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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 5, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. the release of a serial sex attacker after less than ten years in prison. demands for the parole board to explain its decision. black cab driver, john worboys, was jailed for offences against 12 women, but police believe he carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. good morning. it's friday the 5th of january. also this morning: a slump in new car sales. latest figures are expected to show they've dropped to their lowest level for six years. a squeeze on incomes, warriors for the economy, and a slump in the demand for diesel. —— worries. what could it mean for the car industry? coffee with a conscience.
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a committee of mps wants consumers to pay 25 pence for using takeaway cups to help fund better recycling facilities. the final chance for england to restore some ashes pride is in the balance. they need a breakthrough. the hosts, 151—2. and the weather. tha nkfully the hosts, 151—2. and the weather. thankfully not as windy in the uk today. a dry day for some showers as well. snow in the scottish hills. getting cold this weekend. details coming up. thank you. first, our main story. the decision to release the serial sex offender, john worboys, after less than 10 years in prison, has brought widespread condemnation. the chair of the "home affairs select committee," yvette cooper, said she was "really shocked" that the former black cab driver was being freed. he was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 female passengers, but police believe he actually carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, has more. for six years, john worboys cruised
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smart areas of london in his black cab looking for women to drug and rape. when he was finally caught, thejudge said he'd serve a minimum of eight years in prison and said he wouldn't be released until he was no longer a threat to women. worboys would show young women he picked up in his cab large wads of cash, saying he'd recently won big at the casino. then he'd offer them champagne, which he'd spiked with sedatives, and rape them. the judge gave him what's known as an indeterminate sentence, under which, people are only freed once they're no longer considered dangerous. but today, the bbc discovered that the parole board has decided worboys will be released this month under supervision after spending less than ten years in prison. i've spoken to one of my clients, who is absolutely horrified and really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio, and feels absolutely sick to her stomach.
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the organisation, rape crisis, said it was far too soon for worboys to be released. although police believed john worboys attacked over 100 women, he was only convicted of attacking 12. and only one of those convictions was for rape. and that's why his sentence was so short. all the same, under the indeterminate sentence rules, the parole board will need to have assured themselves thatjohn worboys was no longer a risk as a sexual predator. daniel sandford, bbc news. last year, new car sales in the uk fell for the first time since 2011. forecasts suggest they will continue to stuggle over the coming months too. so, ben, what's causing this bump in the road? the great thing about numbers like this is it reflects how we are thinking, feeling, and spending. exactly. we have not been splashing
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out. after years of solid and record growth, car sales fell by 5.6% last year. in itself, it may not seem like much of a fluctuation, but there are many reasons as to why. the end of cheap finance deals, personal contract payments. you pay a set amount every month and at the end of that period you have the choice to pay more and own the car 01’ choice to pay more and own the car or handed back and get a fresh one. that is great. interests rates have been great. but now they are rising. a flood of second—hand cars come onto the market after those and they are much cheaper. but then there is uncertainty are much cheaper. but then there is u ncerta i nty after are much cheaper. but then there is uncertainty after brexit. people i'm not sure about things and are holding off purchasing things. we have less money in our pockets as
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well. and there have been changes to car tax, meaning owning a car is becoming more expensive. 0n car tax, meaning owning a car is becoming more expensive. on top of that, worrying about cash. all that together means it has been a tough time for the car market. in 45 minutes i will speak to someone from the industry to ask what it means for them and carmaking in this country, and crucially, diesel cars. they fell by more than 17%. that is big news. we will talk about that later. there is a lot to talk about. thank you. the united states is suspending almost all security aid to pakistan because it says the country is failing to deal with terrorists there. the state department says the freeze will remain in place until islamabad takes action on groups with links to the taliban. earlier this week, president trump accused pakistan of lying and harbouring terrorists, while also receiving billions of dollars from the us. the publisher of a controversial new book about donald trump's white
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house has responded to attempts by the president's lawyers to try to block its release. the publication of the book, which is a fly—on—the—wall account of trump's first year in power, has been brought forward to today. in a tweet overnight, donald trump it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. 0ur north america correspondent, peter bowes, reports. publish and be damned. the white house dispute its accuracy and deep president has threatened to sue for libel they say at the author and the publisher should immediately cease and desist from any publication. instead, the release date has been brought forward, much to the apparent delight of mr woolfe. "here you go, you can buy it and read it, thank you, mr president" he tweets. the white house says it is false and fraudulent.
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it portrays mr trump is being surprised at winning the presidency and paints a picture of his administration as dysfunctional and divided. steve bannon, who was widely quoted in the extracts already published, has not disputed their content. his response on a radio programme, to declare his unfailing support for the president. the president of the united states is a great man. you know, i support him day in and day out, whether going through the country giving the public miracle speech or on the show or on the website. and mr trump's response to that... i don't know, he called me a great man last night. so, you know, he obviously changed his tune pretty quick. now, with the lawyers poised, there's an entire book to read for the next instalment in this extraordinary saga. peter bowes, bbc news. north korea has accepted an offer by south korea to hold talks next week. the meeting will be the first between the two countries for more than two years. it'll take place on tuesday, in the demilitarised zone that divides the peninsula. 0ur correspondent, sophie long, is in seoul this morning.
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what is the purpose of this meeting? many people will breathe a sigh of relief at this development. many people will breathe a sigh of relief at this developmentm many people will breathe a sigh of relief at this development. it is significant. we had confirmation from the south korean unification ministry that north korea sent a fax ona line ministry that north korea sent a fax on a line closed two years ago and on a line closed two years ago and on the ninth ofjanuary on a line closed two years ago and on the ninth of january they will meet in the demilitarised zone between the two countries. at that meeting we know they will discuss the possibility of pyongyang sending a delegation to the winter the possibility of pyongyang sending a delegation to the winter olympics due to get under way here in south korea next month. now, this comes just hours after the united states and south korea agreed to stop their joint military exercises. now, these ta ke joint military exercises. now, these take place on a regular. the us and south korea say they are defensive,
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but north korea says they are excuses for provocations. now, that happened. we have confirmation the talks will take place. so, it is a step in the right direction. thank you very much. so, that was sophie long in seoul. the number of people applying for teacher training has fallen by a third compared to this time last year. applications to become english, maths, and science teachers showed some of the most dramatic levels of decline, leading to school leaders warning of an impending crisis in education. however, the government said teaching continued to be an attractive career and it was investing hundreds of millions of pounds to improve recruitment. every hot drink served in a takeaway cup should be subject to a 25 pence tax, according to a group of mps. the environmental audit committee is calling on the levy in order to pay for improvements to the country's recycling facilities. 2.5 billion cups are thrown away each year even though some shops
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offer a discount for people who bring their own. consumers respond better to a charge than they did to a discount. we know a load of coffee shops are already offering a 25p discount. it is up to them how much of this tax they want to pass on to the consumers, but what we are seeing is we are following the principle that the polluter pays. we need a radical shift, a revolution, in the coffee industry, to deliver a more sustainable way of consuming coffee. we are live all morning at one of the only plants in the country that can fully recycle coffee cups. john maguire will have more on the problem and possible solutions later this hour. look at that. that mountain of coffee cups. more than half of all flat faced dog is seen by a vet last year needed treatment for issues directly
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related to how they were bred. more than half of flat faced dogs, including french bulldogs and pugs, seen by vets last year required treatment to correct painful deformities including surgery to clear obstructed airways skin problems and eye ulcers. the british veterniary association said the majority of flat—faced dog owners are still unaware of any problems with the breeds. it is that time of year you will be making goals and resolutions. if you wa nt to making goals and resolutions. if you want to keep a fitness regime up without giving up the alcohol, this could be one for you. it is called beer yoga. it is taking off in pubs. it involves drinking pints of beer while doing yoga. we have been informed they regularly sell out, though it is unknown whether it outweighs the negatives of drinking. so, they were doing yoga while holding their pints. you could spill
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it. beer or goat yoga? i have tried goat yoga. i picked that last time and will continue to do so. though i'll have a pint after. they will go down 3—1 in the ashes if they win this rather than 4—0, but it seems to be slipping away, this fish. fish? fifth test. if they do not get any more, the final test could be lost in the next few hours. 160— two. the hosts are settling into
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their groove. the australian captain looked imperious once more. and now for the football. west ham spoil tottenham's 100% record over the festive period. it finished 1—1 after a pair of stunning long—range goals at wembley. how about that? pedro 0biang's effort was matched by son heung—min. after the match, son said he thought 0bian's goal was better. the fa cup returns tonight, with the first of the third—round matches. liverpool host everton at anfield live on bbc one, while manchester united face derby county. it's the first time in 58 consecutive fa cup matches that united aren't on telivised live. and serena williams has pulled out of this month's australian open. she gave birth to her daughterfour months ago and played an exibition match last week and was hoping to defend her title, but she said although she was "super close" to her best, she wasn't quite ready for competition. that is a very american phrase. she was seen it is going well, but not quite good enough. she wants to feel
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100%. we look forward to her returning whenever that may be. 100%. we look forward to her returning whenever that may hem will not be long. the papers soon, but first, the weather. what is it like? good morning. it is not that windy this morning. good news after strong severe gale force winds over the past few days. that is the main theme of the forecast today. the details. not only is it not as windy, some of you will stay dry, but still some rain in the forecast, mainly in the form of showers. in scotland, cold enough once again for sleet and snow, especially across the higher ground. a cloudy day in scotland. further south, morning brightness, the same in england. yorkshire, sunshine. heavy showers in north—west england at the moment. east anglia and the south—east,
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early—morning rain clearing away. dry and bright conditions for a time. along the south coast, showers. they are already in the south—west of england and quite widely across wales, perhaps on the south—west of england and quite widely acro a wales, perhaps on the south—west of england and quite widely acro a wales, perha sfon the south—west of england and quite widely acro a wales, perha sf the he showers. m" ,-..-... ww” showers. the m" ,-..-... ww” showers. the “5m,21,,,”, m 7 ww” showers. the §tffl and 777” ”7 7 7'777” ireland, showers. the south and east, though, possibly drycool cool start to the country uk wide. a touch of frost here and there under clear skies. some sunny spells. across scotland, generally rather cloudy. further patchy rain, sleet, and snow. feeling cooler today across the uk. temperatures in double figures. 4— nine degrees as a high in the afternoon. even more cold tonight and over the weekend.
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the details. through the night, outbreaks of rain, sleet, and snow, pushing southwards across the country. not much in the way of snow. nothing concerning. wind picking up to the north and east of the uk. chilly, the further north and west you are. elsewhere, the breeze will keep the frost that day. cloud on the weekend. showers around. merging into longer spells of rain across the southern half of the country, especially the far south—east. have the bursts. sleet and snow mixed in. the north and east, dry and bright weather. you will notice the strength of the wind. north— north—east. a cold feeling day. noticeable chill. overnight, sunday morning, as the wind goes away in the north and west, widespread frost. temperatures as low as —10 in rural rural parts of scotland. frost was the south and
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east. a strong wind. gale force at times in the english channel. sunday, other than rain, times in the english channel. sunday, otherthan rain, otherthan for the channel islands and shetland, after a frosty start, a lovely winter's day. dry and sunny, if you do not mind the breeze to the south and east. more updates later on. iam glad i am glad it's not too windy out there. rustling through the papers. having a look at the front pages. you are very neat over there. look at ben's little stuck there. who are you blaming? i'm not blaming anyone. a page of times. the gate we talk about —— they're going to be talking about this in a moment. these revelations about donald trump and the much talked about book is being published today, brought forward among the rounds of ingall —— legal issues. fascinating stuff.
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the story we are covering today. the story ofjohn worboys, aged 60. he was a former taxi driver and he was charged with jug —— was a former taxi driver and he was charged withjug —— drugging and sexually assaulting a police 12 women. he became known as the "black cab rapist. he will be released after serving less than ten years behind bars. it is believed he attacked more than 100 women during his time as a taxi driver. the front page of the sun there. the front page of the sun there. the front page of the daily mirror as well. also, the front page of the daily mail. then, you are having a look at car sales. we have an update on what they've lost the diesel was the big
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loser. down around 70%. we will talk to the boss of the industry body in about half an hour but it is a dire hmmfi about half an hour but it is a dire forecast for sales. a near 5% fall in the uk. it's a whole range of things that have been discussed. worries over the economy. i want to highlight this story. i wonder what it feels like to lose £13 million in one day. that is what mike ashley, the largest shareholder in debenhams, faced yesterday. they said their christmas trading was pretty poor. a big slump in the value of shares. the biggest shareholder lost 13 million quid. value of shares. the biggest shareholder lost 13 million quidm isa paper shareholder lost 13 million quidm is a paper loss. i have a lot on jose mourinho. pieces because he lives in a hotel in manchester, it does not mean he is not committed
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long—term. —— he says. staying in the hotel for all those weeks on end. he says he does it because he is lazy and he likes living in a hotel. he says if the fans wanting to be comfortable. sad guys don't work well. and as somebody is making your bed view. he never struck me as being a sad person. not a case, to use a cliche, but it is in the air. they want players to have more mental and psychological resilience. they have hired an australian. working with the australian swimming team. doctor pepper grange. she is
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renowned forgetting into the players heads. look out for her. here is how it works. let's hope it does. one of the meetings i enjoy about our team is that there is often a box of biscuits in the newsroom. i haven't seen them! it took a biscuit to catch your eye. the traditional biscuit tin. a certain size and depth is important. in each segment there are three or four of your favourite biscuits. this is an argument over a cadbury ‘s variety box which has only one level. there is just box which has only one level. there isjust one of box which has only one level. there is just one of each biscuit. i'm sure they are not the only people who are doing it. attention has been drawn to the issue. it reminds you of smaller chocolate bars. but this
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is taking away a whole layer. unfortunately, it naga gets to the box first there is no hope for anyone. we'll get an update on the sport and then the weather. even by the standards of this presidency, the noises coming from the white house have attracted even more controversy than usual with a very public war of words between donald trump and his former top aide, steve bannon. it follows allegations in a new book about the first year of the trump administration. white house lawyers had threatened legal action. in response, the publishers brought forward the release date to today. so what does this all mean for the president? scottie nell—hughes is an american journalist and conservative commentator who campaigned on behalf of donald trump in 2016. a very good morning to you, scottie and thank you forjoining us. how do
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we approach this? can we deal with some of the trivial stuff first, if you like, and get to is serious stuff. the book now being published today, there are some details about donald trump's habits, going to bed at 6:30 p.m., a cheeseburger in bed, changing his own sheets because he is worried about bugs and germs. talk to us about some of the little stuff that has emerged. the white house this morning is more twisted than c would be at yoga. bookstores oi’ than c would be at yoga. bookstores or even staying open to get this book to people and the trivial parts, the gossip, the middle school aspect is probably what has been dominating headlines for the last 48 hours as are some of the things that you've mentioned. is it true or not? how are they going to back it up? did you see president trump with the
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cheeseburger? those other tabloid issues that sarah sanders was referring to. can you prove it? but it makes it a good read. what is more concerning is what you will go to next, the issues of the people surrounding the president and his actions and reactions. so let's talk about these quotes that we have., for example. 100% of his advisers think he is incapable of functioning in hisjob. think he is incapable of functioning in his job. first of all, i don't discount this book. michael wolff has no region to publish a com pletely has no region to publish a completely scandalous, for joint and slanderous look. he was not one of those" never trump" journalists. he criticised the media in 2016. he had
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no reason to come up criticised the media in 2016. he had no reason to come up with this hit piece but to make a claim like that is false. that doesn't mean there area is false. that doesn't mean there are a lot of advisers who are snakes. thinking they were going to help them. they were putting their own priorities overhears. that is what president trump needs to recognise. what is true and what is not and what will his reaction be? what we have found in the past with donald is that nothing sticks. is there anything that is really important? i think it's very concerning. what this does is it shows the republican party is very divided. steve bannon represented
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the scottie —— the steve bannon conservatives. then there are those who followed donald trump. the gop is as divided as ever. tomorrow, many is as divided as ever. tomorrow, ma ny states is as divided as ever. tomorrow, many states start pulling papers for people running to the house of representatives. it will be interesting to see if we have the engagement in 2018 and this book does a real damage to the republican party. people will just does a real damage to the republican party. people willjust tune out. donald trump is not there to drain the swamp, they will say, he brought the swamp, they will say, he brought the swamp, they will say, he brought the swamp with him. he tried u nsuccessfully the swamp with him. he tried unsuccessfully to stop this being published. there are allegations about his own family, treachery and treason. will he be required to take some form of legal action because of the stance he has taken? that is the best thing the publisher could want, the president telling him not to publish the book. it catapulted the book even higher. steve bannon knows
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the number one rule in trump world is not to go up to his family. he would have ignored this entire book if he didn't go out the way he did. once this is out, it is out. the more attention donald trump gives this book, it is kerosene on fire. focusing on a bigger issue that we need to be focusing on. thank you, scottie commerce —— talking to us from the united states. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come... as mps call for a crack down on disposable coffee cups, john is at one of the uk's only plants currently able to recycle them. they are not easy to recycle. that's
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absolutely right. the amount of coffee to drink. this is half the time of coffee cups. this is what gets the knights team back in the office. that is the issue. a copy cup is bonded plastic. making it waterproof and cardboard as well. it is separating those two materials thatis is separating those two materials that is very difficult. once it is mashed up and the plastic and cardboard is separated, they can turnit cardboard is separated, they can turn it into pulp. the pulp then goes into a giant machine that produces paper and look at the amount of paper that can be produced. only 1% of these cups are properly dealt with. we'll all pay 25p to make this happen. now, the
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news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushell. a 20—year—old who was stabbed to death on new year's day has been named as steve frank narvaez—arias. he was killed in old street and was one of four young men to die in separate stabbings across the capital amid new year's celebrations. two teenagers were arrested yesterday on suspicion of his murder. a second victim who was stabbed in the same incident remains in hospital in a critical but stable condition. islington council has announced that any development of the holloway prison site must include at least 50 percent of genuinely affordable housing. the historic site, formerly home to europe's largest women's prison , is up for sale by the ministry ofjustice. the planning document states a women's centre and a public green space must also be included. a theatre in havering is attempting to breakdown the social barriers faced by those with dementia, putting on special performances
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for patients and their carers. the queens theatre in hornchurch stages tailored shows, where the house lights remain on, sound levels are reduced and extra, specially trained staff are on hand. tickets have been selling well and a local dementia support group says the events are invaluable. you get a lot of isolation because initially, you don't know where you can go. it's important that people socialise, to be able to take someone to places where they don't feel embarrassed if they do something silly or embarrassing. and there's racing at kempton park later, with extra traffic expected on a308 staines road east before the gates open 4:15 this afternoon. good morning much quieter weather of —— morning of weather today. it will feel a touch cooler and there will also be some showers around that time is that they will be
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interspersed with some good spells of brightness and sunshine. we are starting up the morning on six or seven celsius. it would be too long before we start to see these showers coming from the south—west. there will be some brightness and some good spells of sunshine. a lot of dry weather around today but the outbreaks of rain are never too far away. a light breeze than we saw yesterday. through the night, the cloud, the outbreaks of rain will hit southern areas. further north, under clear skies, a touch of frost, baby under clear skies, a touch of frost, ba by cold under clear skies, a touch of frost, baby cold enough for that. and the default into tomorrow morning. it will start to feel a lot colder tomorrow. a cloudy day with some outbreaks of rain. what's more sunshine on sunday that a chilly north—easterly breeze. iam back i am back later. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news
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and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. ? as scientists warn reefs are under siege from global warming, we'll find out why coral bleaching is bad news for biodiversity. you might still have your christmas decorations up, but according to the travel industry its time to think about summer. we'll find out how to get a bargain before 8am. you never really know what you are made of until something extreme happens to you. and it's the most elite unit in the armed forces, but what does it take to be an sas soldier? after 9am, we'll meet one civilian recruit hoping to prove that. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. yvette cooper has called on the pa role yvette cooper has called on the parole board to explain its decision
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to release the serial sex offender, john worboys. he was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 female passengers. police believe he carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. yvette cooper said she was shocked by the move and victims groups have expressed shock and outrage. car sales have fallen. it has been blamed on the financial insecurity around brexit. the decline is expected to continue. a controversial book which is a fly on the wall account of donald trump's first year in the white house is being published today. the release date has been brought forward. donald trump said it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. north korea has accepted an offer
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by south korea to hold talks next week. the meeting will be the first between the two countries for more than two years. it'll take place on tuesday, in the demilitarised zone that divides the peninsula. every hot drink served in a disposable cup should be subject to a 25 pence tax, according to a group of mps. the environmental audit committee is calling on the levy to be introduced to pay for improvements in the recycling of paper cups that have a plastic lining. 2.5 billion are thrown away each year, but the british coffee association says a charge is not the answer. consumers respond better to a charge than they do to a discount. we know a lot of coffee shops are already offering a 25p discount. it is up to them how much of this tax they want
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to pass on to the consumers, but what we are seeing is we are following the principle that the polluter pays. we need a radical shift, a revolution, in the coffee industry, to deliver a more sustainable way of consuming coffee. and now for the sport. explain where we are in the ashes. what is at sta ke ? we are in the ashes. what is at stake? a critical hour coming up. england are 3—0 down so far in the ashes, but they want to restore pride by finishing 3—1 not 4—0. australia are trying to push home a fourth victory. but the last few hours has been getting away from england. unless they can produce magic and get rid of steve smith, the captain of the australian team, this is over. it is getting away from them. there are critical moments in test matches where your chances almost gone, even if mathematically you could come back.
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it is looking at the moment like it is slipping away from england. the story so far. england added 133 runs to the overnight score. they were helped by this extraordinary dropped catch. right through his fingers, josh hazlewood. they were out for 346. england made a few breakthroughs. australia replied. mason craine got his first test of england bowling and very nearly removed steve smith, the legendary captain. they have rallied to 184— two. ominously, steve smith is still at the crease and looking good. west ham have ended tottenham's100% record over the festive period. it finished 1—1 at wembley, after a pair of stunning strikes, pedro obiang put west ham ahead, and seven minutes from time, son heung—min put away an equally impressive long—range effort, although son said he thought obiang's goal was better. spurs are fifth in the premier league table. the premier league teams enter
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the fa cup third round this weekend and the merseyside derby between liverpool and everton kick's off the bbc‘s coverage. it's live on bbc one tonight. it's been suggested that liverpool managerjurgen klopp doesn't take the fa cup seriously, something he's keen to disprove. the lineup will be a lineup which shows all the respect we have for the fa cup. umm... i knowa few people have said that i don't respect the competition, stuff like that, enough. but that is obviously not the truth. so, maybe we have to make it a little bit more obvious. it is not a league game. there are no points available. it is win or bust. as simple as that. the premier league, less pressure. it is a glory game. you go out and seek the glory
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and try and win it. if we are to get through, we have to beat liverpool. manchester city women's latest signing nadia nadim says she wants to "be a part of history" after arriving at the wsl club. she was born in afghanistan but her mother paid traffickers to take her and herfamily to england after the taliban murdererd herfather. the family ended up in denmark, where she found her love of football in a refugee centre. nadim has finally made it to england and says she wants to help the club keep growing. the club is so young. they have achieved so much. so, just being a pa rt achieved so much. so, just being a part of that journey, achieved so much. so, just being a part of thatjourney, umm, and trying to reach even higher levels, it's amazing. that is really where your love and passion comes from in the game, down here. how it has transformed a life. you are playing for the love of sport. and serena williams has pulled out
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of this month's australian open. she gave birth to her daughterfour months ago and played an exibition match last week and was hoping to defend her title, but she said although she was "super close" to her best, she wasn't quite ready for competition. a lot of talk about andy murray in the last 24 hours about whether he can makea the last 24 hours about whether he can make a comeback. hip injury? yeah. tiger woods, a can make a comeback. hip injury? yeah. tigerwoods, a hip can make a comeback. hip injury? yeah. tiger woods, a hip injury, can make a comeback. hip injury? yeah. tigerwoods, a hip injury, he knows what it is like to come back. and that was ten months. tiger woods says he wants to get back to a full schedule, back—to—back tournaments, all that. he will start that at torrey pines. that is not to be confused with farmer's golf. it was invented by a cheese farmer who put
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clogs on the end of golf clubs because he was fed up with paying fees. you learn something new every day. have you had your coffee this morning? i have. cane recycle that? i think you can. —— can you. morning? i have. cane recycle that? i think you can. -- can you. inside, because it is lined with plastic, it makes it really difficult to recycle. that is the big issue. makes it really difficult to recycle. that is the big issuelj heard about hot liquids reacting with plastic as well. we should talk tojohn maguire. with plastic as well. we should talk to john maguire. ahh, yes. he is somewhere where they are trying to improve the situation. explain more. this is a paper mill which has been
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here since the middle of the 19th century. coffee cups are ready modern problem. plastic in the middle to make it waterproof. cardboard on the outside to make it rigid. separating them is difficult. you can recognise some of the logos on these bales. they are squished and weighed about half a ton. they go through the role is to make this wonderfully vivid paper. this will now go on to the packaging and also emblems as well. but this is one of the only two sites in the uk that does this process. a committee of mps says it wants to see a 25 p levy ona mps says it wants to see a 25 p levy on a single youth cup of coffee to get money back into the system to pay for stuff like this. we will get do you know. why only you and one
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other company? we did this a few yea rs other company? we did this a few years ago and we realised half a million coffee cups went through us. you have plastic and insight which is to make it waterproof. —— inside. it keeps the heat in as well. the plastic and inside is quite difficult to remove. and expensive? well, we developed this over the past few years. we are essentially floating off the plastic. what we are able to do is completely separate the plastic from the paper. the majority is made from pulp? yes. we can use all of that, a high—quality material, in papermaking. here are some things you can do. packaging boxes, a
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shopping bag, even with the cupcycling logo on it. yes. they have used our process. in every bag, one coffee cup goes goes into it. this is interesting. it is the plastic. this is actually a replacement for single—use plastic. you can put a cellphone inside it. it is completely able to be recycled. and you are from the environmental charity behind a lot of the campaigning going on. you had those giant coffee cups we saw in manchester and in london that people could make sure coffee cups were able to be disposed of. what is the issue? we know about try to separate it, but what is going wrong on a wide scale? the cups need to be separated out when they are recycled
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in the first place. if they go to mixed recycling with everything else, they will not be recycled. that is what we did with the campaigns in manchester and london. in london, we launched in april at the end of 2017 as well, we recycled 4 million cups injust one square mile. it can be done? yes. it proves if it is communicated well and facilities are provided, the public is willing to recycle them, but we have to give them the facilities. no one will vote for a 25p addition to their morning coffee. we will do a numberof their morning coffee. we will do a number of trials in some starbucks in london and will test adding a levy and see how customers respond. we have done a study to understand it. recycling, it comes down to industry
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and government changed. all terms and conditions on the facebook page. small from us. if you're watching the train or whatever, drinking a cup of coffee, have a think about what you are going to do with it. back to you. there's growing criticism over a decision by the parole board to release serial sex attacker, john worboys, from prison. uk car sales have dropped to the
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first time in six years. let us take a look at the weather both here in the united states. some pretty extreme conditions in the united states. i couldn't have said is any better. extreme is the word to mention across much of eastern portions of the us. they are under the grips of some bitterly cold winter conditions. we saw the first measurable snowfall for some in almost 30 years. temperature records have been raking quite widely. if you look at the chart there, we have the cold arctic air down across many parts of the east. that sort of temperature differential, you get a
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very strong winds that has been blowing up. that low pressure to pick deep. ours. that's how it got its name rain showers. some of you will get to drive some of you will stay dry. particularly southern and eastern parts. showers will come and go. in scotland, sticking with cloud and outbreaks of rain and hill snow. temperatures lower than they have been through recent days. the
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exception will be the channel islands. we stick with lots of cloud and further outbreaks of rain and hill snow. clearing skies developing to the west of scotland. for most, with a cloud in place tonight, you should state frost free the vast majority but increasingly windy into the start of saturday, particularly within eastern areas of the country. showers could merge into longer spells of rain. some sunny conditions but bitterly cold winds blowing. making it feel subzero for many. as began to saturday night, the temperatures appear. there will bea the temperatures appear. there will be a widespread frost developing into the north and west.
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temperatures as the many, the winds will be a little bit light on sunday. high pressure in charge, and you will have a dry and sunny day the most part. dry and sunny, we will be very grateful for. last year, new car sales in the uk fell for the first time since 2011. forecasts suggest they will continue to stuggle over the coming months too. so, ben, what's causing this bump in the road? they are a really good indicator about how the economy is faring. if the economy is ok you will splash out. these are the latest figures from the industry body. they show car sales fell by 5.6% last year. this put that on the graph. you can see why it significant. sailors have been going a pretty consistently.
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you can see the end, still on the slide. mike hawse is with me. if we look at that, you can see pretty consistent robust growth. this thing that strikes me first of all, we still sold 2.5 million cars. that is the third best in the past decade and the sixth best ever. talk me through wide. why have we seen such record growth. ten years ago, we had written off the car industry but we are still buying them. it was wrong to write them off. over the last few yea rs has to write them off. over the last few years has been increasing economic growth. the way people buy cars has changed. but those issues together and then you do —— the new technology on the car means a new
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car is cleaner and cheaper to what —— cheaper to run. car is cleaner and cheaper to what -- cheaper to run. let's talk about this falloff. a bit of a perfect storm. so many different factors that affected it. less cash in our pocket. a 17% fall in diesel sales. so many headlines about it. one of the drivers, a clear decline in consumer business. all the figures say people are less enthusiastic. it is the second biggest item after your house. secondly, a lot of confusion about diesel. this has caused people not so much to switch into petrol. and we are seeing that. but diesel owners often sitting on their hands, waiting to see what will happen. and the problem with
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thatis, will happen. and the problem with that is, they are keeping older cars on the road the longer which is less good the environment. people are going to be spending more money on average. if you buy a diesel car, you'll probably saved £300, £400 per year. the majority was what we sell overseas. the weak pound makes exports cheaper. the majority of the parts that go into our cars also come from abroad. a lower pound isn't necessarily could do such a complex transaction. a word on those fork declining growth. that spills
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over into business and consumer confidence. next year, —— the important thing is to choose the right sort of car per ewe. most people, accommodation of both. better fuel economy. people, accommodation of both. betterfuel economy. increasingly people, accommodation of both. better fuel economy. increasingly in terms of connectivity. as soon as
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you get these cars on the road, it makes the environment better safer. it will be an interesting time. very good to see you. still to come this morning. but is it true? you should have pulled the surveillance when you are asked true. is it true? how would you react to finding out the world was going to end in five years? that is the premise of a new thriller from the premise of a new thriller from the creator of the award—winning crime series luther. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushell. a 20—year—old who was stabbed to death on new year's day has been named as steve frank narvaez—arias. he was killed in old street and was one of four young men to die
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in separate stabbings across the capital amid new year's celebrations. two teenagers were arrested yesterday on suspicion of his murder. a second victim who was stabbed in the same incident remains in hospital in a critical but stable condition. islington council has announced that any development of the holloway prison site must include at least 50 percent of genuinely affordable housing. the historic site, formerly home to europe's largest women's prison and famously used to imprison suffragettes in the early 1900s is up for sale by the ministry ofjustice. the planning document states a women's centre and a public green space must also be included. a theatre in havering is attempting to breakdown the social barriers faced by those with dementia, putting on special performances for patients and their carers. the queens theatre in hornchurch stages tailored shows, where the house lights remain on, sound levels are reduced and extra, specially trained staff are on hand. you get a lot of isolation because initially, you don't know
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where you can go. it's very important that people socialise, to be able to take someone to places where they don't feel embarrassed if they do something silly or embarrassing. and there's racing at kempton park later, with extra traffic expected on a308 staines road east before the gates open 4:15 this afternoon. now, the weather. good morning. a much quieter day of weather today. winds lighter than yestrerday. it will feel a touch cooler and there will also be some showers around that time is that they will be interspersed with some good spells of brightness and sunshine. we are starting the morning on six or seven celsius. a dry start but it won't be too long before we start to see these showers coming from the south—west. there will be some brightness and some good spells of sunshine. a lot of dry weather around today although outbreaks of rain are never too far away. tops between 7 and 9.
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a light breeze than we saw yesterday. through the night, the cloud, the outbreaks of rain will continue to hit southern areas. further north, under clear skies, a touch of frost, maybe cold enough for that. and the fog into tomorrow morning. it will start to feel a lot colder tomorrow. a cloudy day with some outbreaks of rain by the end of the day. lots more sunshine on sunday that a chilly north—easterly breeze. i am back later. hello.
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this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the release of a serial sex attacker after less than ten years in prison. demands for the parole board to explain its decision. black cab driver, john worboys, was jailed for offences against 12 women, but police believe he carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. good morning. it's friday the 5th of january. also this morning: a slump in new car sales. latest figures are expected to show they've dropped to their lowest level for six years. coffee with a conscience. a committee of mps wants consumers to pay 25 pence for using takeaway cups to help fund better recycling facilities. last year was a tough one for the holiday industry, with airline strikes, terror attacks and some pretty wild weather. i'll ask the boss of one big travel firm how they're riding out the storm.
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hopes of restoring pride for england in the ashes have been smashed around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and the around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and the uk? around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and the uk? not around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and the uk? not as around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and the uk? not as cold around. australia showed no mercy on the third day. and frigid weather in the us. and the uk? not as cold in the us. and the uk? not as cold in the uk. for today, the good news is it is not as windy as it has been. snow in the scottish hills. the full forecast forecast coming up. good morning. first, our main story. the decision to release the serial sex offender, john worboys, after less than 10 years in prison, has brought widespread condemnation. the chair of the "home affairs select committee," yvette cooper, said she was "really shocked" that the former black cab driver was being freed. he was jailed in 2009 for offences
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against 12 female passengers, but police believe he actually carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, has more. for six years, john worboys cruised smart areas of london in his black cab looking for women to drug and rape. when he was finally caught, thejudge said he'd serve a minimum of eight years in prison and said he wouldn't be released until he was no longer a threat to women. worboys would show young women he picked up in his cab large wads of cash, saying he'd recently won big at the casino. then he'd offer them champagne, which he'd spiked with sedatives, and rape them. the judge gave him what's known as an indeterminate sentence, under which, people are only freed once they're no longer considered dangerous. but today, the bbc discovered that the parole board has decided worboys will be released this month under supervision after spending less than ten years in prison. i've spoken to one of my clients, who is absolutely horrified and really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking
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tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio, and feels absolutely sick to her stomach. the organisation, rape crisis, said it was far too soon for worboys to be released. although police believed john worboys attacked over 100 women, he was only convicted of attacking 12. and only one of those convictions was for rape. and that's why his sentence was so short. all the same, under the indeterminate sentence rules, the parole board will need to have assured themselves thatjohn worboys was no longer a risk as a sexual predator. daniel sandford, bbc news. last year, new car sales in the uk fell for the first time since 2011. forecasts suggest they will continue to stuggle over the coming months too. so, ben, what's causing this bump in the road? good morning. it is a reflection on
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how we feel in terms of the economy. yes. you will only splash out on a car if you think you have money. it is interesting. when you look at the numbers which give us an indication of what happened, let's look at the numbers. last year, 5.6% of a fall in uk carsales. numbers. last year, 5.6% of a fall in uk car sales. looking atjust diesels, that is even worse. they we re diesels, that is even worse. they were down more than 17%. if you look at the forecast for next year and beyond that, it is a similar picture. why is that? why have sales fall in? a perfect storm. so many factors. the headlines about diesels, clamping down on emissions. they are the bad boy of the industry now. we talked to the boss of the industry body. they said it could be
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temporary. if we start to look at the savings you make on the fuel, it could cancel it out. but we have seen bad headlines. inflation is squeezing income. less money in our pockets because prices are going up. the state of the economy and brexit. and changes in car tax. it is more expensive to own a car to be all of those things together mean it is getting tougher to have a car to pick and personal contract payments as well. that is a way of renting a carfora as well. that is a way of renting a carfor a couple as well. that is a way of renting a car for a couple of years and at the end of that period you have the option to buy or give it back and new one. that has meant a huge flood of second—hand cars have ended up on the market. you could look at the market and save why get a new one if i could have a cheap second hand one. that is why new ones have gone down. why would you get a new one?
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thank you. a controversial book, which is a fly—on—the—wall account of trump's first year in power, is being published today. the publisher opted for an earlier release date in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. in a tweet overnight, donald trump said it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, reports. publish and be damned. the book that won't go away. the white house dispute its accuracy and the president's lawyers have threatened to sue for libel. they say the author and the publisher should immediately cease and desist from any further publication. instead, the release date has been brought forward, much to the apparent delight of mr wolff. "here you go, you can buy it and read it, thank you, mr president," he tweets. the white house says it is false and fraudulent. it portrays mr trump as being surprised at winning
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the presidency and paints a picture of his administration as dysfunctional and divided. steve bannon, who's widely quoted in the extracts already published, has not disputed their content. his response on a radio programme, to declare his unfailing support for the president. the president of the united states is a great man. you know, i support him day in and day out, whether going through the country giving the public miracle speech or on the show or on the website. and mr trump's response to that... i don't know, he called me a great man last night. so, you know, he obviously changed his tune pretty quick. now, with the lawyers poised, there's an entire book to read for the next instalment in this extraordinary saga. peter bowes, bbc news. north korea has accepted an offer by south korea to hold talks next week. the meeting will be the first between the two countries for more than two years. it'll take place on tuesday, in the demilitarised zone that divides the peninsula. our correspondent, sophie long, is in seoul this morning. just tell us more about the buildup
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and what this meeting will consist of. good morning. this comes after the north korean leader made a new year's address in which he said he would be open to dialogue with south korea. after that, the south korean government offered high—level talks with north korea. the day after that we had a telephone line which was dortmund more than two years was reopened by north korea. —— dormant. this morning, by fax, we heard nk accepted. they will meet on the border of the dmc. it will take place on tuesday the ninth of january, a month before the opening ceremony of the winter olympics here in south korea. —— dmz. they will talk about the possibility of north
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korea sending a delegation to the winter olympics. that is important. we have had consistently from kim jong—un that this could be a groundbreaking chance to change the direction. tensions were increasing through 2017. it seems the two sides will sit down and talk about the possibility and also about other things that could ease tensions here between the two koreas. sophie, for the moment, thank you. every hot drink served in a takeaway cup should be subject to a 25 pence tax, according to a group of mps. the environmental audit committee is calling on the levy in order to pay for improvements to the country's recycling facilities. 2.5 billion cups are thrown away each year even though some shops offer a discount for people who bring their own. consumers respond better to a charge than they do to a discount. we know a lot of coffee shops are already offering a 25p discount. it is up to them how much of this tax they want to pass on to the consumers,
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but what we are seeing is we are following the principle that the polluter pays. we need a radical shift, a revolution, in the coffee industry, to deliver a more sustainable way of consuming coffee. the number of people applying for teacher training has fallen by a third compared to this time last year. applications to become english, maths, and science teachers showed some of the most dramatic levels of decline, leading to school leaders warning of an impending crisis in education. however, the government said teaching continued to be an attractive career and it was investing hundreds of millions of pounds to improve recruitment. a severe winter storm is hitting the eastern united states, bringing strong winds and blizzards. it's the tenth day of record—breaking low temperatures, which have already claimed several lives. 17 people are believed to have died as a result of the cold weather. nearly 5,000 flights have been cancelled. the national guard has been deployed in parts of new york state to assist with rescue efforts
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and transporting supplies. the snow has finally tapered off after 12 hours of pounding snow. the wind has not let up. we saw 40—15 mar per hour winds. —— 40—50 miles per hour. we even saw rescues. what was remarkable to watch today was how quickly all of this happened and how quickly all of this happened and how quickly all of this happened and how quickly the snow came down. it was incredible to watch at times. we we re was incredible to watch at times. we were seen three inches of snow an hour. this is what has been left behind in its path, a serious pilot of snow. on top of that, this is not over. we have this arctic blast coming in. we could be in the single digits with windshields well below zero. “— digits with windshields well below zero. —— windchills. not surprisingly, people have been
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feeling the cold. and cold—blooded creatures in florida have had issues as well. videos have shown frozen iguanas. that is correct. some have fallen from trees. the number of reptiles found on the ground, as you can see here, well, you will be pleased to hear they did warm back up, though, after a few hours of the sun. presumably they lock down and then get ok in the sunshine. amazing creatures. amazing. the weather is coming up later. the sport as well. we will return to the top story. mounting criticism
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of the decision to release serial sex attacker, john worboys, after ten years in prison. the news was met with shock by some of his victims who say they weren't told of the move by authorities. campaigners have also suggested his sentence was too short. we can speak now to lisa thompson who's from the victim support charity, rape and sexual violence project. quite a few issues to address. some of the victims were not told of his release. surely that is quite unusual. it happens probably more commonly than people think. but, absolutely, the victims and survivors should have been told and we should have a system with victims at the absolute centre, involved at every stage. this is a systemic failure that this has happened. so he was sentenced for a minimum of eight years. he served, what, nine, ten, years, including being in
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custody for the first time. he was charged with attacking 12 women, the suspicion being he attacked more. what is your reaction?” suspicion being he attacked more. what is your reaction? i think it is absolutely abominable. i could not believe the decision when i heard about it. my heart goes out to the women. he is a massive risk. this is a massive failure in the system for the women who have courageously reported him in the first place and gone to court. my heart goes out to them. what they must be thinking, i cannot imagine. in your experience, how does this come about? if police say they suspect he attacked hundreds of women, around 100 women, why do you think this was not reflected in his sentencing? and how has it not been reflected in the fa ct has it not been reflected in the fact he has been released now? that isa fact he has been released now? that is a good question. i think that sentences often are not reflective
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of the horrendous crimes that people have committed. this was an indeterminate sentence, so, actually, he could have been kept in for longer if he was deemed a risk. many people still think he is a risk, so, ithink many people still think he is a risk, so, i think we support the pa role risk, so, i think we support the parole decisions actually being made public to see what those decisions we re public to see what those decisions were actually about. there is a system in place to assess his risk to the public, and his release, so to the public, and his release, so to speak, will be closely monitored. does that not show that the system is working in terms of monitoring him and keeping women, potential victims, safe? the judge called warboys a master of deception. ——i don't think it does at all. the police can't be there within 24 hours. the risk is there to people. he spoke to women who are victims of rape, men and women who
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are victims of rape. what do you say to people when you are trying to assure them that there is a system in place, that they are safe? try to give them the courage to go forward. but vast majority of people, 85% who have been through sexual offences, don't report because they don't have faith in the system. many survivors feel the ordeal of reporting is as bad as the offence they have been through and it's a massive ordeal. macro one —— yvette cooper has asked for the decision to be reviewed. are you hopeful this could be done?” don't think this is possible but the reasons need to be made public, we can understand what is behind it and there is openness and transparency.
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we need to look at this more closely and we need to be up in arms about the system and challenge the system. say to those women that we don't accept this for you. regarding the pa role accept this for you. regarding the parole board, it is a 3— member panel. the parole board has released a statement of its saying it is heard live evidence from offenders, managers, psychiatrists and there has been scope for victims to put forward their views. should we trust in the system? i don't pick we should. we are in the same week were a man has been found guilty of murdering three of his partners where he has been released up to reach of those. do we have faith in that system? i'm not sure we should. we should be challenging it. we need to look at the reasons why this man
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has been deemed to be safe. thank you very much the joining us this morning. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. these outdoor sampling the weather. good morning. iam these outdoor sampling the weather. good morning. i am top of broadcasting house in london. pretty good news from up on the roof. melanie is windy as it has been the few days. the general forecast for todayis few days. the general forecast for today is very to be left windy across today is very to be left windy a cross m ost today is very to be left windy across most of the uk. some rate in the forecast. the coldest aero at the forecast. the coldest aero at the moment. some dry weather on the top and tail of the country but a bit more breeze through orkney & shetland. some clearer conditions to the north—east of england and yorkshire this morning. west of the
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pennines in the north—west of england, we are seeing some showers developing. a few showers into parts of the midlands. more showers along southern coastal counties still affecting the south—west where we have heavy ones at the moment. still blustery through the english channel. lots of showers through friday morning. some of the showers on the heavy side. some showers to the far north of the country. clear skies through the night, some frost and very the conditions around. take it easy on some of the roads. you might actually stayed dry throughout the day. elsewhere, showers come and go. still some sleet and snow over the high ground of scotland. the bridges generally low single figures for most part. into tonight, we continue with quite a bit of cloud
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around. increasingly wintry through eastern parts of scotland. —— eastern parts of scotland. —— eastern parts. the cloud will keep temperatures up for the vast majority. largely frost free. some frost and ice around into the start of saturday morning. what many of you will notice is the strength of the wind. strong to gale force winds. showers across many parts of england and wales. longer spells of rain into the south—east later on. that wind will make itself known, making it feel closer to freezing if not below. as the winds ease down through saturday night and showers fade, it's going to be a frosty night. you will notice you can avoid the frost in the south of the country. still quite a breeze. other than that, other than a brain to the channel islands. maybe also the
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shetland. a largely dry and sunny day to come. that is how it is looking. hundreds of millions of people depend on them for food and income but col leagues are under threat. —— coral reefs. a study published in the journal science, suggests there's been a dramatic rise in the rate of coral bleaching. so what is the significance of this and can it be reversed? let's speak to nick graham who's a professor of marine ecology at lancaster university. we are familiar with the problems of coral reefs. but yet compiled data to show that it is escalating. coral bleaching occurs when coral becomes
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stressed. corals are animals. they live in a close relationship with single celled algae. the algae give the callback colour and their food. the relationship breaks down the tissue is translucent. critically, once this bleach has occurred in the algae has been lost, they started out. what we are looking back here, the image, that was bleached coral. we have heard about bleaching. and we are told that coral can recover from bleaching. what in this study is different from what we have been hearing in the past two years. we compiled a global database. these
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data reports go back 40 years. we have looked at incidences of coral bleaching through time. firstly, coral bleaching is absolutely a modern phenomenon. it did not occur before 1980. it never happened before? small-scale stress events through localised hot patches but these global events where huge areas are bleaching, it is a new phenomenon. it is becoming more frequent. any given reef is not expected to bleach m25, 30 years but by 2016, every individual reef —— coral reef is bleaching every six
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yea rs. if coral reef is bleaching every six years. if the bleaching causes a lot of mortality and you lose 80, 90% of coral cover, it can take a minimum of ten years for the fastest growing corals to re— popular at the area. some coral weeks to recover. they shipped to these fleshy seaweed states and they are unlikely to bounce back and recover. why is it important that they remain intact? coral reefs cover only 0.1% of the ocean but they contain 30% of biodiversity. that is 3096 of all the diet —— the bio diversity. if we lose coral reefs, we are losing a huge amount of biodiversity. they provide food security and livelihoods the hundreds of millions of people throughout the tropics. anybody who worries about food insecurity, migration, all these
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problems, needs to worry about them. with the data showing its more frequent and more widespread, that's correct, what is your conclusion breast what is causing it and what can be done to stop it? it is temperature. the bleaching occurs when there is a spiking temperature and an anomaly. we have seen in rise of one degree already. a smaller and smaller anomaly caused by el nino pushes coral across the comfort zone. background temperatures are warmer. if you follow your charts through, the worst possible scenario, if we don't change anything we carry on, when do coral reefs stop being part of the world we live in? within decades. how many
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decades? the impacts of global warming on coral reefs are happening today. in 2016, 75% of the world's coral is bleached. when you say decades? 20 or 30 if we follow business as usual with carbon emissions. very few coral reef slapped. if we can address carbon emissions, we will see a future with coral reefs. are you hopeful we will? it is absolutely achievable. it comes down to politics and whether leaders around the world wa nt whether leaders around the world want a future with coral reefs. professor nick graham from lancaster university, thank you. plenty coming up university, thank you. plenty coming up on breakfast but first, what is happening where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushell. a 20—year—old who was stabbed to death on new year's day has been named as steve frank narvaez—arias. he was killed in old street and was one of four young men to die in separate stabbings across the capital amid new year's celebrations. two teenagers were arrested yesterday on suspicion of his murder. a second victim who was stabbed in the same incident remains in hospital in a critical but stable condition. islington council has announced that any development of the holloway prison site must include at least 50 percent of genuinely affordable housing. the historic site, formerly home to europe's largest women's prison is up for sale by the ministry ofjustice. the planning document states a women's centre and a public green space must also be included. a theatre in havering is attempting to breakdown the social barriers faced by those with dementia, putting on special performances for patients and their carers. the queens theatre in hornchurch stages tailored shows, where the house lights remain on,
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sound levels are reduced and extra, specially trained staff are on hand. tickets have been selling well and a local dementia support group says the events are invaluable. you get a lot of isolation because initially, you don't know where you can go. good morning. a much quieter morning of weather today. the winds lighter than yesterday. it will feel a touch cooler and there will also be some showers around that time is that they will be interspersed with some good spells of brightness and sunshine. we are starting up the morning on six or seven celsius. also be some showers around that time is that they will be interspersed with some good spells of brightness and sunshine. we are starting the morning on six or seven celsius. a dry start but it won't be too long before we start to see these showers feed in from the south—west. there will be some brightness and some good spells of sunshine. a lot of dry weather
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around today although outbreaks of rain are never too far away. top temperatures between 7 and 9 celsius. a lighter breeze than we saw yesterday. through the night, the cloud, the outbreaks of rain will continue to hit southern areas. further north, under clear skies, a touch of frost, maybe cold enough for that. and the fog into tomorrow morning. it will start to feel a lot colder tomorrow. a cloudy day with some outbreaks of rain by the end of the day. lots more sunshine on sunday that a chilly north—easterly breeze. i am back later. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. the decision to release the serial sex offender, john worboys, after less than ten years in prison, has brought widespread condemnation. the former black cab driver was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 female passengers, but police believe he actually carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults.
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victims' groups have expressed outrage that he is being freed and the chair of the ‘home affairs select committee', yvette cooper, has called on the parol board to explain its decision. for the first time in six years, the number of new car sales has fallen. in 2017, new car registrations fell by more than 5%. and diesel vehicle sales dropped by 17%. the fall has been blamed, in part, on financial insecurity surrounding brexit. the society of motor manufacturers and traders says it expects the decline to continue. a controversial book, which is a fly—on—the—wall account of donald trump's first year in the white house, is being published today. the release date was brought forward, in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to try to block it. in a tweet overnight, donald trump said the book was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. north korea has accepted an offer by south korea to hold talks next week, in what will be the first meeting between the two countries
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in more than two years. it'll take place on tuesday, in the demilitarised zone that divides the peninsula. the agenda is expected to focus on improving relations between the two sides and the possiblity of pyongyang sending a delegation to the winter olympics next month. every hot drink served in a disposable cup should be subject to a 25 pence tax, according to a group of mps. 2.5 billion paper cups are thrown away each year but the majority can not be recycled because they have a plastic lining. the british coffee association says a charge is not the answer but the environmental audit committee argues the tax would pay for improvements to recycling facilities. the number of people applying for teacher training courses has fallen by a third compared to this time last year. the latest figures from the admissions service, ucas, reveal applications to become english, maths and science teachers were amongst the most dramatic declines. school leaders and academics have warned of a potential crisis in the education system but the government has said hundreds of millions of pounds are being invested to improve recruitment. more than half of all short—nosed
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dogs seen by a vet last year needed treatment for health issues related to their breed. the british veterinary association has warned that dogs like pugs and bulldogs often suffer from breathing difficulties, skin problems and eye ulcers. some of the uk's most popular breeds of dogs are facing increasing health problems because of the way they are bread. more than half of flat faced dogs, including french bulldogs and pugs, seen by vets last year required treatment to correct painful deformities including surgery to clear obstructed airways skin problems and eye ulcers. the british veterniary association said the majority of flat—faced dog owners are still unaware of any problems with the breeds. one last story. it has been incredibly cold in the us. they have had a surprising problem. apparently, iguanas are falling from trees because they kind of frees up in the relatively cold weather. ——
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freeze. although they are completely rigid, we have been told after some sunshine, their bodies start of get going again. i get it. sunshine, their bodies start of get going again. iget it. ifeel like that all through winter. sometimes you just want to shut down. there is that feeling after winter. you just think, after some sunshine, you think, after some sunshine, you think, that is better. i feel the same watching the cricket. it has been going bad for england. same watching the cricket. it has been going bad for englandm rained yesterday. it is over for the day. they are trying to restore some pride and save themselves from losing 4—0. it has all gone wrong.
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here's the story from day two. england were all out for 346, adding 133 to their overnight score, but they were helped by this extraordinary dropped catch from josh hazlewood. england did make two early break throughs in australia's reply, including the important wicket of david warner. 20—year—old, mason crane, got his first taste of test action and he very nearly got the australia captain steve smith, who got lucky with edges on a few occasions. but omniously smith is still at the crease alongside usman khawaja, who'd moved onto 91 by the close. australia are 193 for two, 153 runs behind, with plenty of time to get ahead tomorrow. iam i am nervous. iam nervous. quite i am nervous. quite excited, though. i had fun. some edges did not get to
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slip, but that happens. that is the game. west ham have ended tottenham's100% record over the festive period. it finished 1—1 at wembley, after a pair of stunning strikes, pedro obiang put west ham ahead, and seven minutes from time, son heung—min put away an equally impressive long—range effort, although son said he thought obiang's goal was better. spurs are fifth in the premier league table. the premier league teams enter the fa cup third round this weekend and the merseyside derby between liverpool and everton kick's off the bbc‘s coverage. it's live on bbc one tonight. it's been suggested that liverpool managerjurgen klopp doesn't take the fa cup seriously, something he's keen to disprove. the lineup will be a lineup which shows all the respect we have for the fa cup. umm... i know a few people have said that i don't respect the competition, stuff like that, enough. but that is obviously not the truth. so, maybe we have to make it a little bit more obvious.
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manchester city women's latest signing nadia nadim says she wants to "be a part of history" after arriving at the wsl club. she was born in afghanistan but her mother paid traffickers to take her and herfamily to england after the taliban murdererd herfather. the family ended up in denmark, where she found her love of football in a refugee centre. nadim has finally made it to england and says she wants to help the club keep growing. the club is so young. they have achieved so much. so, just being a part of that journey, umm, and trying to reach even higher levels, it's amazing. it started as fine. it quickly
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became an obsession. what a story. —— fun. we wish her a successful career at manchester city. and serena williams has pulled out of this month's australian open. she gave birth to her daughterfour months ago and played an exibition match last week and was hoping to defend her title, but she said although she was "super close" to her best, she wasn't quite ready for competition. sport relief is a few months away. five celebrities competing over obstacle courses. members of the public try to forecast who will win. i entered the race. i am second on the left. michael vaughan, the
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cricket legend. i was looking for a shoot here. that is me in the purple shirt. —— shoe. i neverfound it. it is called and they're off! it is on tonight. michelle from the one show. penny lancaster. and some little quy- penny lancaster. and some little guy. all i penny lancaster. and some little guy. alll am interested in is you. it is the first of six episodes. thank you. perhaps you have a cold or flu. perhaps you have a cold orflu. the latest figures from nhs england say five times as many are being treated in hospital in the week after
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christmas as compared to the one before. is this typical? let's talk toa gp. before. is this typical? let's talk to a gp. good morning. how are you? iam ok. i have to a gp. good morning. how are you? i am ok. i have a sniffle, but that's like many people. what are the basics? people know when they have the flu. what is the difference? a heavy cold...“ have the flu. what is the difference? a heavy cold... if you ever have the flu, you know you have it. high temperatures. it takes you out. you cannot move. you are aching, you are tied. if you have a cold, it does not come on back quickly. —— tired. you can do a little bit more and it takes longer to recover from. most little bit more and it takes longer to recoverfrom. most people little bit more and it takes longer to recover from. most people can work out if they have a cold or a flu. what can you do about it when
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you have it? if you have it, if you are healthy, rest, drink plenty of fluid, take paracetamol, a depression, your body will fight it off. —— ibuprofen. otherwise, speak toa off. —— ibuprofen. otherwise, speak to a pharmacist. look at a website. dial 911. you will get better. there are people who are vulnerable to it, the elderly, the pregnant, those with terminal illnesses. that is right. they should have been given a flu vaccine. that is the best protection against the flu. hopefully you have had it. if not, go and get it. within 10—14 days you should have built up an immunity. go and get it. within 10—14 days you should have built up an immunitylj should have built up an immunity.” know you are establishing the difference between the flu in the cold. anecdotally, people have said sometimes they have something in between. a couple of days completely
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lifeless, they can only stay in bed, but they do not think it is the flu. they have ongoing systems. sometimes they call it a chesty cough that is ha rd to they call it a chesty cough that is hard to get rid of. there are many viruses that give you a cold. you can end up with a cough that can last three weeks. that is perfectly 0k. last three weeks. that is perfectly ok. that is how it progresses. if you are not sure, speak to pharmacists and find out if things are ok. that is ok. with a flu, it does leave you... you have a few days of temperature leaving you flat—out. people who have had the flu will be able to tell you the difference. it is interesting. we have many people getting in touch. stacey is saying the same thing as you. going back to the flu jab. christine says she has had this virus despite having the flu jab. she is recovering and feels awful.
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does not know if it is worth having it again. this person asks if it cove rs it again. this person asks if it covers the australian flu which is becoming increasingly prevalent in the uk. yes. the short answer is yes. what usually happens is about a year or so before the flu comes, the world health organization works out what they think will happen and tried to make sure the vaccine cove rs tried to make sure the vaccine covers those. australia gets theirs first. they were hit hard this year. the vaccine we have at the moment should cover it. not everyone gets the vaccine, not everyone is protected. 40— 60%. that is a lot. they have taken the jab. and it is not protecting them ? they have taken the jab. and it is not protecting them? it does not seem a great protection rate. no. ideally... well, the flu is always changing and mutating how it
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attacks. it is good at it. that is why every year it comes back to pick it changes and is more virulent. we a lwa ys it changes and is more virulent. we always try to play catch up and change vaccines and make sure we get protection in. i think eventually there will be plans of changing how vaccines work so we can protect ourselves. without... stereotypes to one side, there are some stoic people who say they only have a cold. right. there is a balance between people coming too quickly. i have to see the doctor because i feel rough, and the people who never go unless they feel really eel. different people respond differently. —— ill. as long as you... you are bestjudge. we lucky there are many sources of information. you can look at things and say, hang on, that sounds how i
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am feeling. get some advice. it is impossible to see a gp sometimes because we are overwhelmed... yeah? yes. we have to send people in. hospitals are overwhelmed. the number of consultations has gone up. this is the season. winter is here. the flu season is here. who saw it coming? we are overwhelmed. we talked about it being a virus. is it a myth that if you do not wrap up warm you will get the flu? umm, ok. they say that if you keep yourself warm, they say that if you keep yourself warm , you they say that if you keep yourself warm, you are less likely to get it. influenza is a droplet infection. people will pass it on to you. that element of things you can control. there is some evidence that when you get cold, you are more likely to
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pick it up. thank you very much field time this morning. good luck in the surgery. i hope matt was listening. he is wrapped up, just in case. not wrapped up too much compared to recent mornings. the wind is much lighter. seeing pictures from the us, a severe winter storm has been battering eastern areas. it got record—breaking cold across much of canada, the eastern us. temperatures well below freezing. you can see some warm air, the orange colours, in between those we saw a deep and significant area of low pressure developed. that has run up the eastern coast, throwing in a storm surge. lots of blizzards as well. up to 50 centimetres of snow. temperatures are some, particularly
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new york, towards toronto, —10 to minus 15. not as cold here of course. thankfully, less windy. we have some chillier across scotland. snow over higher ground. clear skies and the top and tail of the country. north—east england should be dry and bright. a few showers in the midland —— in the midlands as well. the south—east, some dry weather. showers running along. still a bit of breeze along the english channel. across wales, showers are widespread and frequent. temperatures very close to freezing at present. we've got some icy conditions. please take
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it easy out there if you're about to head out. some parts of southern scotla nd head out. some parts of southern scotland and towards parts of eastern england will stay dry. elsewhere, the chance of showers in the day. still the risk of some sleet and snow. temperatures lower than the past two days. the rain coming and going here and there. turning increasingly to sleet and snow. maybe a touch of frost but for most, the breeze will keep temperatures above freezing. it is going to be a cold start the weekend regardless. they are coming in from the north and north—east. emerging too long spells of rain in the south—east corner. brightest in the west of scotland in north—west england. but that cold, really
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adding to the chill. made to feel subzero, particularly in scotland. showers into saturday evening will fade away. went to the north and west. the greatest risk of frost into sunday morning. —10 possible. sunday, despite the chance of a bit of rain in the channel islands and in shetland, high pressure is building. a dry and sunny day to many. good news to enter the forecast. i always take my whether guidance from you. have you booked your holidays. you planned ahead. he booked it six months ago. you did? that is talking about when we book
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holidays. matt clearly got the holidays. matt clearly got the holiday booking leave. hejust holidays. matt clearly got the holiday booking leave. he just goes anywhere. yep — last year wasn't a great one for travellers. flights were cancelled, airlines went bust, there was travel chaos from bad weather and terrorist attacks put off people from travelling. all in all, it was a tough year. with me is the boss of virgin holidays — joe thompson. he started the job in the midst of all that chaos. it's there to stay is —— it's fair to say you start the job in a pretty turbulent year. prior to that, i had beenin turbulent year. prior to that, i had been in trouble for 14 years, working with our sister company, virgin atlantic. i am familiar with the travel industry being at the beck and call a little bit of those
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global events. it is rare that a day passes and you don't see something that affects your business. the key for businesses that are going to be successful is that you evolve your product, make sure you stay relevant and, holiday perspective, when you buy a package holiday, you get that protection which means that if the unexpected does happen when you are on holiday, you got that protection and security to know you will be looked after. one of the things that usually impressed me was in the aftermath of the hurricane season in the caribbean and the cabinet was offered to customers. we saw customer scores increase from people travelling to the caribbean in september and october last year. really crucial time of year for you. are you worried about the squeeze on incomes? people might not splash out ona incomes? people might not splash out on a big holiday. january is a huge
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month the travel industry. we expect to see about 30% of bookings. it's a huge month frost. there are some great deals to be got out there. amazing holiday value. in terms of how that links back to the broader macro economic environment, we are seeing some uncertainty. everyone focusing hard on those retail numbers and high street sales. we are confident going into this big weekend, it is going to be the biggest weekend. an extra 10% of holiday prices. they singled out virgin to misleading customers on prices. you put customers on sale. why? a lot of discussions. we
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absolutely never want to mislead customers. it is a stark example. a holiday in florida, and then the day after, that same holiday was £230 —— £230 less for a couple. it wasn't in the sale period initially. the sale started in the price fell. we were able to offer better pricing to customers. what we have done is to have taken a look at the way we communicate it is as transparent as it can be. people know they will get great value. more from me after eight o'clock. some offer me then. i will see it soon. ——i will see you soon. “— will see it soon. ——i will see you soon. —— some more from me then. did
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you say yes, it is not going to happen again? it won't happen again. that is all anybody wants to hear. they are part of the morning routine for millions of us. in fact, so many paper coffee cups, like this, are sold in the uk each year, they could circle the planet more than five times. however, they are a massive headache for recycling plants, because the paper cups actually contain a plastic lining. john maguire is in cumbria for us this morning — this is clearly a problem, but are there solutions? i know that naga drinks black decaffeinated copy. you are quintuplets espresso guide. we are addicted. only 1% of cups are recycled. it is the composition of the materials. giving into rigidity. this is what they term the pulp
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into. this fantastically vivid paper. making paper itself, the packaging for envelopes. those spindles you can see, about 2.5 tons of paper on now. let's find out more about the process. you got here an idea of some of the stuff you can make paper cups into. you warrant —— you are one of only two companies doing it. one of the things that we realised, we've got a great source of raw materials. billions of copy cups. what we are doing is, we are extracting the plastic from the inside. we are doing it now between a few years. what we are able to do is take the woodpulp al from the cup and reuse it into some of those
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products. a couple of examples here, you may recognise this. it can replace plastic as well. you can see this. that is rigid, isn't it? gavin, good morning to you. it is half the battle getting the stuff, isn't it? we have run a couple of campaigns. if you give the public the facilities to recycle their copy cups, they are willing to do so. if he communicated well, we have a cycle 4 million cups in nine months just from the city of london. it can be done. i think most people who use disposable copy cups, and industry needs to do more to make those
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facilities. is that 2023 target, is it realistic. it is difficult to recycle 100% of anything. any material, you will struggle to recycle 100%. the number is so low, it is less than 1%. there needs to bea it is less than 1%. there needs to be a real concerted effort. thank you very much. much more from us. these mps are saying it should be 25p extra perk up. i light a levy. we're talking about much more. hopefully this gets you going when you get your early morning cup of joe. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushell. a 20—year—old who was stabbed to death on new year's day has been named as steve frank narvaez—arias.
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he was killed in old street and was one of four young men to die in separate stabbings across the capital amid new year's celebrations. two teenagers were arrested yesterday on suspicion of his murder. a second victim who was stabbed in the same incident remains in hospital in a critical but stable condition. islington council has announced that any development of the holloway prison site must include at least 50 percent of genuinely affordable housing. the historic site, formerly home to europe's largest women's prison and famously used to imprison suffragettes in the early 1900s is up for sale by the ministry ofjustice. the planning document states a women's centre and a public green space must also be included. a theatre in havering is attempting to breakdown the social barriers faced by those with dementia, putting on special performances for patients and their carers. the queens theatre in hornchurch stages tailored shows, where the house lights remain on, sound levels are reduced and extra, specially trained staff are on hand. tickets have been selling well and a local dementia support group says the events are invaluable. you get a lot of isolation
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because initially, you don't know it's very important that people socialise, to be able to take someone to places where they don't feel embarrassed if they do something silly or embarrassing. let's check the weather. good morning. a much quieter day of weather today. winds lighter than yestrerday. it will feel a touch cooler and there will also be some showers around that time is that they will be interspersed with some good spells of brightness and sunshine. we are starting the morning on six or seven celsius. a dry start but it won't be too long before we start to see these showers coming from the south—west. there will be some brightness and some good spells of sunshine. a lot of dry weather around today although outbreaks of rain are never too far away. tops between 7 and 9. a light breeze than we saw yesterday. through the night, the cloud, the outbreaks of rain will continue to hit southern areas. further north, under clear skies, a touch of frost, maybe cold enough for that. and the fog into tomorrow morning. it will start to feel a lot colder tomorrow. a cloudy day with some outbreaks
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of rain by the end of the day. lots more sunshine on sunday that a chilly north—easterly breeze. and i am back later. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the release of a serial sex attacker after ten yea rs the release of a serial sex attacker after ten years in prison. john worboys was jailed for offences on 12 women but police believe he carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. it is friday the 5th of january. aslump in it is friday the 5th of january. a slump in new car sales, figures show a drop to their lowest level in
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six years. a squeeze on our incomes, worries over the economy and the end of cheap finance deals are being blamed for the fall. and there's been a slump in demand for diesel. i'll look at what it means for the uk car industry. copper with a conscience, a committee of mps wants consumers to pay 25p for using take break—ups, to help fund better recycling. in sport, england's hopes of restoring pride are smashed around sydney. australia take control of the final ashes test, showing no mercy to england's beleagured bowlers on day two. a huge winter storm in the united states has caused flooding in boston and giant waves of the east coast. and matt will have the weather closer to home. at least hear the wind has eased compared with recent days. sleet and snow on the scottish hills, but it is set to get colder this weekend, at least a little bit sunnier as well, the full forecast
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in the next 15 minutes. first, our main story. the decision to release the serial sex offenderjohn worboys after less than ten years in prison has brought widespread condemnation. the chair of the home affairs select committee, yvette cooper, has called on the parole board to explain why he is being freed. he was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 female passengers, but police believe he actually carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has more. for six years, john worboys cruised smart areas of london in his black cab looking for women to drug and rape. when he was finally caught, thejudge said he'd serve a minimum of eight years in prison and said he wouldn't be released until he was no longer a threat to women. worboys would show young women he picked up in his cab large wads of cash, saying he'd recently won big at the casino. then he'd offer them champagne, which he'd spiked with sedatives,
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and rape them. the judge gave him what's known as an indeterminate sentence, under which people are only freed once they're no longer considered dangerous. the parole board has decided worboys will be released this month under supervision after spending less than ten years in prison. i've spoken to one of my clients, who is absolutely horrified and really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio, and feels absolutely sick to her stomach. the organisation rape crisis said it was far too soon for worboys to be released. although police believe john worboys attacked over 100 women, he was only convicted of attacking 12. and only one of those convictions was for rape. and that's why his sentence was so short. all the same, under the indeterminate sentence rules, the parole board will need to have assured themselves thatjohn worboys was no longer a risk as a sexual predator. daniel sandford, bbc news.
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last year, new car sales in the uk fell for the first time since 2011. forecasts suggest they will continue to stuggle over the coming months too. car sales give an indication of how well we think the economy is doing because we are more likely to splash out on a new car if we think things are going ok, a bit of money in your pocket. let me run you through the figures, new car sales were down by 5.6% last year, quite a significant fall because the industry has been growing so quickly over the last ten yea rs or growing so quickly over the last ten years or so but if we broke that down into diesel sales as well, a particularly big four, 17%, which has given the bad headlines about emissions and whether diesel is better or worse for the environment and the forecast for the next couple of years are not great either,
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suggesting we have hit the peak of the market for the time being and things will tail off over the next couple of years. why, because it is a perfect storm of factors, we are more uncertain about the economy, uncertain about diesel, changes in car tax last year made it more expensive to own and run a car, and the inflation that we have been talking about means we have less money in our pocket, prices are going up, but the biggest issue is what is done as personal contract payments, a way you might buy a car, offered by new car sellers and is basically means you pay a bit every month and at the end of the period you have the option to buy the car outright and hand it back and get a new one, but that means there have been a tonne of second—hand cars flooding the market which has brought down prices and beans people
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may be opting for a second—hand car rather than a new one, which is why we have seen new car sales fall by 5.6% last year. a controversial book, which is a fly—on—the—wall account of trump's first year in power, is being published today. the publisher opted for an earlier release date in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. in a tweet overnight, donald trump said it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. publish and be damned. the book that won't go away. the white house dispute its accuracy and the president's lawyers have threatened to sue for libel. they've demanded that the author, michael wolff, and the publisher should immediately cease and desist from any further publication. instead, the release date has been brought forward, much to the apparent delight of mr wolff. "here you go, you can buy it and read it, thank you, mr president," he tweets. the white house says the book is tabloid trash, false, and fraudulent. it portrays mr trump as being surprised at winning the presidency, and paints a picture of his administration as dysfunctional and divided. steve bannon, who's widely quoted
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in the extracts already published, has not disputed their content. his response on a radio programme, to declare his unfailing support for the president. the president of the united states is a great man. you know, i support him day in and day out, whether going through the country giving the public miracle speech or on the show or on the website. and mr trump's response to that... i don't know, he called me a great man last night. so, you know, he obviously changed his tune pretty quick. now, with the lawyers poised, there's an entire book to read for the next instalment in this extraordinary saga. peter bowes, bbc news. north korea has accepted an offer by south korea to hold talks next week, in what will be the first meeting between the two countries in more than two years. it'll take place on tuesday, in the demilitarised zone that divides the peninsula. the agenda is expected to focus on improving relations between the two sides and the possiblity of pyongyang sending a delegation
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to the winter olympics next month. every hot drink served in a disposable cup should be subject to a 25p tax, according to a group of mps. 2.5 billion paper cups are thrown away each year but the majority can not be recycled because they have a plastic lining. the british coffee association says a charge is not the answer but the environmental audit committee argues the tax would pay for improvements to recycling facilities. the number of people applying for teacher training courses has fallen by a third compared to this time last year. the latest figures from the admissions service, ucas, reveal applications to become english, maths and science teachers were amongst the most dramatic declines. school leaders and academics have warned of a potential crisis in the education system but the government has said hundreds of millions of pounds are being invested to improve recruitment. a severe winter storm is hitting the eastern united states, bringing strong winds and blizzards. it's the tenth day of record—breaking low temperatures, which have already claimed several lives.
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greater boston is one of the areas forecast to receive more heavy snow. cbs news correspondent kenneth craig told us about the situation there. the snow has finally tapered off, after about 12 hours of pounding snow, but the wind has not let up today, we thought 40, 50 mph wind here in the city of boston, and out on the coast of buds of 70 mph plus, and some significant flooding and a number of rescues in some communities. what was really remarkable to watch today is just how quickly all of this happened and how quickly all of this happened and how quickly all of this happened and how quickly all of the snow came down. it was really incredible to watch, at times we were seeing three inches of snow and hour and this, as you see, is what has been left behind in its path, a very, very serious storm and now the clean—up begins and on top of that, over the next couple of days, this is not over because we are going to have this arctic blast come in, about 24
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fahrenheit right now, tomorrow at this time we could be in the single digits with wind chill well below zero. and those low temperatures have been causing problems for many people, but also for cold—blooded creatures in florida. videos uploaded to social media show frozen iguanas that had fallen from trees. they were so cold, they literally froze stiff from the cold. but what then did happen is when they put the iguanas in the sunshine, on a warm piece of grass, they defrosted, effectively. it is like a form of hibernation, effectively? exactly, stasis, and they recovered, so they are fine, so extreme temperatures in boston and in florida as well. matt will bring us date with those and of course bring us up—to—date with what is happening is happening in the uk. over recent weeks, we've be hearing how a number of rape
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trials have collapsed, after it was revealed vital evidence had not be disclosed by prosecutors. and earlier this week, it emerged danny kay had served three years in jail after being wrongly in a moment we'll speak to him about his experience and the issues this case raises for both victims and those falsely accused. first, though, let's get more from brea kfast‘s graham satchell on danny's story. danny kay spent two years in jail for a crime he didn't commit. he was eventually cleared of rape when old deleted facebook messages cast doubt on the truthfulness of his accuser. texts, e—mails, social media messages, all have become hugely important in rape trials, they can provide vital evidence of the relationship between the accuser and the accused. leah malan's rape trial was stopped last month. text m essa g es was stopped last month. text messages from the woman who had accused him cast doubt on the allegations. in his case, police had
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the messages but did not pass them onto his defence lawyer. an apology just doesn't feel like enough. the length of time that i faced, the fa ct length of time that i faced, the fact that the person remains anonymous when i am everywhere and have been dragged through hell for the last two years, an apology does not even slightly cut it at all. in danny's case, failed to find the facebook messages, they were discovered by his sister—in—law, but both cases have raised a significant questions about the disclosure of evidence and the ability of police to gather what may be critical digital messages. danny kayjoins us now, along with his lawyer, philip rule. people will be aware this is not easy for you, talking about this and these circumstances, one of the first interviews you have done. thank you for being here. first of all, if you could take us back to the moment, in court, when you have gone through the trial and that moment when the verdict that you know to be wrong is read out, can
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you just put us in that moment, what that was like for you? devastating. for a system that you trust to let you down, i had complete faith in it, i trusted that the truth would come out in trial and it didn't. do you remember very vividly that you we re you remember very vividly that you were standing up in court, who you looked at first, what your instinctive reaction was? no, not really, it was all a bit blank. i remember sitting there, standing up for the jewellery to come out, the judge asked for a majority vote and the majority was guilty, that was it. had you been given any indication, it is inevitable you would discuss this with your loyal, any indication about where the verdict was going? did you have any feeling in the run—up to that? verdict was going? did you have any feeling in the run-up to that? not really, in the start of the trial my
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legal team said we would pretty much breeze through it. they were confident because of the evidence? the lack of evidence, pretty much. the lack of evidence, pretty much. the only bit of evidence they had was something that she had tampered with, so... what you are saying there, this is the reason that your conviction has now been quashed, is that there were social media m essa g es that there were social media messages between you and the woman who accused you of raping her, and some of those were omitted in terms of evidence, and the reason this has been quashed now is because they we re been quashed now is because they were discovered? been quashed now is because they were discovered ? how been quashed now is because they were discovered? how did that come about? i passed my details onto my sister—in—law whilst i was in prison, and she went on to facebook and recovered them from an archive. why do you think it was possible for your sister—in—law to recover those and not the police? ijust think your sister—in—law to recover those and not the police? i just think the police didn't bother looking, to be honest. philip, it's probably a good time to
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bring you into this story. as danny has explained there was evidence that wasn't discovered by the police. what have you learned as you have looked into the case? danny's case is an example where things have now been put right, which is fortu nate, now been put right, which is fortunate, albeit too late really fortunate, albeit too late really forjustice to have been served in this case. amongst lawyers who work in the justice system, it's not uncommon to see in adequate or late disclosure of evidence being held by police given over to the defence team. danny's places is slightly unusual because all reasonable lines of enquiry don't seem to have been followed in relation to digital media, because we know that the account given by the girl of her social media didn't include the
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majority of messages. what steps should be taken? the officer in charge of the case has to investigate the case and disclose information. in investigating, the officer's duty is to follow all lines of enquiry both against and for the suspect, so looking at innocence and guilt, and then provide that to defence lawyers, whoever they were at the time, before my involvement to ensure that material is placed before the jury, because for the public to maintain faith in the justice system, we need to know police officers are properly trained, able to do these things, in all cases, not just cases trained, able to do these things, in all cases, notjust cases as serious as this, because it still matters to the accused, witnesses and genuine victims who are looking to the police to conduct these investigations fairly with fair trials to follow. so we can all as a
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society have that faith in a fair trial maintained. unfortunately, there have been quite a few enquiries recently with both the ease and the bcs jointly finding that material passed on was poor. danny, you spent a long time in prison and you shouldn't have been there. at your lowest ebb, what was going through your head in those circumstances? i was focusing on my appeal, it was going down for quite awhile, and then focusing on rebuilding my life when i got out. do you think you are in a position now where you can rebuild your life or go back to a life where... you can't forget what has happened in the last four years, but have a decent and happy life now? yes, i
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can decent and happy life now? yes, i ca n start decent and happy life now? yes, i can start building towards that, yes. it will still be difficult because it will always be on my name. do you feel that, do you feel that no matter what has happened, the conviction has been quashed, it should never have happened, do you still feel it hangs over you? yes, there will always be people out there will always be people out there who have their doubts. we appreciate you coming in and telling your story to us. thank you as well for your time this morning. thank you. thank you. it is 90 minutes past eight. time to look at the weather with matt. —— added 8:19am. we have talked about the extreme weather conditions in the united states and it has been very gusty hair. indeed. thankfully temperatures are improving in the united states, where highs today are only minus 15. nowhere near as cold here, set to get colder this weekend, but the big news is that it is nowhere near as windy as it has been across the uk. much improved conditions for much of
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the uk. some rain here and there, not everyone will see it, and with cold weather across scotland where we have rain at the moment, there could be sleet and snow across higher ground. even clearer skies, we will see some frost and i surround this morning, in parts of cumbria, northumberland, north—east england. a bit more rain across other parts of north—east england, across parts of the north midlands as well. some of that will be on the heavier side. east anglia largely dry, some showers along southern coastal countries of the uk. they have made it to the south—western corner. across wales, lots of showers around to find, starting the day heavier. temperatures hovering around the freezing mark and eyes on roads and pavements this morning, they take it easy if you are heading outside shortly. but many places
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will stay dry today, elsewhere there is the risk of a shower around and in scotland, those showers will be wintry across higher ground. temperatures today, lower than we have seen in recent days. maybe, just maybe getting into double figures across the channel islands. as we go into tonight, still lots of cloud, there will be further showers around, making their way south as we go through this evening and overnight. the showers we do see across eastern scotland and northern ireland by the end of the night will start to turn increasingly wintry, a little bit of sleet and show mixed in —— sleet and snow mixed in. frost and eyes could be around again into the morning, but elsewhere, cloud in place and a strengthening breeze, so temperatures shouldn't drop too much. most of you will start saturday frost free but wherever you are, it will be a cold start to the weekend. let's have a look at what is happening through the weekend.
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for much of eastern scotland and northern ireland, showers around, pushing southwards and is druids. the wind will give an added chill —— and eastwards. as showers fade away, we could see lows of —10 overnight in parts of rural scotland where there's snow is lying. finishing saturday night into sunday morning across southern coastal counties, touching gale force winds across the channel, but sunday in itself, dry with sunny spells. possibly some rainfor with sunny spells. possibly some rain for the channel islands, but for the vast majority, sunday looks like a good day for the vast majority if you don't mind the cold. thank you. there are many things you can't
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do until you turn 16 — such as buying a lottery ticket or working full—time. now another has been added to the list — and it relates to caffeine consumption. one supermarket has announced that, from march, it will restrict the sale of highly caffeinated energy drinks to under 16s. joining us now isjenny rosborough who's a nutritionist from action on sugar and patsy kane, the executive head teacher of the the education and leadership trust. obviously schools have an interest in this. first of all, a reaction to be banned, by one supermarket. what do you think? i think it's a really good move and to be encouraged. it would be nice to see either a volu nta ry ba n would be nice to see either a voluntary ban or national guidelines on that. if it in reaction to a problem, jenny? yes, so the drinks come with a warning label that there is not recommended for children, yet at the moment they are freely available for children to buy and
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they are doing so, on their way to school, perhaps on their lunch breaks as well and that can create huge problems. i suppose i was trying to get that, is there a problem amongst children, those under 16, who are buying more caffei nated under 16, who are buying more caffeinated drinks? with energy drinks, it's not only the caffeine, and busy they do can contain more caffeine than is recommended for children, but also the sugar. some contain 22 spoons of sugar and children already have two to three times the amount of sugar recommended. our more children buying these drinks these days? between 2006 in 2014, the increase in sales was by about 150%, so it's definitely not something that's been going down, so we need policy to tackle that. patsy, as far as the school is concerned, there is evidence that there is too much caffeine, they are getting too much in their system. a child comes into school with one of these drinks, what do you do? one of the issues
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is, particularly in one of the schools are now trust, they weren't coming in withjust schools are now trust, they weren't coming in with just one, they were coming in with just one, they were coming in with three or four. local shops were selling for for a pound, they weren't eating breakfast, they we re they weren't eating breakfast, they were coming in with blazer pockets and bags stuffed with these high—energy drinks. we instituted a ban and we have a bag check, which we haven't done in any of our other schools. the reports back from teaching staff was that the behaviour was so much better. has this been in place for a while, the band? yes. have you had come back from parents, because i'd imagine a situation where they would say, and ina minute, situation where they would say, and in a minute, if i want my child to have a drink at school, they can. has that happened ? have a drink at school, they can. has that happened? no, it hasn't, but i don't think parents are necessarily aware what their children are spending their money on. i don't think many parents would be happy to know they were turning up be happy to know they were turning up with four of these drinks in the morning. we have also moved to
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online payments only for food at school, and we have seen the uptake of nutritional meals increase because parents know that is buying their children a good school meal. there is a fine line though, isn't there, between who tells children what to do, be it a supermarket, you understand the duty of care at a school because you are entrusted with it, but supermarkets telling children they can't have something, even though it's not against the light by —— against the law to buy it? we shouldn't be doing the responsibility in children's hands, because they are too young to make the right decision. parents at the ultimate responsibility here because they can buy them if they choose to. energy drinks can be perceived as giving energy when in actual fact they might give that quick burst, but it's not something sustainable throughout the days which is what theissue throughout the days which is what the issue in schools is. i think this is a really good move by waitrose. i don't know how many
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teenagers are going into waitrose perse teenagers are going into waitrose per se but we really do need all the other supermarkets to follow suit because they have no reason not to now. jenny, thank you very much, jenny, nutritionist, patsy came, headteacher. it is set to turn much colder as we had to the weekend with sharp overnight frost but many places will see some sunshine, particularly on sunday. a messy picture today, a band of hill snow affecting the far north of scotland with strong wind. for england and wales, and every of low pressure bringing sunshine and showers, some heady, quite windy for a time across the south but at least there is some sunshine around. overnight, the band of rain and hill snow will sink south into northern ireland and central northern parts
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of england and in towards wales, behind it much colder and widespread frost, wintry showers here, a little less cold in the south because of more cloud cover. high—pressure topples and across the north of the uk bringing very cold arctic air across the country, gradually, through the course of saturday, so much colder feel to things, particularly across the northern half of the country, bright with some sunshine, snow showers here, to the south a band of cloud and rain which will slowly sinks southwards, brighter skies and colder conditions moving in to the north. as we head into the overnight period of saturday, those showers die away, strong north—easterly wind, it will be a very cold one, particularly for central and northern areas with a hard frost here, less cold in the south because ofa here, less cold in the south because of a breeze and a bit of cloud, but we should lose that cloud from the south on sunday as really builds across the uk and wind will be lighter as well so it will be a very cold, frosty start, many of us will
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see crisp winter sunshine but it really will be cold, temperatures around freezing to six or seven best. it stays cold into the start of next week as well, morning frost and some sunshine around. this is business live from bbc news, with susannah streeter and samantha simmonds. more record highs for the us stock markets, but are they a sign of what's to come in the year ahead for the world's biggest economy? live from london, that's our top story on friday 5th january. wall street was boosted by more positivejob news, so can president trump keep the party going, and will america's lowest paid finally start
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to feel the benefit? also in the programme... the lure of the long—term. china says it will offer highly skilled foreign workers 10 year visas as it tries to light up economic growth this
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