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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 29, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. with exactly one year to go until britain leaves the eu, theresa may visits all four uk nations, pledging to make the country "strong and united" after brexit. brexit provide us with opportunities, i want to see us coming together as the four nations gci’oss coming together as the four nations across the united kingdom, we have a very strong union and that is in our interests and in our interests to come together and really seize these opportunities for the future. and i am in bolton, an area that voted to leave during the referendum where here today we will hear people's hopes and fears for the future. a senior labour party figure resigns in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust. police say sergei skripal and his daughter, were probably poisoned at his home, high levels of a nerve agent were found at the front door. after the high court decision to block the release of serial sex attackerjohn worboys,
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the parole service boss, who resigned yesterday, says more heads should roll. also this morning, a homecoming for malala yousufzai. after being shot by the talent for advocating education for girls, the world's youngest nobel peace prize winner returns to pakistan for the first time. the former australian cricket captain, steve smith makes a tearful public apology about the ball—tampering scandal, saying he'll regret it for the rest of his life. is any good can come of this... if it can be a lesson to others then i hope i can be a force for change. good morning.
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it's thursday 29th march. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is visiting scotland, wales, england and northern ireland today — exactly one year before the uk is due to leave the european union. in an appeal to voters who backed both leave and remain, the prime minister has pledged to keep the country strong and united after brexit and that it's important to make brexit a success for everyone. as part of the bbc‘s day of coverage — we're in bolton — where the majority of people voted to leave in the eu referendum. our chief political correspondent vicki young is there. that's right, and since that referendum many people have talked about the divisive nature of the vote, how different countries in the united kingdom voted different ways, how different communities respite and even how different families will
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just different ways which led to lots of arguments. what the government is hoping now is that people will get behind brexit, now that it people will get behind brexit, now thatitis people will get behind brexit, now that it is very much on the horizon with one year to go. negotiations with one year to go. negotiations with brussels of course have been ongoing. we are moving on now to the transition phase which has been agreed. for 20 months after we leave not an off a lot will change but theresa may has clearly decided it is time to get out and about and get the message across to people that the message across to people that the united kingdom may have voted in different ways but we will be leaving the eu together. theresa may has started her tour in scotland, i think you can see her here in ayrshire, she is visiting all four nations today starting off by visiting textile workers at a factory there. she get that message out to people and it is time to —— that it out to people and it is time to —— thatitis out to people and it is time to —— that it is time to rally around and look ahead to a very positive future andi look ahead to a very positive future and i think that will be her message today, very much that the united
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kingdom has a positive future ahead of it and once this deal is done and she has managed to move on now to talk about the trading relationship then there is no doubt that ministers still think there's a bumpy road ahead but they certainly feel it is going on the right direction. this is what she has to say to voters today on that visit. i believe there are real opportunities for the united kingdom when we weave the european union. we are starting the negotiations on trade arrangement and arrangements ofan all trade arrangement and arrangements of an all in economic partnership will be with the eu 27 was really. i believe we can negotiate a good agreement with his tariff free and with as much frictionless trade as possible so we will maintain those markets in the eu but also that we open up markets around the rest of the world. brexit provide us with opportunities and i want to see is come together, the four nations across the united kingdom, we have a very strong union. that is in our interests and it is in our interests
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to come together and seize these opportunities for the future. that message could just as easily have been directed at her own party, the conservatives had their bitter differences over brexit. we have seen that played out in the house of commons with some fierce arguments about exactly what kind of brexit the government should be aiming for but it is notjust the tory party that has had its differences, labour, two with a lot of speculation about how they might vote when it comes to the final deal and that crucial vote in the house of commons in october. let's cross to westminster and norman smith. the view in government is that they are moving remorselessly towards that straight steal and leaving eu but in part that'll depend on what labour do but in part that'll depend on what labourdo in but in part that'll depend on what labour do in that critical so—called meaningful vote in october and rather different messages coming out with the shadow foreign secretary last night suggesting that labour could actually back the brexit deal
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negotiated by the government and then this morning withjohn macdonald saying that emily thornbury was just talking in her sarcastic way and that the government would have to meet keir starmer‘s six test so where are they? i don't the shadow rather mild secretary. what the labour do?m you look at what was said we said the six tests are fundamental to what we are all about. jeremy corbyn made that point and keir starmer i brexit spokesperson has been absolutely clear. those in six tests are not impossible to meet but the government has got to... let me suggest they are because one of them is that the eu should enjoy exactly the same benefits that we currently enjoying the customs union and single market. we leaving! the important thing to say is that as david davidson ‘s words. that is the commitment made by the government that they would honour exactly the same terms and conditions of the customs union and single market. that is really important because what we want is brexit forjobs,
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brexit for our economy. what we can see one year on but not a cure to go the vote in parliament by which time we have got to know what this government is doing will take place ina lot government is doing will take place in a lot less than a year. and we're nowhere near there yet. that should worry the public. what they should know is that labour will not let them simply drift into a nosy brexit through incompetence or inertia. —— 80 deal brexit. we will hold their feet to the fire with the six test record. let me put it to you that it will not be the six tests that will determine how you vote it will be your assessment as to whether this isa your assessment as to whether this is a moment word you could perhaps defeat misses me and passivity the general election. people will have different views on this but brexit will dominate this country for a generation, i don't think any of us wa nt to generation, i don't think any of us want to see this now as being about party politics. it has got to be about the nature of our society and
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oui’ about the nature of our society and our economy and making sure that the brexit deal we have kids as close to the eu saw a major trading partner and delivered to the british public the brexit they voted for last year and also makes sure as well that we see the brexit forjobs, brexit for a living standards and no diversion of people's terms and conditions in the workplace. important underwriting that labour will demand. let's talk about the other around, of anti—semitism. the head of the disciplinary panel resigned after she intervened on the half of someone after she intervened on the half of someone who is facing charges of supporting anti—semitic, and anti—semitic article, a holocaust denial article. she has stood down from that post. should she not also stand out from the national executive? christine has made sure she will stand down from the nec bike... has she? i believe so, she has made it clear she will not seek
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re—election to the national executive. the important thing is that christine very quickly admitted she made a mistake, a big mistake, but she admitted she had made that mistake. what she is absolutely at one with the rest of us in saying is that we will drive anti—semitism out of the labour party, we are an anti—racist party in her bones and i've written up in a city has a kid when half the mps werejewish and i am proud of that tradition. the important point is this, she realised her position was untenable and did the right thing and stood down. doesn't jeremy corbyn me to come out publicly and denounce those who for example were demonstrating against the rally organised by the british board of deputies year at westminster at the start of the week? start announcing those of his supporters trying to deselect the likes of david langley who attended that demonstration. people need to hear from
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that demonstration. people need to hearfrom jeremy that demonstration. people need to hear from jeremy corbyn confronting some of his own supporters. jeremy corbyn did make it clear specifically around david lambie and what whatjeremy corbyn said was selection deselection resides with constituency parties with the tutor before the reasons that david went and stood in solidarity with people who were demanding labour deals with anti—semitism. i want the labour party to deal with anti—semitism. i think people of any decency not simply labour party members, but across society, what is to challenge anti—semitism. it goes deeper. the jewish community in britain now feels very vulnerable and that is something we must understand. all hate crime is horrendous and anti—semitism has particular overtones because of its history, that we have got to tackle it and labour must be at the front of that as we always have been found most certainly will be again. thank you very much. i big day on the brexit fund but also a big day here for mr corbyn in trying to put to bed all
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of these claims of anti—semitism within the labour party. thank you very much. theresa may is taking this opportunity to mark the day by travelling around the united kingdom, she started off this morning in scotland's in ayrshire, a country that footed very much to remain in the scottish government then nicola sturgeon leading the charge for the uk to stay in the single market and stay very close to the eu. but the premise has moved on to newcastle, she has been there this morning meeting toddlers and their parents, discussing maybe not brexit with the children but talking about the future and of course a lot of emphasis on the younger generation in the future that the uk might have outside of the european union. we will hear more from the
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prime minister later, c is due to give an interview to our political editor so we will hear what she has to say to mark this occasion. there will be more on that later on. how do people in northern england think things will pan out once the transition period begins? we will go into the transition period were not much my exchange for 20 months or so. danny savage has been on a road trip across the north talking to people about what if any changes they expect to see. he travelled to lincolnshire, east yorkshire, county durham and greater manchester. 0ur our first 0urfirst port of our first port of call on our northern brexit road trip with immingham, a gateway to europe for trade. at the moment around 6096 of
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our trade is with the eu, 40% is with the rest of the world. they do not envisage post—brexit chaos here or at other airports, but last week's agreement on a transition period is very welcome. it does take time to increase the capacity of the systems and make sure trade with the eu can continue to flow smoothly and efficiently, and that is why the transition period is so important and so welcome. the transition period is really important to your business at least going forward as brexit happens? absolutely right. from lincolnshire it was onto a in east yorkshire. the farmer has lots of foreign workers, no fan of brexit he accepted will happen but is frustrated by a long transition. up with that want to grow my business and this is stifling it because we do not know if it will grow, if we will have the staff to run the business. how can i borrow money from the bank and grow the business
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to pay for staff while in this transition with delays? it is putting a cap on the growth of business. we headed north to county durham. this company has just started making washing machines for the uk market and beyond, business is doing well and brexit is not going to change 0utlook year. is doing well and brexit is not going to change outlook year. the way we sell products abroad is to make good products for people to buy, tariffs and other changes are an inconvenience. but this comes down to business people doing a good job. you have to run your business well. that is being echoed british citizen and a good european. run the business as well as we can. after hearing from big businesses we went south and her destination was greater manchester with a busy mix of people on friday. we found graham kendall having lunch and looking forward to brexit. is a change that people are frightened of, people
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should brace change, it is not necessarily bad. there are a lot of emerging markets coming out in the world and we must take advantage of those. karen simson sells furniture from italy and is not so sure. we wear remainders, we resigned herself to the fact that it was out of control and must go with the full. not a big fan but it is one of those things, you have to take it on the chin. the owner of this greek deli is no fan of brexit, with the weaker pound being higher prices. is no fan of brexit, with the weaker pound being higher priceslj is no fan of brexit, with the weaker pound being higher prices. i have an older population who shop in the market and because of the uncertainty the double what is going to happen, trade has gone down so people are not spending what they're used to. on it is because prices have gone up and they can't afford it. as overviews are divided on what brexit might mean but what is clear is that it is touching every walk of life and nobody is certain about the future. it is that uncertainty i think that
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people are talking about most. any people are talking about most. any people voted to leave and thought it would be pretty instantaneous, that hasn't been the case of course we have had these long negotiations already with many more to come. to gauge the reaction ijoined in bolton market by david smart the general manager of greenhouse bakery. you have been a biggerfor over 40 yea rs. bakery. you have been a biggerfor over 40 years. yes. you voted to leave. i certainly did. over 40 years. yes. you voted to leave. icertainly did. how over 40 years. yes. you voted to leave. i certainly did. how do you think it is going? it is after the expected, all you have to do is look around this wonderful market, there is every nationality under the sun and that is a good thing for the uk. but i wanted to leave. sought was because you're a wider immigration? certainly not, i voted to leave because i wanted, knowing that having a global markets and being able to trade with the rest of the world is the right of the uk. the
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immigration side of it is an absolute nonsense, i think we should have the ability to control who comes in but if you look around now we actually need people from foreign nationals to come to this country and help us perform her normal work. are you concerned that already eu nationals may not be coming here, they might be put off by the brexit vote ? they might be put off by the brexit vote? there is a lot of scaremongering going on about, we waiting for them how to do this and that and it is nonsense. england, the uk, we want foreign nationals to come here and that will help us make britain i mean, great again, so please everybody out there we want foreign nationals to come and he wa nted foreign nationals to come and he wanted to come under control. so trading is the big thing for you. we are about to move on to that stage of the negotiations, her trade relationship with the eu. are you
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concerned that tariffs are barriers that trade could impact on businesses in the uk? not at all. we area trading businesses in the uk? not at all. we are a trading nation and always have been for hundreds of years and will continue to be a trading nation. we will trade with other countries that wa nt to will trade with other countries that want to trade with us. mercedes will a lwa ys want to trade with us. mercedes will always wa nt want to trade with us. mercedes will always want to sell cars in england. we will always want to sell bentleys to another. business will take the upper hand. business has the trade. gb, uk has to trade. 0ther upper hand. business has the trade. gb, uk has to trade. other countries have to trade with us. so let business just get have to trade with us. so let businessjust get on have to trade with us. so let business just get on with trading and we will get into this, don't worry. so your positive? unbelievable positive, it is a good thing for britain, as soon as we can come out of the european community and let us get on with what we're good at, being british, trading with the world, the future is ours. thank you very much indeed. my pleasure.
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there will be more from usain bolt and throughout the day. but a quick reminder you get much more on brexit on the bbc news website. and to help you understand some of the language there's now a jargon busting index. that's all at bbc.co.uk/news. always good to cut through the jargon. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. with exactly one year to go until britain leaves the eu, theresa may visits all four uk nations, pledging to make the country "strong and united" after brexit. a senior labour party figure resigned in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust. and police say sergei skripal and his daughter were probably poisoned at his home, high levels of a nerve
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agent were found at the front door. and in sport former australia cricket captain steve smith breaks down in tears and apologises for his pa rt down in tears and apologises for his part in the ball tampering scandal. he said it was a failure in his leadership and added that he devastated about it all. there is no place for england mainstays moeen ali and chris woakes to face new zealand, the pair have been dropped from the 12 man squad for the second test that starts later in christchurch. and andy murray will play his first event since january's hip surgery at the live demo open in the netherlands in june. it is a grass tenement and is designed to help them prepare for wimbledon. i will be back with more london stories after half past 11. police say former russian spy, sergei skripal and his daughter, were probably poisioned at their home after high levels of a nerve agent were found at theirfront door. the pair were found collapsed
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on a bench in salisbury on 4 march and remain in a critical condition. police say inquiries will focus on their home address but the risk to locals was low. 0ur correspondent duncan kennedy is in salisbury this morning. at the cord and close to sergei skripal‘s house. the fact that the concentration observed —— nerve agent explains how some of the first responders were affected are not affected as the case may be. yes, we don't know which one of those people were affected, overall it still remains the case thatjust four people were made ill by the nerve agent, sergei skripal and his daughter, sergeant nick bailey and his daughter who has now been released and a fourth person who we believe to be a police officer has been treated on an outpatient basis. this comes as you know after weeks
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of speculation about just where this nerve agent was administered. what speculation about was a thin sergei skripal‘s bmw car? did they get it ata bar skripal‘s bmw car? did they get it at a bar they went in the centre of the city? the restaurant? we had not known until the met police put out the statement saying they now believe that first contact for sergei skripal and julia was here that the house behind me and specifically under front door. they are not telling us what kind of substance it was, whether it was a gel, powder, liquid orsome substance it was, whether it was a gel, powder, liquid or some other substance. we understand it could have been on the front door handle but that hasn't been confirmed in they're not seeing it who might have put this substance on the door. and is there any change in the schiphol‘s condition at all? there is not, officially they remain in critical, stable condition in
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hospital. we know that sergeant bailey was in a serious condition but has now been released and is recuperating, the other person we know the fourth personally believed to bea know the fourth personally believed to be a police officer being treated on an outpatient basis of that person we don't know what they are male orfemale but person we don't know what they are male or female but much person we don't know what they are male orfemale but much healthier. in terms of other people being affected it is just those for, as you said the police say to these people living in this area the risk is low but they have also given other bits of information for example that they now have 1300 pieces of evidence that they have come across, we have spoken to 500 people or so in this investigation, 5000 hours of cctv footage, but no update has yet on the health, the change in health sergei skripal and his daughter, all we do know is that the shifted the emphasis of the investigation has gone from the city centre to hear at the house and over the next few days what we will see isa the next few days what we will see is a shift in the centre, we will see decontamination units going and
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ready to clear the town centre area which is currently cordoned off and ready for the public to go back in onceit ready for the public to go back in once it has been cleaned up. and briefly, do you think local people have been reassured by this statement that the risk to them is low given that a number of weeks have elapsed since the attack? we have spoken to a few people here, they are not concerned. the stoic british attitude to all these kinds of things, they take it at face value what the police are telling them. the risk is low. the house is sealed off but all around life is going on. peoplejust want sealed off but all around life is going on. people just want their city back to as it was. this medieval beautiful city of salisbury, the centre will get back to rommel in the next few weeks or so, but here it could take a bit longer. a 57 year old man has appeared in court in connection with the hatton garden robbery. the 14 million pound heist — the biggest burglary in legal history — was carried out over the easter weekend 3 years ago. he is charged with conspiracy to burgle and conspiracy to hide criminal property.
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helena lee is outside the court now. what has been happening? it was one of the biggest raids in uk history, a number of men have already been convicted for their part in the hatton garden heist, nearly £40 million worth of valuables were taken, including gold diamond stud sapphiresjudging that taken, including gold diamond stud sapphires judging that raid taken, including gold diamond stud sapphiresjudging that raid on police and we said that there was one outstanding member of the gang that they had not yet caught, they say that this man was caught on cctv footage and he was known as basil. but —— now on tuesday of this week michael seed 57 years old as you say, he was arrested at his home address in islington in north london, the flying squad, members of the flying squad for the
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metropolitan police seized a number of items and he was then charged on wednesday evening last night. he made a short appearance here at westminster magistrates' court, he spoke very briefly to confirm his name his date of birth and also his address. there was no application for bail, and he has been told that he will now face another court appearance, a next court appearance at woolwich crown court on the 26th of april. nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai has returned to pakistan for the first time since being shot by taliban militants. these pictures from pakistani television shows her with her parents at islamabad's international airport under tight security. malala, who's now aged twenty, was shot in the head by a gunman for campaigning forfemale education. 0ur correspondent secunder kermani is in islamabad. malala's life has changed beyond
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anything she could have imagined that the last five years so it is not surprised this is a really emotional return for her. absolutely, she arrived with her pa rents absolutely, she arrived with her parents in the early hours of this morning at islamabad airport and then this morning she went and met then this morning she went and met the pakistani prime minister and from his offices and she gave a speech that was broadcast on state television that was really quite emotional, she broke down in tears ona number of emotional, she broke down in tears on a number of occasions she said that it had been her dream to step foot once again in pakistan, the whole time that he was out of the country, it was nearly six years ago that she was shot in the head at point—blank range by gunmen from the pakistani taliban on a school bus, the targeted her because she was a campaigner for girls education in her home region of the smart valley in northern pakistan which was once
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a militant stronghold. she survived the attack and was taken to britain for treatment and has been living there ever since. she is now a student at oxford university in fa ct. student at oxford university in fact. really, now, a return is cinematic or emblematic i should say that security in pakistan has been drastically improved in the past few yea rs. drastically improved in the past few years. the level of violence committed by militant groups has drastically reduced but there is still a lot of security around her visit, it is not clear whether she is going to be able to visit anywhere else in the country other than the capital. in terms of how pakistan has changed in the last five years, especially in relation to the education of girls, what would you say? certainly it is an issue that malala yousafzai has been very prominent in raising and not just yousafzai has been very prominent in raising and notjust any pakistani
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context, she has a foundation that works in nigeria, afghanistan, works with syrian refugees, there is certainly a recognition in pakistan about the need for the real education. it is interesting to note that while malala yousafzai is a hugely admired figure throughout the world and many people here have greeted her arrival enthusiastically, there is a significant part of the pakistani population that believes that she is some kind of western agent believes in conspiracy theories that see her as perhaps being shot by the cia rather than the pakistani taliban, i was speaking to a colleague from bbc urdu who was telling me about the number of vitriolic messages that appeared on their facebook page, some of them very misogynistic and nasty, abusing malala yousafzai. 0f course many other pakistanis, malala and the work she has done as a source of great pride and particularly more so now that she is
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backin particularly more so now that she is back in pakistan. thank you very much for that. it is half past 11 exactly, let's take a look at the weather forecast. for now, we have some sunshine across many parts of the uk. showers moving into the far south west at the moment. there graduate work their way further north into the midlands and north wales. showers elsewhere, but lots of dry and bright 10k. remaining cloudy in scotland. temperatures up to 11 degrees. through the nights, shower is continuing to spread northwards. some heavy, a little snow on high ground in the pennines. showers into the south of scotland and
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temperatures around 4 degrees. good friday, a dry start for many, some showers across southern areas merging into longer spells of rain, spreading northwards, but many northern areas should remain dry except some snow showers in scotland. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: theresa may sets off on a tour of the british isles with a pledge to keep all four uk nations united after brexit. it's exactly one year to go until britain's official departure from the eu. brexit provides us with opportunities, i want to see which i start coming together. we have a very strong union, it is in our interest to come together and really seize these opportunities for the future. a senior labour party figure resigns in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust.
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police focus their inquiries on the home of sergei skripal and his daughter, saying the highest concentration of the nerve agent that poisoned them was found on theirfront door. after quitting the role, the former parole board chairman says the ministry ofjustice must also accept its part in the decision to release serial rapistjohn worboys. in a moment, we get a reality check on brexit as chris morris asks how much progress has been made and how much is still to do with just a year to go. serapis at the bbc sports centre now with all the latest on the cricket ball tampering scandal. is dz going to be forgiven? we will have to wait and see, this scandal has engulfed the world of cricket because those cricketers have now arrived back home after
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that ball tampering incident in that third test against south africa at the weekend. steve smith, the former captain, says he is gutted and devastated about his part in that scandal. he said it was a failure of the leadership group, and he will regret it for the rest of his life. he was very emotional in that press conference to the media after landing at sydney airport. a1(m), there is flash photography as we hear from steve smith. there is flash photography as we hear from steve smithlj there is flash photography as we hear from steve smith. i made a serious error ofjudgment hear from steve smith. i made a serious error of judgment and hear from steve smith. i made a serious error ofjudgment and are now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership. of my leadership. i'll do everything i can to make up for my mistake in the damage it's caused. if any goods can
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come from this, if it can be a lesson to others, then i hope i can bea lesson to others, then i hope i can be a force for change. i love the game of cricket, i love entertaining young kids, i love kids wanting to play the great game of cricket. that i love. the two other things is, at any time you think about making a questionable decision, think about hugh you're affecting. you're affecting your parents, antecedent way my old man's been... thanks, everybody. and my mum, it hurts. are very upset steve smith, there. cameron bancroft also spoke to the media, he landed a nine—month ban.|j love playing the game of cricket,
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there is no greater pride to me. i'm extremely disappointed and regret my actions. i'm sorry too to those people they're looked up to me around the world, especially the case. i knew i'm a role model and i've not acted like one. i have met many people down and i understand the disappointment in the broader community. words don't mean much in the circumstances, so i'll focus on my actions and conduct going forward. meanwhile, david warner, who was banned for a year for devising the plan released this statement on social media. in it, he said mistakes have been made which have damaged cricket, i apologise for my part and take responsible to for my part and take responsible to for it. england have dropped moeen ali for
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the first time in three years following their defeat to new zealand in the first test. chris woa kes misses out zealand in the first test. chris woakes misses out on the second and final test which gets under way later tonight. england looking to win that series. both players failed to ta ke win that series. both players failed to take a wicket in that defeat. james spence, jack leach and mark would have all the 12— man squads. we've underperformed throughout, not done ourselves justice. this we've underperformed throughout, not done ourselvesjustice. this is we've underperformed throughout, not done ourselves justice. this is an opportunity to try and get something from this winter. the lads know the importance of that. we're had a number of decisions as a group, we are honest about how we want to move forward as a team. it's about putting that into practice and delivering on the field. andy murray
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has announced plans to play his first event since hip surgery in january. is competitive come back will start in the netherlands in june. it is a grass court tournaments, so he hopes it will help prepare him for wimbledon. that is all the sport for now, i'll more in halfan is all the sport for now, i'll more in half an hour. the latest for you on the response to the poisoning of sergei skripal. georgia has expelled a diplomat, the foreign ministry has expressed solidarity with the united kingdom and shares the position of the united kingdom and the international community. the diplomat is based at the swiss embassy. georgia expelling a russian diplomat as part of the international response to the poisoning on salisbury of sergei
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skripal and his daughter yulia. with one year to go until the uk leaves the european union, theresa may is visiting england, scotland, northern ireland and wales. the prime minister will tell voters that whether they voted leave or remain, the important thing is making brexit a success for everyone. so with one year to go, how far have we got and what still needs to be done? chris morris from reality check reports. so, just one year to go until the united kingdom is due to part company with the rest of the european union. it's also one year since theresa may triggered article 50 of the lisbon treaty, marking the formal start of the brexit process. and in accordance with the wishes of the british people, the united kingdom is leaving the european union. this is an historic moment from which there can be no turning back. well, after a stuttering start, negotiations on a withdrawal agreement have made progress. legal text has been agreed on a financial settlement, the divorce bill. the government says the uk will pay
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the eu up to £39 billion to cover things like outstanding bills and pensions. there's also broad agreement on the rights after brexit of eu citizens here in the uk and uk citizens elsewhere in europe. and crucially, on the terms of a 21—month transition period after brexit, when the uk will continue to abide by all eu rules and regulations. the transition will give governments and businesses more time to get ready for a new relationship in the future. but there's still an awful lot to do in the next 12 months. both sides have promised no return to a hard border in ireland. there are intensive talks on how to guarantee that once the uk leaves the single market and the customs union. there's also no full agreement yet on the role of the european court of justice after brexit. elsewhere, spain, for example, is insisting it must be consulted on the future status of gibraltar. as for a new trade deal between the uk and the eu, talks on that haven't yet begun.
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the eu says the uk's red lines limit what can be achieved, but the uk still wants the most ambitious free—trade agreement in history. customs is one obvious challenge. the future of fishing and other. the aim is to reach a broad political agreement by october. but detailed trade negotiations will have to continue long after the uk has left. so, is brexit on track? well, there are two big warning signs. firstly, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed — in other words, failure to reach agreement on one issue could bring the withdrawal deal crashing down. and secondly, it's far from clear whether the government has a majority in the house of commons to win approval for the brexit it wants. there's just one year left, but there's still a long way to go. what's the feeling about brexit elsewhere in europe? 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in the belgian city of antwerp. and is what matters, as do many of
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the northern ports in europe. zeebrugge as well, rotterdam, and for is the second biggest port in europe, and there is huge trade between britain and these ports. if you order something in the supermarkets, chances are they're probably here waiting to be taken to britain by container. ins of broker, most of the cars coming into britain are there. that something like £30 billion of trade crossing between them, and some are, after decades of britain being in the customs union, tariff read trade, very little red tape, that is going to be something to deal with. let me bring in the
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flemish mep to spell out, please, for me, a year to go, what it means what are people thinking on this side of the water? there is a lot of concern. we respect the choice the british people have made, but for other enterprises there are a lot of unknown factors. the consequences could be very serious for flounders, which is amongst the hardest hit regions in europe, just after ireland and holland. with one in 40 jobs depending on trade with the uk. we have a trade surplus with the uk of around 14 billion euros in important sectors, chemical and pharmaceutical, machinery, cars and so on. pharmaceutical, machinery, cars and so on. there are a lot of concerns,
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of course, and enterprise is right to prepare themselves, but paul watts ? to prepare themselves, but paul watts? this is not yet clear. we have this transition period. this is good news, uncertainty is the enemy of enterprise, but we have to worry is it not too short and rb kicking the count down the road? and you worry there is enough time after brexit for businesses to get there docks in order to make sure, well, the talk is of tariff free trade, it is that achievable? wooden how this will be achieved, and this is what we are concerned with. yes, enterprises are preparing, this is a permanent mission to london to prepare, and other boards are preparing a special team for this purpose. there is a lot of uncertainties. thank you. very briefly, two quick points coming
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hearing today from heads of the port who think the british think we're going to make it hard, but the rout is it will be difficult to sort trade in future. i have got back from spain and greece, the feeling that there is some mps saying they don't think it will happen. that is not the feeling here, northern europe believe it will happen and they are preparing for it. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has insisted that labour will not tolerate any form of racism in the party. the head of the party's disciplinary panel, christine shawcroft, has stepped down after it emerged she'd opposed the suspension of a local election candidate accused of holocaust denial. mr mcdonnell said labour was bringing forward measures to deal with anti—semitism which should have been implemented "ages ago". we're joined now byjustin cohen, news editor of jewish news, who conducted an exclusive interview withjeremy corbyn on allegations of anti—semitism in labour. let's ta ke
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let's take a look at the front page of this week's jewish news, let's take a look at the front page of this week'sjewish news, and you can see for yourself, on the front cover, it says... so, what was it about the interview about the answers that did not satisfy you? unlike many other people i was speaking with before the interview, i had an element of hope, albeit from a low bar. we had seen hope, albeit from a low bar. we had seenin hope, albeit from a low bar. we had seen in the previous couple of days the jewish community going seen in the previous couple of days thejewish community going for than it ever had in condemning the lack of action within the labour party and byjeremy corbyn himself towards anti—semitism. in response, jeremy corbyn has gone further than he had ever done before. he explicitly
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expressed condemnation of new types of anti—semitism. he said it was more than a few bad apples. so went into the interview after three years of trying to get it that there must bea of trying to get it that there must be a readiness here to move forward and carry on an effort to repair ties with thejewish community. quite a gargantuan task in itself. i was rather disappointed with a lot of what i heard. principally, given where we are at the moment is, giving jeremy corbyn's in recognition of the extent of the problem, he was unable to explicitly condemn the claims that allegations of anti—semitism were smears that have, from people very close to him,. he also endorsed and went out of his way, to some extent, to
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endorse a fringe group that put on a counter demonstration to the mainstream community demonstration on monday. that group put out a statement saying that the main reason behind what was going on, for 1500 people gathering to condemn a leader of the opposition foreign in unprecedented fashion was down to more local elections then the real fight against anti—semitism. more local elections then the real fight against anti-semitism. so, some not, wouldn't be fair to say you've got his response was not emphatic enough? we've howard recently and in the past that he gave a lot of the right language. he gave a lot of the right language. he gave explicit condemnation of anti—semitism and a denial that he was an anti—semite. something i have never believed that. many people do believe that to be the case,
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however. in your boat or plane to ta ke however. in your boat or plane to take a zero tolerance approach to anti—semitism and all these people are gathering to say more needs to be done, there is a counter demonstration it says these people are wrong and you endorse these people as good people, there is a question mark over your seriousness. 0n the deselection of mps who attended that rally on monday, including david lammy, you asked him about that, and he said it's up to the local party, but not for that. what did you make of that answer?m obviously it leaves the door open for people to move towards the selections for other reasons, just not specifically for the rally. it's important we heard that, because he is not the only mp has faced this abuse for attending the rally. final question on christine shawcroft over
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these holocaust denial facebook posts made by a labour candidate in peterborough who is no longer the labour front candidate. she peterborough who is no longer the labourfront candidate. she hasn't been asked to step down from the nec yet, should she? from what i understand, she has taken a positive approach tackling anti—semitism 0ctonauts. she has called for action against ken livingstone and others. she has recognised a mistake, and i believe it could be genuine, however in light of a zero tolerance approach, she needs to realise her position at the moment is untenable. thank you very much. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: with exactly one year to go until britain leaves the eu, theresa may visits all four uk nations, pledging to make the country strong and united after brexit. a senior labour party figure resigns in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust.
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police say sergei skripal and his daughter were probably poisoned at his home. high levels of a nerve agent were found at the front door. in the business news: the owner of retail chain bargain booze is on the brink of administration. the firm, which also owns wine rack, says it plans to appoint administrators unless circumstances change. in recent weeks, it's issued profit warnings and revealed a £30 million tax bill. the business world is eagerly awaiting an investor vote which will decide the fate of engineering giant gkn. the outcome of the vote, set to be announced by 1pm, could see turnaround group melrose win in its £8.1 billion bid to buy the british—based company. the business secretary greg clark has written a letter to melrose asking for commitments which include maintaining
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the workforce and headquarters in the uk. annual house price growth remained subdued in march, according to the nationwide building society. the increase of 2.1% was down slightly from february's rate of 2.2%. nationwide said subdued consumer confidence and wage growth failing to keep up with the rise in the cost of living had offset healthy employment gains and low borrowing costs. back to our top story now, and the struggling drinks retailer conviviality. the group, which employs about 2,500 staff, has warned it may have to call in the administrators if circumstances do not change. michael hewson is chief market analyst at cmc markets. conviviality may not be a name that many people watching know about. who aren't they and what do they only? direct drinks wholesaler and a
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supplier to jd wetherspoon, for example, and a host of what restau ra nts. example, and a host of what restaurants. this is a symptom of a number of key factors. a perfect storm of higher costs as well as an overambitious acquisition spree that has taken place over the last two yea rs. has taken place over the last two years. they came out with a profits warning recently and a pretty sizeable tax bill? indeed. in january, they took over the assets of palmer and herve, another wholesaler, for £25 million. in hindsight, that looks overambitious in the context of the 30 million tax bill. while i think this is very convenient to talk about the fact that consumers are feeling the squeeze of higher prices, they are feeling the squeeze of import prices. management decisions also play a part. this company is
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important because of its 2500 employees. those jobs will be at risk in the event of administration? i think the employees of central convenience, who conviviality took over previously, but themselves a stay of execution. we should find out what happens to these jobs in the next ten days and whether not other wholesalers will step in to buy these assets. you keep a close eye on the retail sector, it has been a torrid time for so many retailers in the uk. what's going on at there? toys r us, matlin, even john lewis has issued a profit warning. 0ttoman, what we're seeing is high levels of invasion, low level of sterling, is squeezing retailers and wholesalers and the consumers. ultimately, those retailers who aren't adaptable, such
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as toys r us, who rely on big box retail parks, feeling the squeeze, because a large part of those costs are fixed costs. when have some unlike amazon firm who can deliver a arsenal to your doorstep the next day it is very difficult to set yourself up apart from that type of change. thank you very much. other news headlines now: uk economic growth prospects have stayed unchanged. according to the office for national statistics, gdp growth was 0.4% in the fourth quarter of 2017. household spending slowed to its lowest rate of annual growth for six years, at 1.7% last year, as consumers faced a squeeze from inflation and poor wage growth. according to figures
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submitted to the government. however, the equivalent gap for hourly pay was much smaller — 9.9%. aianb is to start sending the chinese government information about customers who book accomodation in china. data shared with the authorities will include passport details and the dates of bookings. the online home—sharing giant said the move meant it was now complying with local laws and regulations, like all businesses operating in china. something to think about if you're booking a holiday in china. looking at the markets, it is the end of a
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volatile week. the easter break sta rts volatile week. the easter break starts tomorrow for city traders with not a huge amount of money in the markets, so liquidity is low. so big ups and downs, at the moment, the london market keeping itself positive. gtn's share price is up as we approach that 1pm deadline, and melrose was made is down. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. we've got the easter weekend coming erythema and it will be unsettled by many of us. cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain as well. for now, dry and bright across most part. this is the scene bright across most part. this is the scene in east bright across most part. this is the scene in east sussex. bright across most part. this is the scene in east sussex. blue sky. further southend west, more cloud
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around. this is devon. from the satellite imagery, we have cloud down to the south and west, 20 dry and sunny weather, clouds across the northern isles. producing rain across the north east. cloud spreading north and east words, it basically she showers. heady this afternoon, across wales into the south east of england. maximum temperatures about 7 degrees, similarto temperatures about 7 degrees, similar to yesterday. tonight, showers across southern areas moving further north. snow over the high ground and pennines. war across the north east of scotland into friday morning. —— more across the northeastern scotland. friday, bright spells, sunshine, but clouds. rain at times, snow on higher
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ground. generally, cool. showers and rain on good friday, hill snow in northern areas. in the south, persistent rain. pushing up into england. maximum temperatures on good friday about 8 degrees. this is saturday, unsettled, lots of cloud, showers, snow, primarily of a higher ground in northern england and wales. some brightness across the far north and west. temperatures for saturday around 10 degrees. easter sunday, again, cloudy to start, then sunnier weather breaking through. easter day the driest day of the weekend, because on monday, rain and
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snow moves in. brexit providers with i want to see us the 55>!“ 59.55»; 23—535; 93; !!=—.’!~;.4 very the 55>!“ 59.55»; 23—535; 93; !!=—.’!~;.4 7; very strong 559 55555-— 59.55»; 9.5—5~.;; 559 5555-554 5.9.9. 2174 in bolton, if! in bolton, an area leave, finding out if! in bolton, an area voted leave, finding out about people's hopes and fears for the future. a senior labour party figure resigns in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust. police say sergei skripal and his daughter were probably poisoned at his home, high levels of a nerve agent were found at the front door. after the high court decision to block the release of serial sex attackerjohn worboys, the parole service boss who resigned yesterday says more heads should roll. also this morning,
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a homecoming for malala yousufzai. after being shot by the taliban for advocating education for girls, the world's youngest nobel peace prize winner returns to pakistan for the first time. and the australian cricket captain sacked for cheating makes a tearful apology as he faces the media. if any good can come of this... if there can be a lesson to others then i hope i can be a force for change. good afternoon. it's thursday 29th march. welcome to bbc newsroom live theresa may is visiting scotland, wales, england and northern ireland today, exactly one year before the uk is due to leave the european union.
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in an appeal to voters who backed both leave and remain, the prime minister has pledged to keep the country strong and united after brexit and that it's important to make brexit a success for everyone. as part of the bbc‘s day of coverage, we're in bolton, where the majority of people voted to leave in the eu referendum. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is there. that's right, engaging reaction from people here, an area as you say that the did vote to leave during that referendum. there is no doubt select that campaign and even sense despite the results that are divisions, divisions amongst families, divisions amongst families, divisions amongst families, divisions amongst constituencies and of course at the different countries of course at the different countries of the united kingdom. the message today from the prime minister after
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she and the government had a successful in getting the transition deal penned down so not much will change when we do leave for 20 months or so. her message today really is one of unity. she kicked off her tour, her very brief tour, off her tour, her very brief tour, of the united kingdom in ayrshire meeting textile workers there. scotla nd meeting textile workers there. scotland of course a country that footage to remain and the scottish government, the snp and nicola sturgeon very much talking about keeping close ties with the european union and wanting to stay in the single market, for example wanting to stay —— to say very much that scotla nd to stay —— to say very much that scotland is a vote and views are reflected in the deal. the prime minister then moved on to newcastle, here she visited a parent and toddlers group preparing for easter and talking to parents and maybe not talking so much to that younger
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generation but there has been a lot of talk about a generational divide when it comes to brexit. her positive message today from theresa may is very much that the country needs to come together. the matter how you voted she says it is now time to look at a positive future. how you voted she says it is now time to look at a positive futurelj believe there are real opportunities for the united kingdom. we are starting the negotiations on trade arrangement and arrangement of a role in economic partnership will be with the eu 27 when believe. i believe we can negotiate a good agreement which is tariff free and frictionless trade as possible so we maintain those markets in the eu but also that we open up markets around the rest of the world. brexit provides us with opportunities, i wa nt to provides us with opportunities, i want to see is coming together, the four nations across the united kingdom. we have a very strong union and it is in our interests to come together and seize these opportunities for the future. that
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was theresa may with a positive message talking about unity. she has also done an interview with what i can spread in the last few minutes and in that interview she talked about a so—called brexit dividend, thatis about a so—called brexit dividend, that is something we had a lot about during the referendum campaign particularly from those under the side of argument, like the foreign secretary boston, the environment secretary boston, the environment secretary michael gove, about why money for the nhs. theresa may talked about that and she was asked if there would be a brexit dividend and she said of course when believe the eu the —— the european union we won the longer be spending vast sums of money you're in and year out sending that money to the eu so there will be money to the eu so there will be money available here in the uk to spend on our priorities like the nhs and schools. of course there are many people who don't share a positive optimistic view about brexit, some of those of course are in parliament. we know that mps will
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get a meaningful vote on any final deal that is negotiated. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. that the vote in october is probably going to be the critical moment of the whole brexit process, where mps will get to vote on whether or not to a cce pt will get to vote on whether or not to accept that deal. some ambiguity about where labour now stands on this, the shadow foreign secretary appears to suggest last night that labour probably would back the deal. no such ambiguity you have to say over the position of the liberal democrats, they have consistently said they opposed to brexit and want a second referendum. the deputy leaderjoins me now. surely the honest thing to do would be to take a look at the deal misses me get and then decide whether back it. a look at the deal misses me get and then decide whether back itm clear from the way negotiations are going so far the government is not even conducting them in a competent way, the deal is going to be pretty atrocious. i would argue it is impossible for the deal to be better
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than the deal we have at the moment when we have full access to the simple market, full access to the customs union, we don't have tariff barriers and we don't have regulatory barriers and indeed that is what is good for business and jobs and that is what is at risk and we still have the chance to stop it. and we should stop it, for all those reasons, we're nearly two thirds of the way from the referendum day until the day that we leave and yet so until the day that we leave and yet so many of the big issues are still unanswered, the government has not got anything that it can say concretely about what has happened for either —— about what will happen on the northern irish border problem and yet two thirds of the way through, still nowhere near to solving that. these are technical but important issues, surely the big issueis but important issues, surely the big issue is that the people have voted and he said he wanted to leave. you seem and he said he wanted to leave. you seem intent on undermining that. not at all. people voted in the said thatis at all. people voted in the said that is what they wanted in the government has gone away to negotiate on that and that is fair enough. but at the end of the day we
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do not know even now, we will have a better idea later this year, what the final terms of that deal going to be. what is that going to look like? and we certainly did not know that when he voted in 2016 and so it is totally reasonable i think to say to people, when theresa may comes back and has this deal you should have the opportunity to look at it and if you like it fair enough, vote for it, but if you don't like it you should have the opportunity to reject it otherwise you're leaving it in the hands of politicians and we might end up with a really bad dealfor britain we might end up with a really bad deal for britain and this is something that will affect the country for generations to come, we are talking about the children's future is here. to you think brexit can still be stopped? absolutely, it is up to the people here and this is why the liberal democrats are launching the biggest ever campaign we have run outside of an election because this momentum is absolutely crucial. if the people decide that we need to have a people's vote on the brexit deal then ultimately that will drive change in politicians and
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if we have that vote it will be up to the people to decide, this process started with the people voting and it should be confirmed by the people voting whether this is the people voting whether this is the path people want to take once they see what is actually an offer. don't you need to make the case for a second referendum to have signs of a second referendum to have signs of a real shift in public opinion? blu ntly a real shift in public opinion? bluntly there has not been, most people are still everywhere. the difficulties you can look that in terms of there has been some movement in public opinion in the direction of been more sceptical, particularly on how the government is negotiating the steel and the flawed information comes out particularly on issues like northern ireland and things like food safety, when people suddenly think we may have to have chorinated chicken and all sorts of different food standards people are much less happy than these magical trade deals that will be negotiated so easily have not materialised. it is difficult to negotiate with massive economies like the us and china and think that
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the uk will come off best. i think the uk will come off best. i think the more that becomes clear the more the more that becomes clear the more the chances that people will look in light of the facts and think this is perhaps not really what we were being sold at the time. this is looking rather different than what we we re looking rather different than what we were looking for. thank you. 0ctober shipping up to be a massive, massive moment, the government of the moment saying that if parliament votes never does not matter we still leaving but you wonder whether perhaps if mps vote now, we'll misses may go back to the negotiating table? will she try and make it a vote of confidence? huge political moment. it certainly will be. thank you very much indeed norman. norman smith in westminster. 0ne much indeed norman. norman smith in westminster. one of the big part of any final deal will be some kind of solution about the irish border. theresa may on her tour is heading
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towards northern ireland this afternoon. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy is in warrenpoint on the irish border. this idea of no hard border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland is proving incredibly contentious and a very difficult to solve. how people there are viewing it? exactly the question of the irish border continues to be an obstacle in the brexit talks, there is continuing uncertainty for people here on both sides of this border. in particular it affects business owners and people who work in the farming, food and agriculture sectors. that is because their livelihoods on both sides of the border depend on good —— on goods being able to move freely between north and south and vice versa. the uk has said its preferred option is to strike that comprehensive free trade deal with the eu but until that happens people on the war certain about how arrangements could work in future and of course any
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increase in bureaucracy and checks in future could lead to delays and could hit their business is now that we are here away from brexit people are watching very keenly, very intently, to find out what the future may hold. thank you. and the irish government pushing for some kind of solution and want to know what the uk government is going to come up with to solve that issue. they want an answer by the summer. we have to see whether that comes their way. here in bolton i have been getting reaction from local businesses about brexit and what the future might hold. i have been speaking to david smart, the managing director of greenhouse ba kery managing director of greenhouse bakery about how he thinks the brexit negotiations are going. all you have to do is look around there isa you have to do is look around there is a wonderful market, there is every nationality under the sun and thatis every nationality under the sun and that is a good thing for the uk. i voted to leave. not because you're
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worried about immigration? certainly not, no, ivoted worried about immigration? certainly not, no, i voted to leave because i wanted, knowing that having a global market and being able to trade with the rest of the world is right for the rest of the world is right for the uk. the immigration side of it is an absolute nonsense, i think we should have the ability to control who comes in, but if you look right now we actually need foreign nationals to come to this country and help us perform a normal work. are you concerned that already eu nationals might not be coming here? they might be put off by the brexit vote. there is a lot of scaremongering going on about we will throw them out and do this and that, and it is absolute nonsense. england, the uk, we want foreign nationals to come in and that will help us make britain... great again. so please everybody out there, we
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wa nt so please everybody out there, we want foreign nationals to come but we wa nt want foreign nationals to come but we want them to come under control. so trading is the big thing for you, you're about to move to that stage of the negotiation and trading relationship with the eu. are you concerned that tavistock barriers with trade could impact on businesses? at the end of the day we had a trading nation and always have been for hundreds of years, we will continue to be a trading nation. we will trade with other countries that wa nt to will trade with other countries that want to trade with us. mercedes will a lwa ys want to trade with us. mercedes will always wa nt want to trade with us. mercedes will always want to sell cars in england. we will always want to sell bentleys to whenever, business will take the upper hand. business has to trade, gb uk has to trade. in other countries have the trade with us so thatis countries have the trade with us so that is —— sawdust letters get on with trading. so your positive? unbelievably positive, it is a good thing for britain, as soon as we can come out
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of the european community and let us get on with what we're good at, being british, and trading with the world, the future is ours. david smart there with his views. they have talked about it being a bumpy road to brexit but the government pleased with how it has been falling in recent weeks but of course money at ago and some really tough negotiations ahead. we follow every and turn. and to help you understand some of the language there's now a jargon busting index. that's all at bbc.co.uk/news. thank you. the time is exactly what past 12, let's look at their headlines. in the top story with exactly one year to wa nt in the top story with exactly one year to want britain leaves eu, theresa may visits four nations
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leading to make the country strong and united after brexit. a senior labour party figure resigns in a row over a candidate who put an article on facebook casting doubt on the holocaust. police say sergei skripal and his daughter, were probably poisoned at his home, high levels of a nerve agent were found at the front door. more on the cricket ball tampering row and the rest of the sport with sarah. good afternoon, former australian cricket captain steve smith broke down in tears as he apologised for his part in the ball tampering scandal. he arrived in syd ney tampering scandal. he arrived in sydney and he was gutted and will regret his decision from the rest of his life. smith has been banned for the year by cricket australia, cameron bancroft has been banned for nine months for his part in it also apologised to the nation on his arrival in paris, he saw admitted that he lives in the aftermath. just
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a warning there is some flash photography as we hear from steve smith first. i made a serious error ofjudgment smith first. i made a serious error of judgment and i smith first. i made a serious error ofjudgment and i now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership. of my leadership. i will do everything i can to make up for my mistake and the damage it has caused. i understand i have let many people down and i understand the disappointment and the broader community. watched on remote in the circumstances, so i will focus on my actions of conduct going forward. the other cricketer involves david walker has been banned from a year for devising the bulk handling plan, he said in social media that he was sorry and people would hear from he said in social media that he was sorry and people would hearfrom him inafew
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sorry and people would hearfrom him in a few days. the aussies going into the fourth and final test with south africa tomorrow, their captain said he hopes more has learned his lesson. this series has been quite trying and a lot of the times he has beenin trying and a lot of the times he has been in the middle of, i have actually heard what he has said to all us, it'll be interesting see his thoughts and it'll be a nice opportunity for him to maybe reflect and see how he could perhaps change the way that he has played the game. i don't think that is the way, the only way that you can win games of cricket. england have dropped moeen ali for the first time in the years following the heavy defeat to new zealand in the first test, chris wilkes also misses out on the second and final test which gets under way tonight. england are looking to tie that two match series, both players failed to take the wicket in the first test defeat, and was by an inning and 49 runs, james vince and
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mark wood have all come into the 12 man squad. andy murray announced plans to put the first event since hip surgery in january, his competitive comeback will start at the london open which begins in the netherlands on the 11th ofjune, it is a grass court tournament so he hopes it will help him prepare for wimbledon. and that is all the sport for me for now. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has insisted that labour will not tolerate any form of racism in the party. the head of the party's disciplinary panel, christine shawcroft, has stepped down after it emerged she'd opposed the suspension of a local election candidate accused of holocaust denial. mr mcdonnell said labour was bringing forward measures to deal with anti—semitism which should have been implemented "ages ago". as soon as jeremy herod about christine shawcross's i think
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completely wrong decision which she then reversed what she saw all the evidence, jeremy asked to stand out and that is what she did sojeremy was decisive on that, she stood down. what he saw dead was he says that the shadow cabinet meeting this week that we pitted procedures under the jack about a report including establishment of a new legal panel to give us advice on all of this and be ruthless in stamping out anti—semitism in the party, some elements that have not been permitted. we have expressed anger about that and button in a new general secretary who next week her first task, jeremy said, your first task is to bring forward an action plan with a timetable in which we will deal with this issue and we will deal with this issue and we will deal with it. he consulting leaders of the jewish community to make sure we follow that advice as well and we will root out, and let's get this message out there, there is
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no room for anti—semitism in our party or any form of racism. there is no room in our society either. we will be the party that eradicates it both in our own party but also we will go back into that leadership role of eradicating it in society overall. earlierjust in: the news editor at the jewish news overall. earlierjust in: the news editor at thejewish news said he had been disappointed by the hatters jeremy corbyn give him when he interviewed him following this weeks protest by members of thejewish community in london. we had seen in the previous couple of days that the jewish community were going further thanit jewish community were going further than it had ever gone in condemning the lack of action within the labour party and byjeremy corbyn himself towards anti—semitism. in response jeremy corbyn himself a gone further than he has ever gone, he recognised exquisitely certain types of new anti—semitism that is connected to israel, anti—zionism as it is often known, he specifically said it was more than a few bad apples responsible for this within the
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party so i went into the interview after three years of trying to get it thinking that there must be a rating this year to move this forward , rating this year to move this forward, to carry on the effort to repair ties with thejewish community, quite a gargantuan task in itself. and i was rather disappointed with a lot of what i heard, principally given where we are at the moment, givenjeremy corbyn's won recognition of the extent of the problem, he was unable to explicitly condemn the claims that allegations of anti—semitism or smears that come from including some people very close to him, people like chris williamson mp, he also endorsed that i would say went out of his way to some extent to endorse the group jewish voice of his way to some extent to endorse the groupjewish voice for labour which is the fringe group that put ona which is the fringe group that put on a counter demonstration to the main, mainstream community demonstration on monday. that group put out a statement saying that the
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main reason behind what was going on, the main reason for 1500 people gathering to condemn the reader of the opposition and unprecedented fashion was down to the local elections more than it was down to the real fighting anti—semitism. summing up on you havejust said, would it be a fair summation to see you felt as response was not emphatic enough? e again as we have heard consistently during this week, and in the past that has to be said, he gave a lot of the right language, we had his explicit condemnation of anti—semitism, we had an explicit denial that he was an anti—semite, something which i personally have never believed to be the case directly. many people in increasing number of people do believe that be the case but yes i think if you are going to clean to take a zero tolerance approach to anti—semitism and all these people are gathering in an unprecedented fashion to say
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more needs to be done, there's a counter demonstration that says these people are wrong, and you endorse these people as good people, dennis? 0r lasciviousness. endorse these people as good people, dennis? or lasciviousness. justin: from jewish news. police say a former russian spy and his daughter were probably poisoned at his home after high levels of nerve agent were found on the front door. sergei and yulia skripal were found collapsed on a park bench in salisbury and remain in a critical condition. caroline rigby has more. three weeks on from the attack which left a former russian spy and his daughter critically ill in hospital, the investigation now focuses on this front door at the home of sergei skripal. detectives say it's where they've discovered the highest concentration of the russian—made nerve agent novichok, leading to the suggestion it may have been where the pair were first poisoned. it's the latest development in a huge investigation involving 250 counterterrorism officers. searches continue in and around salisbury, with traces of the nerve agent found at a number of locations, including the restaurant
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where the pair ate and the bench where they were found unconscious shortly after the meal. the criminal investigation continues alongside significant political activity. an ever—growing list of nations, now more than 25, have expelled more than 130 russian diplomats or spies. a co—ordinated response to the country britain says is behind the attack. i believe that these expulsions represent a moment when a feeling has suddenly crystallised. when years of vexation and provocation have warned the collective patience to breaking point. across the world, across three continents, countries who are willing to say enough is enough. russia continues to deny any involvement in the poisoning and has threatened retaliation for the expulsions. caroline rigby, bbc news. we spoke to our news correspondent duncan kennedy
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who is in salisbury 0verall, overall, it still remains a case that just four people overall, it still remains a case thatjust four people were made ill by the nerve agent, 30 scrip al and his daughter, sergeant nick bailey who went to hospital at the fourth person who we believe to be a police officer who is being treated in outpatient basis. this comes after weeks of speculation aboutjust where this nerve agent was administered. speculation about wasn't in the bmw car? did they get it at the berkeley went in the centre of the city? we hadn't known until the police put out this statement saying they now believe the first contact for sergei skripal and his daughter on the substance was he that he has behind me and that specifically on their front door. they are not seeing what kind of substance and was, whether it was a gel, powder, liquid rubber substance understand it could've
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been on the front door handle and that's not been confirmed and they're certainly not saying it who might have put this substance on the door. and is there any change in the condition of sergei skripal and his daughter? that is not, officially end —— officially there remain any critical stable condition in hospital. we know that sergeant bailey was in a serious condition and has now been released and is obviously recuperating. the other person we believe to be the police officer is being treated as an outpatient so that person, we don't know the male or female, but obviously much healthier. in terms of other people being affected it is just those for, as you said the police are seeing for these people living around this area the risk is low. there are other bits of information for example that they now have 1300 pieces of evidence that they have come across, they
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have spoken to 500 people or so in this investigation. 5000 hours cctv footage, no uptake as yet on the health, the change in health of certainty and uley, we do know that the shift in the emphasis of the investigation has gone from the centre to healing the house. a man has appeared in court charged in connection with the hatton garden robbery three years ago. 57 year old michael seed is alleged to be the last member of the gang that raided safe deposit boxes in london's hatton garden over the easter bank holiday weekend three years ago. around £14million worth of valuables were stolen in the heist six people have already been convicted of burglary and conspiracy. an 18—year old has been arrested after a number of schools and colleges across the uk received threatening emails. the national crime agency said the incident was linked to a hoax bomb threat that closed hundreds of schools last week. the teenager was arrested in abbots langley, hertfordshire, on suspicion of making malicious communications. it is almost half past 12/ head into
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the easter weekend let's take a look at what the weather has distorted them. good afternoon, signed for the easter weekend not looking too bad, we had some sunshine in many places but there are some showers around as well and i think it is that makes to the story that we will take with us through the next few days. let's ta ke through the next few days. let's take a look at the detail further lessen this afternoon, so good though sunshine with showers, to articulate in north—east scotland and any burst of family showers drifting across southern and central areas to go on through the afternoon into the evening. during the night we ta ke into the evening. during the night we take the showery rain further north in the winter is —— winter and is on the high ground. it will get chilly, but not quite as cold as last night but there could be a touch of frost in places. into tomorrow, good friday, still wintry showers in the north. this band of
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rain with hilssner drifting across northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland. another band of rain moves into the south but the rain is all in different bands, in between the ruby slices of sunshine. quite a cool feel at 6—9d and generally for the easter weekend in a word, mixed, cool with some rain at times, snow over the hills but in between all of that some sunshine, too. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines: it's exactly a year until britain leaves the eu and prime minister theresa may is visiting scotland, england, northern ireland and wales in a single day with a pledge to keep the country united. brexit provides us with opportunities. i wanted to see us coming together, the four nations across the united kingdom. we had a very strong union, that is in our interests and our interest is come together and seize these
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opportunities for the future. the row over anti—semitism in the labour party deepens as a senior figure resigns. it's emerged she called for the reinstatement of a council candidate accused of holocaust denial. police are focusing inquiries on the home of former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter — and say the strongest traces of nerve agent were found on theirfront door. the former parole board chairman who resigned over its decision to release john worboys says the ministry ofjustice must also acknowledge its role in the matter. nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai has returned to pakistan for the first time since being shot by taliban militants. the surprise trip is taking place under tight security. with one year to go until the uk leaves the european union, theresa may is visiting england, scotland, northern ireland and wales. the prime minister will tell voters that whether they voted leave or remain, the important thing is making brexit a success for everyone.
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so with one year to go, what more needs to be done? here's our assistant political editor norman smith. so, here's the brexit board. the snakes and ladders of the next 12 months on the road to brexit day. well, here's one early snake. in april, mrs may faces a possible commons revolt over her plans to leave the customs union. if tory mps side with the opposition to defeat the prime minister that could throw her brexit plans into disarray. assuming theresa may avoids that, there's another snake looming in may with the local elections. tory mps are bracing themselves for dismal results, particularly in london. so, could heavy losses reignite the doubts about mrs may, and even provoke a possible leadership challenge? however, maybe the world cup will be a helpful pick—me—up and
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distraction if england make it through to the final. could success on the pitch provide mrs may with a brexit bounce? well, don't hold your breath, given our recent woeful record. in august, we should find out of the government's charm offensive to woo eu countries over the heads of the european commission has been a success. so, will german car makers and french wine growers put the squeeze on the eu leaders to compromise and reach an agreement with mrs may? now we come to a critical moment. in october, eu leaders are to decide whether to agree a trade deal with mrs may. this will determine what access we have to european markets, what will happen at the border with northern ireland, and who will control ourfishing waters. it will be a big step forward towards brexit. but, look, one month later,
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mrs may is likely to face this, the proverbial anaconda of brexit snakes. in november, mps are likely to get to vote on whether to approve or reject any trade deal. if mrs may were to lose, it could plunge the whole brexit process into chaos. some mps say it could force the prime minister to go back to the negotiating table to try again. and if mrs may survives that, then the european parliament will also get a vote on the final brexit deal. they could veto it and demand changes to it before they will give it the go—ahead. come next year, and mrs may should know whether any businesses and banks are going to quit the uk because of brexit. there have been plenty of warnings, but as we head towards the last few weeks, if there hasn't been a significant exodus, that would be a big bonus for the government's brexit plans.
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and if mrs may survives all that, then at 11pm on march 29th 2019, britain will leave the eu. brexit will become reality, bringing to an end our 46—year membership of the european club. but before then, there is an awful lot of snakes and ladders on the way to brexit day. what's the feeling about brexit elsewhere in europe? 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in the belgian city of antwerp. life on this side of the water is, i think it's fair to say, about anxiety, caution, thickly in the
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courts. antwerp is the second biggest port in europe behind rotterdam. there are billions of pounds of trade going back and forth here, steel, clothing, cars, things you orderfrom the here, steel, clothing, cars, things you order from the supermarkets, they run outs, within a day, it'll arrive from here or zeebrugge. what will happen after, suddenly, these poets, when the customs union is no longer there, what replaces it? the talk is of tariff—free trade, and the idea is there will be trusted them in place so you know what's coming from the ports. rotterdam and dunkirk are going through the same issues. let's bring in a member of the european seaport organisation. first of all, what is the for the sports? for the north european ports, it is important to trade with the uk. portsider gates to trade,
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they move goods and the economy, which means they really rely on frictionless, no borders, easy trust to each other in the internal market and the customs union has made it possible. they fear that you go towards a more market—fragmented approach, and that the whole business model of trade between the uk and eu could be changing and could be made more difficult. we see containers coming from the uk side. let me ask you about the impact on the dutch and belgian is, they could be the two worst countries of other than ireland in times of the economy, particularly... boris johnson talks about the best trade deal there has been, is there room for optimism? can this be sorted
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out? i think, with a good deal, a lot ca n out? i think, with a good deal, a lot can be solved. with pragmatism from both sides, a lot can be solved. but it will remain a brexit. you will still be out customs union, if you are out of the internal market, this means extra checks and controls. for instance, the dutch have commissioned a study, and they have commissioned a study, and they have measured that going out of the customs union, that would mean 40% new relations for customs people. you will need a lot more capacity. is anything you see that could be positive for this side of the water in brexit? no, there are no winners. it's very important to limit the negative effects. if there may be positive news, it will be that it
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has made a lot of eu businesses what it means to be without a customs union and outside the internal market. thank you. it is fair to say the point being made there is you don't know what you've got until it's ghana. another point that strikes me, i was in italy and spain over the past security days, many mps there saying they don't believe brexit will happen. that is not the case in rosenior, most businesses and politicians saying get on with now. “— and politicians saying get on with now. —— not the case in northern europe. three australian cricketers who admitted cheating during a test series in south africa have returned home. captain steve smith broke down in tears as he took responsibility for the scandal which has rocked australian cricket. while cameron bancroft — the player who used sandpaper to tamper with the ball — said he wished he could turn back the clock. a warning that there is flash photography in the apology given by smith. to all of my team—mates, to fans
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of cricket all over they world, and to all australians who are disappointed and angry — i'm sorry. what happened in cape town has already been laid out by cricket australia. tonight, i want to make clear that, as captain of the australian cricket team, i take full responsibility. i made a serious error ofjudgment and i now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership. of my leadership. i'll do everything i can to make up for my mistake and the damage it's caused. if any good can come from this, if it can be a lesson to others, then i hope i can be
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a force for change. it's all right, it's all right. i know i'll regret this for the rest of my life. i'm absolutely gutted. i hope, in time, i can earn back respect and forgiveness. i've been so privileged and honoured to represent my country and captain the australian cricket team. cricket is the greatest game in the world. it's been my life and i hope it can be again. i'm sorry and i'm absolutely devastated. any time you think about making a
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questionable decision, think about you're affecting. you affecting your pa rents. you're affecting. you affecting your parents. and to see how my old man's been... thank you, everybody. and my mum, it hurts. i can't remember what else. but it's, yeah... ijust want to say i'm sorry for the pain that i've brought to australia and the fa ns i've brought to australia and the fans and the public. it's devastating and i'm truly sorry. at that news conference was our sydney correspondent, hywel griffith. clearly exhausted and emotional, steve smith needed the comforting hand of his hand of his father on his shoulder at times to keep himself composed and fight back the tears. it's very clear he's now started
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to take in the enormity of what happened in cape town and the impact, not just here in australia, but the whole cricketing world. he did give this press conference to give his apology to the nation, to the cricketing world, and, i guess, to try and start the process of rehabilitation and salvation. he said he hoped, out of all of this, he could eventually become a force for good. but as he landed, he was being given some more bad news — some big—brand sponsors here in australia have distanced themselves from him, saying they don't allign with the brand values, so he'll no longer be the face of breakfast cereal or one of the big banks here in australia. likewise, over in perth, one of the other three, cameron bancroft, also gave an emotionally charged press conference, admitting that he lied about what they were up to on the field. he said that he would regret that moment for the rest of his life. but of the three who have been found guilty of ball tampering, one, so far, is saying he won't go in front of the cameras.
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david warner will arrive here in sydney, but we've already been told he will not take questions, he won't give a press conference. and many people here in australia venting their anger towards him. they think he was the ringleader and he quite possibly will be the one who finds it hardest to win back the public emotional support here in australia. the information commissioner has welcomed facebook‘s announcement that it will be shutting down its partner category service, using third party data to inform targeted advertising. elizabeth denham says she raised it with the tech giant as an area of concern. let's talk to our technology reporter chris fox. what exactly is this new development? our service is a third source of data. when people target advertising and you on facebook, they had three sources. the first is
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facebook‘s data, 80 you have put on facebook, name, date of birth, all your wall posts. the second category is advertiser's own data. and advertiser can say, i have all these e—mail addresses, and i want to target them not via e—mail, but i wa nt to target them not via e—mail, but i want to find those same people on facebook and advertised in the mayor. the third source is these partners that facebook wouldn't otherwise have. such as your credit ca rd otherwise have. such as your credit card spending history or your experience history. if i wanted to advertise to you and i want to advertise to you and i want to advertise to you and i want to advertise to a women, but only women with good credit history, i would need that third—party data. in return, the third party gets a slice of the revenue. that will be wound down over the next six months. facebook has announced a raft of changes to its privacy settings. what does that mean? if your worried
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about privacy on facebook, the advice is not to use it. on facebook, you other products, you are being used to target advertising. the changes made yesterday were to simplify the privacy settings. before, you had to go through up to 20 different screens defined all the different privacy settings. location privacy in one area, post—privacy and another area, all on 20 screens. lendl be in one long screen, so easier to go through and find all the settings. does not rolled out worldwide yet, however. 0n the settings. does not rolled out worldwide yet, however. on facebook, you can already download a huge data dump on everything facebook calls about you. it is a massive file, ta kes about you. it is a massive file, takes ages to hear together, has every m essa g e takes ages to hear together, has every message and voice that you have sent, all in a big data dump. inafew have sent, all in a big data dump. in a few days' time, it'll let you download specific parts of that data, so just the download specific parts of that data, sojust the messages, you might need to download the whole file, so that gives you a bit more
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control over what data is held about you on facebook. thank you very much. theresa may is now on her way to northern ireland, it is exactly one year to the day before the uk leads the eu. but before leaving newcastle she sat down and spoke to the bbc‘s political editor, laura kuenssberg. it's a year to go before brexit and we leave the european union, i'm single four nations today because they deal with 12 strike with the european union is one that will be good for all parts of the united kingdom. imike good for all parts of the united kingdom. i mike ross are listening to people. i met mothers and young toddlers today. i'm visited a business already. i will be seeing farmers and others. and hearing what they want from brexit. if you think about the children i have met today, it is about their future. we want to
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get a deal that is right for the whole of the uk. it is a bright future, we want to grasp the opportunities brexit provides and to strengthen the bonds of this, the most successful union in the world. webbing hearing from voters on the bbc, and group in coventry told us it up there been made big promises an brexit on the nhs and immigration, but we can feel restriction that nothing has changed yet and it may be another few years before they see any real difference. what do you say to them? we spent 40 years as a member of the european union, over those years, years as a member of the european union, overthose years, there is years as a member of the european union, over those years, there is a lot of complex interactions developed. as we leave, the key thing is to make sure we do that smoothly, and a way that gives people confidence for the future and that we maintain the good trade links with the eu, because that is aboutjobs here links with the eu, because that is about jobs here and links with the eu, because that is aboutjobs here and children's futures here. what we can also do as we leave is to grasp the
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opportunities around the rest of the world as well. we will be introducing our own, we will be taking back control of our borders and immigration rules. we won't be spending vast sums of money every year to the spending vast sums of money every yearto the eu, that spending vast sums of money every year to the eu, that or unable us to spend on priorities like the nhs and skills. but i'd already announced this week, i'm crowd we have been putting extra money into the nhs and also announcing that we will rather than annually topping up the nhs, we will look at it long—term plan, because that's about confidence for the future too. the prime minister speaking to the bbc‘s political editor, laura kuenssberg. you can watch the full interview with theresa may at half past one here on the bbc news channel. so, how are voters feeling about brexit with one year to go? the victoria derbyshire programme brought together a group of voters — half of whom voted to leave the eu, and half voted to remain. they've been telling tina daheley how they view things at the moment.
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i voted to remain a. i felt that leaving created a great deal of uncertainty and the potential benefits outweighed the risks. i am have to say i'm encouraged by the progress the government have made so far. we have a lot of eu national is in middle management roles in the uk and the new civil be able to stay is good news. our big concern is seasonal workers. it's around migration and sure people have views on that. the government has promised it will reduce net migration to handfuls, we have seasonal workers, people coming here in march, living in september, going back to their country. we had a seasonal worker scheme that was cancelled well bulgaria and romania joined the eu, and we have had a net influx causing concern, because once and seasonal jobs, they moved the wider economy.
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so we need a seasonal scheme and we need clarity, because farmers are not investing for three and four yea rs' not investing for three and four years' time, because they don't know when they will have people. will have no staff and no horticultural industry. it is that start. have no staff and no horticultural industry. it is that startlj have no staff and no horticultural industry. it is that start. i voted to leave, i'm project manager. is interesting in of the culture of the world, because i feel the european union limits would have sat. a vote to leave was to be a more global britain. in terms of new zealand, canada, australia and india, the european system prevents, holds us bag is a country. it is saying that we are focusing on the european union and european migration. brexit is an opportunity to beat global britain, where we can encouraging, help and improve our systems and these systems for people and the european union. i think a lot of
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people on the remain side say that britain was —— brexit was about anti—immigration fuming. however this may... the point was about the uk and parliament as a country taking control over that policy. advise we'll bring you in next, you are an immigrant and students who voted to leave ? are an immigrant and students who voted to leave? my main reason for writing to me was to do with parliamentary solitary. 0n the point of immigration, i'm completely against this rhetoric that the vote to leave was anti—immigration and makes us are less tolerant and less excepting society. i think every single country in the world should have 100 present control of every single person they let into their country. at the end of the day, the uk is an island, we have limited resources and space, uk is an island, we have limited resources and space, limited everything. we can't keep accepting anyone for the sake of it. ‘s not saying that we do, however countries
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like new zealand who have a strict immigration policy, we wouldn't then say they are in tolerant society. wouldn't say there are xenophobic because they have strict controls of who they bring in. i am a surgical trainee in central london. as a doctor, i'm concerned about the negative impact the brexit will have on the nhs. we all know it is overstretched. we haven't got enough staff or money coming in. the problem with brexit, we're at risk of losing not only our brightest doctor but the allied medical professionals. radiographers, the porters and clerical staff, who form the backbone of the nhs. increasing training numbers don't mean there will be able to create a home—grown medical workforce. will be able to create a home—grown medicalworkforce. bursaries will be able to create a home—grown medical workforce. bursaries are disappearing. with the ongoing
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contract debate for junior doctors, the idea coming into the profession isjust not attractive the idea coming into the profession is just not attractive to the idea coming into the profession isjust not attractive to high school is any more. having our eu colleagues in the workforce is not just about service provision, we all learn from each other which improves the quality of health care that we deliver. finally, what i'm particularly concerned about is the impact brexit will have on research and innovation. we are very dependent on eu grants and collaboration, and we need the sharing of ideas. we need the movements of the greatest minds within europe so that we continue to advance of boundaries of medical knowledge. also so we continue to enhance the global influence the uk is having in this field. much more to come throughout the day. in a moment, the news at one with jane hill. first the weather with ben. good afternoon. if your thoughts have already turned to the weather for your easter getaway, the signs
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in many places at the moment are pretty good. sunshine at that, this picture from suffolk. we have had hefty showers as well, particularly down towards the south. through tonight, this band of showery rain and thunder will continue to drift further north. showers across northern and eastern scotland, wintry over high ground. is as cold as last night, but fairly chilly, cold enough for a touch of frost and places. into the easter weekend, a mixed affair. generally cool, and spells of sunshine. good friday, this band of rain moving north, weakening with when theunis over high ground. then a fresh batch of downpours in the south. through the u nsettled downpours in the south. through the unsettled weather, some spells of
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sunshine. temperatures struggling, a little below where we should be this time of year. saturday, some weather will continue to drift northwards, some uk, perhaps some sleet up over high ground. areas of sunshine in scotland, and single digit temperatures. easter sunday, the most reliably dry day of the weekend. ground—breaking up from time to time to give spells of sunshine. fabrics of santa the far south west later in the day. that is a sign of things to come. easter monday, this area of low pressure driving a system in from the south. 0utbreaks driving a system in from the south. outbreaks of rain, but and ethical obligation because that system it will move into fairly cold air. so there is the potential of some snow. don't take it too literally, the uk
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most likely over high ground, but could fold lower levels in places as well. the further north you are, the better chance of staying dry, the further south, the better chance of just seeing rain. there is the chance of some disruption. theresa may is on a whistlestop tour of the uk exactly a year before britain leaves the eu and she's promised a deal that works for everyone. she says brexit will mean more money for the nhs and education — and vows to keep the uk united. i think there's a bright future out there.
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and yes, i think brexit is going to deliver a country that will be different, but i think there are real opportunities for us as an independent nation for the future. we will have the latest from our correspondents around the country. also this lunchtime... police investigating the salisbury poisoning say the highest concentration of nerve agent was found on the front door of sergai skripal‘s home. the labour party embroiled in another row about anti—semitism, as the head of its disputes panel steps down. and australia's sacked cricket captain breaks down in tears
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