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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 29, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's 9am, i'm tina daheley. welcome to the programme. it's exactly one year to go until brexit. the article 50 process is now under way and, in accordance with the wishes of the british people, the united kingdom is leaving the european union. we've got an audience here from all over britain and we'll be asking how they, and you, are feeling about the whole thing, 12 months before the uk leaves the eu. we're also talking to a woman with severe cerebral palsy who says she's been discriminated against by british airways after they wouldn't let her change the name on a ticket she'd bought for one of her carers. and do advertisers use race to grab people's attention? we're talking to industry insiders after claims they're producing racist adverts on purpose. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. this time next year,
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we'll be a matter of hours away from leaving the eu. we want to hear from you this morning, about your hopes and worries for the next 12 months. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about. use #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... theresa may will visit all four of the uk nations today to mark a year to go until the planned departure from the european union. in an appeal to voters who backed both leave and remain, the prime minister will pledge to keep the country strong and united after brexit. she will also make a commitment to increase the powers of the devolved administrations. our brussels reporter, adam fleming, looks back at the progress made since article 50 was triggered, and what's still left to be resolved. a year ago, this happened. the article 50 process is now under way. the united kingdom is leaving the european union. a yearfrom now, the uk will no longer be a member
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of the european union, so let's take a look where progress has been made and what's still to be agreed. the first phase of the brexit talks was all about the two sides, led by the eu chief negotiator michel barnier and the brexit secretary david davis, agreeing the terms of the divorce in a brexit treaty. important sections like the rights of eu nationals who stay in the uk and uk citizens who live in europe. how the uk will live up to its financial obligations. the money. along with a post—brexit transition period. it has all been agreed in principle but remember that... nothing is agreed. until everything is agreed. phase two starts now and is all about negotiating the shape of... ourfuture relationship. the eu says it's going to be based on four parts. number one. the free—trade agreement. number two. security partnership.
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number three, a partnership on defence and foreign policy. four, working together on other things, like transport, education, research and culture. oh, and there's something else. everyone agrees that there should be... no hard border. to avoid a hard border. no hard border between northern ireland and ireland. but the two sides haven't been able to agree how to actually do that. they do agree there should be a joint committee for solving disputes between each side, but they can't agree whether there should be a role for the european court ofjustice. during the transition period, things will feel very similar because eu law will continue to apply. the uk will not have a seat at the decision—making table here in brussels. eu nationals will still be able to move to the uk and settle permanently if they want to. britain will be able to go out into the world and sign new trade deals. with old friends and new allies around the globe. although they can't apply until the end of the transition, or unless the eu gives permission.
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and there's one other thing, that flag won't be there any more. theresa may is visiting all four nations in the uk today, as we mentioned. she is in peshawar at the moment, let us listen to what she said. -- she is in scotland. the president of the farmers union told itv yesterday farmers did not have enough information from the uk government about brexit to plan ahead. that is not good enough with only a year to go? what we have said in relation to farming and of course once we have finally left the european union, we will of the common agricultural policy, and we will develop our own policy in the uk, recognising the devolved status of agriculture, but what we will be doing is ensuring, as we have committed to, that the overall support available to farmers will be there for the rest of this parliament. what we are now doing is consulting on what the shape of
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future farming policy should be in the uk. to ensure we are able to see the uk. to ensure we are able to see the farming industry thrive when we are outside the eu. i believe there isa are outside the eu. i believe there is a really good future for farmers in scotland, and other parts of the uk, outside of the eu. with reference to the common agriculture policy, the scottish government say that without knowing about the financial deal between scotland and the uk over replacing common agricultural policy, they cannot kick this to delete the meat details ofa kick this to delete the meat details of a new system of support. —— they cannot give details. there are two strands we are talking about. one is the way we are discussing with the scottish government how we can ensure that when we leave the eu, we devolve more powers down to the scottish government and we ensure also those markets that are important for scottish farmers and businesses, markets elsewhere in the uk, still able to be open, through
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not providing barriers within internal markets, that we get a good trade deal with the eu so that the trade deal with the eu so that the trade is able to continue with the eu and of course we will be looking to ensuring we can open up more markets for scottish farmers and others around the west of the world. how do you respond to claims from the scottish government that brexit will damage the economy of scotland? i believe there are real opportunities for the uk when we leave the eu. starting now, the negotiations on the overall economic partnership with the eu 27 when we leave, i believe we can negotiate a partnership with the eu 27 when we leave agreement ve can negotiate a and frictionless as possible, so we maintain the markets in the eu, but also that the open up markets around the rest of the world. brexit provides us with opportunities, i to com“!!— 7?
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adamant some of these powers must be retained by westminster? we are very clear that when we see powers being returned from brussels, we will be devolving significantly more powers to the devolved administrations, the scottish government and others. what we want to ensure is that we maintain the uk's internal markets. so farmers in scotland can carry on selling produce to the rest of the uk as easily as they do today. we are talking with the scottish government about how we can ensure through the legislation that we both devolve more powers to scotland but also ensure we maintain that ability to continue to trade freely within the uk. if you cannot get a deal on what the snp, westminster power grab, are you happy to have the matter decided in the supreme court?
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let us be clear, there is no power grab. we're not taking back any of the powers currently devolved to the scottish government, indeed the scottish government, indeed the scottish government, indeed the scottish government will be receiving more powers as a result of leaving the eu. what we are discussing with the scottish government is how we can do that and ensure we still maintain the ability for scottish farmers, scottish businesses, to trade freely across the whole of the uk. just as we are negotiating the agreement to ensure they can continue to trade freely with the rest of the eu. last week at peterhead, fishermen said david davis was a turncoat, are you a turncoat too? when you sell out the north—east fishermen if that is what it takes? i was pleased yesterday to meet representatives of the scottish fishing industry and to hear from them directly what they want to see in terms of our fishing once we have come that independent coastal state which we will become at the end of the implementation period, out of
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the implementation period, out of the eu, it will be the uk determining access to our waters. i was very pleased to hear directly from the scottish fishing industry what their interests and hopes are. as the uk government, we are very clear we want to see the fishing industry across the uk, in scotland and elsewhere, enhanced. we want to rebuild that industry for the future. that is our aim and that is what we will be talking to the fishing industry in scotland and elsewhere about over the coming months. theresa may there. we are joined by our political guru, norman smith, who will help us make sense of it. where are we at?|j smith, who will help us make sense of it. where are we at? i think we have reached the moment where you listen to theresa may, the government, they are more comps —— confident. now you get the sense
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they are much more confident they can make it happen. if you think back, there were question marks about whether theresa may could survive, whether the party would split, whether the brexiteers would go on the war path. basically they have hung together and i think theresa may, a bit like the old story about the rabbit under her, the porters under her! remind. you get boris made, the hare, galloping away. theresa may is the tortoise. she got parliament to agree to article 50 and then she got everyone to agree to the divorce bill, then the arrangements, transitional agreement, she slowly, slowly grinds her way on and if you talk to folk in downing street now, they are much more confident, that they will get a deal, and that brexit will happen. that said, if you say, ok, what are
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you going to do about northern ireland? you going to do about northern ireland ? there you going to do about northern ireland? there is an awkward silence, they do not have an answer. similarly, you say, what happens if in october, mps say, we do not like the deal you have got? there is an awkward silence. they are more confident but still major hurdles ahead. you will be with us for our debate where we will be finding out what some people in the uk think about brexit and where we are with the year to go. now a summary of the rest of the day's news. the head of the labour party's internal disputes panel has stepped down after it emerged she'd opposed the suspension of a local election candidate accused of holocaust denial. christine shawcroft sent an email calling for the reinstatement of alan bull, who was due to stand for peterborough council in may. in a statement, she apologised and said she had not been aware of the abhorrent facebook post that led to his suspension. mr bull has said the article he posted does not reflect his views. police say former russian spy
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sergei skripal and his daughter were probably poisioned at their home after high levels of a nerve agent were found at theirfront door. the pair were found collapsed on a bench in salisbury on 4th march and remain in a critical condition. police say inquiries will focus on their home address but the risk to locals was low. thejustice secretary, david gauke, has ordered a review of cases in which prisoners have been released directly from high—securityjails. it comes after a decision to release sex offenderjohn worboys from a high—security prison was overturned by the high court. three judges ruled that the parole board failed to probe the credibility and reliability of worboys. nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai has returned to pakistan for the first time since being shot by taliban militants. the 20—year old human rights activist was shot in the head six years ago after campaigning forfemale education. she's expected to hold talks with the country's prime minister, shahid khaqan
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abbasi, during her visit. that is a summary of the latest news. to get in touch with us. time to get some sport now with sarah. good morning. let us start with cricket because i do not think the three australian cricketers who have been involved with the ball tampering scandal which has engulfed the world of cricket over the post the world of cricket over the post the meat past few days, they will not have a warm reception —— over the past few days. steve smith is going to speak to the media in the next half an hour, we will bring you all the details from that as they come in. in the last hour, cameron ba ncroft come in. in the last hour, cameron bancroft was emotional in his press conference in perth where he admitted he feels like he has let
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eve ryo ne admitted he feels like he has let everyone down. he was given a nine—month ban for his part in the scandal. he said it was a big learning curve for him, that he had to ta ke learning curve for him, that he had to take his chance to take control of his own values in the test match, but his own actions, he didn't, and he said it was a real embarrassment. david warner, the player who devised the plan to cheat, his reaction on social media, not going to have a press c0 nfe re nce , social media, not going to have a press conference, he said mistakes had been made. he apologises for his pa rt had been made. he apologises for his part and takes responsibility. he says that, understand the distress this has caused the sport and the fans. the captain, steve smith, also banned for a year for his part, fans. the captain, steve smith, also banned for a yearfor his part, he is going to speak in sydney shortly. england play new zealand later and they have made some changes, will that help? yes, england were hoping so. that help? yes, england were hoping so. desperate to make a better start than the one they produced in the
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last test match against new zealand, bowled out for just 58. last test match against new zealand, bowled out forjust 58. chris woakes and moeen ali have been left out as england try to tie the two match series. both failed to take a wicket in the first test. james vince, jack leach and mark wood have come into the 12 man squad. finally, could we... we have underperformed, this is an opportunity to try to get something from this winter and the lads know the importance. we have had a numberof lads know the importance. we have had a number of discussions as a group, been very honest, about how we want to move things forward as a team and it is about putting that into practice now and delivering on the field. they will aim to deliver from 11pm later this evening in the second test in new zealand. now let me ask the final question, could we see an all british final and the
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women's champions league? you never know. ashley you never know. the big news, for the first time, two english clubs in the semifinals. chelsea first, they beat montpellier 3-1 chelsea first, they beat montpellier 3—1 last night. it was 5—1 on aggregate. england's fran kirby given a helping hand with the first of her two goals on the night and this is chelsea's first appearance in the last four, they will face the tune that have knocked them out in both of the past two seasons. on the other side of the draw, man city also true for a second straight season. also true for a second straight season. 5—3, they beat the swedish side, having already led 2—0 from the first leg. they will play the title holders, defending champions, in the semifinals which take place towards the end of april. that is your sport for now. if everything goes to plan, exactly one year from today, at 11 o'clock at night, britain will officially leave the european union.
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article 50 was triggered on 29th march 2017 — setting in motion the two year time frame within which britain and the other 27 eu countries would have to complete all their negotiations ahead of the official transition period. so we've brought together a group of voters — half voted to leave the eu, and half voted to remain — to see how people have been feeling since the referendum. we've heard an awful lot from the politicians about what is and isn't being done. but as we're officially halfway towards leaving, we want to know what you think — what matters to you, whether you've changed your minds, and how you feel about the yearahead... also here is our political guru, norman smith, to explain what it all means and to help separate fact from fiction. welcome to all of you. with one year to go, how are you feeling about progress so far? i am quite confident. i think it's all looking good at the moment. i think she is
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studying the ship —— steadying the ship. what happens going forward has yet to be seen as there are some difficult discussions to be had about trade, which is a concern for my industry as there are a lot of companies closing. so fairly positive from you. i am terrified about what is coming. i work for an eu firm and i have an eu wife. there are no certainties about anything so far, about whether we would be able to trade or sell services into the eu any more, whether my wife will be able to stay. the future for my kids, who are half eu, they have german and british citizenship, there is no certainty at all. thank you. how are you feeling?”
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there is no certainty at all. thank you. how are you feeling? i am very negative about the whole situation. we just heard the prime minister says she wants to unify the four nations of the uk when she hasn't consulted them. wales hasn't been consulted them. wales hasn't been consulted and they have complained about it. scotland have been consulted and they have complained about it. and there is also a suggestion from members of the government that there was going to bea government that there was going to be a custom deal for northern ireland in terms of free movement. so one of the things we have to be aware of is that the prime minister is talking about unity. one of the issues i had with the eu as a leaver was about democratic legitimacy. you have to also have democratic legitimacy in the way you conduct yourself as a government. so you should be consulting with all four nations and you should move forward with that progress and bring everybody to the table. and how are you feeling at this table?|j everybody to the table. and how are you feeling at this table? i am very concerned. i voted you feeling at this table? i am very concerned. ivoted remain, but the issues i am concerned about haven't even been discussed. what are you
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concerned about? as a youth worker and asa concerned about? as a youth worker and as a parent of children with special educational needs, my concern is about the provisions for education and after—care. a lot of services are funded by eu money. is our british government going to guarantee that they can meet what we currently get? it is for the most vulnerable of our society. we will come back to norman to find out what will happen. and you? my name is nick and! will happen. and you? my name is nick and i recommend the growers of strawberries and those good things in britain. i voted to remain. i felt that leaving would create uncertainty and i felt the potential benefits outweighed the risks. i am encouraged by the progress the government has made so far. we employ a lot of eu nationals in junior and middle management roles in the uk, and the news that they will be able to stay as employees is
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good news. our concern is still over seasonal workers and migration. i am sure others will have views on net migration. the government has promised that it will reduce net migration to handfuls, but our industry relies on 90% seasonal workers, people who come into this country in march, leave in september, go back to their country of origin. we had a seasonal worker scheme which was cancelled when bulgaria and remain a joint eu, and there has been a net inflow of bulgarians and romanians causing concern. bulgarians and romanians causing concern. once they were in seasonal jobs, they moved into the wider economy. so we need a seasonal scheme and we need clarity because at the moment, farmers are not investing for three or four years' time because they don't know whether they will have people. without a scheme, we will have no staff and no uk horticultural industry. given that we have a year, what can the government do to reassure you? there
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was a seasonal workers' scheme. the home office has two setup some rules and a trial for this coming home office has two setup some rules and a trialfor this coming autumn, and a trialfor this coming autumn, and it has to be in place by 2019. the home office view is that it will be simple because we had a scheme in 2012. i don't think it will be that simple, because we will have a different regime and different expectation from the people who voted to leave the eu, so that scheme has to be robust. it had to deliver what our industry needs, but it also has to deliver what the voters wanted as well. so i would like clarity from the home office. norman, can you give us like clarity from the home office. norman, can you give us some charity? i can because amber rudd, the home secretary, was asked by a scottish tory mp yesterday about this and she said she would shortly be bringing proposals on the sort of scheme you are talking about. so clearly, they have taken on board the concerns of people in your industry, in part because many of you are in tory constituencies, and
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they are acutely aware. more broadly on immigration, my sense is that there will be proposals brought forward which drive down the numbers who come to britain, partly because of the potential economic implications and partly because the number of eu migrants coming here is already falling sharply. in terms of already falling sharply. in terms of a government scheme, i think they will be much more cautious about radical measures. is that a concern for anybody here? did anybody vote to leave because they wanted to see those numbers brought right down to the tens of thousands?” those numbers brought right down to the tens of thousands? i voted to remain, and! the tens of thousands? i voted to remain, and i am concerned about migration. i am from new zealand, and it is very difficult for anyone outside the eu to come and live in the uk. but i am concerned about migration. one of the things that attracted me the most about britain was that it was such a beautiful,
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vibrant place was that it was such a beautiful, vibra nt place with was that it was such a beautiful, vibrant place with a rich tapestry of culture. i think by leaving the eu, it would be to the detriment of the uk. and as you have seen, we have already seen numbers fall and people emigrating. do you not feel that it may give other people from outside the eu more of an opportunity to come into the uk to work and live? you're right, so in many ways, i have found myself thinking i would like to stay in the uk. but i think it should be open. i consider myself to be a citizen of the world, and the idea of free movement is something that appeals greatly. hello. my name is charles andl greatly. hello. my name is charles and i voted leave. it is interesting speaking of the culture of the world. personally, ifeelthe european union limits us. voting to leave was mainly a call to be a more
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global britain. in terms of new zealand, canada and india, the european system in essence holds us back as a country. it is saying we are focusing on the european union and european migration, whereas brexit is an opportunity to be a global britain where we can encourage and improve our immigration system is and improve these systems for people outside the european union. a lot of blame for thatis european union. a lot of blame for that is on the remain site, the idea that is on the remain site, the idea that brexit was always about anti—immigration feeling, with whereas it was really about control. the point was about the uk having control as a parliament. let me bring you in. i know you are an immigrantand a bring you in. i know you are an immigrant and a student and you voted to leave. yeah. my main reason for voting to leave was to do with parliamentary sovereignty, but to
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touch on the point of immigration, i am completely against this rhetoric that the vote to leave was anti—immigration and it makes us a less tolerant and less accepting society. i think every country should have 100% control of every person they let into their country. at the end of the day, the uk is an island with limited resources. we can't keep accepting anybody for the sake of it. i am not saying that we do accept anybody for the sake of it, but for example, countries like new zealand with a notoriously strict immigration policy, we would then say they are an anti—tolerant society. we wouldn't say they are xenophobic because they have stricter controls of who they bring in. and you are saying that despite the fact you moved here?” in. and you are saying that despite the fact you moved here? i am saying that despite the fact that i have moved here. i understand how immigrants can enter society, but i still believe every country should have 100% control of every person
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thatis have 100% control of every person that is allowed into their country. and the irish? they are not in the uk, the republic of ireland. if the uk, the republic of ireland. if the uk wants them to come into the country, that is up to the uk. we should control every person that comes into the uk. does anyone disagree? on the opportunity of brexit, the whole of the european economic union is short of seasonal labour. one of the opportunities you mention of a world market is that we could set up a seasonal working scheme that brought seasonal workers in from outside the european union. so there can be benefits to not being in the eu. we will be pressing government to look at this, because even within the european union, there are now non—eu worker schemes in places like poland, portugal and spain to address that issue. as long as we are in this process, we are
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slightly hamstrung. this is not immigration, this is seasonal work. let's hear from the doctor in the corner. i am a surgical trainee in central london. as a doctor, i am concerned about the negative impact that brexit will have on our national health service. we all know the nhs is overstretched. we haven't got enough staff or enough money coming in. with brexit, we are at risk of losing not only our brightest doctors and nurses, but also our allied health professionals, the physiotherapists, radiographers, porters and clerical staff, all of whom form the backbone of the nhs. simply increasing training numbers doesn't mean that those slots are going to be filled to create a home—grown medical workforce. tuition fees are up, nhs bursaries are disappearing and with the ongoing junior doctors contract
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debate, the idea of coming into the profession is just not attractive to high school is any more. and having eu colleagues on the workforce is not simply about service provision. we all learn from each other, which ups improve the quality of the health care we are delivering. finally, i am concerned about the impact that brexit will have on research and innovation. we are very dependent on eu grants and collaboration, and we need the sharing of ideas. we need the movement of the greatest minds within europe so that we continue to advance the boundaries of medical knowledge, but also so that we continue to enhance the global influence that the uk is having in this field. norman, tell us where we are with the nhs. remember the big £350 million going to the nhs every week there was on the side of buses during the leave campaign. there are
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those like borisjohnson who are convinced that when we leave the money will be there. philip hammond is deeply sceptical which is why we have had announcements about theresa may having a long—term plan and signalling there will be more money for the nhs because it was part of the brexit deal, that the nhs would get more cash, but it may not come from the eu, but the view is it has to be found from somewhere. in terms of your concerns about the recruitment and eu staff, when you talk to people injeremy hunt's team, they are very aware of it, the tilt among brexit ministers is that really it is time we started training our own people and we cannot continually rely on particularly nurses from the third world because that is depriving them, it is argued, of people should be staying in their health system. one of the ideas which is kicking around is that when we get the immigration proposals, employers
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could be taxed or have to pay a levy if they recruit from abroad and the thinking is that would go into training home—grown uk staff. the difficulty of course is that it ta kes difficulty of course is that it takes about seven years to train a doctor so there is a time frame gap between training the people and what happens in the short term. but i wonder when we get the final package whether there will not be special provision for the nhs because it is so heavily reliant on staff notjust from the eu but from the rest of the world. are you concerned because you represent employers who employ care home workers? yes, i represent organisations who employ people that supply care in people's own homes, the side of health and social care thatis the side of health and social care that is a lot less visible, it is happening in private, and the support... ministers are much more willing to talk about supporting the
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nhs, it needs to support adult social care. one of the things that really distresses government at the moment is the number of people left in hospital unable to be discharged. pa rt of in hospital unable to be discharged. part of the reason why people are not necessarily able to go out of hospital is a lack of capacity to support people at home. policies about recruitment to the nhs and a largely professionally qualified workforce also need to consider what happens for adult social care and a workforce that does not have a large requirement on qualifications but does need people who are caring and able to have the right values to support people at home. successive governments have dodged the bullet on this. an issue for years. every government has backed off because there was a furore about who will pay for it. a lot of talk now that the government gets it and they will
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do something. when you talk to health professionals, frankly, they area health professionals, frankly, they are a bit, we have heard it before, andi are a bit, we have heard it before, and i would say honestly they are right to be a bit cautious. not immediately looking like there will bea immediately looking like there will be a great resolution to social care, i don't think. has anyone here changed their mind about the way they voted? i am nick thompson, iona company, a software company, we build mobile and web apps —— i own a company. i purchased it back in 2013, only a handful of people at the time. what my focus was to grow the time. what my focus was to grow the company. the quickest way to do that was to go to europe and we recruited dozens of people from different countries and it was working well. i was very pro—remain and that is howl working well. i was very pro—remain and that is how i voted and on the day of the referendum, i was not only disappointed but my fears came true very quickly when i found all
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the people coming over, it dropped off a cliff, hardly any interest, and stalled the business. forjobs in the company? yeah, it's called the business for at least a year. rather than moaning, i got on and change the business and consulted with my team and we thought, what can we do? we improve the business, we offered more benefits, we made the company more attractive, weave and opened an office in central london. it was a tremendously positive experience —— we have even opened an office in central london. i have changed my mind about brexit. we have seen an increase in interest in our services, more customers coming on board. we think the reason is because uk companies typically we re off is because uk companies typically were off shoring software development, a complex expensive process, now things have changed, there is a caution in the industry now and we are seeing more in the uk trade and the economy is improving.
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with all of those things considered, i think with all of those things considered, ithinkl with all of those things considered, i think i have changed my mind about brexit. if you were to go back, would you vote to leave?” brexit. if you were to go back, would you vote to leave? i think i would. i voted to leave, would you vote to leave? i think i would. ivoted to leave, i have would you vote to leave? i think i would. i voted to leave, i have also changed my opinion, i no longer think it will be beneficial, i no longer think anyone can say with any certainty that leaving the eu will be beneficial for the wider population. we are here talking about the opportunities of leaving europe and we can do this with people from across different parts of the world and so on, but none of that is the policy of the government. nothing the government has done has suggested it is their intention to go out to the world and maybe connect more with people from different cultures. that is what we get in the rhetoric but not the policy. the immigration proposal proposed by the government last year wa nted proposal proposed by the government last year wanted to have a separate regime for new people from europe who arrived in the country in the transition period. i do not believe
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the government is taking advantage of the possibilities of brexit and thatis of the possibilities of brexit and that is an issue but more importantly i think we need to look at how the government is consulting with the people and also we need to have an assessment of why certain european leaders are maybe not doing their best to make things as easy as possible for the uk. i do not believe they are going out of their way to make things difficult, but there has to be the realisation that we voted to become europe's economic competitors and at the same time as we voted to remove ourselves... they would say, if you're not paying membership, why do you get the benefits? absolutely. we need to understand why you're —— why european people are saying that. i do not think there has been a malignant effort by european leaders to try to punish the uk, i think there is a lot of love in europe for there is a lot of love in europe for the uk, i think they are surprised and disappointed by the decision to leave and that is important as well.
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how much progress to you think has been made? i do not think there has been made? i do not think there has beena been made? i do not think there has been a lot of progress at all. a bit ofa been a lot of progress at all. a bit of a mess. i am employing polish people, i have a builders in bromley, they are thinking of going back to poland. tell us how you voted against? i voted leave, to be honest. i am voted against? i voted leave, to be honest. lam in voted against? i voted leave, to be honest. i am in two minds at the moment because we cannot believe what the government says. they say one thing, they change their minds. from a selfish point of view, you voted leave, even though that means you may lose polish workers. that is why we need clarity. the government have not made it clear what will happen to the polish workers. they need to know where those people are. what would you reassure you?” need to know where those people are. what would you reassure you? i don't know because we cannot believe a lot, what they say, we do not know where we are. do we know what would happen to the workers, norman? no, we don't. that is one of the extraordinary... a year away from leaving, the whole immigration
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package the government promised they would outline last summer, they didn't because it was, how are we going to do this? now we not get the government white paper until the autumn which is after probably parliament has voted on whether to accept the deal which is a bizarre situation so parliament will be voting without having had the immigration proposals in front of them and without any legislation to implement it. the only thing i wonder when you're polish workers, are they going back because they feel they have been rejected or because the pound has taken a nosedive and they think they can earn a decent wage in poland?” think it is about the government not making it clear where they stand, andl making it clear where they stand, and i think they feel rejected as well by the british people. the uncertainty. let us go back to you and your situation. you are married toa and your situation. you are married to a german lady and you are not sure... being married makes no difference, being married to a brit,
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it makes no difference to an eu citizen. they are allowed to stay here or not on their own merits. my wife might be able to apply for settle m e nt wife might be able to apply for settlement later this year, i think they are writing the software now. that is the keyword, might. no clarity. they say you will be able to apply by the end of the year. that is their promise. it has shifted a lot. then they will have to get through 5000 a day for the next two years. does anyone think this is going to work? a lot of people would assume your wife would automatically have the same rights as you. that is not the case at all. my wife probably will get settlement in the end. tens of thousands of people will not. what will we do with them? are they building the detention centres now to round them 7 detention centres now to round them up? i have just detention centres now to round them up? i havejust got detention centres now to round them up? i have just got settlement last week. it is not cheap. it will probably cost about £15,000. the
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various visas and fees. something a lot of people will not be able to afford. eu citizens have a much cheaper... the same price as a passport. if it goes smoothly. because they are already here, as eu citizens, we are taking rights away. we have dozens of eu employees and we want them to stay. why should it be discriminating european against the rest of the world? why should we discriminate for irish people, scottish people? it is a historical fa ct, scottish people? it is a historical fact, eu citizens have a right to come here and they have exercised that right and we are taking the rights away from them. there is an opportunity to make a fairer system. how is it fair to take rights away from people who have exercised them? you have given them rights... what would the fairer system look like?” do not think we should take rights away. let me speak. my experience is
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trying to help people from outside the eu come to work inside the uk is incredibly conjugated, bureaucratic and expensive. making life worse for eu citizens will not help the others. —— incredibly complicated. we are not part of the eu now, we won't be, we have to think about us asa won't be, we have to think about us as a country and looking after our interests and making a fairer system... 3 million people made their lives here on the understanding... why do we get some comments from people watching this at home and get you to respond? on facebook, craig says, sadly brexit will be watered down so much it may as while not happen. i wanted and voted for a full hard brexit with no compromises. theresa may is a remainer and we should replace her with jacob rees—mogg. remainer and we should replace her with jacob rees-mogg. anyone agree? no! suspend negotiations and restart. matt on facebook, get on
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with brexit, we voted for this, not this soppy appeasement of the remain voter, we voted to have limited interference from the eu, time for a no deal brexit and for this country to become a low regulation, low tax economy ready to undercut the eu in all sectors. if out how their respects more interesting views from both sides, someone on twitter, the biggest disaster in decades. on twitter, it is a complete an expensive waste of time, the uk will spend ages negotiating what it has got now, surely more important issues to tie up politicians with, nothing but brexit for five years, people who get eu money are deluded if they think they still will. fair bit of negativity, how about positivity? i am positive. we can go back to the negatives first.” positivity? i am positive. we can go back to the negatives first. i think thatis back to the negatives first. i think that is fundamental is that theresa may has done a good job on, the european court of justice may has done a good job on, the european court ofjustice and the idea, coming back to the
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appointments and, in terms of sovereignty, the idea of uk law being supreme over... instead of eu law. it would be. it will. wto, they have their own courts as well. the uk has representation on the wto.m doesin uk has representation on the wto.m does in europe. but we are represented by european judges... let me ask you. as part of the withdrawal bill, the laws coming over, part of uk legislation, and then the government will choose which to keep and which to amend and throw away, are you happy about that? for sure, i represented my mp to represent me and we have a poll system in this country. the problem with the eu was that innocents it was bureaucratic. —— we have a parliamentary system in this country. the problem with the eu was that it was bureaucratic. the idea of the european parliament is
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that... innocents, i know who my mp is, most people do not know who their mep is. just because you do not have votes, it does not mean democracy, you do not have the engagement of the people. i am positive with because we are gaining back control over decision—making, increasing accountability, whereas the european union has become a for lobbying and backroom deals whereas here we have much more transparency. backing that up? completely. the erosion of democracy and parliamentary sovereignty that the eu has caused is not only an oration to parliamentary sovereignty but it is an oration to the sovereignty of the people. what things specifically worry you? we have talked about who is allowed to come into the uk, what else? i believe i voted for my mp and my mp is there to represent my interests in parliament. european
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commission, a body that i did not vote for, it should not have the right to supersede what the body who i voted for... i will let you come in. hang on. your negative comment now. or that at the eu have someone like theresa may... —— all the time you have someone like theresa may, you have someone like theresa may, you will not go to the opposite side, so for me, my opinion, they need to gather wrap their clowns out of the circus, get someone who knows what they are doing... that is the problem, we have not got anybody. that is the concern i had. we have a great entrepreneur sitting here! we should maybe former party! just one moment, i will come to norman very quickly to talk about the ecj and then i will come to you to find out more about your story. where do we stand at the moment? how much
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influence of the ecj have on us when we leave? the ecj will still have some influence, but massively reduced. listening to this debate, so much of the argument still seems to revolve around those for whom the issue is about sovereignty, predominantly leavers who want to take back control of laws and money. that is theissue control of laws and money. that is the issue for them. and for the remainer macros, the issue is the practicalities and the economics. and they are slightly talking past each other. if you talk to someone like david davis, the brexit secretary, he will always say it is not about the economy, it's about the principle of taking back control to parliament. so there is a different argument going on between the two sides, which is why it has maybe been hard to reach any kind of compromise. let me come to claire. tell us about your biggest concerns. my concern is the amount of charities and social enterprises and small smes who provide support for
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children, young adults who have got various special educational needs and disabilities. a lot of their funding is through grants from europe. is our government going to guarantee that our young people in this country who are getting failed dramatically, the cuts to children and adolescent mental health is dramatic and the alternative provisions within schools, the lack of support and education for teachers within schools about mental health and children's additional needs isn't being met as it is. that is with the money we get from the eu, so is the government going to give that money to support the next generation? there isn't an answer to that. some areas like farmers have been told that the cache comes from the common agricultural policy will continue. in terms of educational
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grants, life will continue as usual during the transitional period. thereafter, i think you are in a much more uncertain ball game and we don't know. it already seems that since the referendum happened, the amount of grants that have been granted to charities and social enterprises and smes in this country have dropped dramatically. so where is children with mental health could have special support and phone numbers, they had peer mentoring support and that has all gone. we now have children who are suicidal. they have no help. i want to thank all of you. let's end on some more comments coming from people watching. on twitter, someone says it is an illusion to think leaving the eu will drastically drive down immigration from eu countries. it will not happen unless we don't want a thriving economy. dave on facebook says it is going exactly the way he envisaged. i voted says it is going exactly the way he envisaged. ivoted remain says it is going exactly the way he envisaged. i voted remain because of the number of problems that leaving would create, and those advocating leave just waved them away as
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insignificant. i believe in democracy, but what is democracy when policies are drawn up by unelected advisers behind closed doors? and jimmy on facebook says, it's my birthday today. happy birthday, jimmy! i reverted to remain, buti birthday, jimmy! i reverted to remain, but i accept the vote of the majority. what i don't accept is no right to vote on a final deal and no real dialogue about what happens if things get worse. thank you to my guests and thank you for your messages. keep them coming in. coming up... british airways stands accused of discriminating against passengers who need to travel with a carer. we'll hear from a woman with severe cerebral palsy who is fighting the airline's policies. more than £880 million of british property claimed to have been bought by russians with suspected dirty money is to be looked at by mps investigating economic crime in the uk. the treasury select committee is looking into the scale of money laundering in britain
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following claims that the uk, in particular the london property market, has become the destination of choice to launder money. it follows recent figures from an organisation that works to expose corruption — transparency international. it estimates that £41! billion worth of uk properties may have been bought with suspicious wealth, with more than a fifth, or £880 million, of these purchased by russians. we can chat about this more now with rachel davies teka, from transparency international, vladimir ashurkov, who was a leading opponent of vladimir putin and anti—corruption campaigner in russia until he was granted asylum in the uk in 2015, and tom keatinge, a financial crime expert at the defence think tank, the royal united services institute. rachel, what did you find? we found £411 rachel, what did you find? we found £41! billion worth of property in
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the uk that we believe was bought with suspicious wealth, people with corruption convictions or allegations of corruption made against them. it is important to note that this is just property we found from publicly available material. like what? like court documents, the lea ks material. like what? like court documents, the leaks from the paradise papers, land registry documents, media expose eyes. we think this isjust documents, media expose eyes. we think this is just the tip of the iceberg. the fact is that if a corrupt individual is going to steal public funds, they need somewhere to hide it and our research has shown that uk property is a good hiding place. vladimir, is all russian money in the uk corrupt? know, most money in the uk corrupt? know, most money coming from russia to the uk is legitimate and a lot of people who come to london to work and we are legitimate. but there are a few rotte n are legitimate. but there are a few rotten apples. and i think now the british political establishment will gather enough political will to go after it. you say a few rotten apples, but they have a lot of
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money. that is true. tom, why russian money? the uk has had a policy for 20 years of laying out the welcome mat to money from all over the world. we have had light touch regulation. david cameron famously said that regulation elsewhere benefits the uk because people come to choose the uk. so we have chosen to take a 50—50 view and acce pt have chosen to take a 50—50 view and accept money in the uk that perhaps, with hindsight, we would have preferred not to have done.“ with hindsight, we would have preferred not to have done. if there is all of this money sloshing around, apart from properties, where is it? artwork, football clubs... basically trophy assets that you can invest a lot of money. it is difficult to spend £10 million, if you think about it. so buying expensive properties, investing in foot ball expensive properties, investing in football clubs and expensive art is the way to do it. who had the example of somebody who wanted to spend £1 million in a week there we re spend £1 million in a week there were struggling to do so? you can
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buy uk property. to somebody like me, high property prices are scary. but if you are someone tried to launder millions of pounds in one 90, launder millions of pounds in one go, property is an attractive option because you can do it in one swipe. and if you want to buy uk property, you can do it anonymously. just add a layer of secrecy to your wealth by opening a company in the british virgin islands. by the property of that company and you don't have to tell the land registry who you are. and expend wealth orders have recently come in. tell our viewers what they are. let's say i am a health minister and i have bought a property for £5 million but my annual salary is £100,000. people might look at that and think that is strange. the law enforcement can get that health minister and say, ok, maybe that is legitimate. please explain the source of your wealth. if the health minister is unable to do that, than law enforcement may dip to recover that property. vladimir, why is london so appealing to russians? london is a
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magnet if russians are to learn any foreign language, it will be english because it is handy in london. london is a big metropolitan city, not dissimilar to moscow. it has a lot to offer. russians trust the british education system, the british education system, the british court system. that is why there is a thriving russian community in london. how much corrupt money is tied up in the uk property market? in absolute amounts, it may be billions. but in terms of the total financial flows that go through the british financial system, it is quite tiny. so going after this corrupt money will not really affect any currency exchange or employment. tell us about the process of the money coming in. a lot of people may find it hard to understand how on the one hand, we are expelling russian diplomats in response to what has happened with the poisoning, and we have the rest of the world backing us, ora lot
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have the rest of the world backing us, or a lot of other countries at least, while we have all this corrupt money in the uk and with the owners of football clubs. it is important to visualise the money—laundering superstore. if you wa nt money—laundering superstore. if you want to launder money, you head for the superstore, and the aisle marks united kingdom. as rachel said, we are places like the british virgin islands that offer secrecy. we have assets that hold their value. the uk is tremendously attractive for investment anyway, and if you want to move your assets away from your country of origin, not just russia, there are plenty of other examples, then the uk is the place to go. are there any checks in place along the way? there should be, in theory. in theory, estate agents, lawyers and accountants, theory, estate agents, lawyers and accou nta nts, if theory, estate agents, lawyers and accountants, if they see suspicious wealth coming through, they should be telling the national crime agency about that. but with the research we have done, we have found that sometimes these checks and balances
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are not carried out and the government needs to do more to make sure this happens. we will be submitting the lists of the treasury committee saying just that. we'll still need more transparency in our property market. the government has said they will bring a register over who really owns so much uk property, but they made that promise in 2016 and we are still waiting for that law. how has this affected the uk property market? that is a good question. a senior within the national crime agency claims it has been raising house prices. while we have not gone that research, we do believe it is feeding into the wider problem of uk homes being used as empty problem of uk homes being used as e m pty safe problem of uk homes being used as empty safe deposit boxes. i go home some of these —— passed some of these homes at night and the lights are off and there is condensation. ata time are off and there is condensation. at a time when there was a shortage of uk housing people like me are desperate to get on the housing ladder, it is frustrating to see that we have so many empty homes in our capital city. finally, a quick word from all of you on what can be
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done to stop money—laundering in the uk. the issue is that we are not just a country of 65 million people when it comes to money—laundering, we are a global financial centre and we are a global financial centre and we don't have the resources in place to police the size of the problem we face. so more to police the size of the problem we face. so more resources to police the size of the problem we face. so more resources and political will is what we need. the uk has quite robust legislation against money—laundering, the bribe react and the proceeds of crime act. itjust takes react and the proceeds of crime act. it just takes political will and resources to enforce it. the uk needs to use willpower and the government needs to bring in the promised property register. thank you forjoining us. time to get the latest weather. for some of us, it has a beautiful start to the day, albeit cold. a lovely picture here from northumberland, sent in by one of our weather watchers. as we go through the day, the cloud will
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continue to build and we will see further showers develop. parts of scotla nd further showers develop. parts of scotland will hang on to dry and bright conditions. at the moment, we have a weather front brake across the north—east, producing patchy rain and hill snow. a weather front has showers rotating around it, and some of those will become heavy, with hail and thunder embedded. temperatures are fairly disappointing for this stage in march. they should be higher than they are. this evening, we continue with this line of cloud and hill snow in the north—east of scotland. our low pressure drifts further east, producing an array of showers, some of them turning wintry across the pennines and the scottish borders by the end of the night. it will not be as cold as the night just gone, but it will still feel cold. we have a changeable easter
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weekend. and on easter monday, there is the threat of snow, and notjust on higher ground. is the threat of snow, and notjust on higherground. on is the threat of snow, and notjust on higher ground. on good friday, our low pressure pushes into the north sea. still a rotation of showers around it, some of those in southern areas, some of them merging to give hail, thunder and lightning. it will still feel cold. but there will be dry weather for northern england, scotland and northern ireland. for saturday, the low pressure is centred across the near continent. still a lot of cloud being dragged in, and still showers as well. overhyped, they are likely to be wintry. brighter skies for scotla nd to be wintry. brighter skies for scotland and northern ireland. in scotland, the showers will be wintry, especially on the hills. temperatures are not brilliant. it
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is today will start on a frosty note. —— easter day. the cloud will build, heralding the arrival of rain. the rain is coming on easter monday and it is going to bring the threat of snow to the hills as it moves northwards. but for some of us, we will study sees smoke even at lower levels, so stay tuned to the weather forecast. hello, it's 10am. it's exactly one year to go until brexit. you've been telling us how you're feeling with so much still to be negotiated. iam i am completely against this rhetoric that the vote to leave was anti—immigration and it makes us a less tolerant and less accepting society. i felt leaving created a great deal of uncertainty and i felt the potential benefits outweighed the potential benefits outweighed the risks. i fought the eu limits us and it was mainly a call to be a
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more global britain. in the next half hour, we'll be putting some of those points from our studio audience to politicians. a woman with severe disabilities is taking on british airways, accusing the airline of discriminating against passengers who need to travel with a carer. she tells us her story. former australia cricket captain steve smith speaks publicly for the first time about the ball—tampering scandal. he apologises and says he'll regret it for the rest of his life. all of my team—mates, the fans of cricket all over the world and to all australians who are disappointed and angry, i am sorry. good morning. here is annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. thank you. good morning. theresa may is visiting all four of the uk nations today to mark a year to go until the planned departure from the european union.
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in an appeal to voters who backed both leave and remain, the prime minister has pledged to keep the country strong and united after brexit. during a visit to a factory in ayrshire this morning, the prime minister made a commitment to increase the powers of the devolved administrations. let us be clear, there is no power grab. we are not taking back any of the powers currently devolved to the scottish government. indeed the scottish government. indeed the scottish government. indeed the scottish government will be receiving more powers as a result of us leaving the eu. what we are discussing with the scottish government is how we can do that and ensure we still maintain the ability for scottish farmers, scottish businesses, to trade freely across the whole of the uk. just as we are negotiating the agreement took ensure they can continue to trade freely with the rest of the eu. the former australian cricket captain, steve smith, has made a tearful apology as he spoke publically about the ball—tampering scandal for the first time. smith was stripped of the captaincy
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and banned for 12 months, after being sent home from south africa. a few moments ago, he made an emotional apology to all australians. there is flash photography throughout the clip. tonight i want to make clear that as captain of the australian cricket team, i take full responsibility. i made a serious error ofjudgment responsibility. i made a serious error of judgment and i responsibility. i made a serious error ofjudgment and i now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership, of my leadership. you can hear more of what steve smith had to say in a few moments in our sports update. the head of the labour party's internal disputes panel has stepped down after it emerged she'd opposed the suspension of a local election candidate accused of holocaust denial. christine shawcroft sent an email calling for the reinstatement of alan bull, who was due to stand for peterborough council in may. in a statement, she apologised and said she had not been aware
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of the abhorrent facebook post that led to his suspension. mr bull has said the article he posted does not reflect his views. the justice secretary, david gauke, has ordered a review of cases in which prisoners have been released directly from high—securityjails. it comes after a decision to release sex offenderjohn worboys from a high—security prison was overturned by the high court. three judges ruled that the parole board failed to probe the credibility and reliability of worboys. police say former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter were probably poisoned at their home after high levels of a nerve agent were found at theirfront door. the pair were found collapsed on a bench in salisbury on 11th march and remain in a critical condition. police say inquiries will focus on their home address but that the risk to locals was low. a man has tried to ram his car into soldiersjogging near their barracks in south—east france. local security services say
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a search is under way to find the driver who insulted other soldiers before speeding off from the scene in grenoble that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. thank you. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. to sport now with sarah. steve smith, the former australia cricket captain, says he is absolutely gutted and devastated about his part in the ball tampering scandal. he also says he knows he will regret it for the rest of his life and he apologised for his actions. very emotional and his first press conference to the media after this has been admitted. he has arrived in sydney. i made a serious error ofjudgment arrived in sydney. i made a serious error of judgment and i arrived in sydney. i made a serious error ofjudgment and i now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership, of my
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leadership. i will do everything i can to make up i will do everything i can to make upfor my i will do everything i can to make up for my mistake and the damage it has caused. if any good can come of this, if it can be a lesson to others, then i hope i can be a force for change. i love the game of cricket. i love entertaining your shukri young kids, i love kids wanting to play a great game of cricket that i love —— i love entertaining young kids. every time you think about making a questionable decision, think about who you are affecting, your parents, and to see the way my old man has been... thanks, everybody. and my mum, it hurts. steve smith, very
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clearly upset there. sticking with this, cameron bancroft has also spoken to the media. he landed back in perth and he says it is something he will regret for the rest of his life. i feel like i he will regret for the rest of his life. ifeel like i have let eve ryo ne life. ifeel like i have let everyone down. he received a nine—month ban for his part in the affair. he added he had lied, he said, i lied about the sandpaper, i panicked in that situation and i'm very sorry. he feels he has let everybody in australia down. vice captain david warner, also banned for a year, along with smith, for his part in devising a plan to tamper with the ball, he has not spoken to the media but he released a statement on social media. he said, mistakes have been made, i apologise for my part, i take responsibility for it. he added he understood the distress it has
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caused the sport and its fans, adding it was a stain on the game, but he says we all love —— the game that he says we all love, he has loved since he was a boy. he added that we will hear from him in a few days. australia play theirfourth test against south africa tomorrow. we will hear from acting captain tim paine later. thank you. rachael monk has cerebral palsy. it's so severe that she needs two carers with her at all times. but that doesn't stop her wanting to travel the world. last year she started making plans to visit one of her oldest friends who had emigrated to canada. she'd bought the tickets months in advance to save on costs, as she had to buy tickets notjust herself but for her carers. then a few months before the trip, one of her assistants resigned, but rachael was told by british airways she couldn't change the name on the ticket and she had to buy a new one for almost double the price of the original. we can talk to rachael monk now.
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and also to michelle macdiarmud, one of her personal assistants who will be accompanying her on that trip the canada. rachael will be communicating via a speech generating device, so we've given her our questions in advance. very good morning. can you tell us a bit about your condition and why you need two personal assistants to fly with you? i was born with complex cerebral palsy and i require support from two personal assistance 2a hours a day. i require help with all aspects of my life, including feeding, communication, personal care, absolutely everything, even scratching my nose. as you can imagine, travelling without the help of my two personal assistants would be impossible. what happened when
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you got in touch with british airways to say you needed to change the booking and you told them about your situation? i am travelling at the end of april this year but i had wa nted the end of april this year but i had wanted the book in advance in order to get cheaper tickets. as a disabled lady, requiring 24—hour support, by two personal assistants, this already adds additional costs to my trip as i have to purchase three tickets. the total cost for the three return tickets was £1500. at christmas time, i was let down by one of the personal assistants i had bought a ticket for, she resigned
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from her post without notice and she left me with a plane ticket i am unable to use. after contacting ba on several occasions to explain my situation and the exceptional circumstances around it, i was told they would not change the name on they would not change the name on the ticket so that a replacement personal assistant could travel with me. i provided proof from the doctors stating that i required the help of two personal assistants at all times, but again, the answer was, no, they would not consider a name change on the ticket. my advocate even contacted five executives from british airways to which we did not receive a response. i was told by ba they advised their customers to buy adequate insurance when purchasing flights. the fact is, idid when purchasing flights. the fact is, i did indeed buy insurance through british airways themselves when i purchased my flights and when
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i rang their helpline for advice, i was told there was no wording in their policy that would help with my situation. whilst i was waiting for all of these replies, from british airways, the cost of the tickets for the flight i am booked on rocketed up the flight i am booked on rocketed up to £780. i have had no other option but to buy another ticket at that price as i could not afford to wait any longer as the prices were increasing on a daily basis. the trip so far has cost me a total of £2300. the costs do not end there. in orderfor my £2300. the costs do not end there. in order for my personal assistant with the newly purchased tickets to sit with me on the flight which is essential i was told i would have to pay up essential i was told i would have to pay up to £16 per flight to select a seat. as a disabled passenger i was able to select my original purchased seats on the plane for free, however because ba would not add the
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additional ticket to my booking reference, the new ticket was classed as a separate booking and it does not include the benefit of free selection. i had also been told in order to cancel the ticket i cannot use to get a slight refund on the taxes of the ticket it would cost me a further £15 to do this online or £30 through the call centre. this is absolutely ridiculous and it would appear british airways are set out to get as much money from their passengers as they can, despite their passengers as they can, despite the circumstances. how did it make you feel that they would not make an exception for you, despite having to spend all that money and buying three tickets? this whole situation has made me
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feel very let down and upset. if i was to travel on the flight as a non—disabled passenger, the ticket would have cost me just over £1100. instead i have had to pay thousands. british airways have cast a very dark cloud over a holiday i have saved hard for and i was so looking forward to it. i am upset and disappointed by the lack of common sense and compassion by the airline. it has been very stressful trying to contact british airways to speak to somebody who can help. everyone we have dealt with over the past three months have been very unhelpful. what has happened now, rachael? are you still going on your trip? british airways finally made contact
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with my advocate, alex, to say they would call me at 2pm to discuss the matter last friday. we waited all afternoon for them to call. when they finally rang at 5:30pm, my advocate had had to go to attend to other business. i dealt with the call with the help from my personal assistant, michelle. we were told that usually they only offered the taxes back from a ticket as a refund which would be approximately £170 but they would also pay the extra money to the total of the original £460 ticket money to the total of the original £1160 ticket bought. they said this would enable me to buy another ticket at the current price. i explained i have already purchased
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another ticket because of the prices increasing daily and the price had only increased so dramatically because i had been waiting for a definite answer from british airways. when my original personal assistant resigned injanuary, i checked the prices for a new ticket and the cost was £420 because i have had to wait for british airways to respond fully, the price increased by over £300. after explaining this, they offered to pay for the £300 difference in price in the form of british airways vouchers to use in the future. one positive outcome of the future. one positive outcome of the phone call, however, was they agreed to seek my personal assistant next to myself and my other personal assistant free of charge which i am happy to say they have now done. despite everything that has happened, how excited are you about
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visiting your friend in canada? steph is my best friend, who emigrated to canada. i met steph when i was 17, when she applied to be my befriender, which is similar to a volunteer. she came into my life when a lot of my other friends were moving on with their own lives. we insta ntly moving on with their own lives. we instantly clicked and have stayed the best of friends ever since. we have shared so many good times, and there are many things in my life i wouldn't have achieved without her friendship. we have had many nights
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away together, been to loads of parties and made many more friends along the way. steph helped me organise a fundraising event for me to climb up a mountain and countless other events. steph is more to me than a friend, she is family and i love her to pieces. i am so excited to be visiting steph and herfamily in canada. it is a dream come true. that's really lovely to hear. ba say they have now offered you a refund asa they have now offered you a refund as a gesture of goodwill. have you heard from them? i have only just i have onlyjust heard the statement this morning on the way to the show
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that british airways have now decided to provide a £780 refund for the additional ticket i have had to purchase. i think this is more than a coincidence that they are willing to cooperate but they have that i am appearing on television. this does not solve all the problems that have been caused over the last few months, and does not help other disabled people who may be caught in the same trap. this fight is no longerjust about the money, it is about the principle of the matter and the problem that are faced by people who are disabled and rely heavily on support. i would like to see policy is changed by airlines when it comes to the exceptional circumstances faced by disabled passengers. iam
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exceptional circumstances faced by disabled passengers. i am willing to ta ke disabled passengers. i am willing to take this as far as i can, not only for myself, but also for the benefit of all disabled people who require support and may find themselves in similar situations. i support and may find themselves in similarsituations. i have support and may find themselves in similar situations. i have had to fight all of my life, so another fight all of my life, so another fight for the rights of disabled people is something i will not back down on. i have already been told that the airline quality rating company have downgraded british airways' quality rating juju my case, and they are to add an additional category to their scoring system to include disabled access. this is a very positive step forward. iam this is a very positive step forward. i am so grateful for all of the support i have received over this issue. and rachael, we are grateful to you for sharing your story. michelle, you are going on this trip with rachael. you have been making a lot of calls to the airline on her behalf. what have
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they been saying to you over the phone? everybody we have spoken to from british airways has been very unhelpful. we have had to speak to different call centres. we have tried to speak to managers, getting nowhere. we have been told the same thing by the managers. it is as though they have been given a script to read and it is the same answer from everybody, despite the circumstances. how do you feel now, having just learned that they have agreed to a full refund?” having just learned that they have agreed to a full refund? i am pleased that rachael will be getting her money back for that ticket. but as waitersaid, it her money back for that ticket. but as waiter said, it does not solve the problem. —— as rachael said. we still want policies to be changed so that other people who need support to travel with don't fall into the same trap and have to have all this stress. this has been a nightmare for rachael and everybody involved. it does sound like it. outside of
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this situation, how frequently do you come across situations where companiesjust you come across situations where companies just don't make exceptions for those less able? we do find that some companies are quite good at helping. even in places like cinemas, they will allow two personal assistance to attend the cinema with rachael without having to pay extra money. but unfortunately, we do come up against companies which are not as reasonable, such as british airways on this occasion. we appreciate you coming in to talk to us about what happened. michelle and rachael, thank you very much. here are some m essa g es thank you very much. here are some messages that have come in. mimi says nice one, great pr. can't change the name of a ticket, so severely disabled passenger can't travel. david on twitter is in tears at the plight of rachael, shame on you, british airways. and an anonymous person says how awful, be anonymous person says how awful, be a need to do the right thing. they
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also need to remove the word british from their name. britain is better than that. keep your messages coming in on all the stories we are talking about. we're talking brexit today — because it's exactly a year until the uk is due to leave the european union. so what might the next 12 months have in store? here is our political guru norman smith, to walk us through it. so, here's the brexit board. the snakes and ladders of the next 12 months on the road to brexit day. well, here's one early snake. in april, mrs may faces a possible commons revolt over her plans to leave the customs union. if tory mps side with the opposition to defeat the prime minister, that could throw her brexit plans into disarray. assuming theresa may avoids that, there's another snake looming in may with the local elections. tory mps are bracing themselves for dismal results, particularly in london. so could heavy losses reignite the doubts about mrs may, and even
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provoke a possible leadership challenge? however, maybe the world cup will be a helpful pick me up and distraction if england make it through to the final. could success on the pitch provide mrs may with a brexit bounce? well, don't hold your breath, given our recent woeful record. in august, we should find out if the government's charm offensive to woo eu countries over the heads of the european commission has been a success. so, will german car—makers and french wine growers put the squeeze on the eu leaders to compromise and reach an agreement with mrs may? now we come to a critical moment. in october, eu leaders are to decide whether to agree a trade deal with mrs may. this will determine what access we have to european markets, what will
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happen at the border with northern ireland, and who will control ourfishing waters. it will be a big step forward towards brexit. but look — one month later, mrs may is likely to face this, the proverbial anaconda of brexit snakes. in november, mps are likely to get to vote on whether to approve or reject any trade deal. if mrs may were to lose, it could plunge the whole brexit process into chaos. some mps say it could force the prime minister to go back to the negotiating table to try again. and if mrs may survives that, then the european parliament will also get a vote on the final brexit deal. they could veto it and demand changes to it before they will give it the go—ahead. come next year, mrs may should know whether any businesses and banks are going to quit the uk because of brexit.
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there have been plenty of warnings, but as we head towards the last few weeks, if there hasn't been a significant exodus, that would be a big bonus for the government's brexit plans. and if mrs may survives all that, then at 11pm on march 29th 2019, britain will leave the eu. brexit will become reality, bringing to an end our 46—year membership of the european club. but before then, there's an awful lot of snakes and ladders on the way to brexit day. brexit will obviously impact different communities across the uk in different ways. we can go now to bolton, which voted in favour of leaving the eu, with a split of 58% leave to 42% remain. our political correspondent vicki young is there... will be gauging reaction. many say
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we haven't left yet, but a lot has happened since that referendum on the road to brexit, the negotiations and all the rest of it, with a lot more still to be done. so we will be gauging reaction from all sorts of people, some of them working on the stalls, and other local business people. android by maggie, ceo of a women's organisation which delivers training for women entrepreneurs, very much on the business side of the argument. you were on the remain side. what do you think business and entrepreneurs are looking for now?” think businesses are looking for clarity of direction. businesses wa nt clarity of direction. businesses want a clear idea of how trade will be facilitated. they need to be able
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to plan in terms of their investment, and also in terms of their workforce development. a lot of businesses rely on staff from across the european union. is there any sign so far that people are not coming here, that the workers that people do rely on are shunning britain? there is evidence that that is the case. this misses are telling us that they are finding it difficult to recruit in certain circumstances anyway — — difficult to recruit in certain circumstances anyway —— businesses are saying it is difficult to recruit, and that has been exacerbated by a fear of the unknown in relation to brexit. some in the government would say that you will not get a deal on the transition period and you will not get a deal on this or that, but they have managed to work their way through with a negotiation. how do you feel it has been going, given that we are almost two years since the referendum? the views that i am
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dealing from businesses is that there is still a lack of clarity. we still don't have the level of detail and reassurance. consequently, that is inhibiting investment decisions and creating uncertainty, fear and anxiety. that is not good for business confidence. so we need greater clarity. you have talked about the social impact of brexit. you work with women entrepreneurs setting up their own businesses. what are you concerned about once we leave the european union that might have a social impact? the concerns are based on research that has re ce ntly are based on research that has recently been published by the fawcett society. they are saying there could be a downgrading of particular types of rights in maternity. even though the government has reassured people about that? well, we have to acknowledge that the government of todayis acknowledge that the government of today is reassuring, but what about the government of tomorrow? we must rely on our partners in europe to
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show the way, and they have done that in the past. thank you very much. we are going to wander over to the fish stall and i will grab a word with tony. you are live on bbc news. we are discussing brexit. how did you vote in the referendum? for me, personally, the right thing to do. are you surprised about the negotiations, how long it is taking, the detail of what has been going on? it has really dragged on for too long. is it what you were expecting when you voted out?” long. is it what you were expecting when you voted out? i expected it to be quicker. you run the fish stall. fishing quotas, quite a big deal recently. it has been. you speak to most people in the business, decimated. hopefully, it will come back. to me, getting out of europe,
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the country was limping. like a business. any business not making money, profitable, not working properly, you close it down, rebrand it, that is what brexit is for us. you are very positive about it. very positive. thank you. the owner of the simon king ‘s. with me in the studio is layla moran, the liberal democrats education spokesperson, conservative backbencher matt warman, philippa whitford from the snp and ben bradshaw for labour. welcome. one year to go, we have been asking our audience what their concerns are, their hopes and fears, we wa nt concerns are, their hopes and fears, we want you to respond to them. the first one, one brexiteer is not convinced leaving the eu will benefit ordinary people.” convinced leaving the eu will benefit ordinary people. i no longer think anybody can say with any degree of certainty that leaving the eu will be beneficial for the wider
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population. we are talking about the opportunities of leaving europe and we can do this with people from across different parts of the world and so on, but none of that is the policy of the government, nothing the government has done has suggested that it is their intention to go out the world and maybe connect war people from different cultures. your response to that, layla ? —— cultures. your response to that, layla? —— connect with people. cultures. your response to that, layla? -- connect with people. he is broadly right. we had the impact assessments from the government, they are clear, we will be a poorer country if we leave. do you disagree? i do. if you look at what the government has been doing, liam fox going to make sure we're ready to have trade deals to sign, whether it is the prime minister even today making sure she's going around every nation of the uk, a huge effort on the half of the government to make sure it is a brexit that works for everybody. directly referencing his point about not feeling like we are
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connecting to other cultures outside of the eu? starting with liam fox, there were other examples, trips to australia, south america, america itself as well, crucial to our post—eu trading relationship, a huge amount of activity and all of that, he is right... trips for him, great, but in terms of people coming in and going out for the uk and being accommodating for people who perhaps wa nt to accommodating for people who perhaps want to work here from outside of the eu? if you look at what the pm made her number one priority, the rights of eu citizens over here and british people in the eu, making sure they are safeguarded, the right signal to send at the beginning. we will have a new immigration policy after we have left, of course. that will beat us setting it, that is the sort of taking back control we talked about in the referendum campaign. it is really important we get it right but it will demonstrate britain remains an open nation on the world stage. we do not know what
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the world stage. we do not know what the immigration policy will be yet. we have just heard the immigration bill has been kicked into the long grass of next year. what that will look like, we will not know for quite some time. because the government policy is getting immigration down to tens of thousands, what we have seen over the last few months, the tier to visa quota has been broken or reached every month, it is stopping people like doctors and so on getting in from elsewhere and because the weird response isjust we thenjack because the weird response isjust we then jack up the salary you have to get, that is fine, that means all the tier two visa allowances will come to london because there is no one in the highland plume of scotland earning 60 grand. it allows people who are professionals or have particular skills from outside the eu to come and work in the uk, the tier two. doctors who have a job,
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they have passed exams, they are wanted, but because of the demand and the salary being hyped up, they are willing to pay you that, we will let you in, it means the nhs cannot respond on the north of britain, the north of england and particularly scotland, cannot respond. all of the tier two visas will end up in london and the south—east. tier two visas will end up in london and the south-east. ben bradshaw. the audience member reflects the concern a lot of people have which is that the deal we are offered will be different from the promises made at the time of the referendum which is why so important our sovereign parliament has a meaningful say on that deal. if parliament rejects it, it is possible the people then have a say on the terms of the deal, i do not see any other way forward. one of the options is we have the opportunity to stay in the eu. currently, that is not being discussed. that is because people voted to leave. but if they then come back with a deal that people
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want, it is either that or a cliff edge. parliament are voting on that deal. but if we then reject the deal, what the government is trying to do is hamstring us into saying, either you accept the deal or have wto rules. one of our viewers, a lady who said she voted to leave because of parliamentary sovereignty and she says she is against the idea that the vote to leave was to do with anti—immigration.” that the vote to leave was to do with anti-immigration. i am com pletely with anti-immigration. i am completely against this rhetoric that the vote to leave was anti—immigration and it makes us a less tolerant and less accepting society. i think every single country in the world should have 100% control of every single person they let into the country. the uk is an island, we have limited resources , an island, we have limited resources, limited space, limited everything. we cannot keep on
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accepting anybody for the sake of it. we are an island with limited resources ? it. we are an island with limited resources? actually, all countries have borders, whether water or land, so you could say that about all countries. people voted leave for all sorts of reasons and we know there are people who voted leave because they feel they were not being listened to and they have had a terrible time since the crash. to put all into one box, i agree it is utterly wrong. and to say they voted because they are anti—immigration? but there are people who voted because they are anti—immigration and government policy has been about getting immigration down to tens of thousands but what was not put forward was the gains we have had, in the economy from migrants, regardless of where they come, the involvement in universities, particularly the nhs and social care, doctors, nurses, other health professionals who have come from europe, and while the government talks about, fine, we will train our own, to train a consultant, as i
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was, a consultant breast surgeon, five years at university, more than ten, 12 years afterwards, so the idea we can drive people out, and we are driving them out, they are leaving, 19% of eu doctors in england are in the process of leaving, we did not talk enough about the benefits of immigration. matt? you should not lump all people together, it is right, whether they voted leave or remain. in a constituency such as mine, some people voted because of immigration, but that is partly because the benefits and costs of immigration have not been evenly spread around the uk, but what i come back to time and again is what people wanted was the sense the politicians they elect directly have control over their lives. the point that the lady made is absolutely right, we have had an immigration policy that simply did not have democratic consent, it did not have democratic consent, it did not have democratic consent, it did not have the consent of the public, and we are paying the price. layla?
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with that, young people in particular will suffer from this because it is notjust about people being able to come into the uk, it is about british people going abroad and having opportunities there and thatis and having opportunities there and that is something we all want to maintain, i that is something we all want to maintain, lam that is something we all want to maintain, i am sure, that is something we all want to maintain, lam sure, but that is something we all want to maintain, i am sure, but it will be much harder now. i agree with the lady, it was notjust much harder now. i agree with the lady, it was not just about immigration, but immigration concerns we re a immigration, but immigration concerns were a proxy for other things that successive governments have got wrong. the underfunding of the nhs, schools, bigger issues in society which i am sorry to say have been put on the back burner completely because of brexit. been put on the back burner completely because of brexitm been put on the back burner completely because of brexit. if we think it will be ending soon, it is not. ten, 15 years... moving on to the nhs, i will constrict eu after, a doctor we heard from who voted to remain in the eu because she says she is concerned not enough new people will come into the profession from just the uk. with people will come into the profession fromjust the uk. with brexit, we are at risk of losing not only our brightest doctors and nurses but the
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allied health professionals, radiographers, porters, clerical staff, all forming the backbone of the nhs. increasing training numbers simply does not mean those slots will be filled to create a home—grown medical workforce. tuition fees are up, nhs bursaries are disappearing. the ongoing junior doctors contract debate, the idea of coming to the profession is not attractive to high school pupils anymore. ben bradshaw? she's absolutely right. i sit on health committee and we published a report la st committee and we published a report last week that highlighted this, we are haemorrhaging eu nationals from the nhs and social care. it is adding to the existing staffing crisis in the nhs. most migrants to this country come from outside the eu, we have absolute full control of that, but we could do much more to control eu migration, we can implement free movement rules in a different way like other countries like belgium, france and germany do,
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making it more difficult for people to come here who did not already have a job, there's more we can do in the current system, but the impact of brexit on the nhs really worries me. we have got to address the challenges in the health service itself, some of that is about increasing training. one in 12 posts unfilled. exactly. it is about making sure we get the approach right. some of it is about the post eu brexit... post eu immigration policy, of course. some of it is about the issues ben bradshaw is talking about, making it an attractive profession. the idea brexit is the single biggest challenge facing the nhs simply to me does not hold water. it is a multifaceted problem, slightly disingenuous to pretend this is the one thing that will make everything infinitely worse. back to that promise of £350 million a week for the nhs and in the election i had a lady who came up to me at a hustings and said, please, ivoted lady who came up to me at a hustings and said, please, i voted to leave on the basis of what they sat on
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that bus, i now know i have been duped, this is why we need to have an exit from brexit, she did not quite so that, but she said, do what you can to get us back the choice. people were lied to win the referendum campaign, it is clear, the nhs matters. you are right, a multifaceted problem, but this is a big issue. finalthought. there is no question workforce is one of the biggest challenges in the nhs but through brexit we will lose a lot of other things, our involvement in the eu research network, the eu medicines agency, and the hardest thing to replace is not trade, it is 40 odd years of cooperation, that is the thing that will hit the nhs at every level. thank you forjoining us this morning. now, our programme has learnt the man leading an investigation into historical sex abuse for the football association may carry out a separate inquiry into the clubs involved. what we
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know so far? this is all about a man called clive sheldon, senior barrister, qc, appointed by the football association to lead this independent investigation into sexual abuse in the sport. you might remember back at the tail end of 2016, a large number of former footballers came forward to talk about the abuse they suffered as young children. as a result of that, clive sheldon was appointed. we think he will look into two things. the role of the fa, what administrators and officials might have known, could more have been done to protect young players? and the role of some of the clubs involved. we are talking about what could be large household names, chelsea, aston villa, man city, they could be drawn into this. we think he has already appointed a team of lawyers to start looking through documents. he has gone his team, have looked at more than 3500 documents so far in the fa archive,
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things like child protection reports, policy documents, and of that, around 350, one in ten, have been classified as highly relevant to the investigation. he has spoken and conducted interviews with 29 victims so far. this is to get at two things, who knew what when and could more have been done to protect the young players? what response have we had from the fa so far?l response from the fa, being quite cooperative understand, and response from the clubs involved, the 12 clu bs. from the clubs involved, the 12 clubs. the final report will focus, we think, on the 12th. what has happened so far, clive sheldon, leading the investigation, he has written we understand to some of the 12 clubs and he has asked for this structured report, timeline of who knew what when and what action was taken if allegations of child sexual abuse were brought up. what he is
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saying, what we understand he will say, is if the response from the clu bs, say, is if the response from the clubs, if it is not satisfactory, if he is not getting questions answered, he reserves the right to go in and conduct his own investigation into some of the clu bs. investigation into some of the clubs. he has not done it yet, but that would be extremely significant. all of this comes a month after barry bennell was sentenced. that case was extremely important. the first trial of someone for sexual abuse charges in the latest revelations emerged. he was a coach from man city, for crewe alexandra, he was sentenced to 31 years in prison for abusing 12 players. closely associated, the club he was most closely associated with, crewe alexandra, they said they would drop their independent inquiry into what happened, because they did not want to duplicate what the police have done. that was met with fury by some of the survivors, the victims. it remains to be seen whether the fa under clive sheldon will decide to
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go in and conduct their own investigation. thank you for the update. let me bring in some of the comments you have been sending. john on twitter says regarding your abysmal treatment of the lady with cerebral palsy, i am appalled. a complete lack of compassion and a full refund offered only as a result of national news coverage? shameful, disgusting behaviour. richard on twitter says, you should be ashamed of the way you are running the company and simply pointing people to insurance policies. it is similar to that issue i had in february. i will not be using ba ever again due to the way you treated my family and having seen this on tv. in a statement, british airways has said over a million customers with disabilities choose to fly with us every year and we ta ke choose to fly with us every year and we take our responsibility to them seriously, aiming to make travel with us easier. to do this, we continually reviewed the needs of customers and seek feedback from them and is busy advisory groups. we
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offer a range of tickets and advise customers to choose the product that meets their individual needs. in this instance, ms monks encountered a number of changing circumstances and asa a number of changing circumstances and as a consequence, we have offered her a full refund as a gesture of goodwill so that she is not out of pocket. now, several big brands have been labelled racist recently after releasing adverts which have backfired. the latest controversy came to light after a rapper in the us highlighted a heineken advert which he said was terribly racist. a newsbeat investigation has found the advertising standards authority has received nearly 2,400 racism complaints since 2013. of those, 12 cases were formally investigated and ten of those had the complaint upheld. joining me now is kubi springer, who is an international brand consultant and the founder of brand agency she builds brands. and paul mackenzie—cummins,
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managing director of clearly pr marketing and communications. and sarah jenkins and sarahjenkins is from an agency. do you think advertising agencies are being deliberately racist to grab attention in, let's face it, an increasingly competitive marketing world ? increasingly competitive marketing world? it's a good question, but we have to remember how valuable of these brands are and have damaged these brands are and have damaged the brands are when they do something stupid. so i don't think any big brand would never damage its reputation by being overtly racist on purpose. despite the examples we have seen? give your reaction to apologising in apologising in january for showing a lack child modelling a hoody which had "coolest
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monkey in the jungle" modelling a hoody which had "coolest monkey in thejungle" on its front and saying sorry for that. dad said sorry for releasing images that showed a black woman turning white after using their soap, and heineken's low—calorie beer, this was the reference the rapper was making. he called a racist and said brands are purposely putting out noticeably racist ads so that they do get more views. this one was showing somebody sliding a beer across a few black people and ending up across a few black people and ending up in the hands of somebody with lighter skin. i genuinely believe that brands are not going out there to grab headlines with bad advertising. these are terrible ads and they are racist and offensive. but these brands are huge. when there are so much money being pumped into advertising, how do they get it so wrong? they are spending millions of pounds and months if not years creating campaigns. but too many advertising agencies, too many production companies are still very white. they are middle class and don't have diverse backgrounds. as
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such, you don't have that collision of perspectives calling it out. such, you don't have that collision of perspectives calling it outm goes through all these gates of approval and no one says wait a minute, that is pretty offensive, or thatis minute, that is pretty offensive, or that is not going to work. kubi, what do you make of all this?” agree with your guest. i think that whilst the ads are unacceptable, i don't agree with the rapper. i don't think brands and advertising agencies are going out of their way to be purposely racist. i think if we look at the business case study here, taking heineken and america as an example, 42.8% of african—americans describe themselves as coloured. so why would a brand like heineken want to alienate such a large potential consumer base? the reality is that you have 42.8% of consumers who are african—american... you have 42.8% of consumers who are african-american. .. but would you really be another group just because you are not representing their race?
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i think if a group feels that you are being racist, there is a chance that you could end up alienating them. but the issue is really about diversity within the decision—making process when the ads are being created. only 5% of senior advertising executives are from the bme sector. so you have a disparity between the community that you want to buy your product and those who understand the mindset and the thought processes of that community in the boardroom. or, is advertising to white? —— paul. in the boardroom. or, is advertising to white? -- paul. yes. so is pr. figures show that 87% of people who work in the uk advertising industry are white. in the pr sector, it is around 91 to 92%. it is down to two things. you have the diversity issue, but you also have the state of the market. when you look at how the likes of amazon, the way
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consumers are engaging with products and buying their products has changed markedly over the last 20 years. this is then putting additional pressure on advertising and pr agencies to continually be thinking of new, creative ways to get their clients' brands seem, heard and read above the increasingly audible noise. that is one side of things. the other side, as your other speakers have touched on, is the diversity issue. when you are putting together a campaign for are putting together a campaign for a tired and you start having a brainstorming session and think, what will be a good campaign for this? if the people sat around that table are the same sex or the same colour or the same age, you are only going to get a mainstream view. you will not get views representing the people the brands want to engage with. so there are two issues and
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the reality is that when you see things like the heineken campaign or the dove campaign coming out, there has clearly been a lack of input at the brainstorming stage and these brands are simply unaware of the fa ct brands are simply unaware of the fact that their advertising is inappropriate. thank you to all of you forjoining us. now, a couple who wanted new challenge in retirement have become stars in the movies. and they've got more than 100 films between them. gilbert and joy newton have begun a new career as film extras. let's talk to joy and gilbert newton and amy leyshan from the film extras company, uni—versal extras. yourjob sounds great. how did you first get involved in becoming extras? well, it was our daughter who put us on to the idea. we went
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online and thought we probably wouldn't get through, put our photos forward and it went from there. we we re forward and it went from there. we were not really prepared for what was to come! you have had a lifetime of working. you are both retired, so why do you want to do something else? it is better than sitting around and doing nothing! that is true! tell our viewers some of the things you have done because you are working. it's amazing. run through some of your extras highlights. well, you get on set, you do what they tell you to do, and that's it. but the thing is, when you're doing thisjob, you but the thing is, when you're doing this job, you can but the thing is, when you're doing thisjob, you can sit around for a lot of time. everybody is always very nice to you. and when they are ready for you to be onset, you go and sit or stand or walk or whatever is required. i think you are being modest. you have been in some pretty big films. tell us what they are.
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together or single? both. well, the one i have just finished which was just released is golden circle. what did you do? i was a wedding guest. it was fun. lots of laughs. can you give some examples?” it was fun. lots of laughs. can you give some examples? i was in american assassin. i was a turkish lady in the crowd. and in the commuter, i was a commuter on the train with liam neeson. and i had various other walking up and down parts. that is what we are, members of the crowd. and you have been in tv series like obesity. and silent witness. -- like holby city. do you
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get to meet some of the actors?m they are not busy. who have you met and what did they say? colin firth, for instance. halle berry. how did that conversation go? it was a nice meeting. what did she say? we just said, hello, how are you doing and so on. and greatjob. said, hello, how are you doing and so on. and great job. you said that to her? yes, because we were having a break and were standing around.” met sir anthony hopkins. he was very nice. it was only a small group of us, but he came over and shook our hands and asked if we were 0k. really nice. and ethan hawke was very nice. but mostly, if you're standing near, they acknowledge you but don't really have a conversation
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because they are into their work. how do you become an extra? it's really easy tojoin how do you become an extra? it's really easy to join us. go to our universal extras website. other agencies are available. but i am biased towards the one that pays my wages! all we ask for is some basic details on how to get hold of people, what you look like, what your measurements are. is it well—paid? your measurements are. is it well-paid? on an average feature film, a day is usually £100 before you go into overtime and if they ask you go into overtime and if they ask you to do anything extra, more money on top. are there any things you have said no to? only in terms of travel. so you do this together and separately. if we are lucky to be together. if we get booked for the samejob. together. if we get booked for the
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same job. sounds like the ideal retirement. thank you for coming in. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. we have got some sunshine across many parts of the uk at the moment, but as we go through the day, we are going to see some showers across the south—west moving their way north and eastwards. in the meantime, look at the scene in liverpool. for many of us enjoying those blue skies and sunshine, in the south—west we have showers at the moment. they are continuing to push northwards across wales into the midlands and into the south—east of england. those showers will be on the heavy side. a few
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showers could crop up elsewhere, but lengthy spells of sunshine and temperatures similar to yesterday. tonight, those showers will continue to push northward. there could be snow over the high pennines. for good friday, it is a dry and bright start, but there will be heavy rain which will move into southern parts of the uk. that rain will gradually move further north across parts of wales, into the midlands and eventually eastern parts of england. in the meantime, the further north you are, it is drier and brighter. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories
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developing at 11. with exactly one year to go until britain leaves the eu, theresa may visits all four uk nations, pledging to make the country "strong and united" after brexit. brexit provide us with opportunities, i want to see us coming together as the four nations across the united kingdom, we have a very strong union and that is in our interests and in our interests to come together and really seize these opportunities for the future. and i am in bolton, an area that voted to leave during the referendum where here today we will hear people's hopes and fears for the future. a senior labour party figure resigns in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust. police say sergei skripal and his daughter, were probably
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