Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  March 29, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

5:00 pm
today at 5pm, with a year to brexit, theresa may promises there'll be more money for the nhs and schools. the prime minister visits all nations of the uk, and insists that britain has good prospects outside the eu. i think there's a bright future out there, and yes, i think brexit is going to deliver a country that will be different, but i think there are real opportunities for us as an independent nature in future. we'll be getting reaction around the uk, about the state of the brexit process, and we'll be talking to british firms about their hopes and concerns. we'll also be speaking to the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, and the former ukip leader, nigel farage. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm... the hospital treating the former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, says she is improving rapidly, and is no longer in a critical condition. britain's biggest engineering group, gkn, is taken over by melrose, trade unions say it's bad news for the workers. australia's cricket coach resigns over the cheating scandal, and the sacked captain,
5:01 pm
steve smith, adds his voice. if any good can come of this, if there can be a lesson to others, then i hope i can be a force for change. and the nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai returns to pakistan, six years after she was shot by taliban militants. it's 5pm. our main story is the prime minister's promise that brexit will mean extra money for the nhs and schools. theresa may is visiting england, scotland, wales and northern ireland, with exactly one year to go, before the uk leaves the eurpoean union, and enters a transition period. mrs may said she believed britain had a bright future outside the eu and that she was confident
5:02 pm
of securing a deal that was good for all parts of the uk. during the day, the former labour prime minister tony blair said brexit could still be stopped, saying it was ‘not too late‘, and that the ‘sensible‘ option was to ‘take a final decision‘, once the terms of the final deal had been set out. our political correspondent chris mason has the latest. on days like today, heavy with symbolism, politicians like to indulge in their own grand gestures, so indulge in their own grand gestures, so the prime minister's been hurtling around the country, championing one union, the uk, the year before we leave another, the eu. at breakfast time, a weaver‘s in air in scotland, by mid—morning a toddler group in newcastle, then a farm in banga at northern ireland at lunchtime and meeting business leaders in barry in south wales this afternoon, and squeezed in among all of this, an appointment with our
5:03 pm
political editor, laura kuenssberg. of course, when we leave the european union we are no longer going to be spending vast sums of money coming year incoming year out, sending that money to the european union, so there will be money here in the uk gas to spend on our priorities, like the nhs and schools. 50 priorities, like the nhs and schools. so do you believe there will be a brexit dividend, would you call it that? there will be money otherwise we would have sent to the european union that we can spend on the uk. would you allow a tax rise for the nhs? we are going to look at a settlement, as we do that we continue to take a balanced approach to our economy. that is what has enabled us to put money already into the nhs. we are already committed to spending extra sums of money on the nhs. so no tax rise potentially? as pa rt nhs. so no tax rise potentially? as part of our normal processes, we will look at the funding, but we have to look at the long—term plan. do you think brexit will be worth
5:04 pm
it? there are real opportunities for the united kingdom, there is a bright future out there and yes i think brexit will deliver, a country that will be different, but i think there are real opportunities for us as an independent nation for the future. politics has been, is and will be dominated by this moment, leave's victory, the years, and labour says the government has no time to waste. what we want is a brexit forjobs, for our economy. what we can't see at the moment, one yearon, what we can't see at the moment, one year on, actually not a year to go, the vote in parliament, by which time we have got to know what this government's doing, will take place ina lot government's doing, will take place in a lot less than a year. and yes, the political debate still rages, from now saying we need another referendum, to those saying the opposite. the big picture is a year from today we will leave the treaty of rome and the subsequent treaties, and we will be an independent country. and i think that perhaps today of all days we need to focus
5:05 pm
oi'i. today of all days we need to focus on. so we are going to leave the european union. i personally can't stand some of the concessions that have been made. there is a demand from the public for that vote on the deal, and that is the liberal democrat view, the democratic route to provide people with another option, which is the option to stay in the european union. delivering brexit is a colossal challenge. absolutely worth it, say some, self—defeating, say others. what few dispute is that it amounts to a wholesale rewiring of our politics, and so potentially our country as well, and it is a job that is only just beginning. chris mason, bbc news at one spinster. —— at westminster. the former ukip leader and mep nigel farage is with me. you were saying you don't like some of the concessions, spell out for the viewers what you don't like about this process? £40 billion in is way too much, the second thing is
5:06 pm
continued jurisdiction of the european court of justice. continued jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. the whole point brexit is run our own country through our own courts, snobbery happy about that, and the concession oi'i happy about that, and the concession on fishing. it is ludicrous that we should take back what is rightfully oui’s. should take back what is rightfully ours. they doesn't stop foreign boats continually fishing in our waters but at the moment we are giving away 60% of the fishing waters to the foreign fleets. i also don't like the fact it took nine months to trigger article 50, two years for article 50, which was supposed to be the transition and i'iow supposed to be the transition and now another 21 months on top of that. many things i could complain about but here is the important thing. one year from today, 11pm on 29th of march 2019, we will leave the european treaties after a period of 46 years, and we will be an independent, free, soft governing nation, and that is a big day in this nation's history. you acknowledge those concessions, and you —— as you have described them, are an essential price to pay to get
5:07 pm
to 20th of march 2019 in that state. i think what she is doing is making those concessions because she has to win that final vote in the house of commons. don't forget there was the big supreme court case with geena miller that said parliament has to have the final say, and i feel she is making the concession so her own rebels and the labour party say you know what, we can't stand the way of this. you are saying she had no choice? that is her view, i think if she had been bolder and taken the country with her, if you take the country with her, if you take the country with her, if you take the country with you, parliament follows as well. but one thing for certain, i felt for the first time today, i listen to people talking about wanting a second referendum, they are beginning to look a bit ridiculous today because the polling is quite clear, 65 to 70% of people said to the government just get is quite clear, 65 to 70% of people said to the governmentjust get on with it, we don't want another vote. with a set of conditions you have outlined, doesn't mean the uk is a vassal state, as some conservatives have said? i think that jacob
5:08 pm
rees—mogg is right about this, we are a rule taken without any say whatsoever, it is not a good deal, but once we are out we will wake up oi'i but once we are out we will wake up on march 30 next year and say we are a free country again, we can do whatever we like, so we could even change the terms of that deal. whatever we like, so we could even change the terms of that dealm what sense? in the sense that once you have a sovereign parliament it can do what it wants. for the last 45 years we have had a parliament constrained by european law and european courts. i think politics proper begins again on this country oi'i proper begins again on this country on march 30 next year. but a deal involves two parties, possibly more. there are plenty of deals in life that get broken, that isjust the way life is. as long as we leave, history has been made, we can get back to arguing amongst ourselves, making our own decisions. i don't like transition and i feel after we have left there will be political challenges to some of those concessions. southee eu should not ta ke concessions. southee eu should not take us at its word when we talk about these concessions —— so the
5:09 pm
eu. once we have left the european union she has done herjob. we had tony blair today, i know you are not his biggest fan, saying as a former prime minister, it looks sense to see what this final deal is, it may be very different to that which was foreseen a year ago, 18 months ago, even you are saying that, the nature of the deal is not what you wanted, does it not make more sense to give parliament a meaningful vote on that final deal? parliament will get a meaningful vote on that final deal and if it rejects it, we are then headed to either a general election ora headed to either a general election or a referendum and that is what tony blair is doing. he is speaking not tojust the tony blair is doing. he is speaking not to just the labour party but to the ken clarkes and anna soubrys sitting on the backbenches, but there are 4.5 million people who voted brexit and then voted ford jeremy corbyn at the last general election. he knows they are pretty firm brexiteers, those midlands, south wales and northern seats, and
5:10 pm
if corbyn was to do anything that was seen to extend article 50 or push for a second referendum, corbyn knows it would cost in the next election, so i understand what tony blair is trying to do, ijust kind of thing the ship has sailed. i think the prospects now of the prime minister being defeated and the second referendum looked very limited indeed. if the final deal is very difficult to get into place, is there a prospect that transition, this article 50 period, the transition itself, could be rather longer than people had predicted? that is the problem, it is one of the reasons i did not want a transition deal, we didn't vote for it, weeks —— we accepted article 50 under two years, then it goes 21 months, and then the next general election perhaps and goodness knows how long. what most people who voted leave certainly want is the government to grasp the nettle, get oi'i government to grasp the nettle, get on with it. yes, sure, there will be one or two choppy waters, one or two changes, but let's get on with it and do it. thank you for coming in.
5:11 pm
the time is ten past five. let's talk to the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, who's at holyrood. first minister, thank you for joining us, good to have you with us. joining us, good to have you with us. what was the sense there in scotla nd us. what was the sense there in scotland for you at least as a government of mrs may's message today? i think for most people, they listened to the prime minister today, a year before the uk is chewed to leave the eu and they wonder why we still then have any a nswe i’s wonder why we still then have any a nswers to wonder why we still then have any answers to the very real and basic questions that people have been asking ever since referendum day, and certainly ever since the triggering of article 50. there is no greater clarity today, a year to 90, no greater clarity today, a year to go, about what the future relationship will be van der voort is back then. and i think that is deeply, deeply concerning. ijust had the, some may say misfortune, of hearing nigel farage in mike in. listening to him saying it doesn't really matter, as long as we leave —— hearing nigel farage in my air. ifiasa —— hearing nigel farage in my air. if i as a scottish national was to say that about independence, people
5:12 pm
would rightly criticise me. it does matter what happens to the jobs and the living standards and other circumstances across the country and with a year to go we still don't know the answers to any of these questions, and the clock is ticking ever more loudly. one of the crucial areas for you and for wales is to do with the repatriations of powers after brexit. are we any clearer now about the kind of powers that will come to you and to cardiff and indeed to belfast after brexit happens? remember, the powers we are talking about are not new powers, they are things like the environment and justice, agriculture and fishing, that are already within the devolved competence of the scottish and welsh parliaments. so the debate just now is not what these powers are committees who them is the debate. at the moment, the uk government wants to centralise these powers at westminster, and effectively decide how they are used. in other words, to reduce the current competence of the scottish
5:13 pm
and welsh parliaments without our consent. i know this sounds very a bstra ct consent. i know this sounds very abstract but it turns the principle of devolution on its head because right now our powers can't be restricted without our consent, so why should we have that happen in the future? and the fact that you have an snp first minister of scotland, a welsh first minister, labour first minister and cross— party labour first minister and cross—party consensus labour first minister and cross—pa rty consensus on labour first minister and cross—party consensus on the scottish parliament on this says that the uk government are in the wrong position, and if they don't move position, we have been very clear, i will not recommend to the scottish parliament that it gives approval to the withdrawal bill. and what with that mean? we would be in uncharted territory. we have a convention, in the interest of frankness and will stress it is a convention, that says the uk parliament can't legislate in devolved areas without the consent of the scottish parliament, and if the scottish parliament were told that consent, then we are in uncharted territory, it has never happened before. i hope we don't get there but i have been very clear that we can't allow the powers of
5:14 pm
the scottish parliament or the welsh assembly just to be the scottish parliament or the welsh assemblyjust to be unilaterally changed without our consent, that would turn devolution on its head. and while it does sound quite a technical argument for people, this is about powers over the environment, agriculture, fishing, justice, perhaps future trade deals, our health service could be put up for grabs. these things really matter and this is why it is such an port and issue farce. we had blair among some people who said they make some sense to look at the final deal and for people at westminster certainly do have a say. what are your thoughts on the mechanism that might be in place that happen? first and foremost, the house of commons has to be in the position of scrutinising the final deal and seeing what the tale it gives, and whether that is sufficient and whether that is sufficient and whether the content of that is good or bad for the future of all parts of the uk and for our economy in particular. i am of the uk and for our economy in particular. iam pretty of the uk and for our economy in particular. i am pretty sure,
5:15 pm
of the uk and for our economy in particular. iam pretty sure, i didn't hear him today, i am pretty sure he was talking about the prospect of a referendum on the final deal. that is certainly not something we have been actively pushing. i don't think it can be ruled out or necessarily should, because right now i think the whole of the uk is still facing this prospect next march, a year today, of taking a step off the edge of a cliff, without knowing what's on the other side, what is beneath us. it is going to be very difficult i think for people to reconcile themselves to that. i think you know i would rather we were staying in the eu, i would rather scotland chose a different future in times to come, but i have been arguing that if the uk is leading the eu it should at least a in the single market and the customs union to give us market and the customs union to give us that agree of continuity and certainty. between now and the autumn, i still hope that is what argument that can gather support across the house of commons and the country. i think it probably does have support across the country. the
5:16 pm
question is whether the labour opposition in the house of commons can get it back together and unite behind that common—sense position. you use the word unite, the prime minister today talking about the unity of the united kingdom and the fa ct unity of the united kingdom and the fact that she lays great store on that. i'm just wondering for the 12 months ahead, is there a danger in your view that this brexit process could cause immeasurable damage to the devolved settlement, or are you confident that could be secured? the devolved settlement can be protected, you know my views on the future constitutional settlement what i would prefer to see for scotland. if there is a will, the devolved settlement can be protected. i think there is a big question over whether there is the will on the part of the uk government to do that. she made a very, very quick visit to scotland today, eight country that voted by more than 60% to remain in the eu, and she didn't answer any questions about the future relationships with the eu, she is the prime minister
5:17 pm
thatis the eu, she is the prime minister that is about to take scotland out of the european union against its votes in that referendum. whether the united kingdom stage united or whether scotland opts for independence in the future frankly is not up to theresa may, nor even is not up to theresa may, nor even is it up to me, it is up to the people of scotland. i think —— whether they stay united. there are many people that despair like i do ina way many people that despair like i do in a way theresa may is leading the uk at the moment. thank you for joining us. the time is 5:17pm. we have been gauging opinion around the country about what lies ahead. danny savage has been travelling through lincolnshire, east yorkshire, county durham and greater manchester to hear what people think about brexit now. our first port of call on our northern brexit road trip was immingham, a gateway to europe for trade. at the moment, around 60%
5:18 pm
of our trade on the humber is with the european union. 40% is with the rest of the world. they don't envisage post—brexit chaos here, or at other ports, but last week's agreement on a transition period is very welcome. it does take time to increase the capacity of these systems to make sure trade with the eu can continue to flow smoothly and efficiently, and that of course is why the transition period is so important and so welcome. so a transition period is really important to your business, at least, going forward as brexit happens? absolutely right. from lincolnshire, it was on to guy poskitt‘s farm in east yorkshire. he has lots of foreign workers. no fan of brexit, he accepts it will happen, but is frustrated by a long transition. ultimately, i want to grow my business, and the transition period is stifling it because we don't know if we can grow, if we'll have the staff to run the business. how can we expand or borrow money from the bank or grow the business
5:19 pm
if we haven't got the staff? while we're in this transition, we're in a delay, so it's putting a cap on the growth of the business. from east yorkshire, we headed north to county durham. we supply the usa now, quite a big market to us. and we supply france as well. ebac has just started making washing machines for the uk market and beyond. business is doing well, and brexit isn't going to change the outlook here. the way they sell products abroad or anywhere is to make good products that people want to buy. it's that simple. tariffs, currency changes are inconvenient, not a deal—breaker. it's down to business people doing a good job. i focus on running this business well. that's being a good british citizen and a good european. run the business as well as we can. after hearing from big businesses, we went south, then west. our destination was bury market in greater manchester, a busy mix of people on a friday lunchtime. we found graham kendall having lunch and looking forward to brexit. it's the change that
5:20 pm
people are frightened of. people should embrace change, really. change isn't necessarily bad. there's a lot of emerging markets coming out in the world, and we need to take advantage of those. karen simpson sells furniture from italy, and isn't so sure. we were remainers. i think we just resigned ourselves to the fact that it's out of our control now, and you've just got to go with the flow. so... not a big fan, but it's just one of them things. you've got to take it on the chin. and the owner of this greek deli is no fan of brexit either, with a weaker pound meaning higher prices. i've got quite an older population that shop in bury market. because of the uncertainty, and they don't know what's going to happen, trade has gone down. people aren't spending what they used to. or it's because the prices have gone up and they can't afford it. as ever, views are divided about what brexit will mean. but what is clear is that it's touching every walk of life and nobody is certain about the future. danny savage, bbc news.
5:21 pm
we'll talk more about the brexit process just after 5.30pm, and you can read analysis online at bbc.co.uk/news. the hospital treating the former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, says she is improving rapidly, and is no longer in a critical condition. but salisbury nhs trust says mr skripal remains in a critical but stable condition in hospital. police say the two were probably poisoned at home, after high levels of a nerve agent were found on the front door handle of mr skripal‘s house. in the past hour — a cordon has been placed around a children's playground in salisbury — as a precaution. our correspondent duncan kennedy reports. for nearly a month the news about
5:22 pm
sergei skripal and his daughter yulia have been mostly bleak, but today, for yulia at least, a corner appears to have been turned. in a statement, salisbury district hospital said, we are pleased to be a will to inform you that yulia skripal is improving rapidly. what today's update hasn't provided us what today's update hasn't provided us with is any news on whether there has been any long—term damage to the yulia for sergei skripal. that may become clear over the next few weeks and months as their hospital stay continues. earlier, police revealed that the nerve agent attack took
5:23 pm
place at sergei skripal‘s house about a mile from the centre of this cathedral city. the property now surrounded by a metalfence has been identified as the main location of the nerve agent. detectives say the biggest concentrations of the poison found so far were on the front door of mr skripal‘s house. three weeks ago, police officers were filmed standing close to the front door without any form of protective clothing. for a number of days, we watched the officers by the property. police say the risk is now low and people living here seem satisfied with that assurance. low and people living here seem satisfied with that assurancem doesn't make any difference to me, quite honestly, so ijust get on with my normal life. people aren't worried? no, i don't think anyone around here is any more worried than anyone else. what is still unclear is that if the skripals were contaminated at their home, why do ta ke contaminated at their home, why do take three hours for them to be affected by the poison after they
5:24 pm
had been for a meal and a drink in salisbury? chemical weapons expert thinks the design may lie in the design of the poison. it seems to have ta ken a design of the poison. it seems to have taken a couple of hours to take effect so i think this is part of the design of this novel chop as an assassination weapon has allowed the assailants, the foreign agents, to get away. they could have been well outside salisbury, in fact well outside salisbury, in fact well outside the country in a couple of hours from having done this. the centre of salisbury, where smaller traces of the nerve agent were found, has now been handed from counterterrorism police backed a welsh police. and a programme of decontamination —— back to wiltshire police. a programme of decontamination will take place next week. now the focus is on the suburbs where police work could take many months. duncan kennedy, bbc news in salisbury. the australian cricket coach, darren lehmann, has become the latest to leave over the cheating scandal in south africa.
5:25 pm
three players, the captain steve smith, his deputy david warner and cameron bancroft, have been given lengthy bans for ball—tampering. smith, who's been sacked as captain, broke down in tears while making a a public apology. he said he took full responsibility for the team's actions, saying he'd regret the incident for the rest of his life. this report from hywel griffith contains some flash photography. back on australian soil, after a huge fall from grace, steve smith landed in sydney to face the cameras and a nation he knows he's let down. with his father at his side, he struggled to find the words. i made a serious error ofjudgment and i now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership, of my leadership. i will do everything i can to make up for my mistake and the damage it's caused. if any good can come of this,
5:26 pm
if it can be a lesson to others, then i hope i can be a force for change. smith may not have been the instigator of the sandpaper plot to change the flight of the ball in the test match in cape town, but as captain, he knew, and tried to cover it up. he knows as a leader he failed completely. remorseful, at times in tears, one of the best batsmen in the world has clearly come to terms with the enormity of his actions. but it gets worse. he's returned here to australia to find big sponsorship deals, everything from breakfast cereals to banks, have ended. and he is not the only one counting the cost. a sponsor of the ashes test series, magellan, has announced it no longer wants to finance cricket australia, ending its three—year deal afterjust seven months. cameron bancroft, the man instructed
5:27 pm
to tamper with the ball, has also flown home to face the cameras, admitting he tried to mislead the match officials when he was caught. yes, i lied. i lied about the sandpaper, and i just panicked, i panicked in that situation, i'm very sorry. but the player said to have come up with the plan has so far avoided the cameras. instead, david warner used social media to say... to see the way my old man has been... and my mum... for australia's captain, there is now a year on the sidelines before he can try to redeem himself in the eyes of the nation. hywel griffith, bbc news, sydney. the fate of one of britain's biggest engineering groups, gkn,
5:28 pm
has been decided in the past hour, after investors backed an £8.1 billion takeover by the business turnaround specialist melrose industries. it's the biggest hostile takeover of a uk company since kraft bought cadbury‘s back in 2010. our business reporter theo leggett is here. first of all, what is at stake here? at sta ke first of all, what is at stake here? at stake is the future of one of the crown jewels of british industry, a company that can trace its roots back to hundred and 50 years, it was involved in building spitfires. nowadays it builds parts for airbus airliners, for the defence industry, it makes parts for half of the cars sold worldwide, so it is a really big prize but it also has a lot of employees. 60,000 around the world and 6000 of them in britain. so it is their future as much as anything is their future as much as anything is under the microscope. in which case, let's talk about melrose industries. what do we know about
5:29 pm
them and what is that signal in terms of what they are likely to do? a much younger company, started in around 2003, and what they do is they go out and find manufacturing companies that they think can be run better, but have potential, restructure them and then sell them off in restructure them and then sell them offina restructure them and then sell them off in a three to five year time frame, or sell off parts of them in that time frame. the problem for gkn concerning suppliers like airbus and also the unions is that this is a business that operate on much bigger timescales. when you are building parts the planes, the investment can last the decades, so they are worried that melrose and its shareholders will be to focus on the short—term and will neglect the long—term health of the company. does the government have a perspective on this, given the strategic importance of gkn? well, greg clark has already written to melrose and obtained what are described as concessions, where melrose remains a uk company for the moment, to not sell off the
5:30 pm
aerospace business for another five yea rs aerospace business for another five years and to keep existing levels of rnd. so the risk that. rose says it wa nts to rnd. so the risk that. rose says it wants to create a uk industrial powerhouse will stop whether it will stick to its comment and promise is whether time for a look at the weather. the forecast is mixed for this weekend, rain spreading in to the sunshine through parts of this south and through the evening and denied the showery rain will spread south, and north over the hills there could be some snow. some showers in northern ireland. all the while we keep showers in scotland seeing snow will stop in between some clear spells, relatively chilly, not as cold as last night with a touch of
5:31 pm
frost. good friday will start lig htless frost. good friday will start lightless will stop —— like this. some general showers interview for north—east scotland, rain pushing into the far south, some slices of sunshine for parts of the midland and wales. wherever you are it will be chilly, six or 9 degrees. staying cool to the weekend, rain at times, sunshine to butjust the risk of some snow by easter monday. this is bbc news — the headlines. with a year to brexit, theresa may visits all nations of the uk and promises there'll be more money for the nhs and schools. i think there's a bright future out there, and yes, i think brexit is going to deliver a country that will be different, but i think there are real opportunities for us as an independent nation for the future. the hospital treating the former
5:32 pm
russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia says she is improving rapidly, and is no longer in a critical condition. britain's biggest engineering group, gkn, is taken over by melrose, the unions say it's bad news for the workers. let's cross to the bbc sport centre — and join will. good evening to you, another tearful and emotional day for australian cricket as the three players taken up cricket as the three players taken up in the ball tampering scandal arrived home. they have all apologised for their roles in this saga as the consequences start to ta ke saga as the consequences start to take their toll. i made a serious error ofjudgment take their toll. i made a serious error of judgment now understand take their toll. i made a serious error ofjudgment now understand the consequences. error ofjudgment now understand the consequences. it was a failure of leadership. of my leadership. i will
5:33 pm
do everything i can to make up for my mistake and the damage it has caused. i understand i have left many people down and i understand the disappointment in the broader community. words don't mean much in these circumstances so i will focus on my actions and conduct going forward. it has been a tough and emotional time for us all, the wife, the kids, and you will hear from emotional time for us all, the wife, the kids, and you will hearfrom me ina the kids, and you will hearfrom me in a couple of days stop at my priority is to get these kids to bed right now and we will talk to you in a couple of days. thank you. darren leeman was clear yesterday of any wrong doing. today, he said he will resign and has decided to step down
5:34 pm
after the current test series in south africa. i had no prior knowledge of the incident and do not condone what happened at all. but good people make mistakes. my family and i have got a lot of abuse over the last week and it has taken its toll on us. life on the road means a lot of time away from our loved ones and, after speaking with my family at length over the last few days, it is the right time to step away. james sutherland, the ceo of cricket australia paid his tribute to the outgoing coach. i have seen the love he has for thejob, his incredible worth ethic and one of the things that really strikes me about darren and his character as a coach is the
5:35 pm
way that he genuinely cares for and loves his players and i had huge regard and respect for the way he has gone about his job over the time that he has been coaching the australian men's team. staying with cricket england have the chance to save the series against new zealand with the second test this evening, play starting in christchurch at 11 o'clock tonight, but without too key players, the first time moeen ali has missed out in three years. joe root and his side need to recover from the heavy defeat in auckland. we have underperformed throughout your not doing ourselves justice as a side but this is an opportunity to try and get something from this winter and the lads know the importance of that, we have had a numberof importance of that, we have had a number of discussions, we've listened to how we move things forward as a team and we will be putting that into practice now stop
5:36 pm
in football, there will be no british referee at the world cup this summer. the officials have been chosen, and none come from the british isles. the only long list including a referee from england didn't add a new when he quit his job. more for you later at 630. let's return to our main story, the prime minister's promise that brexit will mean extra money for the nhs and schools. theresa may is visiting england, scotland, wales and northern ireland with exactly one year to go before the uk leaves the european union and enters a transition period. we've been gauging reaction around the uk about what lies ahead. our chief political correspondent vicki young has been in bolton in greater manchester, speaking to remain and leave voters about their hopes for the future. i'm very sorry about that is the
5:37 pm
story about the salisbury poisoning incident, involving the former russian spy and his daughter, we we re russian spy and his daughter, we were told earlier that the daughter is no longer in a critical condition but surrogate is still in —— the father is in a critical condition in hospital still. i want to talk to you about the practice process today, vicky young will be telling us today, vicky young will be telling us about views in bolton in good register in a new minutes. now to our brexit correspondent in westminster. what is your view today on the kind of thing that to raise a has been doing up and down the
5:38 pm
country with one year to go and the kind of high stakes that we are still playing for? what is interesting about today is the government has chosen this as a key symbolic moment on the brexit process when she can make a big statement about keeping the uk together in its own union and going out into the world of forging a bright new future. the reason i say it is symbolic of the fact that today doesn't mean anything in the actual details of the brexit process , actual details of the brexit process, the stuff i follow every day. in fact the european commission running the talks is closed today for the easter holidays. the chief negotiator however has been on the airwaves and stuck to his usual scripts in interviews with french radio saying because of the uk red lines about not leaving the single market and customs union, and jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice the best the european union is about to offer is a free—trade deal. to reza made's vision will have to wait some time
5:39 pm
for that —— theresa may's vision. there are still big outstanding ambitions that haven't quite been met yet, including the irish border, and had you saw that the governance ofa and had you saw that the governance of a brexit treaty? how do you solve disputes between the two sides and is there a role for the european court of justice? two is there a role for the european court ofjustice? two issues are sure you'll agree quite big in points and then the whole package will go in front of the european parliament and be presented to mps here at westminster and they will get a vote on it will stop today tony blair said that is the opportunity for mps opposed to brexit to try and stop that happening. one of the government ministers responsible for art legislation through the house of commons, is andrea leadsom, which is what she had to say about this.
5:40 pm
well, what he said is that if she looks at the legislation passed on brexit so far, but some people have made lots of loud noises about amending it is trying to change it, taking lots of opportunities will be able to do that and actually the government only lost one vote on one small breeze of legislation and in terms of what will happen next, in terms of what will happen next, in terms of what will happen next, in terms of brexit negotiations, the two sides will turn their attention to the shape of the few true relationship, the uk trade steel and the eu political declaration on the principles of the trade deal, and what the next few months is going to be out is how detailed is that document, 20 pages of what one person describes as highfalutin waffle, a former diplomat, or is it to be really detailed about what the future relationship between the uk and eu looks like when it comes to trade and security defence data
5:41 pm
protection, aviation, climate change commit you name it, it will be a busy year for us. understatement of the century there. thank you very much for your thoughts in westminster. we have asked our reality check team to look at how prepared the uk really is for what is coming up, what still needs to be done to kind of go through the priorities for us to spell out really even more clearly what the goals are over the next 12 months in all kinds of sorts sectors so chris morris from the bbc reality check team has prepared this analysis for us. so, just one year to go until the united kingdom is due to part company with the rest of the european union. legal text has been agreed on a financial settlement, the divorce bill. the government says the uk will pay the eu up to £39 billion to cover things like outstanding bills and pensions. there is also broad agreement on the rights after brexit of eu citizens here in the uk and uk citizens elsewhere in europe. and crucially, on the terms of a 21—month transition period after brexit when the uk will continue to abide by all eu
5:42 pm
rules and regulations. the transition will give governments and businesses more time to get ready for a new relationship in the future. but there's still an awful lot to do in the next 12 months. both sides have promised no return to a hard border in ireland. there are intensive talks on how to guarantee that once the uk leaves the single market and the customs union. there is also no full agreement yet on the role of the european court ofjustice after brexit. while elsewhere, spain, for example, is insisting that it must be consulted on the future status of gibraltar. as for a new trade deal between the uk and the eu, talks on that haven't yet begun. the eu says the uk's red lines limit what can be achieved. but the uk still wants the most ambitious free—trade agreement in history. customs is one obvious challenge. the future of fishing, another. the aim is to reach a broad political agreement by october. but detailed trade negotiations
5:43 pm
will have to continue long after the uk has left. so, is brexit on track? well, there are two big warning signs. firstly, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. in other words, failure to reach agreement on one issue could bring the withdrawal deal crashing down. and secondly, it is far from clear whether the government has a majority in the house of commons to win approval for the brexit it wants. there's just one year left, but there is still a long way to go. chris morris there from the bbc reality check team. our chief political correspondent vicki young has been in bolton in greater manchester, speaking to remain and leave voters about their hopes for the future. we are here in bolton market gauging reaction in an area that in the referendum voted to leave but of
5:44 pm
course there were different opinions and there still are stop let's discuss the future, people's hopes and fears for the future. i'm an joined by maggie bondy women's organisation and david from general manager of greenhouse bakery in bolton. you were on the remain side of the argument, what is your main concern about the teacher? there is a variety of issues still remain u nsettled a variety of issues still remain unsettled in relation to brexit. in terms of trade, in terms of the movement of free movement of workforce but also we are in a market, surrounded here today by food products, meat products, a whole range of challenges in relation to make sure that we have the standards in terms of the products, and it goes across a variety of domains. ever been from education, training, access to it, and general cooperation, the variety is very unsettled at the moment.
5:45 pm
david many feel the uk is cutting itself off from its closest market, itself off from its closest market, its closest trading partner if you like and we will be putting up barriers to trade. is that not going to be able problem? how can it be a barrier to trade? look around us now, we have hundreds of nationalities, the world to trade m, nationalities, the world to trade in, how can it be a barrier? if it isjust purely in, how can it be a barrier? if it is just purely european, in, how can it be a barrier? if it isjust purely european, that actually is quite restrictive. because you have to trade within that closed environment but if you have the world to trade in, happy days. you worried about the labour force, about courage in people who aren't british to come here? what i am very worried about is the scaremongering, skulduggery that we are doing, people saying that they had to send them home, and in fact what we do, we employ nearly a thousand people here in alton, a high percentage of whom are foreign naturals, and many have come to me and have asked what will happen
5:46 pm
after brexit? i have said, absolutely nothing, your job after brexit? i have said, absolutely nothing, yourjob will be safe. with colleagues in spain and italy, we have eight italians, i said bring them across, we would love to have them. we have talked about the social impact, you work with women and entrepreneurs, the social impact fear might happen after brexit, what are you concerned about? the reset is showing that at the moment there are some considerable fears and anxieties in relation to the repeal of types of laws of legislations which have been pro—gender equality, paternity, pa rental pro—gender equality, paternity, parental rights, and we have led the way with europe, and using them as exemplars, and they have been. it can only be good having those kinds of laws in place supporting women to come back into the workplace so consequently we wouldn't want to see a repeal of any of those. do you have to be either the eu for that to happen? the fact that the matter is that many of these laws came about and actually saw their first i
5:47 pm
suppose sight of them in the eu, and we we re suppose sight of them in the eu, and we were inspired by the eu and our cooperation with other eu countries, so the social impact can mean quite negative but the thing we don't know, ultimately that again will create fear and anxiety, fundamentally we cannot have a regressive, a regression back in terms of losing those rights. are you concerned about the uncertainty that has been? the vote was two yea rs that has been? the vote was two years ago, we are in a taxation period, nothing will change, it feels like a long road? you have hit it on the head there, but an awful lot will change. it will be a slow progress progression over the next hopefully two or three years where business gets itself sorted out, trading partners are sorted out, we don't want to work against europe but with europe, so things like laws and trading standards and customer rights, employee rights are quite rightly should be aligned, i have no problem with all this at all. thank
5:48 pm
you david smart and maggie o'carroll, eddie very much indeed. a couple of the views here in bolton market. vicky young there speaking to people about brexit. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has insisted that labour will not tolerate any form of racism in the party. the head of the party's disciplinary panel, christine shawcroft, has resigned, after it emerged she had opposed the suspension of a local election candidate accused of holocaust denial. our political correspondent iain watson reports. this is christine shawcroft, usually a close ally ofjeremy corbyn, a leading figure in momentum, the grassroots group set up to support his leadership. she has resigned from chairing labour's disputes panel, the party that looks at breaches of party rules, including allegations of anti—semitism. she sent this e—mail opposing the suspension of a council candidate, saying, i am concerned to hear about the suspension of alan bull. the original complaint —
5:49 pm
a facebook post taken out of context and alleged to show anti—semitism — was received almost a year ago. this i think we should reinstate his membership. he says he is a lifelong anti—racist and he posted an image privately which may not have been genuine for discussion and debate and after the e—mail was leaked to the times, christine shawcroft gave this statement. i sent this e—mail before being aware of the full information about the case. i had not been shown the image of this abhorrent facebook post. i'm deeply sorry for having done so. she has admitted her mistake, she did not look at all of the evidence, and as soon as she did, she resolved her position and stood down. she has learned her lesson in that respect. why is this potentially damaging forjeremy corbyn? his internal opponents are questioning his judgment. they say christine shawcroft was given the key role of chairing the party's disputes panel last year with the full support
5:50 pm
of their leader's office, even though the incumbent voted off was seen as tougher on party discipline. nowjeremy corbyn is coming under renewed pressure to remove christine shawcroft from labour's ruling national executive entirely. former members of labour's nec have made their views known publicly. johanna baxter said stepping down from chairing the disputes panel is not enough, ignorance is no excuse. some mps say this is about a much bigger issue. it is quite rightjeremy asked miss shawcroft to stand down from chairing the disciplinary committee, there's no way she could continue to do that, but her position is not the main issue, the main issue isjeremy made a good statement this week finally promising action against anti—semitism. we now need to see that action. anyone guilty of anti—semitism in the labour party must be expelled. supporters ofjeremy corbyn said the issue of anti—semitism is being used by opponents inside and outside his party to destabilise him, but there is a growing realisation more needs to be done to tackle the underlying problem. iain watson, bbc news.
5:51 pm
the justice secretary david gauke has ordered a review of cases where prisoners are released directly from high security prisons. it follows the high court ruling overturning a parole board decision to release the serial sex attacker john worboys. the boa rd's chairman nick hardwick was forced to resign yesterday but says the ministry ofjustice should also take responsibility for failings in the case as our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. asjohn worboys remains inside waiting for a new parole hearing, outside in the political arena, the row over his case continues. the head of the parole board has been forced out of his job by the worboys shambles. in the commons yesterday, the justice secretary, david gauke, admitted mistakes in his own department, but made clear he thought the blame for the mess lay at the doors of the parole board. and this morning, he raised more questions about its performance.
5:52 pm
john worboys has been in wakefield, a top security category a prison. the minister is now asking for a review of six cases where offenders were freed straight from category ajails. the now ex—head of the parole board made plain his anger at this. well, one of the concerns i have had about this matter is about the independence of the parole board, and thejustice secretary should back off. i think if people have got concerns about a decision that the parole board made, then there are proper ways of dealing with this. worboys, known as the black cab rapist, was convicted of drugging and sexually assaulting 12 of his passengers. but it's believed he attacked more than 100 more. the parole board has been criticised for failing to examine the scale of his offending. but that's not the only problem, says one of his victims who fought to keep him in prison. it's not one particular person that is at fault here, it's the whole system is failing and i do believe a lot
5:53 pm
of it is down to funding. we all know that there are going to be issues when he is released with policing and the licensing conditions, who has got time... we have not got the resources to watch him. the ministry ofjustice denies funding played a part in the failings of this case. but it is planning changes to the parole system after what happened withjohn worboys. june kelly, bbc news. health service bosses has warned that the nhs in england doesn't have enough beds or staff. the organisation representing them, nhs providers, says hospital waiting lists will grow in the next financial year and patient care will suffer. but the government says it's addressing the issues with its latest pay offer and plans for a long term funding settlement. our health correspondent nick triggle reports. the new financial year starts next week. for the nhs in england, it promises to be an important 12 months. staff are voting on a pay rise
5:54 pm
which will see their salaries rise by a minimum of 6.5% over three years. meanwhile, on wednesday the prime minister committed the government to developing a long—term funding plan but a new report by nhs providers, which represents chief executives, warns neither of these will help in the short term. the group says the health service is facing an impossible task meeting its commitments on a&e and hospital operational waiting times. at the moment, we are setting standards which our own trust leaders are telling us that they cannot achieve. at the moment, we are setting standards which our own trust so 55% of our trusts say that they are really worried about meeting their financial targets next year, and 35% of them have said even though they have signed up to it, they will not reach those targets. that shows us the kind of culture we're operating in. we've got to do something to ease that culture. when people are set targets and standards that they cannot meet, we lose confidence.
5:55 pm
it says the nhs is short of both beds and staff with 1 in 12 posts currently vacant. the nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai has returned to pakistan for the first time since she was shot by taliban militants in 2012. malala who's now 20 was shot in the head because she was campaigning for women's education. alison freeman has more details. under the cover of darkness and amid tight security malala yousafzai returned home to pakistan. it was the first envisaged by the human rights activist since she was shot by the taliban in 2012. malala met the prime minister and went on to ta ke the prime minister and went on to take the stage at his office to give an emotional speech often wiping away tears. it was broadcast on state tv. i still can't believe it,
5:56 pm
that this is actually happening. malala was shot in the head by gunmen five and a half years ago. she has been campaigning for girls education in the valley which at the time was a militant stronghold. now an oxford university student having lived in the uk ever since, in 2014 she became the youngest person to win the nobel peace prize. but today she recognised the changes in her home country. from seeing the extremes of terrorism, seeing how many difficulties women and girls face in our society and how we can fight against those challenges, i can move on the street and meet people and talk to people and it is my old home again, the place i go up. her trip
5:57 pm
is expected to last for days but it is expected to last for days but it is not clear if she will visit her home town. time for a look at the weather. i them. hello there, hugh. ithem. hello there, hugh. we i them. hello there, hugh. we have just about arrived unscathed that the easter weekend, throwing any sort of weather at us too. this time the weather should land somewhere in between, a mixed easter weekend to come, some sunshine today but the further south you words things clouded over with a brace of showery rain and as we go through the evening and tonight we take the rains northwards across england and wales and to northern ireland as well with some snow over high ground and some snow showers continued over the north—east of scotland, snow is piling up here. in between,
5:58 pm
temperatures dip away, not as cold as last night but could still be a touch of frost. confirmation that of the mixed easter weekend, cool, rain at times, some spells of sunshine as well. this area of wet weather is pushed out into scotland over good friday, snow showers across north—east scotland, and rain pushing in across southern areas later in the afternoon but in between bouts of the midlands, wales, some slices of sunshine on what will be quite a cool day. still some wet weather around the, when jonas mixed in over high grounds on saturday, still those snow showers against north—east scotland. generally the cool field continues, 5-9d. generally the cool field continues, 5—9d. sunday looks like a fairly dry
5:59 pm
day, some spells of sunshine, the odd shower in the north—east but then behind me to the south—west you can see our next area of rain and it is this that has the potential to cause us a is this that has the potential to cause us a little bit of trouble as we move into easter monday. this frontal system pushes northwards bringing rain with it and that frontal system moving into some relatively cold air, so that wet weather made, may in blazes down into snow. don't take this chart to literature it —— too literally, there is a lot of uncertainty about how much snow we could see but there is the potential in some places for some disruptive snowfall. bear that in mind, try in the far north, most likely rain in the south so if you have travel plans on easter monday there is the risk of some smoke, destruction possible but lots to play for between now and then do the advice is to stay tuned to the forecast! weekley.
6:00 pm
exactly one year to go until brexit — the prime minister says leaving the eu will mean more money for the nhs and schools theresa may has today toured england, scotland, wales, and northern ireland and promised to make brexit a success. we will be taking back control of our money. we won't be spending vast sums of money every year to the eu and that will enable us to spend on priorities like the nhs and schools. also on the programme tonight. conscious and talking in hospital — yulia skripal — the daughter of the former russian spy poisoned by a nerve agent, is no longer dangerously ill. australia's disgraced cricket captain steve smith breaks down as he apologises to his country and his family for the ball—tampering scandal. any time you

65 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on