Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 19, 2018 10:45pm-11:00pm GMT

10:45 pm
the transition period, which runs until the end of 2020. now, this has caused a massive backlash, especially among scottish conservative mps. if you by the election last year, the did well in scotland. they got 13 mps in total. it is worth remembering that there are more scottish tory mps than there are do you —— dup mps. they do wield quite a lot of power if they are upset, which they clearly are, on this. one of the great slogans in scotla nd on this. one of the great slogans in scotland during the general election last year was, vote tory, get fish. the whole point was that they would go down to westminster and fight ha rd to go down to westminster and fight hard to make sure that after brexit scottish fishermen would get access to their own waters without eu fishermen coming in as well. this transition deal clearly is not going to happen at least until after... transition deal clearly is not going to happen at least until aftermm might change in a year and 18 month's might change in a year and 18 months time. might change in a year and 18 month's time. clearly the prime minister will be saying to the
10:46 pm
conservative mps, and jacob rees—mogg on the heel is threatening to do rees—mogg on the heel is threatening todoa rees—mogg on the heel is threatening to do a protest of throwing fish into the thames tomorrow, a sight to see! she will be saying it is a temporary extension. but by the time you go back to the polls we will have those fish that we promised all constituents. the tory mps met with the chief whip julian constituents. the tory mps met with the chief whipjulian smith this afternoon. if he had been intending to calm them down and get them back on board, i don't think it went very well! apparently he completely lost the room. at one point said, well, there's nothing worried so much to worry about, the fishermen are going to vote labour anyway, that went down very, very badly, especially amongst tories who see the snp as the main rivals north of the border. when the prime minister meets with mps tomorrow she has a lot of bridge building to do in terms of trying to win them round on this point. put us into another perspective on the brexit deal, this is from the times.
10:47 pm
and theirfront page, brexit deal, this is from the times. and their front page, it's brexit deal, this is from the times. and theirfront page, it's not brexit deal, this is from the times. and their front page, it's not the lead, we will talk about that shortly, but the transition deal over brexit is held by businesses, they are taking a more positive view. yes, businesses seem to be pleased. although there is a massive gap over the border with northern ireland, and really until that is resolved, this isjust, you know, words. but the cbi is please. we have another quote from jacob rees—mogg, who seems a lot happier than he was about the fish. the key argument is that this is just a temporary transition, and they are wielding with great pride this idea that they can negotiate trade eels. but of course, if those trades eels require regulatory death alignment, i don't and that's one of the words we re allowed i don't and that's one of the words were allowed to use —— if these trade deals. that causes a problem with northern ireland, so until that is fixed you can't do innovative trade deals at all, and trade deals don't cover services, so the economy is still a mess! it has written into
10:48 pm
the backstop suggestion that the eu have, if all attempts to not having hardboard fails, northern ireland will remain in the single market. that has been dismissed by downing street. dup clearly don't want that either, but the eu or insisting, both sides have said, we don't want it hardboard, both sides have said, we don't want it ha rdboa rd, but both sides have said, we don't want it hardboard, but that's just words. saying it is fine but meaning —— making it happen is something different. david davis as the argument today, if a very good you'll ends up being done, then the border issue to an extent goes away because the relationship will still because the relationship will still be so close between one side, non—eu and the other side that is still the eu. absolutely, if there is still a deal whereby our regulations and economies remain closely integrated. the problem is if we want to start letting in american chlorine washed
10:49 pm
chicken or doing what the labour party was talking about, banning foi grass from the uk market as an animal rights policy. how do you talk —— stop that coming in over the border? is that the biggest challenge in these talks? without a doubt, that is the one thing... they have managed to reach agreement on a lot of the big things, eu citizens, the divorce bill, other aspects. but the divorce bill, other aspects. but the one thing that has been front and centre of the discussions from the very beginning and they are still no closer to reaching an agreement, it is the irish border. this is why you get a hard brexiteers saying, the irish should leave the customs union as well, forgetting that we haven't ruled island since 1916. that move on to uber, in the light of this pedestrian being killed in the united states, kevin, they are going
10:50 pm
to suspend self driving tests. yes, you can see why, this poor woman was crossing the road when she was hit bya crossing the road when she was hit by a driverless uber car. this is something that has always concerned me about driverless cars. will it be a real rush towards heading in that direction, ultimately all cars being driverless, if you put all your faith ina driverless, if you put all your faith in a machine, it's very easy for it to go wrong. it clearly has come with tragic consequences. they have decided to pull the plug. the idea is that self driving vehicles will be safer because they behave predictably. the problem is that they are starting to react with all sorts of unpredictable things, like other drivers on the road or in this case a pedestrian, and training the machine to gradually recognised that is proving much more difficult than the sort of technology pioneers imagined it would be. it raises
10:51 pm
questions as to how far forward other countries move. there is a reference in the piece to gatwick airport planning to test self shuttle buses this summer. —— self driving shuttle buses. the move is in one direction, it is a question of how it is regulated and everything that goes with it. thing that brexiteers have said, we can be a place like arizona that deregulate in orderto enable a place like arizona that deregulate in order to enable more technology innovation. in some ways that is a compelling argument, we can have the flexibility of a smaller market and allow people to do things like health driving cars. the problem is, that comes with real risk and a political cost as well. the real cost of human life. and shuttle buses at an airport, it's a muller to be self—contained space. when ca i’s to be self—contained space. when cars are on the open road driving for miles and miles and in heavy traffic, stop and start and the pedestrians, it is brought and full of danger. take us to the guardian, this is the cambridge analytica
10:52 pm
story, the files, as the guardian is calling them. data firms caught boasting about tricksters swing elections. this is the third day the guardian has been headlining on this story, they have done some impressive longform journalism and have been pushing this story for a year, basically. we have now had these revelations, an undercover recording, of these data firms executive making extraordinary both about plans to basically blackmail politicians with honey trap prostitutes in the ukraine. it feels like a thriller. but it feels really quite real. we should say that they deny any wrongdoing and this is very much reported, as you say, and this is day three. interesting, actually, because facebook have become caught up because facebook have become caught up in all of this because of the suggestions that names were harvested. and the new york times, this is reuters reporting the new
10:53 pm
york times and i think we might be able to show this, with the facebook security chief alex stein moss, who is said to leave after classes of disinformation. you can see that page from the new york times. —— clashes over disinformation. it's all very conjugated. billions were wiped off facebook‘s shared price —— are complicated. that is... what this guy has boasted about is shocking, but it's the fact that millions and millions, tens of millions and millions, tens of millions of people's anzor gubashev is what harvested —— personal details were harvested against the law by facebook. it throws up all sorts of details as to how this could possibly happen, facebook was maqsood ready measures, and then how this information was used perhaps to steal election results. certainly trump has said that thanks to this, this was part of the reason that he managed to get elected, it makes you
10:54 pm
wonder what influence they have. we have got a couple of minutes left andi have got a couple of minutes left and i want to try and squeeze two more in. polly, we have the front page of the son. as you might imagine, they are talking about an argument —— the sun. argument -- the sun. it is a horribly tragic story. with a clear need for him to take some time off and seeks treatment. you know, i think like more and more people, this addiction to painkillers is something where, just like in the us, we need to look really carefully at what policy we have doesn't want people, it sure that we invest in rehab services. it's all right for ant mcpartlin, he can probably afford rehab and we hope it really helps. the tragic thing is there are thousands of families who will be affected by addictions like this who just aren't actors those services. and also the impact it will have on itv local who can't afford those services. ant and dec come without a pair, you can't have one without the other. they are buffets of saturday
10:55 pm
night tv all round the it's notjust saturday night takeaway —— they are the face of saturday night tv. they are very key to the whole itv market. if one of them isn't very well, sadly, the whole thing comes crashing down. let's conclude with the daily express, which has certainly an arresting headline. miracle cure for sight loss, pollock was “— miracle cure for sight loss, pollock was —— polly? miracle cure for sight loss, pollock was -- polly? i don't know about medical claims, but it is a module. you. open —— it is a module. you. now we have got themselves helping to cure blindness, it feels like a miracle cure narrative about themselves might be coming true. i'm a medical perspective, that is very exciting. it is very exciting to think that we have seen conditions that previously nobody thought were curable. thanks to the ground—breaking medical
10:56 pm
breakthroughs, it yours can be found. it shows the importance of funding —— a cure can be found. it shows the importance of funding research as much as possible, there are sure is out there for lots of conditions. two patients miraculously regained their vision, an 86—year—old man and a woman in her early 60s were suffering from age—related macular degeneration and they are not suffering from back any longer. more than 600,000 people are affected by this condition. that is affected by this condition. that is a result of great investment in research and development and regulations to support its. as you rightly pointed out, we have ended up rightly pointed out, we have ended up on rightly pointed out, we have ended upona rightly pointed out, we have ended up on a more rightly pointed out, we have ended up on a more uplifting note! that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer.
10:57 pm
thank you, polly and kevin. from us all, goodbye. good evening. it is the equinox tomorrow and the astronomical start of spring. and for lee, the weather is set to respond accordingly. —— thankfully. we saw spring flowers in your bouncing back after being covered in snow at the weekend. —— in york. temperatures climbing back to levels where they should be, swapping the easterly winds for westerly once. tonight, in north—easterly component to the breeze across england and wales. dragging cloud from the north sea. a lot more cloud than last night. there will be breaks here and there are allowing temperatures to drop closed —— close to freezing. western scotla nd closed —— close to freezing. western scotland and northern ireland, the winds are like and we could seek temperatures between —6 and minus
10:58 pm
eight. the high—pressure has been to the north of the country and is on the north of the country and is on the shift on tuesday, cutting of my close call the winds. still a northerly airflow but coming round the area of high pressure, the air is not chilly. more cloud across england and wales tomorrow, cloudy with sunny breaks. showers in the used should fade away as will those in the north—east of scotland. after a very frosty start, the best of the sunniest weather in scotland and northern ireland. temperatures nine 01’ northern ireland. temperatures nine or10 northern ireland. temperatures nine or 10 degrees. the high—pressure continues to push southwards, allowing the atlantic are to dominate for all of us and eventually bringing in milder air. with that does come cloud. scotland and northern ireland on wednesday, a cloudy day. brightest towards the east. a sunny but frosty start across england and wales, a cold start on wednesday morning compared
10:59 pm
with tuesday morning. whilst it does stay dry here, after a sunny start, it clouds over. §i“fj in , it'dcili-js over: deni blesfig li-‘etut jh— and milder air it'dcili-js over: deni blesfig li-‘etut 71a and ri-iillier air winds the north and milder airswinds—svea’ as
11:00 pm

43 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on