union and the single market, because it will then become the border between the united kingdom and the other 27 member states of the european union. you are right, the government has suggested that technology might provide the answer, at the moment, however, the government admits its proposals are u ntested government admits its proposals are untested and, crucially, the republic of ireland, which will be on the other side of the border, is not convinced that that can deliver
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the no hard border, no infrastructure aim that everybody shares and that is why, as a committee today, we have called on the government to set out in more detail how exactly it thinks this can be made to work, because there does seem to be a conflict between the two things at the moment. can you explain the committee's breakdown in terms of you, you campaign to remain in the eu ahead of the referendum, how it breaks down in terms of what the agenda is? is the aim to facilitate the government's negotiations over brexit, or is it to throw up challenges? ourjob as a select committee is to scrutinise the process of brexit, the workings of parliament for exiting the european union, to listen to the evidence and produce reports and make recommendations. we are doing our job. this is the most challenging process that this country has been through certainly since the end of the second world war over 44 years
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we have built up a relationship with our friends we have built up a relationship with ourfriends and we have built up a relationship with our friends and neighbours we have built up a relationship with ourfriends and neighbours in we have built up a relationship with our friends and neighbours in terms of law, trade, movement of people, and all other things, and it is, unsurprisingly, a complex and difficult process. i said at the very first meeting of the committee, it doesn't matter whether anyone voted remain or leave, the decision was made by the british people in june 2016, have a job now is to look at what is happening and to offer advice and recommendations, and that is what we have done today in producing ourfirst is what we have done today in producing our first report on the negotiations, which covers notjust the question of the border between northern ireland and the republic, called on the government, if we do move onto phase two of talks later this month, which we hope very much we will, the government needs to set out with greater clarity what this new deep and special partnership it wants us
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to have with the european union is going to consist of. we also want the government to be clearer about how a transitional arrangement period is going to operate, because businesses need to know where they are going to stand after the end of march 2019, which is when we will leave the institutions of the european union, so we are doing our job, which we have been set up to do. the reason i ask, this is obviously a matter that has been given a deadline, it is a process thatis given a deadline, it is a process that is extensive, and it appears, for example you have asked ministers to publish a white paper on the transition period. it appears some of the things you are bringing up our slowing down the process.” don't accept that at all. it has taken time for the government in some cases to adopt its policy positions because, let's be honest, there have been differences of view within the government about the approach that should be taken. but we are all working to a ticking clock. i think asking the government to set out with greater clarity how a transitional period is going to
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work, for example, is not about slowing things down, it is about trying to give reassurances to businesses, some of which, as you know, are making contingency arrangements because they need to guard against the possibility that we might end up with no deal. we also say in today's report that we agree with the chancellor of the exchequer that leaving with no deal would be a very, very bad outcome for the united kingdom. and that, i think, is self—evidently the case. so, in saying to the government that greater clarity is needed, that is an effort to move things on because it is uncertainty, as i'm sure you appreciate, which is the biggest problem we face at the moment because there are lots of people in their jobs, because there are lots of people in theirjobs, work, industries, the service sector, four fifths of the british economy, sitting there saying, we know how things work today but we are not sure how things will work after march 2019 and how it will operate in the transition period, and that is why as much
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clarity as possible is required and thatis clarity as possible is required and that is what the committee is encouraging the government to provide. the bbc have spoken to a former scotla nd the bbc have spoken to a former scotland yard detective who said he was shocked by the amount of pornography found on the work computer of damian green. this evidence has been put forward and spoken too to the bbc. do you think mrgreen spoken too to the bbc. do you think mr green should resign?” spoken too to the bbc. do you think mr green should resign? i think if anyone has evidence in connection with the inquiry the cabinet office is currently undertaking, that evidence should be provided to the inquiry. i don't think it's right for any of us to prejudge its outcome. there is a process, we should allow that process to reach its conclusion. i am sure we want to see that dumb as soon as possible, but since that inquiry is taking place, i'm not going to comment on that. —— place, i'm not going to comment on that. -- it place, i'm not going to comment on that. —— it should be done as soon as per the looks. hilary benn, thank you forjoining us.
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who would like to see a dog frolicking in the snow? truffle the dog from york, who played in it for the first time. brilliant. who would like to see a weather presenter skating on ice and falling over presenting the weather? definitely not me! i am always last in the queue. good morning. i am at the royal pavilion in brighton, on ice of course, because it is the start of the meteorological winter. 1st of december, first day of advent as well. ice rinks are popping up happened on the country. this one, you can't argue with the setting. it is here until the 14th of january. i argue with the setting. it is here until the 14th ofjanuary. i have been looking the forecast for the winter, the next few months from the met office. it looks like the first half of winter will be a bit colder than the second half but there is a
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long way to go and we will keep you updated bbc breakfast. a cold start to winter and things are set to change over the next few days. let's take a look at the forecast. this weekend it tends notjust cloudy but my order as well. the first weekend it tends notjust cloudy but my order as well. the first signs weekend it tends notjust cloudy but my order as well. the first signs of thatis my order as well. the first signs of that is this morning in northern scotland, some patchy rain pushing in. the rest of scotland, a frosty start but funny. a sunny star in north—west england as well. to the east of the pennines in eastern england, some showers around. not quite as snowy as yesterday. a little bit of sleet and snow on higher ground. beware in the next hour or higher ground. beware in the next hourorso, it higher ground. beware in the next hour or so, it could be icy. the wind is not as strong as yesterday. very blowy in east anglia and the south—east this morning adding to the jail, but in the west winds are lighter and other than an isolated shower most should have a fine, sunny winter's day. northern ireland starting funny and frosty. the best of the sunshine for you will be this
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morning. cloudy as we go through the day and with it the chance of some patchy light rain or drizzle. that may make it to north—west england by the time we hit the late afternoon, evening. showers in eastern areas will gradually become confined to the coast, particularly east anglia and these. still windy here, elsewhere the wind slighter, not quite as chilly as yesterday, even though temperatures down on where they should be for the time year. still cold out there. with clear skies to begin this evening and overnight across england and wales in particular, this is where we are likely to see a frost. cloud increasing in the north, temperatures will rise but any brea ks temperatures will rise but any breaks in the cloud and temperatures could drop below freezing. some patchy rain and drizzle working southwards, so still the chance of some iciness into the start of saturday morning. not as chilly as the past few mornings, certainly in scotla nd the past few mornings, certainly in scotland and northern ireland. saturday, fairly cloudy, some patchy
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light rain and drizzle, mainly in the west and the top and tail of the country, the heaviest of the rain will be in scotland. not a wash—out, some dry weather as well. much milder across scotland and northern ireland for tomorrow. still a bit chilly, though, to the south and east of england. the milder will be with us on sunday. quite a bit of cloud to begin with, some patchy rain in the west but most will have a dry day on sunday and compared to saturday, a little bit brighter. once the brightness breaks through the cloud, temperatures up to 10—11. it looks like the milder air coming off the atlantic will continue with us into the start of next week as well. but certainly at the moment got my a cold enough start to the first meteorological day of winter, and an enjoyable start with a weather man still on his feet! so disappointing. someone is upset with you, brendan in bold has e—mailed us. please no more confusion in
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telling people winter starts today. he says it starts on the 21st of december. that is why i have always mentioned is the meteorological start. a5 whether folk we compare the seasons in three—month chunks which helps us compare data. to be honest, in my opinion, it is nature that tells us when the season starts rather than a particular day. and in the last few days, it has felt like winter! october, that's when it started. laughter thank you. it does look chilly. let's go from a chilly matt to a lovely roaring fire out in the open with marshmallows being roasted. we have been lucky enough to invited to a school this morning in wythenshawe. all part of our series this week looking at children with special educational needs. nikki is there warming herself by the fire for us. yes, normally i am
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permanently frozen, even in the summer but i'm keeping lovely and toasty by the fire, toasting marshmallows. a couple have gone up in flames but we have put them out, it's all fine! this has to be about the caller school i have ever been in my life. i don't know if you can cb hyndman, but they've got some fantastic ports where the pupils stay overnight. —— i don't know if you can see behind me. i would show you can see behind me. i would show you around but i don't trust you my driving skills and there is a fire. we have some of the young people here that go to private hill high. we have been having a little chat, will you tell me why this place is so special? you have camped here overnight, haven't you ? so special? you have camped here overnight, haven't you? do you like it, what did you like about the pods? yeah, overnight. what kind of
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stuff do you enjoy doing in the pods, do you like the fire? make the fire, cooking marshmallows. who doesn't love that?! do you have lots of friends? yes. it's like having cool sleepovers. fun times. daniel, hello. daniel, what sort of stuff do you do here? what do you enjoy?” enjoy the fire. how do you make the fire? you actually liked it? light a flint. flint. that is a very impressive. i've seen i'm a celebrity and they can't do that there! were other stuff do you like doing? building the hammocks. building the hammocks. this is the coolest place! you are far too young
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for this, daniel, but coolest place! you are far too young forthis, daniel, but what coolest place! you are far too young for this, daniel, but what do you wa nt to for this, daniel, but what do you want to do when you get older?l chef. are you going to cook me some brea kfast later chef. are you going to cook me some breakfast later on? lovely speaking to you. sian you are the assistant head, why do you need places like this? it's a great opportunity for our students to have access to educational experiences and also work on their social skills and develop their life skills. with having a forest school area, it gives the opportunity to use their skills they have learned in the classroom and apply it to the outdoor world. a really unique place. i imagine a lot of parents with children would love their kids to go somewhere like this, a mix of the curriculum but also activities like staying over in the heart. yes, parents have been fabulous, we have parents have been fabulous, we have parents that he, the pdsa, we try to make sure it's notjust about the students but their families as well. it has been a really positive
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experience for us. thank you. i think i am going to set up a hammock and have a little goes, i was up 4am! back to you. at least get marshmallows, come on, don't complain nikki, it's all good.” know, i'm not. i'm going to start eating those soon. they get hot soon, be careful! louise is there with nikki and they will be talking about communication, how important it is. they have special rooms, jane has been in a sensory room which is a lot of the pupils understand how to communicate and also be calm often in a busy world. lots of people getting in touch this morning, not only talking about the staff, people talking about the staff, people talking about the staff and a lot of praise for them but we met some real characters down there. more from louisa lytton later on this morning. time to get the news weather and travel weight you are, see you soon. today marks the first day of
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meteorological winter and ironically it is going to be less colborne it has been over the last few days. this area of high pressure has been with us but while we had northerly wind this week, today we have wind coming in from the north and the west, so that is a less cold direction and this morning while we have a few wintry showers and ice in the north—east, those showers will fade away and for many others it will be dry into this afternoon. across scotland, the cloud will increase this afternoon and with that some rain moving in with temperatures around four or 5
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degrees. bitter rain for northern ireland, much of england and wales will be dry with bright spells. still a few rain showers across parts of lincolnshire, into the east midlands, down towards the south—east of england. away from that there will be some sunshine and temperatures just a few degrees higher than they were yesterday. tonight we will continue with this cloud, which will trickle further south, and with it some outbreaks of rain moving towards the south, largely frost free tonight because of the cloud, less cold air moving m, of the cloud, less cold air moving in, temperatures no lower than about three to 6 degrees. so it is going to bea three to 6 degrees. so it is going to be a milder weekend, it is going to be a milder weekend, it is going to be a milder weekend, it is going to be cloudier, and there will be a little bit of rain around as we go through saturday and sunday. so here is saturday, then. some patchy rain across southern areas, more in the way of rain coming in towards scotla nd way of rain coming in towards scotland and northern ireland. there will be a few breaks in the cloud here and there but, overall, it will be mostly cloudy and temperatures up
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to about seven or eight celsius, just coming up to where they should be for the time of year. sunday is fairly similar, again there will be lots of cloud, a few breaks developing in the cloud from time to time, temperatures across the south getting up to ten or 11 degrees. more detail on the website, that is all from me, goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and david eades. america edges closer to massive tax reforms, but will they really deliver president trump's promised boost to the world's biggest economy? live from london, that's our top story on friday 1st december. as the president lights up the christmas tree,
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he's hoping senators give him the gift he wants — but can the us really afford the biggest tax changes in a generation? also in the programme... the world's largest lithium ion battery gets up—and—running

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