Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 25, 2018 6:00am-7:00am BST

6:00 am
hello. this is breakfast, with rachel burden and chris mason. a promise to boost the number of midwives being trained in england. the government says 3,000 extra places on training courses will be created over four years. union leaders say the plan will need time and investment. good morning. it's sunday the 25th of march. and don't forget, the clocks have gone forward by an hour. also this morning: hundreds of thousands of people attend rallies across america demanding tougher guns laws. among them, martin luther king's 9—year—old granddaughter. i have a dream that enough is enough! and that this should be a gun—free world! a church service will be held in southern france in memory of the four people killed in friday's attacks by an islamist gunman.
6:01 am
good morning. in sport, it's been described as australian cricket's darkest hour, after its captain, steve smith, confesses to hatching a plan to cheat south africa in the third test by tampering with the ball. also this morning: the multi—million pound project to restore the world's first iron bridge, built in shropshire more than 200 years ago. and simon has the weather. dry weather, sunny spells, and temperatures in double digits. i will have all of the weather in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. an extra 3,000 midwives are to be trained in england over the next four years. the move will see 650 midwives start training next year. it is one of a number of proposals to be formally announced by the health secretary,
6:02 am
jeremy hunt next week. the royal college of midwives has welcomed the news but says the plans need investment and time to work. like other parts of the nhs, maternity units have been under pressure. the bursts rate has been rising, and some hospitals have been unable to accept any more expectant mothers. —— birth. the government has insisted more midwives are being trained all the time. now, though, 3000 will be announced to enter training. it is notjust about boosting numbers. currently depending on the trust, women can see several midwives over because their pregnancy. jeremy hunt is expected to pledge that by 2021, most women will have a named midwife. base a dedicated staff reduces stillbirths, miscarriages, and deaths. this comes after the
6:03 am
lifting of restraints on pay rises in the health service, meaning a newly trained midwife will have a salary 20% higher by 2020. but it is not yet clear where the funding will come from. and while welcoming the move, given the time it takes to train, the royal college of midwives says it does not help but is now. lebo diseko, bbc news. —— mothers now. hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets in cities across the united states to demand tougher gun laws. the demonstrations were led by survivors of the mass shooting at a school in florida last month. washington saw the biggest anti—gun rally for a generation. here's our correspondent, chris buckler. in america's capital, this rally was presented as a rising, an attempt by stu d e nts to presented as a rising, an attempt by students to take on this nation's powerful gun lobby, and to deliver a warning to politicians, change the
6:04 am
gun laws must come. to the leaders, sceptics, and cynics, those that told us to sit down and stay silent, wait your turn. welcome to the revolution. #i gotta keep trying... 0n revolution. #i gotta keep trying... on stage, there were performances by many celebrities, but speeches were from students, many from the douglas high school were 17 were shot dead just a month ago. and the huge crowd also heard from the nine—year old granddaughter of martin luther king jr, a woman with her own vision. my grandfather had a dream that his four little children would not be judged by the colour of their skin, but the character they have. i have a dream that enough is enough!“ this was a new generation speaking, president trump was not here in
6:05 am
washington to hear it. he had left the white house to go to his golf resort in florida, the state the stu d e nts resort in florida, the state the students had come from and their friends were killed. six minutes and 20 seconds with and aris and my friend carmen would never complain to me about piano practice. —— an. 0n to me about piano practice. —— an. on stage, one of the survivors of the parkland massacre, read out the names of those who died, and then simply stood in silent four minutes after minute. —— in silence for minute after minute. since the time that i came out here it has been six minutes and 20 seconds. the shooter has ceased shooting and will soon abandon his rifle. has the rallies we re abandon his rifle. has the rallies were held from los angeles to new york, but there have been campaigns after shootings before, and the stu d e nts after shootings before, and the students know they need to continue to put pressure on the politicians,
6:06 am
including their president. —— sisters rallies. chris buckler, abc news, washington. —— bbc news. the official brexit campaign group, vote leave, has been accused of breaking electoral spending rules during the eu referendum. a former volunteer claims in interviews with the observer newspaper and channel four news that the organisation breached official spending limits. vote leave has denied any wrongdoing and borisjohnson has described the accusations as "utterly ludicrous." a church service will be held in the southern french town of trebes this morning in memory of the four people killed in a series of attacks by an islamist gunman. a national memorial service will be arranged in paris in the coming days to honour the police officer who died after trading places with a female hostage. lucy williamson reports from ca rcassonne. this attack has become not the story ofa gunman, this attack has become not the story of a gunman, but the story of a hero. arnaud beltrame, the man who made an astonishing act of ribery
6:07 am
seem natural, almost routine. —— bravery. flags were lowered to half—mast at his former base and at units across the country and should be to their colleague and friend. many who did not know him put down tributes. he is a hero for me because he has given his life for a lot of people. he knew it was dangerous, what he did, but he did it. the gendarmerie said his death was a reminder of their daily commitment to protect the people. for the people themselves, his actions are defiant response to the would—be attackers of the country, a reminder of the best of grants. by the morning after the attack the supermarket, the sight of so much drama, was chilled and empty, a crime scene. —— best of france.
6:08 am
inside this building on friday, arnaud beltrame offered up his life in place of others. his mobile phone, secretly connected to collea g u es phone, secretly connected to colleagues outside, giving the operation a vital edge. his mother said she was not surprised at what her son had done. that is the way he lived in the way he worked, she said. he used to tell me he was just doing hisjob nothing more. lucy williamson, bbc news, carcassonne. a group of mps has described funding figures issued by the government for its flagship free childcare policy in england as "misleading and out of date." members of the treasury committee called for more money to be paid to childcare providers. the government has said that it will consider the recommendations, but that it is already spending more on childcare than any previous government. officials at cricket australia have launched an investigation into ball tampering. cameron bancroft has been charged by the international cricket council after footage was released which showed him rubbing the ball with yellow tape. let's speak to our correspondent,
6:09 am
phil mercer who is in sydney for us. what is extraordinary about this story is how blatant it was. the yellow ta pe story is how blatant it was. the yellow tape was picked up by the cameras. what happened exactly? cameron bancroft was picked up tampering with the ball. we understands now after a press conference that the australian skipper, steve smith, knew in advance this conspiracy was to unfold. this has to be the biggest scandal in australian sport for many, scandal in australian sport for any scandal in australian sport for many, many years. there will be cricket fans right across australia and beyond these shores, no doubt, who will be asking themselves the simple yet searching question, what we re simple yet searching question, what were they thinking? and fans in england, or example, will also be asking themselves, perhaps, had they done it before. these questions will be part of an investigation by cricket australia. it is sending
6:10 am
senior officials to south africa to try to get to the bottom of this scandal. and then it will decide what to do next. but there is a furious reaction here in australia to this scandal. lots of calls for steve smith to stand down. and at the moment, the national sport of australia, cricket, well, it's reputation is in tatters. thank you very much. john —— phil mercer, speaking from australia. last night, landmarks across the uk were plunged into darkness to mark earth hour. famous monuments and buildings including buckingham palace and tower bridge turned out their lights to raise awareness about climate change. countries around the world also went dark to show international unity for the environment. now, the debate around the need for tighter gun controls is one that still divides america, but yesterday, hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets across the country calling for change. jane strachey, a british citizen living in newjersey,
6:11 am
was one of them. we can speak to her now. thank you for talking to us. how was it? world, it was a great opportunity to be part of this protest. —— well, . opportunity to be part of this protest. —— well,. there were hundreds of people in the small town i was participating in. mainly at the request of my 13—year—old cousin who felt as a high school student she needed to be part of this movement to protect students and bring in greater gun control. different generations were present. for the small town, there were well over 1000 people. it was great to be pa rt over 1000 people. it was great to be part of. the striking thing, emotionally charged elements, you are part of a much bigger national event. that is right. what is interesting is there were thousands of rallies all over the us. many in
6:12 am
the bigger cities like washington and new york, obviously. but these smaller voices, they feel they have a voice that needs to be spoken. the man called the action was to get people to an role for voting in the next election. —— main call. people to an role for voting in the next election. -- main call. the feeling around those demonstrations yesterday is canned in the long—term they achieve something? —— can. they have achieved something now, but they are colliding with a long established acceptance that guns are just part of american culture, written, as it is, into the american constitution. exactly. hats off to the students of the parkland shooting who have been able to make this a national protest in a short time to be one month later this conversation is still on the table. the momentum, pushing forward, the conversation has to stay open. it is
6:13 am
thanks to these rallies and talking to people like the bbc and other news outlets that this conversation will stay at the forefront of the american mindset. how do you keep the momentum going? that is the challenge. absolutely. of course, the last thing we want to see is what often happens, a big dip between shootings and then it rings it back to the table when there is another shooting. —— brings. it back to the table when there is anothershooting. —— brings. i do not believe guns should he in a classroom. given it is written clearly into the us constitution about the right to bare arms, what is realistic in terms of changing the law here given it is highly unlikely that amendment to the constitution is ever likely to shift? umm, obviously, we... i do not think in the immediate future we are going to see any change to the second amendment, though it would be a good thing. what would be good to see is a ban on assault rifles,
6:14 am
drake do background checks, and limitations on the sale of high—calibre magazine. —— greater background checks. it is lovely to talk to you. thank you. hundreds of thousands of people right across america. it is 6:14. the clocks have gone forward. it is six. remember that. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. more than 3,000 places on midwifery training courses are to be created over the next four years in england as part of plans to meet nhs staffing demands. hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets in the us to demand stricter gun laws, led by survivors of the mass shooting at a school in florida last month which killed 17 people. washington saw the biggest anti—gun rally for a generation. here's simon with a look at this morning's weather. it isa
6:15 am
it is a real treat for us, we have you in the studio, which doesn't often happen in the weekend. we have got some fine weather today. spring has sprung. the clocks have gone forward. for many of us today it will not feel too bad at all. we begin the morning with sunny spells and will end the day with sunny spells. light winds as well, temperatures into double figures across many parts. this morning we have more in the way of cloud across england and wales, coming up from the south. clear skies in scotland and northern ireland. a touch of frost around there. as we go through the day, cloud across england and wales will gradually clear to the south—east. so it will improve. it might take some time to clear away from kent, fx, towards east sussex. many parts of england and wales will be dry and fine. showers into
6:16 am
scotland, northern ireland and into the far north of england. maximum temperature is getting to about 10— 13. this evening and tonight, we will see clear spells across scotla nd will see clear spells across scotland and northern ireland, allowing temperatures to drop down fairly quickly. england and wales, not as cold as quickly, but you can see the blue here taking over. so going into monday morning there will bea going into monday morning there will be a frost around, particularly the further north and west you are. to the south and east, holding up to about 1— four celsius. in the week ahead, a bit backlash. cold air coming in from scandinavia, slightly less cold air coming in from the atla ntic less cold air coming in from the atlantic and as these two air mass is meat we will see something a bit more wintry going into next week ahead of easter. —— air masses. before we get there on monday, a cold start to the day with some frost around. cloud increasing from the west. 0utbreaks frost around. cloud increasing from the west. outbreaks of rain spreading from northern ireland to the west of wales and the far
6:17 am
south—west of england. maximum temperature is still about 10— 12, still holding onto those milder conditions. that is set to change as we go into tuesday. this area of low pressure will move through. it is going to bring a spell of heavy rain and then increasingly we will see some snow falling across the far north—east of scotland. much of that will be over higher ground but it will be over higher ground but it will go down to lower levels. temperatures here really taking a drop, 5— eight degrees. further south, sunny spells, one or two showers and milder air, temperatures still in double figures. as we go into wednesday, we still have that split. cold air towards the north, less cold air towards the south. further north, again, there will be some rain. some snow falling. much of that will be over the higher ground but increasingly through the week, snow could come down to lower levels. look at those temperatures, 4-7 levels. look at those temperatures, 4—7 across the north and east of scotland. further south, still just
6:18 am
about into double figures but i suspect it will feel chillier, with the north—westerly wind through the course of the day. so, a white easter, or not? potentially. some places could see some snow. not as widespread or disruptive as we had a few weeks ago, with the beast from the east, it will be more complicated than that. i managed to mow the lawn today, and do you know what else i did?i today, and do you know what else i did? i cleared out the shed. there are few things in life more satisfying. just as well i did it then. thank you. an impressive enterprise for a saturday afternoon. we'll be back with the news headlines in a few moments, but first, it's time for the film review, hello, and a warm welcome. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode.
6:19 am
so mark, what do we have this week? what have you been watching? interesting week, we have a psychological thriller starring claire foy by steven soderbergh, unsane. wrinkle in time, the big budget adaptation of a much—loved book by ava duvernay. and pacific rim: uprising, john boyega stars in the robotic sequel. claire foy is a big—ticket? the new film by steven soderbergh, claire foy will be very much in the shadow of an old sam fuller film, called shock corridor, an interesting, trashy, exploitation film. claire foy is a businesswoman whose life has fallen apart because she has endured a stalker, and basically, as a result of this, she has had to move towns, keep her identity quiet, keep her phone number secret. she has lived a very difficult life as a result of this stalker‘s attentions and unsurprisingly she suffers from anxiety and depression. she goes to see her doctor,
6:20 am
during the course of the conversation, she happens to mention in passing that she has thought about suicide but she mentions it literally as an aside. the next thing, she is signing a piece of paper which she is told is completely standard and suddenly she finds herself incarcerated. against her will. she is completely sane, but she's now in prison, so here she is now in prison, so here's a clip. can i ask, do you think i could just make a phone call, to let my family know that i am 0k? you get a phone call... that is so nice. thank you. you are saying you want your phone call now? yes, yes, that is what i am saying, it is like you read my mind. yes, hello, my name is sawyer valentini, i am at highland creek behavioural facility.
6:21 am
lam being held here against my will, please send help, thank you. i will be out of here in like 20 minutes. do you know how many calls the cops get like that every week? those are from crazy people. that is kind of the set—up, then she's trying to prove that she is completely sane, and the more she attempts to do that, the more insane they think she is. very odd, like side effects, which started like a serious drama and went off the rails, this begins in a fairly intense fashion, and then descends more and more into just complete craziness. and it does so very knowingly. the interesting thing, it is shot on an iphone 7. it does not look grungy, that gives it a very immediate look. he said he found it liberating, steven soderbergh. we have seen other films shot on iphones before, for instance, tangerine. juno temple, great screen presence, she is an unruly force of nature, she has a small role.
6:22 am
she's really captivating. the film itself, steven soderbergh is interesting, not above exploitation movies, he's not above enjoying a certain degree of cinematic hysteria. what makes this work is claire foy, because herjob is to keep a completely straight face while everything around her is descending. and the whole thing is, you have to believe in her. she starts to think that her stalker is working in the hospital. is he, isn't he, is she imagining it, is it true? none of this would work if you did not have a performance at the centre which had complete conviction, somebody where you think, i'm investing my sympathy and belief in this character. on one level, it'sjust like a big, overblown episode of the twilight zone. it has that sense of seriousness at the beginning. that goes out of the window very fast and it descends into entertaining histrionics, all over the place, makes no sense whatsoever, all over the place. there is a point where someone clearly said, this plot does not... actually, let's carry on!
6:23 am
laughter. claire foy carries it and it is a great tribute to her. terrible thing to say but i was so stressed just watching the trailer that i did not go to the screening because i thought, i am so stressed and angry over these two minutes, i cannot handle that for two hours. perfectly fine... is it stressful throughout? certainly, at the beginning, when she is saying, i'm not meant to be here. i do find that stuff... it is intense. a third of the way through, it goes, never mind, let's go completely and enjoy ourselves. that is what happens. claire foy keeps it together. superb actress, she's terrific. a fantastic director, ava duvernay, what do you make of this? this means you have read some
6:24 am
of the reviews are not positive. this is her adaptation of the much—loved book a wrinkle in time by madeleine l'engle. storm reid goes searching for her missing scientist father, an adventure through time and space, led by three bizarrely attired astral guides. the film is really interesting in as much as it is a broad canvas, a film breaking the white male grip on the fantasy market, trying to do something adventurous, aimed very specifically at the seven to 14 age group. and as a 56—year—old man, i am demonstrably therefore not in the target audience! the thing that troubles me is this, because i'm excited by the idea of it, is why didn't i like it more? the thing it reminded me of was peterjackson?s adaptation of the lovely bones. a really difficult book, he did this fantastical adaptation which had loads of dreamy visuals. but it never got under the skin of the book, and i felt all the time that i was watching the film rather than experiencing it. fantasy, you have to be engulfed, you have to be swept along. what i did like about it, a film with a young female central character who gets through on her wits rather than anything else.
6:25 am
she is the emotional heart of the film. all the way through i could feel myself thinking, i want to be carried along by this but i am not. i am willing to accept that it may read differently if you are in the target market. it may be that i was just too detached from the film—making to be able to fully invest in the story, and i confess, i will go and see it again but i would be lying if i said the film worked for me. i wanted it to, but if you think of the best fantasy films, i?m thinking about et, for instance, no matter your age, you burst into tears. you weep buckets because it is et. this does not do that, my feeling is it is an honourable failure. nothing wrong with that, i would rather see a film—maker aim high and trip up than play it safe, but i did feel that i wanted this to work and it did not. 0k, and your third choice, is this a blockbuster? let's wait and see! the first pacific rim, guillermo del toro took greatjoy in the spectacle of really big
6:26 am
robots hitting really big creatures. ok, so made by somebody who loved all that stuff, and i think del toro is sorely missed on the sequel. this is set ten years after the battle at the end of that one. black marketeer jake pentecost, son of idris elba's character from the first, has to go to prison or go back and work as an instructor for more people to learn how to drive these massive robots, these jaegers, and of course, he agrees to be an instructor. black marketeer jake pentecost, son of idris elba's character from the first, has to go to prison or go back and work as an instructor for more people to learn how to drive these massive robots, these jaegers, and of course, he agrees to be an instructor. how are you doing? this is a military base. you remember how that works. ranger pentecost.
6:27 am
ranger, sir. let's get you squared away. try not to steal anything while you are here. did that haircutjust call you pentecost? as in stacker pentecost? pilot of coyote tango, hero of basically the whole world? it isjust a name. it is a really cool name! in its favour, it is a film about massive robots hitting each other, it has none of the leering nastiness of a michael bay movie, that is good. 0n the other hand, what it does not have is any of the magic and wonder and awe of a guillermo del toro film. nor does it have the fun of real steel, for instance, with hugh jackman and big fighting robots. very quickly, despite the fact we have some interesting actors, very quickly it becomes big robots hitting each other and smashing great big buildings and none of it having any impact whatsoever. really odd, you are left with the spectacle. empty spectacle.
6:28 am
very few occasions in which empty spectacle alone will get away with it. i think we have seen enough big robots hitting each other to no longer be impressed by that. what you need... i know this sounds old—fashioned, you need a story that you care about, characters that you like and you are rooting for. some kind of heart amidst all the real steel smashing. and real steel did have that and this did not. i get the feeling you did not like it much. what is good ? the best thing out, you were never really here, by lynne ramsay. she has made only four features. morvern callar, we need to talk about kevin, ratcatcher and this. she dances to the beat of her own drum. this is a really brilliant film, starring joaquin phoenix as a guy who is a hitman, specialises in retrieving lost teenagers. but the film is not interested in the nuts and bolts of the plot, it is more a psychological
6:29 am
state, a brilliant score byjonny greenwood, you need to see it on a big screen because it is proper cinema. i think lynne ramsey is a genius. an absolute genius, please go to see this film because it is wonderful, make it a hit. this is written and directed by angela robinson, great performances by rebecca hall, bella heathcote, believe me, i did not know this story before i saw the film, very eye opening, very entertaining, not enough people saw this in cinemas. i would like more people to see this film on dvd, professor ma rston and the wonder women. that is just about all we have time for this week. you can find all of the film news and from across the bbc on the website. all the previous programmes are on the iplayer, as ever. enjoy your cinema—going. see you next time. hello.
6:30 am
this is breakfast, with rachel burden and chris mason. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. an extra 3,000 midwives will be trained in england over the next four years, as part of government plans to meet staffing demands. the 25% boost is one of a number of proposals hoped to help reduce miscarriages and stillbirths. the royal college of midwives has welcomed the news but says the plans need investment and time to work. hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets in cities across the united states to demand tougher gun laws. the demonstrations, under the movement march for our lives, were led by survivors of the mass shooting at a school in florida last month. washington saw the biggest anti—gun rally for a generation. more than 800 other protests have taken place with solidarity events in edinburgh, sydney, and tokyo.
6:31 am
the official brexit campaign group, vote leave, has been accused of breaking electoral spending rules during the eu referendum. a former volunteer claims in interviews with the observer a church service will be held in the southern french town of trebes this morning, in memory of the four people killed in a series of attacks by an islamist gunman. a national memorial service is being arranged in paris in the coming days, to honour colonel beltrame who died after trading places with a female hostage. president macron has paid tribute to him, he said he deserved "the respect and admiration of the whole nation." childcare can be expensive. last year, the government almost some working parents in england more of it for free. but according to mps on
6:32 am
the treasury committee, childcare providers are not being paid enough, and that is costing parents money. if you are an eligible working pa rents if you are an eligible working parents in england, you can get 30 hours of free childcare a week for your three or four—year—old. it pays childcare providers 34 p less than it costs on average to look after them. that means they have to find money elsewhere, sometimes charging more for children aged under three and four food and other things. the mps behind it said things need to happen. this is what the costs. is the national government is interested and wants to make it work, they have to make sure the costis work, they have to make sure the cost is carried by national government. —— if the. cost is carried by national government. -- if the. the government. -- if the. the government says it is spending more than ever before on childcare, but it will consider the recommendations. caroline davies,
6:33 am
bbc news. farmers in scotland are struggling to recruit enough seasonal migrant workers to meet demand, in part, due to a lack of confidence over brexit. that's the findings of a report by the scottish government. the study suggests that last year recruitment agencies experienced a 20% increase in demand for fruit and vegetable pickers despite extra efforts to source staff from bulgaria and romania. the winner of the first eurovision song contest, lys assia, has died in zurich at the age of 94. she won for switzerland in 1956 with a song called "refrain." lys assia represented her country in 1957 and 1958, and attempted to return as a contestant in 2012 and 2013. the organisers of eurovision have paid tribute to her "lasting commitment" to the song contest. earlier, you might have heard us discussing how tourist attractions and monuments in london switched their lights off for an hour last night, but other cities around the world also got in on the act.
6:34 am
from paris to berlin, landmarks in cities across the globe fell into darkness, to show international awareness for climate change. the initiative began in 2007 in sydney, but now more than 180 countries take part. it is quite dramatic when it happens, isn't it? you would really feel power, wouldn't you, if you we re feel power, wouldn't you, if you were in control of the likes of the eiffel tower. 0nes —— one switch. i would enjoy it. don't do it in these studios, though. speaking of bad ideas, what on earth were they thinking? absolutely! it has been called the darkest hour of cricket. this says it all. they look like two little schoolboys
6:35 am
who've done something very, very naughty. what is even worse is it wasn'tjust these two. naughty. what is even worse is it wasn't just these two. we are talking about ball tampering, affecting the ball, doing something to it, making it shinier, using lip balm, or in this case, making it rougher, using sandpaper. but it wasn't sandpaper, it was a piece of sticky tape. it had dirt granules. people will think how on earth does that affect the travel of the ball? but even the tiniest adjustment has an impact. they are made in such a way, rough on one side, smooth on the other, you change the speed, which is the most important thing,
6:36 am
it hugely changes the game. let's ta ke it hugely changes the game. let's take a look at the footage. this is what the television cameras picked up. it showed cameron bancroft take what he said was yellow tape out of his trouser pocket before rubbing the ball during the third it is so blatant! then trying to hide the tape down his trousers when umpires suspected something was up. the umpires obviously suspected something was wrong. it is at that point he should have tried to admit, say he had tape, but he said he had a sunglasses case. covering it up makes it worse. he later admitted to working the match ball with dirt on that sticky tape. inevitably, people will ask if this does happen before the pipe there is an investigation under way. —— before. steve smith said he was aware of it. people have asked if he should stay. here is the man himself. lam not i am not proud of what has happened.
6:37 am
umm... you know... it is not within the spirit of the game. my integrity, the team's integrity, the leadership group's integrity, has come on the question, and rightfully so. come on the question, and rightfully so. umm... it is not on. umm... it is certainly not on. and it will not happen again, i can promise you, under my leadership. steve smith. very different from the ashes under ben stokes. england's cricketers are into the fourth day of their test against new zealand in auckland. the home side declared on 427—8 after their first innings. england are currently 38—1 in their second innings, trailing by 331. joe root and mark stoneman at the crease. alastair cook went in the third over for just 2 runs. of course, the opening race of the formula 1 season is under way in melbourne. lewis hamilton started the australian grand prix from pole position for the fifth year in a row.
6:38 am
but the briton has only won it twice. he dominated qualifying yesterday and is currently leading the ferraris of kimi raikkonen and sebastian vettel. that is by three seconds. you can follow the action with commentary on bbc radio five live. with no premier league football this weekend, it was a busy weekend of international friendlies, and a great result for northern ireland. they came from behind to beat world cup finalists south korea in belfast. the levelled the match thanks to an own goal after a clever 0liver norwood free—kick. then substitute paul smyth scored the winner in the 86th minute becoming the first northern ireland player to score on his debut since george mccartney against iceland in 2001. imean, i i mean, i am i mean, iam getting i mean, i am getting used to it. it isa i mean, i am getting used to it. it is a great feeling in front of all of the crowd. they have been a great support every single home game to be
6:39 am
i thought i would take the moment and put up my hands. —— game. i am enjoying it. saracens are up to second in rugby union's premiership after a 24—11 win over harlequins in the first—ever premiership match at the london stadium. with several players back in club action after the six nations, two returning stars made the difference for saracens. wales wing, liam williams, and england back—row, maro itoje, scoring for the european champions. in the pro14, cardiff blues stepped closer to sealing a play—off spot with victory over ulster, who themselves now face a tricky task of reaching the post season matches. the blues ran in four tries to secure a 35—17 bonus point win. british number one, kyle edmund, is out of the miami 0pen, losing a tight second round match to young american frances tee—a—foe in three sets. the australian open semi—finallist saved five match points in the final set, but couldn't deny the world number 63 victory.
6:40 am
britain's cyclists continued to dominate on day three of the para—cycling track world championships in rio. sophie thornhill and helen scott set a world record on the way to claiming britain's eighth gold in the the women's tandem one kilometre time trial. the british team collected a total of six medals yesterday, including golds for tandem duo neil fachie & matt rotherham and crystal lane—wright. that brings their overall tally to fifteen with more chances for british success later today. not much personal space when you're on their tandems. you have to know each other pretty well, and if you don't, you soon will. now, when you think beach volleyball, you picture sun—kissed beaches and a pleasant heat to match, but for scottish volleyballers, the reality couldn't
6:41 am
be more different. training at edinburgh's portobello beach they've had to contend with freezing temperatures and howling winds. breakfast‘s mike bushell went along to train with them ahead of their journey to australia for the commonwealth games next month. the views out to sea might be the same, but that is where any comparisons and between gold coast, australia, and edinburgh's portobello beach on a freezing winter's day. it is raw, really raw, isn't it? the wind off the sea, a few degrees, and the ball stings
6:42 am
your hands. but if you can play here, surely you can play anywhere. and this is what team scotland has as their secret weapon, as they chase a medal, and their dreams, based on real sand. the gold coast will be windy. this puts us in good stead. it gives us a good chance to do well and we love it. they have been training here virtually every day, even in the dark, using nearby street lights, because they want to make the most of beach volleyball making its debut at the commonwealth games and the difference it has already made to their sport.“ games and the difference it has already made to their sport. it is huge for the sport already in scotla nd huge for the sport already in scotland and it will only get bigger. we have permanent nets here. we have never had them in scotland before. however, on occasion, the sand has been frozen solid, so a localfarmer sand has been frozen solid, so a local farmer has sand has been frozen solid, so a localfarmer has come sand has been frozen solid, so a local farmer has come to the rescue. the farmer, who wants to remain
6:43 am
anonymous, has replaced grains of wheat with grains of sand.“ anonymous, has replaced grains of wheat with grains of sand. it is a huge improvement. we can come here and we do not have to rely on the weather. the sand is the same and it is good quality. teamwork is crucial in beach volleyball, especially in these games, where they will be out to beat players who are normally their teammates. for any athlete, this is the pinnacle, representing great britain at the london 0lympics. but to represent team scotland, it is a special moment, and something we are really excited about. that is dedication, isn't it? yes. you know... just the psychology of embracing the ultimates of the
6:44 am
glamorous summer sport and just looking at his hands, you need gloves on. but they would not work with whacking the ball over.l gloves on. but they would not work with whacking the ball over. a mike busheu with whacking the ball over. a mike bushell classic. as ever. more than 3,000 places on midwifery training courses are to be created over the next four years in england as part of plans to meet nhs staffing demands. hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets in the us to demand stricter gun laws — led by survivors of the mass shooting at a school in florida last month which killed 17 people. washington saw the biggest anti—gun rally for a generation. now, what do they say about the weather in march? it comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb. this one has been roaring all month long and it is still roaring. yes, looking forward to spring, the light
6:45 am
evenings, british summertime. u nfortu nately evenings, british summertime. unfortunately it will turn colder into next week. you are the bearer of that news. i can tell you some good news. today is not too bad for many of us. a fair amount of cloud in england and wales, but they should then break up and we will have sunny spells and light winds as well. that means temperatures will be getting into double figures and it shouldn't feel too bad. the satellite picture this morning shows us clear skies across scotland and northern ireland. england and wales, lots more cloud around first thing this morning. gradually that cloud will start to disappear and there will start to disappear and there will be some holes developing in the cloud. we will see some sunny spells. there could be more cloud lingering in the afternoon in the far south—east of england. further north, more cloud developing, with a few showers in towards scotland and perhaps northern ireland and the far north of england. but with some light winds, all of us really seeing temperatures into double figures, ten or 11 or 12 celsius. this
6:46 am
evening, tonight and into next week we will see weather that is a bit more chilli coming in. certainly with clear skies tonight across scotla nd with clear skies tonight across scotland and northern ireland, frost developing. you can see those blue colour is developing. further south and east we hold onto the mild conditions. temperatures going no lower than two or three degrees. a cold and frosty note. plenty of sunshine first thing on monday. going through the week we will probably see some changes. we have a clash, a battle, between cold air coming from scandinavia and less cold aircoming coming from scandinavia and less cold air coming from the atlantic 0cean. as those two meet, that is the boundary of where we could see some snow. let's talk about monday morning. as we mentioned, a cold and frosty start, with some sunshine. cloud increasing from the west during monday and without some outbreaks of rain spreading into northern ireland, west wales, and the far south—west of england. maximum temperatures at this stage in double figures, about 10— 12. as isaid,
6:47 am
in double figures, about 10— 12. as i said, tuesday and the rest of the week, we see this area of low pressure coming in, marking the boundary between the colder rare coming in to the north and the less cold air in the south. it will bring heavy rain on tuesday, sweeping east, and increasingly, as cold air cut scene, there will be some snow across the north—east of scotland. —— cold air cuts in. still double—digit temperatures down towards the south. wednesday, increasingly we will see snow across scotland, the far north of england, much of that falling over higher ground, but down to low levels we might see some sleet. heavy showers coming in on a rather brisk north—westerly winds that might make it feel just a bit north—westerly winds that might make it feeljust a bit chillier north—westerly winds that might make it feel just a bit chillier towards southern areas. you will certainly notice that colder air further north, 4— seven celsius. in the run—up to easter we will keep that battle between the cold air and be less cold out. it is as if winter keeps saying, one more thing, and then popping up. and a week later we are back into the whole thing again.
6:48 am
absolutely. thank you, we will talk to you later. still to come, we will be looking at the sunday papers. but right now, time for the travel show. hello and welcome to the travel show, coming to you this week from tokyo. it's a city that is gearing up to host the olympic games in two years' time and also a place that i call home. but, like the rest of the team, i spend a fair amount of my time on the road, bringing you stories from around the world. so let's have a look back at some of our most recent travels. here's a taste of what is coming up. it's crazy here. there are gunshots, there are sirens. it's crazy here.
6:49 am
there are gunshots, there are sirens. uluru is one of those must—see destinations if you are heading to australia. but not everybody manages it. it is remote and expensive to get there. despite all this, if you are still keen to climb the rock then time could be running out as henry discovered when he headed there in january. the giant monolith attracts over a quarter of a million visitors each year. for many of them, climbing to the top is something of a rite of passage. as well as being an important place for tourists, uluru is a sacred site. at the moment, tourists are allowed to climb to the top but all of that is about to change. at the end of 2017, the people who manage uluru in conjunction with its anangu owners made a landmark decision to ban tourists from climbing the rock.
6:50 am
why was the decision made in the first place to ban the climb? there are a couple of reasons. primarily because anangu do not want to see people climbing for cultural reasons, but there has also been a significant number of fatalities on the climb. the ban will not come into force until october 2019 and, until then, tourists can continue to climb on days when the weather is not too extreme. the base of the route has a number of signs asking tourists to respect this is intense. all of these mad races, getting it
6:51 am
out of their system! i am eating a seasoned campaigner here. mahmud tarha hello. how are you? —— muhamed, hello. can you show me a few of the things you do?” muhamed, hello. can you show me a few of the things you do? i can. this car is like as it came from the factory. so from the factory it has around 250 horsepower. it will not be enough to take us to the top. but i refuse to give up. rajan racing to the top earlier this year on the programme. still to come on the travel show, we remember the time christa took on a surreal underwater challenge in denmark. 0ur newbie, mike corey,
6:52 am
got a gentle introduction into life here on the programme. injanuary we welcomed mike corey to the travel show team. i'm not sure if he realised what he had signed up for when we sent him to mexico. he was there to join a group that run regular events designed to put locals off the idea of attempting an illegal border crossing into the usa, by recreating what it would be like. the experience is open to tourists as well, so we sent him along tojoin in. we are told to meet inside the main gate. and even though these guys are playing a part, they really mean business. he is yelling at the top of his lungs. he's the coyote, someone who brings you across the border. he's taking his character extremely seriously.
6:53 am
i'm going to have to get going. sirens wail. this is intense. there are gunshots, there are sirens. this bridge is totally not stable. and there are people crawling on the ground. i don't know what is going on but the group is slowly... man groans. you 0k? yes. unsure footing i can deal with. woman screams. but things get much scarier when you are forced to the ground by these very authentic—looking armed bandits. solo. i'm actually afraid to make too much noise. i don't want them to come back. sirens wail.
6:54 am
we have to go. look at this. i have a cactus stuck in the bottom of my shoe. look at that. that went all the way through the side of my shoe. this is the moment.
6:55 am
hopefully we cross the border. 0ur coyote is stressing out. we wait for the next truck and as soon as the next truck comes we are jumping in the back. sirens wail. sirens off in the distance. illegal crossings are currently at the lowest they have been for 17 years. though the journey still kills hundreds of people annually. here at the park they hope that this experience will save lives. it has certainly given many of the guests here tonight pause for thought. to finish a look back at some of our
6:56 am
favourite travel stories last month i took one of the most surreal sightseeing tours ever invented. while it might be popular with tourists here in tokyo it seems some of the locals are not so keen. i guess the best way to describe what i am about to experience is a self—drive videogame simulation with some sightseeing thrown in. konnichiwa. welcome to maricar, nice to meet you! nice to meet you. even though it is a sunday morning and the traffic is lighter, it takes a while to get used to driving a vehicle that feels so low and exposed. slightly vulnerable, but i think i am getting the hang of driving this car now. oh, my gosh. do you see how close
6:57 am
i came to a taxi? we are going through the most fashionable part of tokyo and i am dressed as a fat plumber. little chance of anyone wanting to copy my outfit here in harajuku, but nintendo are reportedly unhappy with their trademark super mario dungarees and cap being used by the tours. there has been talk of legal action, but the subtle name change from mario kart to maricar and the inclusion of some other characters seems to be keeping the lawyers at bay. we are coming up to the crossing. oh, my goodness. oh, my gosh, i can't believe we are going through shibuya crossing! although some of tokyo's taxidrivers
6:58 am
say that they can be disruptive and dangerous, johnny tells me that he has supervised over 2000 tours without any serious accidents. but several cab drivers we met still had concerns. new regulations now mean that modifications will have to be made to the go—karts and it is hoped that repositioning tail lights and fitting better back and head protection and mudguards will provide safety for kart drivers and other road users and pedestrians. that's it for a look back at some
6:59 am
of the best bits on the travel show so far this year. in the meantime, don't forget to sign up to us on social media and you can share your travels with the world. we'll see you next week. from everyone here in tokyo, it's goodbye. hello. this is breakfast, with rachel burden and chris mason. good morning. it's sunday the 25th of march. and don't, forget the clocks have gone forward by an hour. also this morning:
7:00 am
hundreds of thousands of people attend rallies across america, demanding tougher guns laws, among them, martin luther king's 9—year—old granddaughter. i have a dream that enough is enough! and that this should be a gun—free world!
7:01 am
7:02 am

44 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on