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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  December 5, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted" in relation to manchester, he also commented that it is conceivable that the attack might have been averted had the cards fall indifferently. brexit impasse — pressure on theresa may to find out what went wrong yesterday — and fix it. in the commons... still some optimism. as was made clear by this statement yesterday, all parties remain confident of reaching a positive conclusion by the end of the week. mr speaker, what an embarrassment. the last 24 hours have given a new meaning to the term coalition of chaos. a warning for parents — the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders.
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coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with jessica. england's cricketers are dreaming the impossible dream after the penultimate day of the second ashes test against australia. england's bowlers performed, and the batsmen are within reach of an historic turn around. more at half—past. we have got the weather as well. storm caroline has been named by the met office. it will bring us some wet and windy disruptive weather through the middle of the week, then it is a return to winter. i will bring you all the details through the afternoon. also coming up. a new clinical trial that doctors are calling ‘a watershed moment'. we'll have the test results which bring fresh hope for millions of people with type 2 diabetes. hello everyone.
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this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. we will have plenty more with that mis we will have plenty more with that mi5 report coming out. first we will go to the house of commons. mi5 report coming out. first we will go to the house of commonsm mi5 report coming out. first we will go to the house of commons. it was unacceptable in its current form. her majesty ‘s government understands the de u p position and we understand in the aftermath of yesterday. the prime minister said there will be no border in the irish sea. she has made it clear the uk is leaving the european union as a whole and the integrity of the united kingdom will be protected. we wa nt to united kingdom will be protected. we want to see a sensible brexit. we will work through the details today and in the coming days with the
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government. these issues are of vital importance to our nation as a whole, that we must work as long as necessary to make sure they got right. the dup does stand strong for the union. by continuing its aggressive stance, they are in danger of delivering for themselves the very outcomes that they say they wa nt to the very outcomes that they say they want to avoid. so no more than ever it is clear that we took the correct view in encouraging people throughout the united kingdom to vote to leave the european union. we will take a few questions. would you be willing to see the deal fail, would you walk away? we are not in the business of issuing any instructions to anybody. we do not wa nt to instructions to anybody. we do not want to see the talks fail and we do not want to see a situation where there is no deal. we want to see a sensible brexit, we will work through the clear red lives that we
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have set down. they are the red lives of the government as well. a sensible brexit where the uk leaves as one nation with a sensible relationship with the rest of the eu, with a soft order in the island of ireland, which can be done on the basis set out in the government paper set out in august. but we have to move in a progressive way and we will work constructively to that end. are you risking losing all? this is a negotiation between the united kingdom government and the european commission. the european commission unfortunately and maybe to the regret to the other member states seeded a veto to the irish republic. that is a matter they will maybe need to be consider. we are confident about where we stand and we are confident that the british government understands that when you translate red lines into text, the text has got to reflect what is the red lines. brexit is not a done
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deal! if the government were to persist with the eu, of reintroducing a border in northern ireland, would you be prepared to turn up the pack that keeps them in power? i do not think the government will consider that. i do not think they will go down the route of trying to impose something that would in our view disrupt politically or economically northern ireland from the rest of the united kingdom. so i do not think that scenario will arise. do you regard them sensible? we continue to work with the government. we have very good discussions with them. as i see, text is important, words are
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important, they really do matter. so when we finally see text, that is when we finally see text, that is when we finally see text, that is when we make the final decision. the text we were shown late yesterday morning did not translate what we had been told in general conversations into reality because there was far too much ambiguity and didn't actually kneel down the issues that need to be nailed down. northern ireland already has a single energy markets with the irish republic saw there are areas where we can cooperate with the irish republic and will it make sense to have some kind of regulatory alignment, in certain specific areas. but not in relation to the following the rules of the single market by the customs union for northern ireland. the fact of the matter is this whole issue of the
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whole divergences of regulatory alignment has been brought in by the irish republic. the factors there we re irish republic. the factors there were sensible and are sensible ways of dealing with the irish border which do not involve that through technology, and trusted trainer status and exemption. the eu has said no to that. it is the eu that is causing the problems in terms of oui’ is causing the problems in terms of our border in ireland, not the dvr oi’ our border in ireland, not the dvr or british government. there are sensible ways around that and they should continue to be explored. —— the dup. would you be astonished? i have learned not to be astonished about anything in politics any more. what did you see that now the dup... the dup does not have any veto. the irish republic does have a veto, they are uncomfortable with that veto because they keep trying to say it is not veto, it is the eu. it is
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clear the eu have given a veto to the irish republic, they are flexing their muscles and using their position to try to gain winds were them. i don't argue with their desire to advance their interests, but they are doing so in a reckless way that is putting at risk years of good angle irish relations. —— anglo irish. there is a tone of aggression from the irish republic with the current administration. they are the ones in danger of bringing about problems with the use of a veto, not us. problems with the use of a veto, not us. the text that you received yesterday morning, did the government change it? the government have been clear about the red lines. we talk to them and we have been clear to them and then clear to us. but as i have said previously, what
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matters is the text, the words that are used in text and an international treaties and agreements. it is vitally important that text translates accurate. when we negotiated the agreement and other agreements, that has been a key test. we have sought to engage the government on that text. the government showed us that text late yesterday morning. so the deputy leader of the dup says avoiding a soft order in ireland can be achieved as those brexit negotiations continue. they are scheduled to return to the negotiating table later this week, according to david davis in the commons. we will return to the issue of brexit a little later on. now to oui’ of brexit a little later on. now to our main story. it's emerged that mi5 and the police had opportunities to prevent
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the attack on the manchester arena this year, in which 23 people were killed. a review of the atrocity by the leading qc david anderson, has concluded that it is "conceivable the attack might have been avoided had the cards fallen differently". his report also says security services were closing mr anderson's report also looked into this year's attacks in london. london bridge, one of the perpetrators was a prime suspect and they had a lot of surveillance on them. it is not easy to say they made mistakes but they did not pick up made mistakes but they did not pick up the planning that happened shortly before the attack. there we re shortly before the attack. there were a couple of people that were not on the radar. manchester, they had a young man, salman abedi, who they had no reason to be suspicious of, though he did have some bad associates. despite that they got quake will stem, they had peripheral vision of what he was perhaps thinking and planning. but at the end of the day they were too late.
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they had a meeting scheduled a few days after the attack to decide what should be done about this man. by that time it was too late. in the past half hour, the home secretary, amber rudd, has been giving a statement on the anderson report in the commons. based on the mis and police reviews, david and simpson explains that in the case of the westminster attack, massoud was a closed interest. they had no reason to anticipate the attack. regarding the manchester arena attack, salman abedi was also a close subject of interest at the time of the attack. and so not under active investigation. in early 2017, mis active investigation. in early 2017, mi5 nonetheless active investigation. in early 2017, m15 nonetheless received intelligence on him which was assessed as not being related to terrorism. in retrospect, the intelligence can be seen to be
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highly relevant. had an investigation be reopened at the time, it cannot be known whether salman abedi's plans could have been stopped. m15 assessed that it would have been unlikely. responding for a labourer, diane abbott said the report highlights the need for a more sub —— resources for the police and security services. as we have said, you cannot keep people safe on the cheap. she talks about ensuring that counterterrorism policing has the resources it needs, but though she accept the part in david anderson's report where he notes that counterterrorism in bid —— into two profiles sees a reduction of 7.296 in two profiles sees a reduction of 7.2% in their budgets. and though she agreed with david anderson when
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he talks about the reliance of m15 and counterterrorism on community policing? that was diane abbott. looking at the manchester attack which seems to be the one this is focused on, because that suggestion that it could have been prevented, had the cards fall in the right way, is good to make a lot of headlines. it isa is good to make a lot of headlines. it is a poignant story. salman abedi kept beeping up on m15 radars. but not for good reasons. one was a case of mistaken identity. then there we re of mistaken identity. then there were these two bits of intelligence that came in months before the attack which were assessed as criminal rather than terrorism. but if by chance m15 has said, we better have a look at it anyway, then that is the opportunity there was to have watched more closely. in retrospect that was stuff that seems to be very
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releva nt to that was stuff that seems to be very relevant to the manchester attack. then there is also this data washing exercise. they were going former subjects of interest, trying to look at who they should look at, his name came up in a short list of have a dozen that they should look at again, but the meeting was scheduled for nine days after the attack. it isa for nine days after the attack. it is a poignant story. it is like a goalkeeper who gets his hand on the ball and somehow is still trickles across the line. hindsight is a wonderful thing. does that look like a mistake was made? certainly mis‘s on assessment is that they think we did not make a serious mistake, but evenif did not make a serious mistake, but even if they got there, they would not necessarily have seen what he was up to. their assessment is that they did not make a mistake. and anyway, it probably wouldn't have stop the attack. but for outsiders, whether it is a mistake not, it has
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this terrible feeling that maybe it could have been stopped. we're not talking about an incident when one or two people died, 22 people died. and some of them children at a concert. it was the most horrendous attack. we just feel there were so close. it also looks at the london bridge attack. what does that say about that? that is a different story. here is a man that came to their attention two years ago. as a man he was aspired to attack the uk. the operation set up was to investigate him. as they looked at him more, it looked like he might be travelling to syria radicalise young kids ina travelling to syria radicalise young kids in a school where he was teaching, so they focus moved off. but although he was still an active subject of interest, what they didn't see was a man who had got together with two associates, gone out and bought knives at the local widow, and then had hired a van to
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mow down people on london bridge. it is the kind of missed opportunity, but ina is the kind of missed opportunity, but in a different way. this was one 939 but in a different way. this was one gag at one point they thought was going to attack the uk, and then he sort of did under their noses. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted" ministers say no part of the uk will be treated differently in the brexit talks as labour branded their approach an "embarrassment." a warning for parents — the growing use of live,
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online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. in a moment... england could be a doubt for the six nations after fracturing his job playing precise and is at the weekend. i will be back with more understudies after half—past. this time yesterday it looked as though a breakthrough on brexit was imminent. 24 hours later — well, there's confusion to say the least. so — in an unusual approach — i'm just going to quote from the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg who wrote this on twitter. she says... this is the rough version of what's happening today... uk govt — says it will all be fine. dublin — says we can't budge. dup — says we won't budge the eu — says the show is now in london... and the brexiteers? well they say that if the eu doesn't bury this bit for now — may has to walk. putting some flesh on that tweet — here's our political correspondent iain watson. it is 320 miles long with almost as many crossing points. both the british and irish governments do not want this to become a so—called hard border after brexit, with customs
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posts and checkpoints, but it has now become painfully apparent that, in the current political landscape, that is easier said than done. this morning, the prime minister said there were still encouraging signs. 0ur talks with the european union have made a lot of progress, there are still a couple of issues we need to work on. here is the core of the problem — the irish government say to guarantee there is no hard border after brexit, rules and regulations should remain the same across the whole island of ireland, but the dup believes this would create an internal border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. they and many conservatives find that unacceptable.
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i don't know what unwise promises have been made to the irish government. if there was a separate arrangement for northern ireland. and the views of the dup are crucial. they are propping up to may's minority government. number ten are confident they can meet the concerns of their northern irish allies. but in the commons today, labour were keen to exploit the current difficult. mr speaker, what an embarrassment. it is one thing to go to brussels and follow it with those on the other side of negotiating tables. it is quite another thing to go to brussels and to follow it with those on your side of the negotiating table. we recognise that as we exit, we must
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maintain the integrity of the market. but we must also maintain the integrity of the united kingdom. there is only one way to solve the problem of the irish border. you're not going to be a will to find a solution to the irish border problem u nless solution to the irish border problem unless unionists feel that remaining within the uk. that means in the same common and customs union, as not just the rest of the same common and customs union, as notjust the rest of the uk, but the irish republic and therefore the european union as well. there is no alternative to this. that kind of deal is likely to appeal to ministers who voted for brexit. confident of a deal mrjohnson? her collea g u es confident of a deal mrjohnson? her colleagues remain tight—lipped on the prospect of any deal at all. we will get the latest from adam fleming ina will get the latest from adam fleming in a moment. but we will go
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to westminster at the moment to find out what is going on. we have heard from nigel dodds, you heard him in that report. he has come out here to address the media. he said he wanted to clear a few things up. he said the dup would not accept any language that separates northern ireland politically or economically. that follows what the british government has been saying. the problem seems to have arisen yesterday because of the wording, the crucial part of all of this, the text they were trying to agree on all this. nigel dodds has said that the dup saw the text late yesterday morning. to them it was unacceptable because it did not reflect the wide discussions they had been having with the british government ahead of theirs. they were surprised to read what they did read. the did not think it make it clear enough, they did not want to have any kind of division from the rest of the united
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kingdom. it does seem that what happens now is that theresa may and the government sounding still positive they can find a deal. she will go back to brussels sol —— sometime later this week. before that she has to make sure the tu pr onside. they are back to the drawing board. —— the dup. it has when wrapped up so much, it would involve the dublin government in some way and that will be a problem. i have been speaking to some mps this afternoon, one leading conservative brexiteer saying that they did not think this situation was salvageable and blame theresa may. it is her feel able to deal with people and get the politics right in all this. and it has not worked out. no one will be confident of a deal but there will have to be a lot more talking. theresa may will speak to arlene foster later this afternoon. let's go over to brussels and to adam. they just say,
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let's go over to brussels and to adam. theyjust say, it is all over to london? that is almost exactly the phrase used by the european commission when talking today. they said the show is in london now. he also said the european commission, the organisation of which michelle barney works for, is radio listening out for any signals for the prime minister is getting ready to come here to solve what the european commission and the eu sees as very much a british domestic problem. although listening to that statement from nigel dodds over in westminster, you realise this might bounce back to be a eu problem very soon. he was saying the dup are ok with this idea of regularity alignment if it is on very specific narrow sectors that are necessary for the good friday agreement or full co—operation across the border. what their problem is is with a blanket alignment with all the rules
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of the single market and the customs union. a much wider idea. the eu and the uk will have to find a form of words that satisfies them. the other parties in northern ireland, the british government, the cabinet, the brexiteers in parliament, michel barnier, and older 27 member states. it could be a problem back here in brussels, too. everyone is waiting to find out when the prime minister and david davis are coming back here. it depends on how things pan out in london. can i bring you some more breaks the news? the bbc podcast which i host... it has gone number one. it has gone number one will stop well done, you. thanks. crisis in the country. but you are pleased you have got a number one. thank you both very much. parents are being warned
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about the dangers of live, online streaming services, after it emerged sex offenders are increasingly using them to manipulate their victims. the warning from the national crime agency follows a week—long operation by uk authorities against child sexual exploitation, which led to the arrest of more than 190 people. angus crawford reports. hands up all those who have used live streaming? aged 13 and 14, they know about apps which let children broadcast live from their phones. today, they're talking about how to do it safely. somebody could be trying to trick you, couldn't they? the apps are quick to download, easy to use. these pupils could go live in the playground, the street, or even their own bedrooms. sometimes it can be quite dangerous, because if someone's following someone that they don't know, they will be able to see it. like, you don't know who is watching you. the real problem with some of these
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apps is there's no proper checking of age or identification, so that means a live streaming service with a 17 rating could be used by children as young as this — or even younger, eight or nine. look at this — a boy and a girl on the app periscope. now read the comments. we don't want to identify them — she isjust nine. almost a thousand people are watching, and they're mostly adult men. we can't show you the worst of the comments. periscope told us it had zero tolerance for this kind of behaviour, but we found it on other apps too, and for the children caught up in it, the consequences can be devastating. i found her inconsolable in her bedroom... this is an actress, but the words are true — those of a mother whose ten—year—old daughter tried out the app 0megle for fun. he switched his webcam on, showed her his private parts, and asked her to take photos of herself, which she did. she was terrified by what had
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happened and scared of what she'd done. it offers offenders an immediate connection to children and young people that is one to one, it allows them to manipulate children and young people, offer excitement, sympathy, connection, emotional connection, involve them with games and trickery, and we see children getting basically manipulated to do things that ultimately they're very uncomfortable about and don't want to do. a campaign video launched today warning about the dangers of live streaming aimed at young people and their parents and posing a stark question — when children broadcast live to the world from their own bedrooms, can they really stay safe? angus crawford, bbc news. bob quick has demanded that the
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first secretary of state, damian green, with drop allegations of home orface the green, with drop allegations of home or face the possibility of league in action. mr green described him as discredited, untainted and u ntrustworthy. discredited, untainted and untrustworthy. and making... he wa nts untrustworthy. and making... he wants mr green to retract the claim that he was a liar and doing he was considering legal action against the cabinet minister. damian green has denied downloading or watching pornography on his work computer. that news just coming in. average rail fares will rise by 3.4% in january. it had previously been announced that fares regulated by the government — which represent nearly half of the total and include season tickets — will increase by 3.6% 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott is at east croydon station in south london. i will give you three guesses. we go
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this —— through this process every year. the campaign groups say enough is enough. you have to please —— freeze prices. young people are struggling because it cost so much moneyjust to get struggling because it cost so much money just to get to struggling because it cost so much moneyjust to get to work and yet the fear is go up every year because the fear is go up every year because the train companies and the government say we are pumping billions of money into the network. if you want better services, it cost you money. we asked some people what they thought. i'm from leicester, i travel down to london on a regular basis for work, and it's frankly extortionate. it's notjust the price as well, it's also the service, which is pretty miserable at times. i ended up leaving myjob because the trains were so unreliable, so i wouldn't say it's value for money at all. just imagine if a business had to take a hit like that, where one—twelfth of their income is spent on travel — or probably more. it is a high one, but the railways really need a lot of refurbing. so you think, you know, that money needs to be... it's a difficult one, and i think we have to be prepared to pay for what we want. government successive governments
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have been shifting who pays for the railway governments, the stations and all the rest of it. less money is coming from the taxpayer, more is coming from tickets. that is why we keep seeing these rises. the good news is that these rises come into effect on january the 2nd. time for a look at the weather... this is the third storm. we are with caroline now. we have had brine. this latest storm as caroline. the alternate gender and they go through the alphabet as well, the next one will be dylan. how bad does that work? it is beautiful on the satellite image. it is a deepening storm. it has got strong winds
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associated with the storm. when it reaches as late on wednesday night and into thursday, we could see some disruptive weather. we will see things associated with the storm, with gusts of 80 mph, particularly across the north of scotland, that will be enough to cause travel disruption and downed power lines as well. in the meantime? it is really quite. the weather is looking pretty cloudy and pretty grave. still pretty mild with those temperatures around eight — 10 degrees. some rain across through today across the north west of scotland, could be persistent. a few spots of drizzly rain elsewhere. as we move through tonight, we keep the cloud and the breeze. enough to keep things frost free, temperatures during the overnight period dissimilar to what we are seeing this afternoon. through the day tomorrow, a similar date through england and wales.
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further north west, more rain rattling in across northern ireland and scotland, the wind picking up as well. another males and breezy day on wednesday. through the overnight period we see the wind is picking up. gail is likely, wednesday night through the exposed irish sea coast and up across scotland. as this band of heavy rain tracks as way gradually south—eastwards across the country as we move into the early hours of thursday. from the word go on thursday we have this band of rain pushing south—eastwards, strong winds following on so we could see gusts of 80 mph or more across the northern have of scotland. it will feel colder as well. we are back into single figures and their wind—chill is making things feel chillier with wintry showers moving into the weekend as well. 0nce chillier with wintry showers moving into the weekend as well. once it as a way, those isobars stretch all the way back to the arctic. that will bring is this all day filtering in from the north, a chilly field to
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the weather as we end the week. after the wet and windy weather, we are back to sleet and rain showers. filtering through down wales, the south east of england. sunny spells elsewhere, when you add in the wind—chill it will feel chilly. 3-6dc, wind—chill it will feel chilly. 3—6dc, feeling chilly as we go into the end of the week. to summarise what we are going on, quite at the moment. from mid week we see the arrival of storm caroline, it will bring as those strong winds, particularly disruptive across parts of scotland. also some heavy rainfall associated with storm caroline. 0nce rainfall associated with storm caroline. once that gets out the way, as we look towards the end of the week, we see a return to something much more wintry. there are warnings out from the met office at the moment, strong winds and then the snow and the ice, particularly across scotland, but you can check the latest warnings by heading to website. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines: a review of terror attacks in the uk has found that opportunities were missed to stop the manchester arena bomber salman abedi who was a "person of interest". and opportunities were missed to stop him. the prime minister is under pressure to get things back on track after brexit talks were derailed yesterday by the dup. the deputy leader of the dup has that northern ireland wants the uk to leave the eu as a one nation and doesn't want to see brexit talks fail. police are warning parents that children using live streaming services are at risk of being exploited by sex offenders. sport now on afternoon live with jessica. and the ashes, england still have a chance? yes, they still have a glimmer of hopein yes, they still have a glimmer of hope in the second test. i am still
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saying england still have a glimmer of hope. they need 178 more runs. it is unlikely, but not impossible. it was a compelling penultimate day. james anderson with the ball, excellent. joe root with the bat, fantastic. england cricket fans will be keeping everything crossed that england can win this match and they can level the series 1—1. england can do this, but they had such a strong start, how did this happen? i don't think australia had much choice. james anderson took five wickets in australian second innings, the first time he has taken five wickets in australia. what a time to do that. joe root, unbeaten half—ce ntu ry time to do that. joe root, unbeaten half—century which led england to 176 for four at the close of play. let's go to andy swiss in adelaide.
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it began a peaceful adelaide tuesday, but turned into the most tense ashes nailbiter. england began with barely a flicker of hope. they needed early wickets and found them. jimmy anderson inspired, taking five in total as his team—mates clung onto their catches. the australian lead was growing. england kept chipping away. if only they bowled like this in the first innings. by the time australia were out, england's target was still matter. 354, they would need a record run chase. as mark stoneman and alistair cooke eased them past the 50 mark, england dared to dream. then a reality check, both went in quick succession. then james winds check, both went in quick succession. thenjames winds wafting his wicket away, not what the occasion called for. but under floodlights, dawid malan and joe root hung on in there. but england
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surviving. it was pure sporting theatre. joe root reached a half—ce ntu ry theatre. joe root reached a half—century but ten minutes from the close, a final twist. dawid malan, gone. australia are still favourites but england, 178 runs will need something very special. this has been some fight back from england, barely 24 hours ago, they looked beaten and the ashes all but gone. but they still have a chance ofa gone. but they still have a chance of a remarkable win. we are delighted to be indisposition to have any sort of chance of winning the game, which we didn't think we would have after the first couple of days. it is good for us. there is a huge amount of work left in this game, if we have any chance of winning it. but the art in with a chance, which is, you know, all we could ask for. so, an enthralling finale awaits. from the brink of defeat, a chance of one of cricket's
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greatest victories. what a final day that will be. play gets underway at 3:30am on radio five live sports extra. the international olympic committee president, thomas bach, is expected to announce later whether russia will be banned from the 2018 winter olympics. the ioc is examining the findings of a 16—month investigation looking into allegations of state—sponsored doping, when russia hosted the last winter games in sochi in 2014. the president of the us anti—doping agency, travis tygart says he wants russia kicked out. athletes around the world, 37 national anti—doping associations have come together in a position that the russian 0lympic have come together in a position that the russian olympic committee, based on proof beyond a reasonable doubt should be suspended with an exception for individual athletes from russia to compete as neutrals if they can show they were not tainted by the doping system that
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was from there. has the ioc the strength to do that?” was from there. has the ioc the strength to do that? i hope so, they did before rio and that is why we are in this mess again. if the right decision had been made, we wouldn't find ourselves on the eve of an 0lympic find ourselves on the eve of an olympic games with athletes questioning the system, having their confidence shattered in the system. let's hope they get it right this time. england's forward maro itoje could be a doubt for the six nations after fracturing his jaw playing for saracens at the weekend. the 23—year—old left the field during saracens' 20—19 defeat to harlequins at the stoop. he'll see a specialist later this week to confirm his return to play schedule. that is all the sport for now, more in the next hour. keep those fingers crossed. we will have more from jessica later on. just want to bring you some breaking news from birmingham crown court. paul smith, has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter by gross negligence of his five—year—old stepson charlie
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dunn. he drowned that a water park. he was found after more than two hours after his stepfather had letting go by himself. he couldn't swim and was pulled from a lagoon at bars worth water park in water park in leicestershire in july bars worth water park in water park in leicestershire injuly 2016. his stepfather, paul smith was overheard saying he did know where the boy was. we arejust saying he did know where the boy was. we are just hearing that paul smith has pleaded guilty to manslaughter by gross negligence. more on that later on. more now on the news that the national crime agency says people need to be aware of the dangers of abuse children can receive while live streaming. almost 200 suspected paedophiles were arrested following a week long uk—wide operation in october. i'm joined in the studio by emily cherry, assistant director of policy and public affairs at the children's charity barnardo's. you, presumably welcome this, but whilst the figure my people see as a large one, is a drop in the ocean?
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we definitely welcome this enforcement action. we are the largest provider in the uk of child exploitation services. we know children are being contacted using live streaming and by predatory offenders online. it is vital we ta ke offenders online. it is vital we take more action. but where does it stop with this? is it down to the providers, the media providers?“ we are looking to prevent more child sexual exploitation, designers need to put in child safety features when they launch new apps. we need the government to make sure they are holding them to account and there is a moment in time within internet safety strategy the government has announced. we need schools to make sure they are providing the right kind of social and health education. and also parents can play a huge role in understanding how your children use the world and talk to
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them regularly. the difficult years for the children who spiral into this mess is something they don't wa nt to this mess is something they don't want to talk to anybody about. so what sort of stories do children tell you, when they think they cannot control this any more? we hear day cannot control this any more? we hearday in, cannot control this any more? we hear day in, day out from children who are contacted regularly online. some of the offenders are the most charming, they will use manipulation and fear but also charm for children to think they are in a real relationship. we want to get the urgent message out to children, please come forward and speak to a trusted adult because it is not ok what is happening to you. what advice do you give to children, who frankly, once the bedroom door is closed, they have no idea what their children are doing online? knowing what devices and technology their children is using is vital. the
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online world is not all bad, but as a parent you need to get alongside them and understand their world and help navigate it safely. a lot of pa rents help navigate it safely. a lot of parents feel out of their depth because the children know better than they do have this technology works? there is internet matters, they have a great website that pa rents they have a great website that pa re nts ca n they have a great website that parents can go to. resources launch by the national crime agency speak to both parents and children on how to both parents and children on how to have those conversations. so it is vital you, as a parent look at what is there to help you. but you will the internet companies to get their act together? it is vital they are designing in the right solutions and doing it with families and children themselves and with child safety experts. that's combined the two to make the online world safer. thank you for coming in, mle. there's encouraging news for people with type two diabetes, it's
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after doctors in newcastle and glasgow carried out a trial on 300 people. they say they have reversed type two diabetes in nearly half of the patients who took part and they're calling it a "watershed moment". the treatment involves losing weight, by being restricted to just 800 calories a day for up to five months on an all—liquid diet. the charity diabetes uk says the approach could help millions of people. 0ur health correspondent james gallagher has the details. isobel murray thought she was facing a lifetime of type 2 diabetes, but she's lost more than four stone on the trial and has now completely changed her relationship with food. her disease is in remission. it's freedom to live your life again and know that you're not in that cycle anymore and know that i can control this, and i will never go there again, never will i be taking diabetic medication again, i'll do whatever i have to do to make sure that that never happens again. she spent 17 weeks drinking these. they‘ re nutritionally balanced soups and shakes to help trigger weight loss. and that's it. there's 200 calories in a class, and you're allowed four of them every day.
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that's just sweet, really, but that's your lot. for up to five months. the pancreas is critical in type 2 diabetes. if excess body fat is stored around the organ, then it reduces the production of the hormone insulin. that leads to levels of sugar in the blood getting dangerously out of control. but losing weight makes the fat cells disappear and the pancreas work properly again. doctors say 46% of patients on the trial put their type 2 into remission. we now have clear evidence that weight loss of 10—15 kg is enough to turn this disease around. it's hugely exciting that we can do that in routine practice, with ordinary nurses, ordinary dieticians, ordinary gps, and ordinary patients. i don't have diabetes anymore, i don't feel like a diabetic, so i don't think about it anymore. i've got my life back. and isobel says if she can do
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it, then anyone can. james gallagher, bbc news. i'm nowjoined by emily burns, head of research communications at diabetes uk. a game changer, is this? we are very excited, it is a special moment for people with type two diabetes. there is an estimated 4 million people with type two diabetes and another 12 million at risk. finding ways to put this into remission could have enormous benefits. that word remission, because people believe they have got this for life? this research is changing that conversation. what this particular trial found is under half of those who took part were in remission under 12 months. which means they don't have diabetes any more and it is very exciting. this isn't a quick fix, it is tough to get to? 800
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calories a day for up to five months. one of the participants, isabel talks about how difficult it was and how the support of her family around her was important. what does that do too, going on to a diet of that sort, you must be very tired, what are the other symptoms? it can depend from person to person. some found it more difficult than others. anyone thinking of taking part, it is essential you speak to your health care professional, because it can be dangerously few are taking certain medications. isabel said it was like changing and the idea that her condition could be put into remission at the end of the trial, was worth it. we are talking about weight? type ii diabetes is a complex condition but being obese or overweight is one of the factors involved. they were looking at weight loss specifically deceive
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cruiserweight could put the type ii diabetes in remission. it seems like a simple idea, go on a diet and it will reverse diabetes, but what has this research done to change the perception? it is notjust the diet, what we are trialling is a programme. you take part in the programme, food is reintroduced over a period of time and then you are supported long—term to keep the weight. it is notjust a diet, it is calorie restriction for quite an extended period of time. researchers are hoping you will lose a significant amount of weight around your pancreas and liver and it will boost those organs to start working again properly to put your diabetes in remission. we don't expect it to be of benefit to everyone, but with 4 million people with this condition, it is bound to have some benefits. thank you for coming in to talk to us. up to one in five patients
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is regularly missing gp appointments, with younger people being the worst offenders, according to a new study by the lancet public health journal. three years ago, nhs england estimated more than 12 million gp appointments are missed every year in the uk, costing in excess of £162 million annually. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. at a busy gp surgery in stockport, time is precious. but 10% of the appointments booked here are missed, at a cost of around £60 each. this gp believes it reflects a changing attitude towards the nhs among younger patients. the nhs is now, for our younger population, seen as a consumer service, a bit likejohn lewis. so perhaps valued differently to the way our older population see the nhs. so i can't think of the last time one of my older patients ever missed an appointment. thatjudgment is backed up by a new research on missed appointments — patients aged 16— 30 are some of the most likely
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to skip an appointment, with one in five failing to show up at their local surgery more than twice. appointments that fell within a few days were more likely to be missed than those booked two weeks in advance. some of the solutions might include to better manage patients who might not attend, so, for example, that might mean giving more patients on the day then up to 2—3 days in advance. because we have a profile of what those patients look like who are more likely to maintain, that is where to not attend, that is where they can be targeted. missed appointments represent a waste of time and money. changing the way we think about the nhs might sustain it into the future. dominic hughes, bbc news. in a moment the business news, but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber,
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salman abedi was a subject of interest before the attack, might have been averted. uk says in a part of the uk will be treated differently in the brexit talks. 0ne talks. one of the parents the growing use of online streaming services is being exploited by online sex offenders. sales of new cars stall once again — in november they fell for the eighth month in a row. the number of new cars registered was down by around 11% compared with november last year. that's according to figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. it suggests consumers are being put off by a rise in inflation and weak wage growth. we will have more on this shortly. commuting costs for rail passengers will rise injanuary at their fastest rate for five years. average railfares will go up by 3.4%. it was already known that fares regulated by the government, which represent about half of the total and include season tickets, would go up by 3.6% from next month.
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the uk's services sector, the biggest part of our economy, grew at a slower pace than expected in november. that sector covers many types of business, from banks to book—keepers, and hotels to hairdressers. meanwhile the prices that companies charge jumped to their highest level since early 2008. the ihs/markit figures show that fewer newjobs were created in november than in the month before. the number of new cars bought in the uk has fallen again. it wasn't that long ago when we said business was booming? the figures are 163,541 new cars registered in november, down 11% from november last year. it is the eighth month in a row figures have falling. 0ne reason is diesel. that is because
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drivers are unsure about the future of diesel. we'll diesel vehicles hold their value and also wages and wage growth, failing to keep up with inflation. as you said, not so long ago we were talking about the boom in new cars and that is part of the reason why we in new cars and that is part of the reason why we are in new cars and that is part of the reason why we are the fall now. how does a car cost £119? i don't know. let's speak to anna—marie baisden, head of autos, bmi research. simon was talking about the huge increase in new vehicles being bought not so long ago and now we are seeing these falls. there is a bit of a link? absolutely, we have had a couple of years of good car sales. we have had some attractive finance options out there. private contract purchases, leasing deals, attractive finance deals and that has led to some booming years. there is an element of normalisation we
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see this year. we were forecasting a fall in sales as a whole this year. then you have the added consumer uncertainty. as he are saying about wage growth and inflation. also things like how brexiter will play out. it is a perfect storm for the car market. what impact does it have on the industry when these figures are falling month on month? for manufacturers in the country, it is not as much as you think, because we import 87% of the sales in this country. a lot of the manufacturers in this country, particularly the high end premium bonds, are global in their outlook so doesn't have much of an impact on them. even things like nissan, they will be exporting as well. so on the domestic manufacturing side it is a small impact than you would think. thank you very much for your time.
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i have been talking to barnardos about abuse of children to whatever websites they use. facebook, you have to be 13 to have an account? you are supposed to be, but it is estimated there is 20 million under 13—year—olds who have a facebook account. 0ne 13—year—olds who have a facebook account. one of the ways facebook is looking at this is, they have launched a new service called messenger kids which is a safe and appropriate version for those younger members. it is aimed for kids aged 6/13. it is locked down version of the messenger service we could access on facebook. in these pa rental could access on facebook. in these parental approval and it also will not be used to collect any data for advertising, which is a significant point. currently it only available to children in the us. currently it's only availibe in the states so let's go to samira hussain who is in new york. this new service launched this week, so the many parents the issue will
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be safety, how are facebook saying they will keep it to save space for children? in order to be able to use this new thing, there is a lot of pa re ntal this new thing, there is a lot of parental control involved. for example, if two friends want to become friends on this facebook messenger app, a parent become friends on this facebook messengerapp, a parent is become friends on this facebook messenger app, a parent is to allow that to happen. what facebook is saying is, we are trying to get more pa re ntal saying is, we are trying to get more parental involvement in this, that way this can be a lot more safe and as he pointed out, they will not be using that information to collect data. there won't be any advertising on this. but there are a lot of detractors saying this isjust facebook's way of trying to market itself to younger and younger people, get them hooked on facebook young and then they can open a facebook account after they turned 13. but also much earlier. it is
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aimed at kids from 13 down to age six, have people been saying it is too young? it has been a topic of conversation. i was watching a lot of the us morning programmes and the same question was asked of a lot of people. we have children and i had to think about whether or not i would really want my sick she rolled to be using facebook messenger. —— six—year—old. especially when there is so much data that is saying this can be harmful to children, social media can be harmful to children and their self—esteem, do we want them hooked on it that early. thank you very much. quick look at the markets. the pound is down against the dollar and the euro. failure to secure the brexit deal making sterling volatile. weak sterling lifts the ftse. but provident financial shares collapsed after the financial watchdog opened an investigation into moneybarn, its car and van financing arm. supermarkets are among
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the best performers. sainsburys and morrisons are higher — and tesco is up more than 3%. those shares have been helped by postive comments from analysts at goldman sachs. that's all the business news. time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. stormy weather later on this week with the arrival of stored caroline. this evening and tonight it is quiet. a lot of cloud, bit of rain the northern and western parts of scotland. breeze towards the north—west and it will be a frost free, mild night to come. during the day tomorrow for england and wales, similarto day tomorrow for england and wales, similar to what we have seen today. cloudy and more breeze picking up, particularly for scotland and northern ireland and the arrival of rain. temperatures —— 12 celsius.
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winds strengthening in the north and west during wednesday night. severe gales around exposed irish sea coasts and towards the north and west of scotland. those winds will strengthen on thursday as rain pushes its way across much of the country. storm caroline on thursday will bring costs potentially more than 80 mph, particularly towards northern scotland where significant travel disruption possible. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3.
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a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted". in relation to manchester, he also commented that it is conceivable that the attack might have been averted had the cards fallen differently. brexit impasse — pressure on theresa may to find out what went wrong yesterday — and fix it. in the commons, still some optimism. as was made clear by the comment and statement yesterday, all parties remain confident of reaching a positive conclusion by the end of the week. mr speaker, what an embarrassment. the last 24 hours have given a new meaning to the term coalition of chaos. a warning for parents — the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport.
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it is all england and the ashes. england's cricketers are dreaming the impossible dream after the penultimate day of the second ashes test against australia. england's bowlers performed, and they're within reach of an historic turn around. sarah has all the leather. —— weather. storm caroline will bring some heavy rain and strong winds, particularly across parts of scotland. i will bring you details on that through the afternoon. a new clinical trial that doctors are calling ‘a watershed moment'. we'll have the test results which bring fresh hope for millions of people with type 2 diabetes. hello, iam
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hello, i am simon mccoy. an independent review into the terrorist attack in manchester, in which 22 people were killed, has concluded that m15 and the police may have had opportunities to prevent the bombing. the review, by qc david anderson, says that the bomber, salman abedi, was "a person of interest" to the security services', and it was "conceivable the attack might have been avoided had the cards fallen differently". mr anderson's report also looked at into this year's attacks in london. london bridge, one of the perpetrators was a prime suspect and they had a lot of surveillance on them. it is not easy to say they made mistakes but they did not pick up the planning that happened shortly before the attack. there were a couple of people that were not on the radar. manchester, they had a young man, salman abedi, who they had no reason to be suspicious of, though he did have some bad associates. despite that they got quite close to him, they had peripheral
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vision of what he was perhaps thinking and planning. but at the end of the day they were too late. they had a meeting scheduled a few days after the attack to decide what should be done about this man. by that time it was too late. the home secretary, amber rudd, gave further details to mps in the house of commons. based on the m15 and police reviews, david anderson explains that in the case of the westminster attack, massoud was a closed subject of interest at the time of the asttack. they had no reason to anticipate the attack. regarding the manchester arena attack, salman abedi was also a close subject of interest at the time of the attack. and so not under active investigation. in early 2017, m15 nonetheless received intelligence on him which was assessed as not being related to terrorism. in retrospect, the intelligence can be seen to be highly relevant. had an investigation been reopened
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at the time, it cannot be known whether salman abedi's plans could have been stopped. m15 assessed that it would have been unlikely. responding for labour, shadow home secretary diane abbott said the report highlights the need for more resources for the police and security services. as we have said on this side of the house, you cannot keep people safe on the cheap. she talks about ensuring that counterterrorism policing has the resources it needs, but does she accept the part in david anderson's report where he notes that counterterrorism indicitive profile sees a reduction of 7.2% in their budgets. and does she agree with
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david anderson when he talks about the reliance of m15 and counterterrorism on community policing? our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. salman abedi kept coming up on m15's radar. he was in contact with someone in syria, but it was not direct contact. there were two bits of intelligence that came into that we re of intelligence that came into that were assessed as criminal rather than terrorist. if by chance m15 said we should have a look at anyway, that was the opportunity there was for someone watching more closely. in retrospect that the stuff that seems to have been releva nt to stuff that seems to have been relevant to the manchester attack. there is also the state washing exercise, going through former subjects of interest, trying to look
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at who they should go back and look at. his name came up out of 20,000 of who they should look at again. the meeting was scheduled for nine days after the attack. it is like a goalkeeper reaching out with a gloved hand, gets his hand on the ball but it still trickles across the line. hindsight is a wonderful thing. doesn't look like a mistake was made? m15's: assessment is not only that they think that they did not make a serious mistake but also they are not convinced that even if they are not convinced that even if they got there, that they would necessarily have seen what he was up to. their assessment is that they did not make a mistake and that it a nyway did not make a mistake and that it anyway probably would not have stopped the attack. but to outsiders, as i say whether it is a mistake or not, i do not know. there is this terrible feeling that maybe it could have in stock. it is not talking about an incident where one or two people died. 22 people died
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and some of them children at a concert. the most horrendous attack. you just feel like they were so close. it also looks at the london bridge attack. what does that say about that? that is a different story. here is a man who came to their attention two years ago. as a man who aspire to attack the uk. the operation was set up to investigate him as someone who might want to attack the uk. when they looked at or, maybe he wanted to radicalise young kids are travelled to syria. they focused and it removed. although he was an active subject of interest, what they did not see was a man who had got together with two associates, bought knives at a local supermarket, then hired a van to mow down people london bridge. again, it isa down people london bridge. again, it is a mist opportunity, but in a different way. this was a gag at one point they thought was going to
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attack the uk, and then he did sort of under their own noses. with me now is chris phillips — a former detective chief inspector with the metropolitan police, and a former head of the national counter terrorism security office. we have two previous everything —— preface everything was saying hindsight is a wonderful thing. if you lost a child in that manchester attack, will you feel angry that something has been mist you?“ attack, will you feel angry that something has been mist you? it is dreadful. we know the sheer number of people out there in a row country who are willing to do this kind of thing. you have to say that other attacks have been thwarted by the same officers deployed on this operation. it is a terrible thing. when you look back you will always find within terrorism you will a lwa ys find within terrorism you will always find some way we could have stopped something. whether it is in this country or abroad. u nfortu nately this country or abroad. unfortunately the security services and police have got, i equate it to spinning plates, they have got hundreds and thousands of plates spinning at any one time. someone
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has to make some risk assessment decisions as to who is on the top of the pile to be watched. if they have more resources, then they could keep more resources, then they could keep more plates spinning and then maybe this would have been prevented? certainly. the more resources you have got, the more you can watch. but we are talking about huge numbers here, 3000 people on the really worrying list. 20,000 people that are within that sort of area as well that you would want to keep an eye on. so the numbers are huge. with respect to the government, no matter what resources they give the police, there can always be a successful attack. but the more resources the police and security authorities have, the more they can prevent these attacks. if i am meeting this report, well i feel slightly miffed that people are going to suggest that we could have done something more or am i going to be saying, we did the best we did,
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that we could possibly do? the one thing we would worry about whether in the police security services is the focus. there will always be things that could have been done that i've been missed. that is how you learn. you learn from little m ista kes you learn. you learn from little mistakes in the past and try and put as bloggers next time to make sure it does not happen again. you have got to focus on the round, there have been successful in stopping terrorist attacks of the last ten, 15 years. it is quite incredible how successful they have been. as our public, we have got to be aware that there will be attacks from time to time there gets through. the public will take that view, but the parents of those children who died or those killed on london bridge will not feel that? these attacks will not go away. this is not something that is ending here. we will have attacks in the future as well. but we as a society need to recognise that perhaps we need to spend more money on civil protection. because if we
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lose our civil protection... what does that mean? what civil protection would have been in place that could have made a difference? in the first instance we need to give the resources to the police. daniel sandford talked about community policing and diane abbott said the same thing. we need to have enough police officers available to deal with, not only normal policing, but also terrorism policy. but also we need to put into place protective security measures that make certain players, our iconic sites were safe. there are many companies, external companies that are actually providing the stuff and it has to be taken up. companies and businesses around the country need to take this seriously. chris phillips, thank you very much. this time yesterday it looked as though a breakthrough on brexit was imminent. 24 hours later — well, there's confusion to say the least. so — in an unusual approach — i'm just going to quote from the bbc‘s political editor
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laura kuenssberg who wrote this on twitter: she says (and this is her tweet) this is the rough version of what's happening today... uk govt — says it will all be fine. dublin — says we can't budge. dup — says we won't budge the eu — says the show is now in london... and the brexiteers? well they say that if the eu doesn't bury this bit for now — may has to walk. putting some flesh on that tweet — here's our political correspondent iain watson. it is 320 miles long with almost as many crossing points. both the british and irish governments do not want this to become a so—called hard border after brexit, with customs posts and checkpoints, but it has now become painfully apparent that, in the current political landscape, that is easier said than done. this morning, the prime minister said there were still encouraging signs. 0ur talks with the european union have made a lot of progress, there are still a couple of issues we need to work on. here is the core of the problem — the irish government say to guarantee there is no hard border
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after brexit, rules and regulations should remain the same across the whole island of ireland, but the dup believes this would create an internal border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. they and many conservatives find that unacceptable. the d thedup the d u p stand strong for the union, stand strong for the northern ireland's position within the united kingdom. we will not allow any settlement to be agreed which causes diverges from the rest of the united kingdom. well, i don't know what possibly unwise promises have been made to the irish government, but it would be completely unacceptable to the dup and to many in our party if there was a separate arrangement for northern ireland. and the views of the dup here at westminster are crucial. they are propping up theresa may's minority government.
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downing street are confident they can meet the concerns of their northern irish allies, but in the house of commons today, labour were keen to exploit the government's current difficulties. mr speaker, what an embarrassment. it is one thing, mr speaker, to go to brussels and fall out with those on the other side of the negotiating table, but quite another to fall out with those supposedly on your own side of the negotiating table. we recognise that as we exit, we must respect the integrity of the single market and the customs union, but we must equally respect the integrity of the united kingdom. but a former labour northern ireland secretary says there is only one way to solve the problem of the irish border. you are not going to be able to find a solution to the irish border problem unless unionists feel they are remaining still within the uk, and that means in the same common and customs union as notjust the rest of the uk but the irish republic and therefore the european union as well.
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there is no alternative to this. that kind of deal is unlikely to appeal to the ministers who voted for brexit. confident of a deal, mrjohnson? and theresa may's cabinet colleagues remained tight—lipped on the prospect of any deal at all. iain watson, bbc news. well in the past half hour the irish prime minister leo varadkar has spoken about the failure to reach an agreement to move on to phase two of the brexit negotiations yesterday. the taoiseach told the irish parliament that the hold up was not from the irish side. we cannot move on to phase two until we have the assurances that we need that there will be no hard border. and indeed the assurances we have been promised for 18 months now and even longer. so as things stand, the ball is very much in london, it is in the london court. the prime minister and the european commission
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and negotiating teams have asked for more time. we are happy that there should be more time. the european council does not meet until thursday next week, so there is time to put this agreement back on track. i understand that the prime minister is managing many difficulties in the united kingdom and the eu and ireland negotiating team and the uu negotiates either one team, we will wait to hear from negotiates either one team, we will wait to hearfrom london. in a moment we'll get the latest from our ireland correspondent chris page — but first live to our chief political correspondent vicki young at westminster. can theresa may fix this? that is a big question. some think she cannot salvage the situation. some of them blame her personally saying she does not do the politics well. there are some of them who would be happy to walk away, to have no trade deal, they think we have given the eu enough, it is time for someone else
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to compromise and we should go ahead with no free trade deal. that is not the majority of the people in the house of commons to think that. where we are now, david davis has been as in question is this afternoon, cancelling dozens from mps. it was interesting what he has to say about this. it does come down to say about this. it does come down to semantics. he is talking about regularity alignment, how closely do we in the uk a—line rules with the eu rules once we have left. that is what this row is all about. he keeps on saying this will be for the uk as a whole, not just on saying this will be for the uk as a whole, notjust northern ireland. we will have regular retreat alignment across the whole of the uk. if he gets what he wants which isa uk. if he gets what he wants which is a free trade deal, he was a customs agreement. we are not talking about harmonisation is, not about the same rules as the eu, we
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are talking about mutual recognition. it comes down to these detailed things. it seems by listening to nigel dodds in the last half—hour, they thought they had this agreement. verbally things were going along. they then saw the text of the agreement pretty late yesterday morning and said the words did not reflect the agreement that they thought they had. so that is why we are in the position that we end. the pressure on theresa may is enormously. she has pressure from the eurosceptics and her party, she has part —— pressure from the d u p who are propping up her government. she is trying to get this deal. she will go back to brussels if she can to carry on these stocks. she will speak to both the dup and... where the dup in the late yesterday are not? nigel dodds is giving a news conference. he said that the dup did see the text that was on the table
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yesterday, but the only site late morning. they seem to suggest they had seen it pretty late on in the negotiating process. they had been assured by the government and the general principles what the government was and was not prepared to agree to. but they never actually saw the wording of the draft agreement. they did not think the wording reflected what the government had been telling them. so the inform the government immediately when they got that text, that draft agreement, that it was not acceptable to them. you are seeing the dup experience in the negotiations they have been involved in in the northern ireland peace process, nigel dodds talked about text being important. the dup know the importance of weighing every word, knowing that every word in an agreement is going to be interpreted. and they want to make sure they say that everything is unambiguous and that as far as possible at this stage the details are kneeled down. that is their problem with the text yesterday, it
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was problem with the text yesterday, it was too general. 0n problem with the text yesterday, it was too general. on this issue of regulatory realignment, he did see the dup were not opposed to have some kind of alignment in some areas. he pointed out the northern ireland had a single energy market with the irish republic. what the dup did not want was for northern ireland to follow the rules of the single market and the customs union asa single market and the customs union as a generality. perhaps a suggestion of eddie —— way forward from nigel dodds, the dup could live with something more specific in specific areas in which the rules for northern ireland and the irish republic and the rest of the uk could line up and that things were kneeled down. we heard more detail than that perhaps could be a way round this impasse. thank you both very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack
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"might have been averted". a warning for parents — the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. and in sport... england captainjoe root leads the fightback against australia in the second ashes test in adelaide. the international olympic committee will decide later today whether to ban russia from the winter olympics in february. and england forward maro itoje could be a doubt for the six nations after fracturing his jaw playing for saracens at the weekend. i'll be back with more on those stores. —— on more of those stories just after half past. the step—father of five—year—old charlie dunn, who drowned at a water park, has pleaded guilty to manslaughter by gross negligence at birmingham crown court. charlie died in hospital injuly 2016 after he was found in a lake at bosworth water park.
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paul smith, 36, had denied any wrong—doing over charlie's death but he changed his plea during his trial. parents are being warned about the dangers of live, online streaming services, after it emerged sex offenders are increasingly using them to manipulate their victims. the warning from the national crime agency follows a week—long operation by uk authorities against child sexual exploitation, which led to the arrest of more than 190 people. angus crawford reports. hands up all those who have used live streaming? aged 13 and 14, they know about apps which let children broadcast live from their phones. today, they're talking about how to do it safely. somebody could be trying to trick you, couldn't they? the apps are quick to download, easy to use. these pupils could go live in the playground, the street, or even their own bedrooms. sometimes it can be quite dangerous, because if someone's following someone that they don't know, they will be able to see it. like, you don't know who is watching you. the real problem with some of these apps is there's no proper checking
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of age or identification, so that means a live streaming service with a 17 rating could be used by children as young as this — or even younger, eight or nine. look at this — a boy and a girl on the app periscope. now read the comments. we don't want to identify them — she isjust nine. almost a thousand people are watching, and they're mostly adult men. we can't show you the worst of the comments. periscope told us it had zero tolerance for this kind of behaviour, but we found it on other apps too, and for the children caught up in it, the consequences can be devastating. i found her inconsolable in her bedroom... this is an actress, but the words are true — those of a mother whose ten—year—old daughter tried out the app 0megle for fun. he switched his webcam on, showed her his private parts, and asked her to take photos
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of herself, which she did. she was terrified by what had happened and scared of what she'd done. it offers offenders an immediate connection to children and young people that is one to one, it allows them to manipulate children and young people, offer excitement, sympathy, connection, emotional connection, involve them with games and trickery, and we see children getting basically manipulated to do things that ultimately they're very uncomfortable about and don't want to do. a campaign video launched today warning about the dangers of live streaming aimed at young people and their parents and posing a stark question — when children broadcast live to the world from their own bedrooms, can they really stay safe? angus crawford, bbc news. a former senior police officer has demanded
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that the first secretary of state, damian green withdraw allegations about him or face the possibility of legal action. last month, in a tweet, mr green accused bob quick of making "untrue" allegations that he had pornography on his work computer. i'm joined now by our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. how did this row all start? this started last month when there was an article in the sunday times newspaper in which it was alleged that damian green had pornography on his parliamentary computer. and the source for that story was said to be bob quick, from the metropolitan police. damian green responded with a tweet in which she said that bob quick was untrustworthy. he said he had made untrue allegations. he described them as disreputable sneers. bob quick has now hit back
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against that in a statement that has been issued through his lawyers today. what has he said? the attack by damian green was deeply unpleasant and personal. it was a hurtful attempt to discredit him. he said that he has acted in good faith, in the public interest and that everything he says is accurate. and he also goes on to say that in no way is he motivated politically and uber is no malice whatsoever to damian green. 0f and uber is no malice whatsoever to damian green. of course the two of them sort of clash nine years ago during an enquiry into leaks from the home office. damian green was arrested. there was a lot of bad blood and scotland yard, certainly between the conservatives and the metropolitan police at the time. what he goes on to sleep in his statement today is, i invite damian green publicly to retract his allegations against him. —— goes on
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to say. there is an implied threat there that if there is no withdrawal of these allegations, then he could be sued. no response from damian green? no response from damian green. he absolutely denies downloading are watching pornography on his work computers and there is a an enquiry examining this issue as well as an unrelated issue of behaviour towards an activist. average rail fares will rise by 3.4% in january. it had previously been announced that fares regulated by the government — which represent nearly half of the total and include season tickets — will increase by 3.6% 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott went to east croydon station. i will give you three guesses. i go through this process every year. the campaign groups say enough is enough. you have to freeze prices. young people are struggling because it cost so much moneyjust to get to work and yet the fares go up every year because
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the train companies and the government say we are pumping billions of pounds into the network. if you want better services, it cost you money. we asked some people what they thought. i'm from leicester, i travel down to london on a regular basis for work, and it's frankly extortionate. it's notjust the price as well, it's also the service, which is pretty miserable at times. i ended up leaving myjob because the trains were so unreliable, so i wouldn't say it's value for money at all. just imagine if a business had to take a hit like that, where one—twelfth of their income is spent on travel — or probably more. it is a high one, but the railways really need a lot of refurbing. so you think, you know, that money needs to be... it's a difficult one, and i think we have to be prepared to pay for what we want. government successive governments have been fasting who pays for them
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for the stations and all the rest of it. less money is now coming from the taxpayer, more is coming from tickets. that is why we keep seeing these price rises. good news is all of these rises come into effect on january the 2nd. you could always go into space. if you are on a long trip, you can recreate the taste of home. if you're away on a long trip you can really start to crave a taste of home — and that's exactly what happened to paolo nespoli??, an italian astronaut who's aboard the international space station. he missed his favourite food so much that he brought it up good afternoon. we have some stormy
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weather on the way. it could bring significant disruption. this evening and overnight it is quite. we have a lot of cloud out there, rain for a western parts of scotland. a breeze to the north west two. it will be a frost free and mild night to come. during the day tomorrow, england and real similar to today. cloudy and more of a breeze picking up for scotla nd more of a breeze picking up for scotland and northern ireland with the arrival of some rain. temperatures around 10—12dc for most of us. when strengthening in the north and the west during wednesday night. gale force winds around exposed costs, those winds will strengthen further on thursday as rain pushes its way across much of the country. storm caroline on thursday will bring gusts of potentially more than 80 mph, particularly northern scotland were disruption to travel may be possible. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber, salman abedi, had been a "person of interest" to m15 — and opportunities were missed to stop him. the prime minister is under pressure to get things back on track after brexit talks were derailed yesterday by the dup. the deputy leader of the dup has said that northern ireland wants the uk to leave the eu "as a one nation"— and doesn't want to see brexit talks fail. police are warning parents that children using live streaming services are at risk of being exploited by sex offenders. the father of a 5—year—0ld boy found drowned in a water park pool has pleased guilty to manslaughter by gross negligence charlie dunn was found dead at the bosworth water park in leicestershire injuly last year. sport now on afternoon live with jessica. .. some of us still think that england
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could win the game in the ashes. some of us still think that england could win the game in the asheslj could win the game in the ashes.” told you that i had my fingers crossed in the last hour. finland have a glimmer of hope. they need 168 more runs in the second ashes test —— england. it is unlikely but it is not impossible. that makes me a realist not pessimistic. but it was compelling today. really realistic. james anderson was fantastic with the ball and james —— joe root was brilliant with the bat. living and wish to win this match it will level the series. this time yesterday it seems very unlikely given this thought that australia had reached. australia had no choice allowing england back into this test. england had a great day. james anderson and took five wickets in the australian second innings. that
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is the first time he has ever taken five wickets in australia. and then captainjoe five wickets in australia. and then captain joe root, real five wickets in australia. and then captainjoe root, real captain's innings from him. an unbeaten half—century. that led england's 274 — four at the end of play. let's go to and he was out in adelaide.“ began a peaceful adelaide tuesday but turned into a tense ashes nailbiter. england needed early wickets and found them. jimmy anderson was inspired is taking five wickets in total as his team—mates clung on to the catches. australia's lead was growing all the time ago. england caps chipping away, if only they had bowled like this in the first innings. england's target was still a massive one stop 354. they would need a record run chase. but as mark stoneman and alastair cook eats them past the 50 mark, england dared to dream. then a reality
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check. both went in quick succession and james vince soon followed. not for the occasion called for. but under floodlights and the feast the press, dawid malan and joe root hang on in there. australia kept appealing and england kept surviving, just. root reached a gutsy half century as the pair rekindled england's hope. but ten minutes from the end, a final twist. dawid malan one. australia are still favourites but england are only a hundred odd runs from something special. this has been some fights back from england. at only 24 hours ago they look beaten and the ashes all but gone but they still have a chance of a remarkable win. to be honest, we are delighted to be in this position to have any sort of chance of winning the game. we didn't think we would have after the first couple of days. it is good for us. honestly there is a huge amount
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of work left for us we have any chance of winning it. but we are in a chance which is, you know, all we could ask for after the first two days. and so, an enthralling from ball finale awaits. strap yourself in that final day. play gets underway at 3:30am in the morning and you can listen on bbc five live sports extra. the international olympic committee president, thomas bach, is expected to announce later whether russia will be banned from the 2018 winter olympics. the ioc is examining the findings of a 16—month investigation looking into allegations of state—sponsored doping, when russia hosted the last winter games in sochi in 2014. the president of the us anti—doping agency, travis ty—gart says he wants russia kicked out... clea n clean athletes from around the world, 37 international anti—doping
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agencies have come together to put together their position. to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the russian 0lympic beyond a reasonable doubt that the russian olympic committee should be suspended with the exception of individual athletes from russia that can compete as neutrals to show that they weren't implicated. does the ioc have the strength to do that?” hope so. they didn't before and that is why we are in this mess again. if the right decision had been made prior to rio, we would not be in this position again on the eve of an 0lympic game with athletes questioning the system and their confidence shattered in the system. let's hope they get it right this time. england's forward maro itoje could be a doubt for the six nations after fracturing his jaw playing for saracens at the weekend. the 23—year old left the field during saracens' 20—19 defeat to harlequins at the stoop. he'll see a specialist later this week to confirm his return to play schedule. that's all the sport for now. we will have more for you in the next hour. there's encouraging news for people
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with type two diabetes, it's after doctors in newcastle and glasgow carried out a trial on 300 people. they say they have reversed type two diabetes in nearly half of the patients who took part and they're calling it a "watershed moment". the treatment involves losing weight, by being restricted to just 800 calories a day for up to five months on an all—liquid diet. the charity diabetes uk says the approach could help millions of people. 0ur health correspondent james gallagher has the details. isobel murray thought she was facing a lifetime of type 2 diabetes, but she's lost more than four stone on the trial and has now completely changed her relationship with food. her disease is in remission. it's freedom to live your life again and know that you're not in that cycle anymore and know that i can control this, and i will never go there again, never will i be taking diabetic medication again, i'll do whatever i have to do to make sure that that never happens again. she spent 17 weeks drinking these. they‘ re nutritionally balanced
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soups and shakes to help trigger weight loss. and that's it. there's 200 calories in a class, and you're allowed four of them every day. that's just sweet, really, but that's your lot. for up to five months. the pancreas is critical in type 2 diabetes. if excess body fat is stored around the organ, then it reduces the production of the hormone insulin. that leads to levels of sugar in the blood getting dangerously out of control. but losing weight makes the fat cells disappear and the pancreas work properly again. doctors say 46% of patients on the trial put their type 2 into remission. we now have clear evidence that weight loss of 10—15 kg is enough to turn this disease around. it's hugely exciting that we can do that in routine practice, with ordinary nurses,
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ordinary dieticians, ordinary gps, and ordinary patients. i don't have diabetes anymore, i don't feel like a diabetic, so i don't think about it anymore. i've got my life back. and isobel says if she can do it, then anyone can. james gallagher, bbc news. joining me now from our newcastle studio is kieran ball who took part in study... i think you were diagnosed with type two diabetes at the end of 2013. when you receive a diagnosis like that what does it mean? it makes you make different choices in life. you have a look at it and you think what do you mean. what does this mean to me. how does it affect my family? lot of things go through your mind. so you then decided to take part. this diet doesn't look pleasant, it's not easy. it's a tough regime. just described the changes you started to feel. yes. i was almost
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like naive to that to what it would be like. but once you start to get into the river and routine of taking the shakes, it's ok. at the original few weeks for me was horrendous. my body was trying to shut down on me. it was quite shocking. i don't thing you can ever be quite ready for what happened to me. presumably you are getting medical advice at the time. what do you mean when you say almost shut down? i stopped eating. i gave up shut down? i stopped eating. i gave up food for the initial amount of time which was 14 weeks. because you are used are piling in sugar because my are used are piling in sugar because d are used are piling in sugar because my body wasn't functioning properly. suddenly i didn't do any of that. the drinks gave me what i needed but my the drinks gave me what i needed but d the drinks gave me what i needed but my body was used to me supplementing it so took time from my body to get use to me to allow it to produce its own insulin. at what point did you think this is worth its? pretty much from day one. i understood. the professor at the time leading the
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study and my practice nurse were really useful towards me and gave me what the bigger picture was. it was about 17 weeks into the trial when my about 17 weeks into the trial when d about 17 weeks into the trial when my body started to kick back into gearandi my body started to kick back into gearand ifound it my body started to kick back into gear and i found it a my body started to kick back into gearand ifound ita lot my body started to kick back into gear and ifound it a lot easier. keirin, most people when they get that diagnosis, you've got type two diabetes, it is for life. indeed it is. it makes you think about what i have done to get to this stage and how does this affect me moving forward. i think part of me coming on the trial was that professor taylor gave me the highlights or the low lights if you like about what might life could entail which to me became a no—brainer because i've got two young children. it made my life better and elongated my life, basically. you say you've got children. it doesn't help your moods, does its? no. but my mood wasn't great anyway. i was so
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reliant inputting sugary substance into my body such as fizzy drinks or high and sugary food. my mood swings we re high and sugary food. my mood swings were horrendous anyway. so in hindsight, my family would probably say there wasn't much change at the beginning! 0bviously now it has greatly changed. just explain the weight loss. what a label for and what are you now? i was about 16.5 stone before at my heaviest. i went down to just below 13. i am now around 13.4. but i'm still monitored even now even though the trial has officially passed for me. i'm still being monitored by my local practice. what do you say to those of us watching now thinking we are overweight, is it too late?” of us watching now thinking we are overweight, is it too late? i don't think it is ever too late. the one thing for me is that you need support of your family to get through it. you need support of your collea g u es through it. you need support of your colleagues will stop i work in the food industry which made my life a bit more of a challenge. you work in the food industry?! i do. it was an
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interesting moment the time. having my shakes when my colleagues were stuffing their face with goodies! if you've got the right support and the right mental attitude, it can work. i would recommend anyone to do it. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us and congratulations. thank you very much. it's been described as a planetary crisis — but a total ban on plastics entering the world's oceans has been rejected by environment ministers from around the world meeting in kenya. they said the proposal was too vague as it didn't specify which sorts of plastic waste should be kept out of the sea. scientists say they're shocked to discover the effect plastics can have on marine life — endangering animals such as turtles which can swallow foreign items in the ocean. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin reports. the plastic epidemic is everywhere. here volunteers are clearing up a beach in watamu, eastern kenya. the plastic comes from as far as indonesia and japan. it is harming animals like turtles which ingest plastic pieces.
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half of the turtles brought in for treatment for eating plastics end up dead. here is one lucky turtle being measured before it is put back in the sea. it was brought in sick by a fisherman. the man who runs the turtle hospital says turtles offer an insight into pollution of the entire ocean. we focus on turtles because they are endangered, but also they are quite a charismatic species. people like turtles. it is easier to get people to like turtles than maybe a ray or some kind of weird fish. but also because they are an excellent indicator species of ecosystem health. at the united nations in kenya, these installations offer an artist's insight into the impact of plastics in the oceans. un environment ministers are discussing what to do about it. some nations are banning plastic bags completely. others are more cautious.
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the un's oceans chief wants much faster action. the plastic, the tremendous amount of plastic that we use ends up in the ocean and the ocean has been seen as a trash dump where we dump everything we don't need. that plastic never goes away. mostly it floats on the surface. it sinks to the bottom. and we urgently need to do something about it. scientists recently discovered that creatures at the very bottom of the sea in the mariana trench had ingested micro plastic fragments. many of them will have been carried thousands of miles from cities far inland. in nairobi, for instance, they have banned plastic bags. but look at this. the un grinds slowly. while governments are figuring out how to progress, ordinary people have simply got to stop doing this. roger harrabin, bbc news, nairobi. in a moment the business news with rachel.
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first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted". ministers say no part of the uk will be treated differently in the brexit talks as labour branded their approach an "embarrassment." a warning for parents, the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. sales of new cars stall once again — in november they fell for the eighth month in a row. the number of new cars registered was down by around 11 percent compared with november last year figures show. we'll have more on this in a moment. commuting costs for rail passengers will rise injanuary at their fastest rate for five years. it was already known that fares
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regulated by the government , which represent about half of the total and include season tickets , would go up by three—point—six % from next month. the uk's services sector grew slower than expected. that affects lots of different types of businesses from banking to farming. meanwhile the prices the companies charge jumped to their highest level since early 2008. sales of new cars stall once again — in november they fell for the eighth month in a row. that is right simon. that is according to figures. in november, thousands of new cars were
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registered. while the figures falling? well, consumers have uncertainty over the future of diesel. can these will hold its value? exactly what you said. previously we have seen a huge boom to the number of cars being bought so there is a hangover from that huge boost in sales. let's hear more. anna—marie baisden, head of autos, bmi research explained why car sales were falling. we've had a couple of years of good car sales. we have had some attractive financing options out there. private contract purchases. leasing deals and attractive financing deals. that has led to some real booming years for sales. there is an element of normalisation about the sales we see this year. we we re about the sales we see this year. we were already forecasting a fall in sales for the year as a whole this year. then you've got the added consumer uncertainty about ways
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growth —— wage growth. also brexit. everything is combining for a perfect storm for the car market. talking about tax — specifically ...how much tax the uk's largest companies pay? so we are talking about the 100 group — it's basically the ftse100 but it also includes a number of large private uk companies. collectively they employ 6.5% of the uk workforce. their total tax contributions — increased for 7th year in a row this report is about showing us — how much tax these large companies pay — how many people they employ — how much they spend on r&d — and how they support smaller businesses in the uk economy. these figures are put together by pwc — andrew packman, from total tax contribution and tax transparency leader. thank you forjoining us on
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afternoon live. what is the aim of a report by this. the aim of this report by this. the aim of this report is to explain all of the taxes that companies pay. people focusjust on taxes that companies pay. people focus just on corporation tax but corporation tax is only one of a much larger number of taxes that companies pay. this year, corporation tax is about 25% of the taxes of these larger companies. tax can be a touchy subject. we've had lots of headlines, people think the corporations don't buy as much tax as they should. looking at this report will people think that companies are paying what they should do? it's the way the tax syste m should do? it's the way the tax system is setup. what i hope should do? it's the way the tax system is set up. what i hope this does is put the taxes that companies pay into context. we had billions of pounds in tax, it is contributed
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from all the tax paid by these companies. and as you say making significant investments in capital investment. uk corporation tax rate is 20% — the government wants to reduce that to 17% what difference would that make to the companies in this report? the purpose of that production ball reduction in corporation tax is to attract investment into the uk so that other tax goes up. to compensate for the reduction in corporation tax. shall we looked at the markets? he took the words right out of my mouth. an hour ago i told you that the sterling is weak and the euro is up. now, we have a downturn.
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provident financial has a group which lends financial grouping and four cars. they are being investigated and a one point they we re investigated and a one point they were down 18% it has now recovered a bit and it's down to 11%. anyone looking at you thinking you are all bouncy, you've just been to lapland, haven't you? thank you. tonight it's the turner prize — the uk's best known art award. previous winners have included damian hurst, grayson perry and steve mcqueen. for the first time it's being held in hull, as part of its year as city of culture. rather than simply previewing the four nominees up for the £25,000 prize — we decided to create our own contest by asking a group of primary school children to decide who would be a worthy winner. 0ur arts and entertainment correspondent colin paterson went to meet the judges
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of "the tiny turner." we are here tojudge the tiny turner! 12 of britain's most honest art critics. their task, examine the work of the four turner prize nominees and pick their favourites. this is the tiny turner. first to be examined by ourjunior judges, lubaina himid. i don't get this one. it's like made out of like wood. she paints on everyday materials to explore black identity. i like how she's put wooden pieces into it. and she just loves art. i think the message is to use your recycling things to make better things for other people.. she says, like, slavery would have been a big thing back in the olden days. next, rosalind nashashibi, who works primarily in film. vivian's garden depicts a mother
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and daughter in guatemala. to be honest, i thought it was really random. the movie was quite interesting, but not that much. there was like dogs fighting and somebody walking along. and somebody walking ——alone. and there was a lot people having an argument. how did it make you feel? it made me feel sad. time to move on to hurvin anderson. i think this is like modern art. ‘cause you can't really see what it is. his paintings explore themese of memory, identity and nationhood. i like all the paintings because all of them are very colourful. i like the pictures because they have a lot of detail on them it took a long time for the artist who made it. this one is very cool.
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it's like nature. and i kind of like nature. i have tried to grow flowers in my garden but i failed. and the final contender, andrea buttner. the hand looks like fish and chips. or maybe dinosaur hands. she often chooses subjects which are overlooked and undervalued within contemporary art. that looks like a potato. and like a police helmet on it. i don't really like them because they are kind of creepy with their pointy fingers. i really like this one because it looks like darth vader helmets and i really like star wars. time for the judges to gather around and pick the winner of the first ever tiny turner. andrea buttner. four! rosalind nashashibi. five. lubaina himid.
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six! and hurvin anderson. 10! yes, a clear victory for the 52—year—old from birmingham. and the reason behind thejudges' choice? i like hurvin anderson's paintings because it's full of nature. because he has nice, bright colours. the painting it makes me think of minecraft. find out if the actual turner prize goes the same way tonight. tiny turner! colin paterson, bbc news, hull. and you can find out who has won the turner prize tonight at 9:30pm on the news channel where we will have live coverage from hull. owning a historic castle is something many of us might dream of, but few could make a reality, but thousands of people across the world have joined forces to do just that. by contributing as little as 45 pounds each, the group raised over "440,000 to buy the neglected 13th century chateau
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mothe—chandeniers in western france. the buyers responded to an online fundraising call and intend to restore it to its former glory. they will have to get rid of those trees fast but rather remarkable pictures. time for a look at the weather... here's sarah. good afternoon. a fairly cloudy weather forecast today. but late in the week we will get storm caroline. it has been named by the met office. it has been named by the met office. it has been sitting in the atlantic at the moment but it will arrive on wednesday night and into thursday. it might bring gusts of more than 80 miles an hour. strongest for the north and west. significant travel disruption is likely. back to the here and now, it is fairly cloudy through this evening. dry for many places but a bit of rain in the north—west. particularly heavy and persistent rain in north—west scotland. breezy and cloudy elsewhere to keep those temperatures at around six to 8 degrees. so a
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soft breeze for wednesday morning. pretty similar to what we have today in england and wales, perhaps quite cloudy. but later in the day, rain and winds picking up. another mild day around ten and 11 degrees but things will turn windy. so in the middle of the week we will see storm caroline bringing wet and windy weather. before colder and more wintry weather returns as we head to the latter part of the week. wednesday evening, those winds stretched across the country. we might see gales also the bury severe gales across ireland and scotland. but that rain many times over the country. the rain really dominating the forecast on thursday. we could see gusts of up to 80 miles an hour ina see gusts of up to 80 miles an hour in a social and with storm caroline.
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they could be followed by wintry showers. lots going on in the weather on thursday. as storm caroline clears away to the north—east, as of friday we start to see colder air coming in from the north. so as we head to the end of the week, the air coming in from the northerly direction. sleet and snow showers on friday blowing in from that northerly wind. particularly for scotland, north england and wales. it is going to feel chilly. three to 6 degrees. feeling sub zero when you add on the wind chill. you can find more details on our. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy.
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today at 4:00pm. a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted". in relation to manchester, he also commented that it is conceivable that the attack might have been averted had the cards fallen differently. brexit impasse — pressure on theresa may to find out what went wrong yesterday — and fix it. in the commons, still some optimism. as was made clear by the comment and statement yesterday, all parties remain confident of reaching a positive conclusion by the end of the week. mr speaker, what an embarrassment. the last 24 hours have given a new meaning to the term coalition of chaos. a warning for parents — the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport.
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it is all england and the ashes. there's triggered at its finest judo. it was england's best day on tour so far. they could be back in the ashes tomorrow. sarah has all the weather. we are watching storm caroline. lots going on in the weather. storm: caroline bringing some dish option. also coming up — we'll be in hull, where the city is gearing up to host one of visual art's most prestigious awards — the turner prize. an independent review into the terrorist attack
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in manchester, in which 22 people were killed, has concluded that m15 and the police may have had opportunities to prevent the manchester bombing. the review, by qc david anderson, says that the bomber, salman abedi, was "a person of interest" to the security services and it was "conceivable the attack might have been avoided had the cards fallen differently". the home secretary has given more details in the house of commons. based on the m15 and police reviews, david anderson explains that in the case of the westminster attack, khalid masood was a closed subject of interest at the time of the asttack. they had no reason to anticipate the attack. regarding the manchester arena attack, salman abedi was also a closed subject of interest at the time of the attack, and so not under active investigation. in early 2017, m15 nonetheless received intelligence on him
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which was assessed as not being related to terrorism. in retrospect, the intelligence can be seen to be highly relevant. had an investigation been reopened at the time, it cannot be known whether salman abedi's plans could have been stopped. m15 assessed that it would have been unlikely. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. salman abedi kept coming up on m15's radar. not for a very good reasons, one time it was a case of mistaken identity. he was in contact with someone in syria, but it was not direct contact. there were two bits of intelligence that came in that were assessed as criminal rather than terrorist. if by chance m15 said we should have a look at anyway, that was the opportunity
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there was for someone watching more closely. in retrospect that stuff seems to have been very relevant to the manchester attack. there is also the data washing exercise, going through former subjects of interest, trying to look at who they should go back and look at. his name came up out of 20,000 of who they should look at again. the meeting was scheduled for nine days after the attack. it's poignant. it is like a goalkeeper reaching out with a gloved hand, gets his hand on the ball but it still trickles across the line. hindsight is a wonderful thing. does it look like a mistake was made? m15's own assessment is not only that they think that they did not make a serious mistake but also they are not convinced that even if they got there, that they would necessarily have seen what he was up to. their assessment is that they did not make a mistake and that it anyway probably would not
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have stopped the attack. but to outsiders, as i say, whether it is a mistake or not, i do not know. there is this terrible feeling that maybe it could have in stock. —— it could have been stopped. it is not talking about an incident where one or two people died. 22 people died and some of them children at a concert. the most horrendous attack. you just feel like they were so close. it also looks at the london bridge attack. what does that say about that? that is a different story. here is a man who came to their attention two years ago. as a man who aspire to attack the uk. the operation was set up to investigate him as someone who might want to attack the uk. when they looked at him more, it looked like maybe he wanted to radicalise young kids or travel to syria.
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they focused on him. although he was an active subject of interest, what they did not see was a man who had got together with two associates, bought knives at a local supermarket, then hired a van to mow down people london bridge. again, it is a missed opportunity, but in a different way. this was a guy at one point they thought was going to attack the uk, and then he did sort of under their own noses. this time yesterday it looked as though a breakthrough on brexit was imminent. 24 hours later — well, there's confusion to say the least. so — in an unusual approach — i'm just going to quote from the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg who wrote this she says (and this is her tweet), this is the rough version of what's happening today... uk govt — says it will all be fine. dublin — says we can't budge. dup — says we won't budge the eu — says the show is now in london... and the brexiteers? well, they say that if the eu doesn't bury this bit for now — may has to walk. putting some flesh on that tweet — here's our political correspondent iain watson. it is 320 miles long with almost
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as many crossing points. both the british and irish governments do not want this to become a so—called hard border after brexit, with customs posts and checkpoints, but it has now become painfully apparent that, in the current political landscape, that is easier said than done. this morning, the prime minister said there were still encouraging signs. 0ur talks with the european union have made a lot of progress, there are still a couple of issues we need to work on. here is the core of the problem — the irish government say to guarantee there is no hard border after brexit, rules and regulations should remain the same across the whole island of ireland, but the dup believes this would create an internal border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. they find that unacceptable. the dup stand strong for the union, stand strong for the northern ireland's position within the united kingdom. we will not allow any settlement
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to be agreed which causes divergence from the rest of the united kingdom. the irish prime minister rated clear that he could block something. we cannot move on to phase two until we have the assurance that we need, that they will not be a hard border. the assurances we have been promised for it longer than 18 months. the ball is in london's court. urgent question, keir starmer. in the british government, the opposition was keen to exploit the difficulties. it's one thing to go
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to brussels and follow—up of those on the other side of the negotiating table. —— it is one thing, mr speaker, to go to brussels and fall out with those on the other side of the negotiating table, but quite another to fall out with those supposedly on your own side of the negotiating table. we recognise that as we exit, we must respect the integrity of the single market and the customs union, but we must equally respect the integrity of the united kingdom. but a former labour northern ireland secretary says there is only one way to solve the problem of the irish border. you are not going to be able to find a solution to the irish border problem unless unionists feel they are remaining still within the uk, and that means in the same common and customs union as notjust the rest of the uk but the irish republic and therefore the european union as well. there is no alternative to this. that kind of deal is unlikely to appeal to the ministers who voted for brexit. confident of a deal, mrjohnson? and theresa may's cabinet colleagues remained tight—lipped on the prospect of any deal at all. iain watson, bbc news.
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karen theresa may fix it? that is the question. nobody knows the answer. we are told that he is confident and the close to ideal and that she plans to return to brussels at some point, presumably when she thinks that she has got an agreement. there is no doubt that this has heaped even more pressure on to her leadership. we seen today in the house of commons several labourmps, snp, lib in the house of commons several labour mps, snp, lib dem, the odd conservative. there is one solution. the whole of the uk could stay in the single market, something that david davis protected. 0n the other side, brexit supporters, they are growing impatient and think that the uk has been compromised enough, we have increased the amount of money
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that we are willing to give, we have talked about the ecj having some kind of role during transition, now all the things we had yesterday in that agreement that was supposed to be there. they say, look, be honest, if ireland and the eu don't like it, now is the time to walk away, get on with it and we will trade with the rest of the world on the world trade 0rganisation rules. she is under an enormous amount of pressure. they don't understand why she went to brussels yesterday without having got agreement of the party that is p°ppin9 got agreement of the party that is p°pping up got agreement of the party that is popping up in government. nigel dodds, the deputy leader of the dup says that the texts that they were shown yesterday simply was not precise enough. too much in it that could be misunderstood and was maybe it will for the misunderstood by dublin. that was the problem, they didn't have it on meltdown. some
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people in theresa may's party says that she cannot do this. this wasn't any conspiracy. this post at purely any conspiracy. this post at purely a clock up? it sounds like it. the dup says that they were consulted over the weekend, they thought that they had a clear idea as to what was in the document. but when the words we re in the document. but when the words were shown to them yesterday morning, they didn't reflect what they had been told and this is an incredibly sensitive issue. in terms of whether we do not make progress and get to that next stage for the uk government, the deadline is the 14th december. the eu summit is happening there. they would say that there is another deadline. they must be hoping that the irish government look at the situation and think, do we really not want to go to trade talks given how much of an impact this would have on the average economy? equally, theresa may once
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the dup -- economy? equally, theresa may once the dup —— theresa may once the dup to think about whether they would end up with jeremy to think about whether they would end up withjeremy kopper. it is a cliche but it is true that if there isa cliche but it is true that if there is a will, there is a way. —— they would end up withjeremy corbyn. perhaps some diplomatic watering can get everybody on side. your absolutely right, that is a cliche! nigel dodds is giving a news conference. he said that the dup did see the text that was on the table yesterday, but the only site late morning. —— but they only saw it. they seem to suggest they had seen it pretty late on in the negotiating process. they had been assured by the government and the general principles what the government was and was not prepared to agree to. but they never actually saw the wording of the draft agreement.
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they did not think the wording reflected what the government had been telling them. so they informed the government immediately when they got that text, that draft agreement, that it was not acceptable to them. you are seeing the dup's experience in the negotiations they have been involved in in the northern ireland peace process, nigel dodds talked about text being important. the dup know the importance of weighing every word, knowing that every word in an agreement is going to be interpreted. and they want to make sure, they say, that everything is unambiguous and that as far as possible at this stage the details are kneeled down. —— are nailed down. that is their problem with the text yesterday, it was too general. on this crucial issue of regulatory realignment, mr dodds did say the dup were not opposed to have some kind of alignment in some areas. he pointed out that northern ireland had a single energy market
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with the irish republic. what the dup did not want was for northern ireland to follow the rules of the single market and the eu customs union as a generality. perhaps a suggestion of a way forward from nigel dodds, the dup could live with something more specific in specific areas in which the rules for northern ireland and the irish republic and the rest of the uk could line up and that things were nailed down. we heard more detail, then that perhaps could be a way round this impasse. thank you both very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted". ministers say no part of the uk will be treated differently in the brexit talks as labour branded their approach an "embarrassment." a warning for parents — the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. england captainjoe root leads the fightback against australia england's best day in the ashes
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series offer. joe root reads the chase on the final day in adelaide. england forward as a dog for the six nations. he has broken his strong. —— england forward is a doubt for the six nations and has broken his job. michael white has been beaten 6—1. i will be back in the next 50 minutes with a full update. —— 15 minutes. parents are being warned about the dangers of live, online streaming services, after it emerged sex offenders are increasingly using them to manipulate their victims. the warning from the national crime agency follows a week—long operation by uk authorities against child sexual exploitation, which led to the arrest of more than 190 people. angus crawford reports. hands up all those who have used live streaming? aged 13 and 14, they know about apps which let children broadcast
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live from their phones. today, they're talking about how to do it safely. somebody could be trying to trick you, couldn't they? the apps are quick to download, easy to use. these pupils could go live in the playground, the street, or even their own bedrooms. sometimes it can be quite dangerous, because if someone's following someone that they don't know, they will be able to see it. like, you don't know who is watching you. the real problem with some of these apps is there's no proper checking of age or identification, so that means a live streaming service with a 17 rating could be used by children as young as this — or even younger, eight or nine. look at this — a boy and a girl on the app periscope. now read the comments. we don't want to identify them — she isjust nine. almost a thousand people are watching, and they're mostly adult men. we can't show you the worst of the comments. periscope told us it had zero
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tolerance for this kind of behaviour, but we found it on other apps too, and for the children caught up in it, the consequences can be devastating. i found her inconsolable in her bedroom... this is an actress, but the words are true — those of a mother whose ten—year—old daughter tried out the app 0megle for fun. he switched his webcam on, showed her his private parts, and asked her to take photos of herself, which she did. she was terrified by what had happened and scared of what she'd done. it offers offenders an immediate connection to children and young people that is one to one, it allows them to manipulate children and young people, offer excitement, sympathy, connection, emotional connection, involve them with games and trickery, and we see children getting basically manipulated to do things that ultimately they're very
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uncomfortable about and don't want to do. a campaign video launched today warning about the dangers of live streaming aimed at young people and their parents and posing a stark question — when children broadcast live to the world from their own bedrooms, can they really stay safe? angus crawford, bbc news. a former senior police officer has demanded that the first secretary of state, damian green withdraw allegations about him or face the possibility of legal action. last month, in a tweet, mr green accused bob quick of making "untrue" allegations that he had pornography on his work computer. i'm joined now by our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. how did this row all start? this started last month when there was an article in the sunday times
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newspaper based iin —— based on a statement by bob quick. damian green responded by saying that it was political smears and that bob quick was in flagrant breach of his duty of confidentiality. a strong criticism of bob quick. it is still on his twitter feed. and what has bob quick said? he has responded today in a statement issued by his lawyers saying that the attack was hurtful, personal and that everything he said about this matter was in the public interest and in no way motivated politically. he says that he bears no malice whatsoever should damian green that he's —— but he has said that you shouldn't restore publicly the allegation that he is a liar and
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that he is considering legal action. there is an implied threat that he will sue him. has there been a response from damian green? he has is that it is inappropriate for him to comment and that there are two enquiries:. the cabinet office enquiry into damian green's conduct and a scotland yard enquiry into the actions of bob quick and another former officer as to whether they have potentially broken the law and preached digital —— breached their duty of confidentiality. the step—father of five—year—old charlie dunn, who drowned at a water park, has pleaded guilty to manslaughter by gross negligence at birmingham crown court. charlie died in hospital injuly 2016 after he was found in a lake at bosworth water park. paul smith, 36, had denied any wrong—doing over charlie's death but he changed his plea during his trial. charlie died in hospital injuly last year. what happened in court?
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we heard last week how it was a warm sunny day, the first of the school summer holidays in july last sunny day, the first of the school summer holidays injuly last year, that the five—year—old went to bosworth for the water park in leicestershire. with his stepfather and mother. birmingham crown court heard how the ball was left unsupervised for two hours and drowned in a 1.4 metre deep lagoon. his stepfather paul smith had originally denied manslaughter by glasgow —— by gross negligence. but he changed his plea today to guilty. it isa he changed his plea today to guilty. it is a popular tourist attraction, it's in one of the lagoons that charlie dunn was found. the court heard last week that he couldn't swim and didn't have any armbands. separately, charlie ‘s mother had
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denied manslaughter. by gross negligence and will not be dry for this. thejury was negligence and will not be dry for this. the jury was discharged. negligence and will not be dry for this. thejury was discharged. —— she will not be tried for this. on a separate occasion, charlie was travelling in a pedal car new to his home and a neighbour prevented him from driving it onto a main board. the case was adjourned for sentence until december 20. —— driving it onto a until december 20. —— driving it ontoa main until december 20. —— driving it onto a main road. leicestershire police told us that they were around 1000 people in bosworth water park on the day that the tragedy happened. many went to trial it was eight and were understandably distressed by what happened. charlie was left alone on numerous occasions
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despite being able to swim. smith was looking after charlie and it was said that his fellow came with tragic consequences. the two will be sentenced on december 20. four days, there has been speculation as to whether donald trump is going to recognise jerusalem as whether donald trump is going to recognisejerusalem as the capital of israel. in the last few minutes, the palestinian president's spokesman says that matter was one that the move would have dangerous consequences. we don't have full details of what exactly was set in this telephone call. it came at such a highly sensitive moment between mr trump and the president in ramallah. what we know from the official palestinian news agency is that mr
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trump told the president of palestine to move his agency in jerusalem. the presidential spokesperson says that mr bass warned this case have dangerous consequences. this is the message that we've had from palestinian officials and leaders around the arab world consistently over the past few days as speculation has mounted about what exactly mr trump's plans. to put background on this, israel says trump's plans. to put background on this, israel sasterusalem as its eternal undivided capital and it's been a source of frustration for israeli leaders that there is not recognition of its full sovereignty over the city. palestinians went eastjerusalem as the capital of the future independent state and it's been the international consensus for a long time now that the status of the city should be decided in a
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negotiated peace deal between israel and the palestinians. the east of jerusalem was captured by israel in the 1967 middle east war. it was later annexed in a move that was not recognised internationally. at the moment, all countries that have an embassy initial, they keep them in tel aviv or close by and theyjust have consulates injerusalem. this isa have consulates injerusalem. this is a big departure from mr trump. google has announced plans to employ ten thousand people to search for violent and extremist content on its video—sharing website, youtube. the website's chief executive says the company will also track videos that risk children's safety, and will make more use of technology that finds extremist videos. the new car market has declined for the eighth month in a row, according to industry figures. fewer than 164,000 new cars were registered last month — down 11.2%on the same month last year. the society for motor manufacturers and traders blamed the government for prompting a sharp drop in demand for diesel cars.
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if you're away on a long trip you can really start to crave a taste of home — and that's exactly what happened to paolo nespoli? an italian astronaut who's aboard the international space station. he missed his favourite food so much that he brought it up with his boss back on earth. the result? pizza in space. without a delivery service nearby, nasa sent up the ingredients to construct some pizzas that were out of this world. paolo and the rest of the expedition 53 crew wasted no time putting them together. you want to know what happens... it floats into someone's face! you are interested in the view from space as well. this would be be seen that you would
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see from the international space station. this was a seamless! this is the view from space. this is storm apparel line. it is swirling in the atlantic and heading towards our shores. —— storm caroline. in the atlantic and heading towards our shores. -- storm caroline. can you just explain why it is caroline? while it is the third named storm of the season. it goes in alphabetical order each year and it alternates by gender. the met office comes up with these names and lost two of the public came up with 10,000 names and these names were picked by the met office. you can submit names if you want. it will be strongest in the north of scotland, caroline, there could be some disruption to power networks and travel as well. what
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about before then? before then it will be much quieter. at the moment, there is a lot of clubs up and down there is a lot of clubs up and down the country. there is some drizzle across the country. tonight, there is enough cloud and enough of a breeze to keep things frost free. temperatures are not far off what they are at the moment into wooden 7-9 they are at the moment into wooden 7—9 degrees. tomorrow, similar tragedy. perhaps a few breaks in the cloud but the winds will pick up during the day. —— tomorrow is a similar story. this is a taste of the first part of caroline. but denied, winds are strengthening across northern and western parts. there could be severe gales across irish seacoast. the winds will go south—eastwards, heading into thursday morning. thursday from the word go will be these very strong
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winds, heavy bursts of rain pushing south—eastwards. there could be gusts of many miles per hour. cold air is bringing in wintry sleet and snow showers. temperatures are back at omitting the figures. as we head into thursday, storm caroline clears away and there is this northerly breeze. cold air is coming in from the arctic as we head into friday. the end of the week looking colder as this in a in funding. in north—westerly wind bringing wintry showers on friday, perhaps some snow across scotland. malcolm wood the south—west, too. some as well but in the breeze it will feel chilly. temperatures are 3—6d but it will feel subzero on friday when you
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think about the wind as well. lots going on through the week. midweek on, the arrival of caroline, wet and windy weather on the way. while that at the way, it is a 20 something wintry. —— once that's out of the way. they will be ice and snow and wind. all the details are on the website. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: a review of terror attacks in the uk finds the manchester arena bomber, salman abedi, had been a "person of interest" to m15 and opportunities were missed to stop him. the prime minister is under pressure to get things back on track after brexit talks were derailed yesterday by the dup. the deputy leader of the dup has said that northern ireland wants the uk to leave the eu "as one nation" and doesn't want to see brexit talks fail. police are warning parents that
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children using live streaming services are at risk of being exploited by sex offenders. sport now on afternoon live with 0lly foster. i don't know about you, my heart can't take much more of this. the ashes, australia looked like a dead cert ‘s and now we are fighting back. it really messes up your sleep pattern! you always get a sense of foreboding, i have done for the first test and for the first few days of this second test in adelaide. jimmy anderson first. joe root toughing it
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out until the close. his captaincy called into question after winning toss and putting australia in to bat first tomorrow mayjust see one of his finest hours. what would you put on an england win? it has got to be 50/ 50. england bowlers turned up jimmy anderson was firing. they bowled australia out for 138 then made it through to the close on 176 forfour. so very simple, england need another 178 runs, very doable in three sessions and can't afford to lose six wickets. our sports correspondent andy swiss is in adelaide. it began a peaceful adelaide tuesday
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but turned into the most tense ashes nailbiter. england began with barely a flicker of hope. jimmy anderson took five in total. australia's lead was growing all the time but england kept chipping away. by the time australia were all out for 138, england's target was still a massive one, 350 for. they would need a record run chase. as mark stoneman and alastair cook eased them past the mark, england dared to dream but both left in quick succession and another soon followed, james vince wafting his wicket away. under floodlights and the most fierce pressure, dawid malan and joe root hungin pressure, dawid malan and joe root hung in there. england kept surviving, just. it was pure sporting theatre. the pair rekindles
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england's hopes but ten minutes from the close, a final twist, dawid malan gone. australia are still favourites but england 178 runs from something very special. this has been some fight back from england. 24 hours ago they looked beaten, the ashes all but gone and yet they still have a chance of a remarkable win. to be honest we are delighted to be in this position, to have any chance of winning the game, which we didn't think we would have. it is good for us. there's a huge amount of work left in this game if we have any chance of winning with it -- we have any chance of winning with it —— winning it but we are in with a chance which is all we could ask for after the first two days. and so an enthralling finale awaits. from the brink of defeat, the chance of one of cricket's greatest victories. mark cavendish says he wants
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to race in next year's four—day tour de yorkshire. it's been running since 2014 when the county hosted the grand depart for the tour de france. next year's event in may also features a two—day women's race. the routes were revealed today and cavendish will do all he can to be there. i want to be in yorkshire, my mother is from here, and to see the legacy, the toured the yorkshire, it is wicked to be part of it. what makes this race special is the fans. you see it every year since 2014, it's a special place to rise in the uk, that's for sure. —— special place to ride. it's a champions league night, the final round of group matches celtic can't qualify for the knock—out stages but they'll guarantee a place in the europa league spot if they avoid a heavy
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defeat against anderlecht. manchester united need just a point from their match against cska moscow to guarantee top spot in their group. i want to make a few but not too many changes. we didn't qualify yet. we didn't finish first in the group yet. there are other clubs also involved in the qualification, and i need to keep a certain balance in the team. chelsea already through — they take on atletico madrid at stamford bridge knowing that victory would guarantee them top spot in their group. that would give them a potentially easier team in the knockout stage. it should be a good match. five—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the last 16 of snooker‘s uk championships after beating welshman michael white 6—1 at the york barbican. playing on his 42nd birthday, 0'sullivan was dominant early on against a slow—starting white.
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he finished the match with a final break of 65. this takes him a step closer to matching steve davis's record of six championship titles. john higgins is leading yan bingtao 4—3. england forward maro itoje could be a doubt for the six nations after fracturing his jaw playing for saracens at the weekend. that starts in february. that's all the sport for now. thank you. now on afternoon live let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk.
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carol malia is in newcastle — she'll be telling us more about people in cumbria still waiting to get into their homes, two years on from the flooding caused by storm desmond. and in a moment i'll be speaking to charlotte leeming in leeds, where the northern ballet is rounding off a big 12 months with its third production of the year. first though to carol in newcastle and the second anniversary of those devastating floods in cumbria. yes, they thought they have the worst christmas ever this time two yea rs worst christmas ever this time two years ago worst christmas ever this time two yea rs ago because worst christmas ever this time two years ago because they were suddenly, brutally turfed out of their homes and their businesses. three rivers were affected here, or rising with unprecedented rainfall recorded. many villages in cumbria we re recorded. many villages in cumbria were flooded and the major city of
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carlisle. 3000 plus homes were affected and the businesses i mentioned, but bridges lost, ripping communities apart, which have only just in recent months been replaced ata just in recent months been replaced at a cost of millions of pounds. the slopes of helvellyn crashed into the river causing flooding further downriver for many months. people we re downriver for many months. people were with absolute disruption. we spoke to one homeowner, paul booth from carlisle, one of the people still waiting to get back into his house. every job that they've done has been done twice or three times. with hard new doorframes, i think we have thrown out two sets of doors, it's been horrendous. we feel helpless. it is very depressing to hear stories like that, but whilst bridges and homes can be repaired
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memories are harder to deal with. yes, we are all thinking about christmas at the moment and to be suddenly without your house is unthinkable. and the damage that is caused by flooding goes far beyond what many might perceive. the residents are worried all the time, those that have gone back into their houses, as you can imagine, every time the rain falls heavily, they are worried sick. we have stormed —— storm caroline to come. you get nervous, my neighbour couldn't sleep and moved her furniture upstairs. people are really frightened so the impact is enormous and the trouble is if you haven't been flooded you don't understand. i go to glenn
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redding most years for holiday and many people do, but what are authorities doing because once it sta rts authorities doing because once it starts raining there it really comes down at you. there have been efforts to make places more resilience to flooding. a list of things have been done and i will read them. we have cheaper government supported home insurance, £5,000 grants for people to improve their own home defences, rebuilding of new flood defences, and also they are looking at rivers from source to seek to try to work out if they can build reservoirs further up river to stop the flooding reaching the towns and cities to prevent this kind of thing happening again. we all have our fingers crossed for tomorrow night with the next storm. most have moved on and the people in the areas hit by storm desmond, these stories go on and on and it's good to revisit.
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let's go to charlotte leeming now in leeds because we are talking about the little mermaid. it's been quite a yearfor the northern ballet, hasn't it? yes, the ballet is based ona hasn't it? yes, the ballet is based on a mermaid who falls in love with a man from the earth. i think many people will automatically think of the disney film when they hear the title, the little mermaid, because the redheaded princess has left a permanent mark on popular culture. but northern ballet are far more faithful to the original story. it isa faithful to the original story. it is a real tear—jerker, a dark story, and this afternoon i was lucky enough to get a sneak peek at the technical rehearsals held at the grand theatre in leeds. the production is looking exquisite. there is colour, sea creatures,
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sailors, sequins and of course romance. i don't want to broadcast any spoilers today, but the mermaid must obtain true love's first kiss or the deal that results in her death. anyone who goes to this production, you really need to take your tissues. just like anyone watching this programme every day, i've got to be honest! but we will leave it there. thank you to both of you. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm. now let's get more on the brexit negotiations. ruth davidson has been commenting on the backlash, she said it was only right other
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parts of the uk are not left behind during those all—importa nt negotiations. there were always going to be sticking points and the northern irish issue was always going to need to be resolved. we need to retain the idea we are negotiating us on united kingdom and we don't leave one part of it behind. ruth davidson there. the government has agreed to release confidential reports on universal credit to a commons select committee, in line with a labour motion debated today. the information is set to be handed over before christmas. the chair of the work and pensions committee, frank field, said he will be seeking the speaker's advice following the government's decision. he said, "i will be asking, before any documents come over to us... what sense of secrecy and honour bind us when we get these documents." more business news injust a moment but first let's look at the headlines. a review of terror attacks in the uk
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finds the manchester arena bomber salman abedi was a former "subject of interest" and the attack "might have been averted". ministers say no part of the uk will be treated differently in the brexit talks as labour branded their approach an embarrassment. a warning for parents — the growing use of live, online streaming services by children is being exploited by sex offenders. hello. sales of new cars stall once again in november they fell for the eighth month in a row. figures from the society for motor manufacturers and traders say the number of new cars registered was down by around 11% compared with november last year. why? uncertainty over the future of diesel, a lack of real wage growth, and a hangover from a previous rise in sales. railfares rise again — train tickets will go up by an average of 3.4% from 2nd january. the increase, the biggest since 2013, covers regulated fares, which includes season tickets, and unregulated fares,
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such as off—peak leisure tickets. the rail delivery group said that more than 97% of fare income went into improving and running the railway. the rmt union called it a "kick in the teeth" for travellers. the online retail giant amazon has finally launched in australia after weeks of speculation about exactly when it would do so. australia's online shopping market is already worth more than £11 million and is expected to grow as much as 50% in the next five years. so lets start with service sector figures — growing at a slower pace than expected — why does that matter? it's worth about 80% of our economy and covers businesses from banking to farming, hotels and hairdressing and the growth is slowing. it is still growing but not as quickly as we would hope or as quickly as a nalysts we would hope or as quickly as analysts expected it to and it's
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facing lots of challenges. we have wea k facing lots of challenges. we have weak sterling, uncertainty over brexit and that sort of thing. now, who is moneybarn because provident financial‘s shares are not doing well. provident financial is a sub—prime lender... well. provident financial is a sub-prime lender... i thought sub—prime lending had been ruled out after the crash? no, we just figured out that was what caused it. moneybarn is their division which provides car and vehicle finance and the regulator have announced they are looking into now how they assess people who apply for this sort of finance. they were down about 18%, now 11% but it's interesting because this company provident financial, their shares have fallen in value. we are looking at the risky loans.
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yes, their company has lost 80% of value since the start of the year. a bit of a supermarket sweep, we have art bit of a supermarket sweep, we have a rt a nalysts bit of a supermarket sweep, we have art analysts saying tesco, morrisons and sainsbury‘s have more positive outlooks on their profit margins. tesco up more than 3%, sainsbury‘s up tesco up more than 3%, sainsbury‘s up more than 3% and morrisons up more than 2%. why? let's ask richard dunbar, investment director, aberdeen asset management. there are self—inflicted problems with tesco and morrisons and are generally weaker consumer. those problems are still in existence but the discounters are not offering
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quite such fierce competition. i think generally one of the larger competitors, asda, has done poorly and the environment is generally better for retailers to improve their profits. richard, let's talk about the service sector. disappointing figures out today, it is still growing but not by as much as expected, how significant is that? we have very good figures from the manufacturing and construction sector who said things were going well when they were surveyed. weaker sterling allowing for better export. the service sector is the biggest sector in the uk, and wages are going up, particularly the minimum wage and living wage, which is putting pressure on business and forcing them to put prices up some things are tougher for that area of the economy but that area is the
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most important part. the economy is still growing but in rather an anaemic way. and richard, not a good time for provident financial, share prices down as much as 18% today. it's difficult, the car loan business has been scrutinised and a -- it business has been scrutinised and a —— it follows problems in their credit card business. to refer to provident financial, the regulator is focusing more broadly on car lending and consumer lending in general. i think their fear is there are too many people borrowing too much against the cars they are buying. that said, the focus is on the sort of people that provident financial are lending to and the practices they have shut those people fall into problems with those loans. thank you your time, richard dunbar. i wonder what the oil stocks
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are doing. we were discussing last week tech stocks were faltering. people are putting money into financials because of president trump's promised corporate tax cuts. a bit ofa trump's promised corporate tax cuts. a bit of a rebalance this week. we have seen amazon, microsoft and facebook shares up today. we have put up brent crude because we have the 0pec meeting over the weekend, all the countries have agreed to hold their production output until the end of the year. the price of light crude has come down in the state. can you speak any quicker? i'm sorry, i talk too fast, i will try to slow down next time but i have so much information to tell you! tonight the winner of one of visual
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art's most prestigious awards will be announced. this year the turner prize will be given in the uk's city of culture, hull. for the first time since the award began in 1984, there is no limit on the age of the artist, previously you had to be under 50. jane hill is at the ferens gallery in hull where the exhibition of the artists' work is being held. i used to think 62 was getting on a bit but i don't any more. age is no barrier any more, not any more there anyway! are you trying to say there is hope for us all? i wasn't bringing you into it. it's actually 63, ilike bringing you into it. it's actually 63, i like to correct you, but i know where you are going with that, lubaina himid is the favourite. we will find out if the bookmakers are
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correct. you can see the artwork on display in the ferens gallery behind me. we are outside now because they are setting up for a drinks reception which is the precursor to the awards ceremony tonight. that's why we are standing outside in the cold in hull where they have been very hospitable throughout the day. let's speak to one hull artist born and bred, very good to see you with us. inside the ferens gallery looking at the short list, any thoughts about what strikes you? what struck me, because i had looked at the artists' work before, and it was at the artists' work before, and it was the immediacy of their work that struck me straightaway. there were no oblique references or anything and that is what i like about all of
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their work. it's almost what i would call about interpersonal dynamics. so everyone can get into the work on a different level. with andrea's screen, her phone screen prints are amazing and i think everyone can identify with that. i think that's what i find fascinating about all of their work. and we are here because hull is the uk city of culture 2017, coming towards the end of what a lot of people say is a very successful year with lots of engagement across the city. as someone who was born here and grew up here, what have people been saying to you about its success or otherwise, what it's done for the city? my family and friends have access to most of the activities here and embraced it totally, which is amazing because when i think back to when i was here
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and then now the turner prize arrives in hull, it's quite astounding for me, having formed myself in hull. and several people i was talking to yesterday were volu nteers was talking to yesterday were volunteers and very passionate about this year. they said we are geographically set apart, people don't naturally come to hull unless they are coming for a reason and this puts it on the map. yes, totally. the people of hull come through and go to these different events which have been incredibly ambitious, not just in events which have been incredibly ambitious, notjust in the event they have put on but also the scale, they have put on but also the scale, the sheer amount of events has been phenomenal. and so well done. it has knocked me out to be honest.“ fantastic, you are in for lovely night in that case. the award ceremony will take place in hull minster tonight and we will have a
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special programme beginning at 9:30pm. will find out who the winner is from the short list. the cold is getting to me here! we have a special programme from 9:30pm tonight until ten o'clock and you will find out who the winner is of the turner prize. simon, back to you. jane, for heaven 's sake get back into the warmth. 0ff you. jane, for heaven 's sake get back into the warmth. off you go! and you can find out who has won the turner prize tonight at 9.30pm on the news channel where we will have a full programme of coverage live from hull. that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with shaun ley. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith lucas. we have some pretty stormy weather on the way later this week with the arrival of storm caroline which could bring significant disruption but through this evening and overnight it is fairly quiet. we have a lot of cloud out there. some
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rainfor have a lot of cloud out there. some rain for western scotland. with the breeze and cloud it will be a frost free mild night to come. during the day tomorrow, former england and wales pretty similar with more of a breeze picking up. for scotland and northern ireland too with some rain and temperatures of around 10 celsius for most. the wind is strengthening in the north and west in particular, severe gales around exposed irish coasts. the winds will strengthen further on thursday. so storm caroline on thursday will bring gusts of wind potentially up to 80 mph, particularly in northern scotla nd to 80 mph, particularly in northern scotland where significant travel disruption is possible. today at 5. the manchester arena bomb attack could have been prevented, a government review concludes. salman abedi had been a "subject of interest" to m15 and the report's author
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said opportunities to stop him were missed. in relation to manchester, he also commented that quote, "it is conceivable that the attack might have been averted had the cards fallen differently". twenty two people were killed when abedi blew himself up at the manchester arena in may. we'll have the latest on the report and i'll be talking with the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation lord carlile. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. theresa may tries to find a out way out of the brexit impasse over ireland's border which would allow trade talks to begin.
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