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tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  April 28, 2018 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: president trump has welcomed the historic summit between north and south korea, in which the countries leaders set out a peace plan and called off their conflict. but mr trump made it clear that the us will continue to put pressure on north korea until the regime gives up its nuclear weapons. a former policeman suspected of being the so—called golden state killer, and on the run since the ‘70s, has made his first appearance in a california court. joseph deangelo‘s accused of multiple murders and rapes. police say they traced deangelo by using dna ancestry websites. the swedish pop stars, abba, have recorded two new songs — their first for about 35 years. the group said they were an unexpected consequence of their recent decision to put together a "virtual reality" tour. it's not yet known when the tracks will be released. now on bbc news, the travel show. this week on the travel show, we
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help celebrate 90 years of australia's legendary flying is service. —— doctors service. what a remarkable bit of kit! yeah. we investigate the mysterious ghost lights spotted over a town in texas. and we had to china to try out a style of skiing which is reckoned to be over 8000 years old. this week i'm unaustralian‘s northern territory. this massive state covers nearly 1.5 million square kilometres. it is the most sparsely populated part of australia and living out here can be hard. because of the sheer size of this pa rt because of the sheer size of this part of the country, at travel has been an important part of life in the northern territory for the past 100 years. —— air travel. it is also the reason that the royal flying doctor service was set up 90 years
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ago, pioneering the then revolutionary idea using planes to bring medical care to remote communities. i have come to their central operation based in alice springs. from here, the service dispatch as emergency response plans all over the northern territory, and it isa all over the northern territory, and it is a busy place. —— dispatches. as we arrived we saw one of the planes bringing in patients from the outback. 0ne planes bringing in patients from the outback. one of the planes has just arrived. two patients were taken off, whisked away to hospital. it is a perfect opportunity to see what is on—board, as one of the senior flight on—board, as one of the senior flight nurses, cathy, is waiting for me. the service's fleet of planes are packed with cutting—edge medical equipment ready for any emergency. hello. hello. how are you? good, thanks, henry. what a remarkable bit of kit you've got here. yeah. explain what you have here? we have a miniature intensive care unit,
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really. we have monitoring, we have drugs on board, we have anything to do with what you would see an intensive care unit. we can take anything from a sore toe to a fully integrated patient who has probably had some trauma or cardiac arrest or something like that. -- to referee:. how many square kilometres you cover out of the space in particular? about a million square kilometres, which is about 45 times larger than great britain. that is a lot of ground to cover. how essential would you say the royal flying doctor service is to be people of the outback? extremely important. it is their lifeline. if they had to come by road, it would be up to eight hours by road, and the roads are not a lwa ys hours by road, and the roads are not always that good. there are camels and donkeys and potholes and water. as opposed to probably up to a one—hourflight. as opposed to probably up to a one—hour flight. so they get into definitive care much quicker. but the high—tech standards we see today didn'tjust the high—tech standards we see today didn't just happen overnight.
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the high—tech standards we see today didn'tjust happen overnight. 1917 founder reverend john flynn first had the idea of creating a flying doc the service, but it took him another ten years to turn his plans into a reality. the first planes took to the skies in 1928. those first planes were very basic boneshakers bite today's modern standards, but slowly innovations like pedal powered radio were introduced, helping to build a lifeline between the flying doctors and the rumoured committees they served. —— remote communities. and the rumoured committees they served. -- remote communities. this time the doctor is landing on a regular periodic visit. the sisters are waiting as it lands, welcoming former raaf pilot robert chadwick and doctor miller. news of the success and doctor miller. news of the success of those early pioneers quickly is red, and eventually the service became a national network across australia. in 1955, queen elizabeth visited from the uk to officially bestowed a service with
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its royal title. today, as modern planes and medicines save even more lives, the story of the flying doc is continues to capture the public‘s imagination around the world. —— doctors. tourism is a crucialform of income for the service. here at the flying doctor tourism facility, letters can learn how the service works and what flying was like back in the day. 90 years of history are brought to life with some of the objects that made it all possible. even the building itself is historic. this building behind us was the original building in alice springs. this is where we ran our head office and also like mitigations department. so it is a listed heritage building and it is 110w listed heritage building and it is now a tourist facility and cafe. as well as educating tourists about the service, the facility and shop or by their crucial source of income. so how important is tourism to funding
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services like the royal flying doctor service tourism is extremely important. 10096 doctor service tourism is extremely important. 100% of our profits from the tourist facility go back into the tourist facility go back into the royal flying doctor service. it helps fund the purchasing and also the medical equipping of our craft. 2596 the medical equipping of our craft. 25% of our funding is the medical equipping of our craft. 25% of ourfunding is a gap the medical equipping of our craft. 25% of our funding is a gap which needs to be filled and that is where oui’ needs to be filled and that is where our money comes from. over the decades, the flying doctor service has saved countless lives. it is amazing to think that is thanks to a smalltown church minister who wanted to do his bit to help people living out in the bush. something tells me he would be very proud of the people who still fly to save lives today. we have gone from just a few planes to 67 aircraft, from 24 different locations in and around australia. next up, we leave the australian
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outback behind and had to america, where for over a century people have reported seeing strange lights on the horizon in the texan town of marfa. no one is exactly what they are, but many people claim to have seen are, but many people claim to have seen them, so we went to meet them. this is the rambling boy, pod casting live from the radio studios in downtown martha, texas. i want to say a few words about martha. it is a very small town, 2000 people. it was a cattle town and a ranching town for many, many years. we have
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become an international arts centre. but we are still a small texas town and, and it is an interesting combination. i have never seen the martha l lights. i have been told that the best time to see them is in the winter. a couple of hours after sundown, or a couple of hours before sunrise. a couple of hours after sundown in the winter is my suppertime. and a couple of hours before sunrise is my sleeping time. and besides that, it is cold out there in the viewing station in wintertime. but i believe they are there. at least, i believe something is there. because i know a lot of reliable people who have seen some sort of light out there. scoffers will tell you that the martha lights are the lights of automobiles travelling north from prison the on highway 60 seven. —— from presidio.
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0r highway 60 seven. —— from presidio. or the lights on aeroplanes, or ranches on mitchell flight, or a border patrol helicopter. many people who think they are seeing the martha lights are undoubtedly looking at automobile headlights or ranch lights. but it is clear that there were other lights out there before they were either automobiles or electricity, and they are still out there. i grew up in martha. i was worn in 19 —— 1950. so i've been around, i have seen the lights and i've heard about them all my life. we show the lights regularly to people from our ranch. today we are in front of the viewing centre which is on the road between martha and alpine. it does cause some confusion
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because of the way it is pointed. the orientation points you to wear it is easy to be misled by automobile lives. —— where it is easy. which are coming up from hills, which are coming up from presidio. not very many people know that from right here, there is a mesquite tree right there, and if you stand about ten yards from the mesquite tree and look straight ahead, there is a bush, there is another green bush, and you'lljust see a lion, if you really look, of little green bushes that form a lineout to a tree, and that tree is
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about a mile and a half away. write over the tree is where the lights are stop i don't remember a single time that someone didn't say, have you seen time that someone didn't say, have you seen be marfa lights? so now when people ask if i've seen the lights, i say, when people ask if i've seen the lights, isay, have when people ask if i've seen the lights, i say, have you seen the lights? and most of them haven't. but the ones that have, they are the ones who are really interested in knowing what the lights are. they came here about three years ago, to marfa, and immediately delve for the landscape. i was stalking the lights every night. i think maybe i saw something like them what i wasn't paying attention. i do try very hard to find them. i'm never quite sure. i got this poem, which is called western power. purple clouds, my doubts. iridescent cream, my loss.
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and the street light, my reading. my appetite, my appetite. red striped sky, my confusion. bright yellow, grey sky, my otter. car lights, my commotion, telephone poll, my wishes. stop sign, my fear. black cloud, white sky, bliss. linking signals, my intentions. black mountains, too many suggestions. skipping lifelines, my attention. a young cowboy first saw the lights. a young cowboy first saw the lights. a young cowboy first saw the lights. the horns on your van, my defensiveness. that old train, my dreams. that old train. still to come on and the travel show. the incrediblejourney of still to come on and the travel show. the incredible journey of one woman who has a passion for wild swimming. water is my domain. i am happiest in the water. and we learn to ski the traditional chinese way.
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so stay with us for that. next up, we continue our series looking at incredible journey is happening around the world, as we visit snowdonia national park in wales. it is here where one woman's passion forswimming is here where one woman's passion for swimming has led her to exploring this wild and unique landscape in a completely different way. it feels pure. i don't think i've feel anything more pure than swimming. the water is my domain. i am happiest in there. 0ver swimming. the water is my domain. i am happiest in there. over the last few years i have in exploring snowdonia national park, and wild swimming its 250 lakes. i have swum
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about 150 now. iam swimming its 250 lakes. i have swum about 150 now. i am always searching for somewhere for a quick swim. if i can squeeze in a new lake then i will always go for that. snowdonia national park is a mountain range in north wales. it is a beautiful area to live in. the mountains you feel very rugged. much more tightly packed. and in between that is where you get the lakes, and although they may be much smaller and a bit of a trek to get to, i don't know, for me, it makes it a little bit more special.
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i have always found since childhood, my mum was a swimmer. marmot castaway 11 years ago and i found grieving was very hard for me, so i think the time alone was part of it. __ my think the time alone was part of it. —— my mother passed away. i do obsessively swim at now and i did not before, but i did not make a conscious decision to start swimming this way, it was definitely subconscious. i have always had this kind of, i call it a nervous anticipation in the tummy but the nerves can be intimidation because sometimes, the water is dark, you do not know what is inside, beasts or
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weeds, but that is an important part for me, is wanting to feel those nerves. iam not i am not somebody who wants to die down. sometimes ijust want i am not somebody who wants to die down. sometimes i just want to i am not somebody who wants to die down. sometimes ijust want to be submerged up to my shoulders and just feel that feeling of the cool freshness on my skin and yeah, sometimes that is just enough for me. it isa it is a time to leave everything behind and that's a huge part for me. documenting the lakes visually came
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about by being scared of what was underneath the surface. and i would ta ke underneath the surface. and i would take a camera under the water with me to capture what was, what was in there, and i would rush home to have a look, to see what i had captured and discovered that there was nothing, i never saw anything, but occasionally i would get a glimpse of myself on the camera or other people die —— other people i was swimming with, and there was a great beauty and grace in seeing people underwater. you are seeing the landscape are totally different reason. most people are coming here to go walking or the hike to the top of mount snowdon whatever. because i doing this, i have seen that parts of snowdonia i would never have seen before. i have no desire to go to
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the top of anything any more, i... yeah, there is still so much to discover. vivienne rickman-poole wild swimming in wales and we will have more incredible journeys wild swimming in wales and we will have more incrediblejourneys for you soon. have more incrediblejourneys for you soon. to finish up though, we are to china, which strangely the sum has been described as the birthplace of the skiing ever since cave paintings of skiers were discovered in the country's altaic prefecture. —— altay. i'm afraid that is all the time we have had this week coming up next week... if you invite was lost in the post like mine that, we visit windsor to experience waves to experience britain's upcoming royal wedding without heading to the church on the big day. don't forget, you can follow us wherever we are in
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the world byjoining is on our social media screens. all the details on your screen right now. but for me and all the team, he and alice springs, it is goodbye. —— here in alice springs. hello. let's bring you right up to date with how the weather is going to pan out across the british isles for the weekend and the start of next week. friday was none too sparkling for many parts of the british isles. here in western wales, pretty typical of what most of you had to endure. when you look at how the chart is shaping up for the start of saturday, the closer you are, generally speaking, to that area of low pressure, the cloudier your weekend is going to be. a lot of cloud around again.
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yes, there will be some sunshine across northern and western parts. we finish off the weekend with an introduction from the south—east of some pretty wet and windy weather. so a chilly start to saturday across scotland and northern ireland too. further south, a blanket of cloud helping to keep the temperatures up, but it delivers the prospect of a little bit of rain as we get through saturday morning. now, i'm just going to take you into the south, with our detailed model, to take a look at how we see the showers developing. you'll see there's no great organisation about them. many will stay dry. pretty cloudy, as i say. the cloud thick enough for rain into parts of yorkshire and lincolnshire and some of the neighbouring counties. further north, into northern ireland and much of scotland, particularly away from the eastern shores, there is a good chance of seeing one or two sharp showers. now we're into the bigger picture. the temperatures profile shows you it will be a none too warm saturday. if you are stepping out in the evening those showers tending to die away,
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that rain hanging on for a good part of the night across the eastern side until late on. going to keep the cloud across the east. that will help keep the temperatures up. notice the blue, extensive across northern and western parts, especially in scotland, northern ireland, the north—west of england. a cold and bright start there. elsewhere, as i say, a lot of cloud. eventually that will thicken up in the south—eastern quarter and before the day is done, we'll see some rain and gathering wind, all of which will combine again to suppress the temperatures below what we would expect at this time of year. now, all of that wind and rain is coming from a big area of low pressure, it's not just the south—east that will see that combination of wet and windy weather. a good part of the near continent, northern parts of germany, getting up towards denmark as well, and even at this range we have a bit of concern about it because it will be pretty filthy, just for the start of the commute and the school day. disruption is likely. so bbc local radio will keep you all over it. there you can see the extent of it.
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it could be cool enough for a little bit of sleetiness across the higher ground and the midlands. seven, eight, or nine degrees or so. perhaps a bit drier and brighter further north. hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and steph mcgovern. amber rudd admits she should have known about targets for deporting illegal immigrants. the home secretary denies reading a memo sent to her office telling her about them. labour says she should resign. good morning, it's saturday, 28 april.
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also this morning: victims of crime will be able to challenge the release of prisoners more easily, under sweeping changes to the parole system. friends for now — a new era for peace between north and south korea, but president trump warns the us will maintain pressure until the north gets rid of its nuclear weapons.
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