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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 7, 2018 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. our headlines today. at stake — a place in the world cup semi—finals for england for the first time since 1990. we're one of the youngest teams in it, but we said we were an improving side who want to make our own history. # it's coming home, it's coming home, it's coming # football's coming home! temperatures are high and so are expectations. we have all the build—up to this afternoon's game against sweden. a plan agreed after
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a 12—hour meeting. theresa may's cabinet backs her vision for brexit. ministers are also warned that breaking rank will no longer be tolerated. "don't worry, we are all strong" — the message to their parents from the thai boys trapped in a cave for two weeks. good morning. they have been queueing through the night at wimbledon. ahead of kyle edmund's huge day with the british number one playing his first third—round match at wimbledon against three—time champion novak djokovic on centre court later this afternoon. another hot weekend for the majority. weather here and also in russia on the way. it's saturday the 7th ofjuly. our top story. england take on sweden at the world cup today, seeking a place in the semi—finals for the first time in 28 years. manager gareth southgate says his
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players want to make history. many places will come to a standstill, although some are going to be caught in a clash with england's biggest game in years, as breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. commentator: dier does it! england win! victory. euphoria. but england's success has posed many a dilemma. lee and alicia are getting married this afternoon near great yarmouth. they have decided to also show the match to guests, rather than ignore it. hopefully, it will be a really good conversation starter, as opposed to people just sitting around looking at their phones, hiding away. we hope england win, otherwise we might have a few miserable evening guests turning up. you hear a lot it is coming home. # football's coming home.#
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tachbrook street market in london. with barbecues being readied, laura's meat has been selling fast. sausages, steaks and burgers. we are going to win the football, 2—1. come on, england. the british beer and pub association predicts an extra 8 million pints will be bought during the match, pumping £24 million into the economy. maroof has never sold so many flags so quickly. this year, everything has gone. we have had to reorder from suppliers. it has been a good year. you have a pub just over the road showing the game. yeah, so as soon as they score, we hear a big scream, we can run out and have a look through the window. and you can restock them with flags, as well. yeah, that as well. a nation prepares. temperatures are high. so too are hopes and expectations. natalie is where the action will be,
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in samara. this stadium, it is lovely. we a re in samara. this stadium, it is lovely. we are privileged to get an insight there at the moment. a remarkable stadium that i understand looks like a spaceship? exactly, it looks like a spaceship? exactly, it looks like a ufo from the outside. the pa system has come on, cracking timing! they have just been playing the england national anthem to get as excited. volunteers are starting to come out for a pep talk, getting ready. it is shaped like a ufo because samara is where rocket production goes on. it is quite bizarre. there is a little museum and big rocket next to it. it looks like it could take off. it is in the middle of nowhere. a4,000 seats. we understand only 1600 tickets middle of nowhere. 114,000 seats. we understand only 1600 tickets have been sold to england fans. 20,000 to other nationalities and 2000 to
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swedish fans. that leaves are short of capacity when you take hospitality and media into account so hospitality and media into account so there are tickets for sale on the fifa website so if any england fans we re fifa website so if any england fans were thinking of coming to the match, they made it to samara and do not have tickets, there are tickets available but england fans are a rare sight indeed which is odd because gareth southgate said it was perhaps the biggest opportunity into a tad have. if you get worried, you are not sure how to while away six hours to go, is to come up with abba references to the england players. we've come up with lo. and our particular favourite loftus chicitita. and we have a front page that says mamma mia, here we go a kane. a lot of enthusiasm here about how england will do. it is a shame
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there are not many fans. what is the feeling about the result that might emerge today? the fans that have made it, because it is a long way to come. who have got a 1k hour sleeper train here to samara. it is tricky to get to. those here are confident because of the way the draw has fallen. the people they are up against, sweden a familiar foe for england, they have played 2a times. england, they have played 2a times. england have won eight, lost seven. a 50-50 england have won eight, lost seven. a 50—50 game. sweden are a tough opponent. england have beaten them twice in the last ten games but as we saw against colombia, this team is ripping up the rule book, 6—1, the biggest win in the world cup for
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england. winning the penalty shoot out for the first time. harry kane described the team as brothers who would do anything for each other and when they step out here, they know a side ranked 12th places below them is all that stands between them and their first is all that stands between them and theirfirst semifinal in is all that stands between them and their first semifinal in a world cup in 28 years. you have great tickets. enjoy the match and hopefully when we next to speak we will be celebrating. as well as defeating the pa system! a toughjob. the match kicks off at 3pm, with coverage on bbc one starting at 2, or you can listen on bbc radio 5 live. in the other quarter—final, russia versus croatia kicks off at 7pm, with highlights on bbc one 10.25 tonight. theresa may appears to have faced down hardline critics of the european union in her cabinet to secure an agreement that will keep the uk closely aligned to brussels after brexit.
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the deal was struck at the end of 12 hours of talks at the prime minister's country residence — chequers. some leave supporters regard the plans as a sell out. let's get more now from our political correspondentjessica parker, who's at westminster this morning. although theresa may has the cabinet onside, even if this goes all the way through to the eu to ratify when it has been bounced back in full, 27 countries have to think it is the right way forward. there is still quite a way to go. something to bear in mind, fora lot quite a way to go. something to bear in mind, for a lot of brexiteers, this plan spells out a closer relationship with the eu than perhaps they would like talking about going along with eu rules with goods. some have expressed concern with one mp tweeting last night,
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british businesses will continue to bea british businesses will continue to be a rule taker from the eu. british businesses will continue to be a rule takerfrom the eu. i hope the details are better than the breaking headlines. brexiteers are calling for details and they might get them. there is a meeting with the chief whip this morning and mps get to talk direct with theresa may in westminster on monday. some say it is academic because the european union will never wear it. we had a tweet last night from michel barnier. he said the chequers discussion was to be welcomed and they will assess proposals to see if they will assess proposals to see if they are workable and realistic. but a sense of relief there is a plan to put forward and theresa may is trying to lay down the law with the cabinet. ina trying to lay down the law with the cabinet. in a letter to tory mps she said collective responsibility is fully restored, at least that is what she hopes. jessica, thank you. the thai boys who have been trapped in a cave for two weeks have written letters to their parents, saying "don't worry,
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we are all strong". the group's handwritten notes include requests for different types of food, and appeals not to be given too much homework. in another letter, their coach, who took them into the complex, has apologised to their parents. let's talk to our correspondent sophie long who's at the rescue site. you have been keeping track and although we are seeing some levity in terms of the tone of the notes coming through, it is still a really serious and worrying situation. it is particularly for the parents of the boys. the boys have been in there two weeks. we have just had a briefing and the centre said were planning and preparation stages are infinal planning and preparation stages are in final phases. they want to move before the health of the boys deteriorates before heavy rain comes. it is raining now, like rain, but heavy rain is forecast this
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weekend. the thrust of the operation has been to pump water out of the complex. millions of gallons has been pumped out and they are trying to reduce the water level to depths they could get the boys out without using scuba gear but it is a complex cave system with deep basins of water and steep roots up and down with narrow passages and some of the passages have water gushing down. it would be a dangerous operation to get them out the way they came in but at the moment that is the only way out. part of the preparation is to set up triage stations along the way. there are places that are safe where the water has been drained out to have those stations. we heard from the governor of chiang rai province and he said if heavy rain comes ahead of when they expect them to and water rushes into the caves, they have an emergency plan to get they have an emergency plan to get the boys and coaches out. one thing
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is morale and we have messages brought out by navy seals and one came from the coach, who is 25, and he said to the parents, i am really sorry, and he also said he promised to look after them the best they can and that they were being treated well by rescue workers. messages from the boys, really sweet, given their predicament and age. many asking for favourite food when they get out, telling parents not to worry, they are strong. another said do not worry about another, he can look after himself. we are keeping oui’ look after himself. we are keeping our hopes high. thank you. police investigating the latest nerve agent poisoning in wiltshire say they've begun examining more than 13—hundred hours of cctv footage. charlie rowley and dawn sturgess remain in a critical condition in hospital, after being taken ill a week ago. investigators believe the couple may have handled a contaminated object. members of a global team of researchers say they've reached
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an important milestone in the quest to design a vaccine that could protect people from hiv. the trial, which appears in the journal the lancet, involved 400 people. scientists acknowledge there are still huge challenges to overcome but say they are cautiously hopeful. almost all wildflower meadows in the uk have been lost since the 19305, according to conservationists. they say that the survival of nearly 11100 species of insects that rely on meadow plants is at risk because of the decline. the department for rural affairs says it's committed to protecting wildlife as part of a 25—year plan. good morning. you may not have realised there is a match going on today. for any england football fans, this is what we are going to be talking about quite a while.
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gareth southgate's men try to reach a world cup semifinal for the first time since 1990. they play sweden at three o'clock. earlier on breakfast the former england striker alan shearer gave us his thoughts on the task in hand. he is getting the best out of this group. for what we lack in ability and we are probably not the best team, we more than make up with team spirit and togetherness and if you put that together you get a chance. gareth ellis have to live with missing a penalty since euro 96 and 110w missing a penalty since euro 96 and now he can forget about that. you can see the relief on his players and him and staff and if it goes again, they have nothing to fear. in a moment we'll speak to scott thorpe, an england fan in samara. first let's say hello to axel olsson, a sweden fan who'll be watching the match in stockholm. good morning and thank you for joining us on bbc breakfast. what is the atmosphere like in stockholm? people are starting to wake up. ever
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since the world cup started it has been ecstatic. all of the time we have had amazing weather, everyone is drinking too much beerfor regular days and we are enjoying the world cup. it sounds like what is happening in england! what of the hopes for sweden today? there is a lot to play for because there is a clear route for either team potentially to a world cup final? clear route for either team potentially to a world cup finanm course, but we do not want to get ahead of ourselves and we know england are a very good team. the england are a very good team. the england team are humble, gareth southgate is humble, the players are humble and this is not good news for swedish fans because england always underestimate us but they are not doing that now, especially with harry kane, the season he has had. you are not letting in too many goals. we are worried but we are
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proud of our national team. not going as fast since 1994. the same as england in that regard, 1990 when england last got to the semifinal. you mention celebrities in the england teams of years gone by. the same could be said of sweden. freddie long berg, zlatan ibrahimovic, they had big players in the past. exactly that has been hard for opposition teams to figure out about sweden. we do not have a start, we have a team. even though eve ryo ne start, we have a team. even though everyone knows exactly what we are doing, it is hard for the teams, even germany, to figure out how to play against us. when we have zlatan ibrahimovic, it was easy, mark him and the entire game is flunked. this isa and the entire game is flunked. this is a collective in a different way, which is also the think about england right now, even though you have obvious stars in harry kane and the other guys. there is a lot of
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talk about sweden here. all the great things sweden have given the world. ikea furniture and abba. a lot of the papers are using abba songs to make the headlines. mamma mia, here we go a kane is the front page on one. do sweden papers do the same? when it comes to that the english tabloids are in a league of their own. it has always been like this with sports headlines. at least what i can see within the british journalism but in sweden not really, it is like, let's do this, that is what the headlines are saying and the morning shows. and the entire week what they have been doing. nice to know we win at something, even if it is bad headlines! i hope you have a good day. not too good, obviously! i hope we win. i know you do. thanks. and he is allowed to hope
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his team wins. scott thorpe has made the long journey east to samara where today's match takes place. well done making the journey. three aeroplanes to get over there? thank you. yes, we flew into hungary and then to moscow and moscow to hear. 18,19 then to moscow and moscow to hear. 18, 19 hours then to moscow and moscow to hear. 18,19 hours of then to moscow and moscow to hear. 18, 19 hours of flying. it will be worth it by hope. i certainly hope it is. you are a dedicated fan. what is the feeling there? i can see england fans behind you. it seems like a nice atmosphere. it is very quiet at the minute with not many england fans about, probably more sweden fans. i think it will liven up sweden fans. i think it will liven up later. yes, we want to get going and get the match started. what is the feeling there in terms of the score? gareth southgate has led a measured team it feels so far it's
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pretty tricky circumstances when you think of the game with colombia's behaviour on the pitch. it seems we keep our heads now, how do you think england will fare against sweden? sweden are very compact. it might be 0-0, sweden are very compact. it might be 0—0, we might win 1—0. we need an early goal. 1-0 would be my prediction. tell us how the swedish fa ns prediction. tell us how the swedish fans are reacting. the fan we spoke to just was respectful to the england team, saying england appears to not be too confident and to be more thoughtful about the team. how do the fans react? have you mixed with any? yes, we have seen a lot of the sweden fans at the fan park this morning and everyone is getting on and talking. there is no bad feeling between each other, everyone is wishing each other a good game. i do
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not think we thought we would get this far and they did not think they would get that far so it is all about enjoying it now. if england win, will you stay on for the next, the semifinal? my wife sam is watching, i do love her, but yes, we will be staying on until we get knocked out. 0k, remind us of your prediction. 1-0. i like a confident man. scott, thanks. let's hope you are right. breaking news from samara, mrs thorpe, he might be staying another week. do notjinx it. cloudy and samara. not so here. it is glorious. good morning. this is a straightforward prediction, the weather serving up no real surprises this weekend. this
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was how the day started in cambridgeshire. we can expect dry weather and hot sunshine to take us through the weekend. the satellite shows cloud, into northern ireland, coastal cloud in eastern scotland and some irish sea coast of england and some irish sea coast of england and wales. if you are on the coast, cloud might lap onto the shoreline and a sea breeze making it feel cooler but generally, blue skies and sunshine through the day. more cloud on the western side of scotland and northern ireland in the afternoon. maybe the odd spot of drizzle. aberdeen into glasgow, sunshine. this is the 3pm, kick—off time forecast. in england, a lot of football watching going on with sunny skies and 31 degrees in the south—east. a small chance of catching a shower. in samara, we did under the cloud. you noticed the
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cloudy skies. you can see them in the graphic, they are cloudy, but some blue sky and i think we will see spells of sunshine to take us through the match. temperatures around 26 and samara and wimbledon, more of the same, 30 degrees this afternoon with a lot of sunshine overhead. i mentioned a small chance ofa overhead. i mentioned a small chance of a shower in the south—east in the late afternoon but essentially, the day closes on a fine note and then the evening, staying dry with clear spells. more cloud in the north—west and the odd spot of bristol. ahead of the cloud, a warm and humid night. temperatures —— the odd spot of drizzle. the cloud in the north—west is associated with a weather front and behind it, cooler air is trying to work into the picture but the front tomorrow will move slowly. really
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hanging over northern scotland with cloud and the odd spot of rain. cooler air to the north—west of that, because everywhere else seeing sunny spells and look at the deep orange on the chart. the south—east might get as high as 32 but the cool weather in the north will spread further south in the coming week. temperatures in london dropping back on tuesday, but they climb again and no real change in the story. more dry and sunny weather to come. thank you. it is time to look at the papers. guardian film critic peter bradshaw is here. you're not talking football in the paperso you're not talking football in the paper so some people will be breathing a sigh of relief. let's
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talk about feed instead. do you eat out alone? i do. sometimes, i did last night. there is no shame in it, no stigma attached. i enjoyed it. a story in the guardian today that a certain leading retailer is ramping up certain leading retailer is ramping up solo dining ranges with things like single burgers and single prawn portions, which means six or seven prawns in a single sashay. because there is now a rising number of people dining alone, but also a rising number of families for whom the communal dining experience is less important. there are more people who have different dietary needs people who have intolerance, vegetarians, vegans, and splitting up vegetarians, vegans, and splitting up the food is now increasingly important. also, it is perhaps the
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case there is no shame in it. it used to be getting a sad meal for one in the supermarket meant everybody would look at you and you would be paranoid as you took it through. it is life now. in terms of people working, partners working, families doing different things. you cannot time meals together. when i was growing up, my mum cannot time meals together. when i was growing up, my mum was cannot time meals together. when i was growing up, my mum was at home, dad got home at a civilised time and we had dinner at 6:30pm, seven b. that is out of the window now, we cannot do. -- 7p. it is a shame? it is, but that is the reality. talking aboutair is, but that is the reality. talking about air conditioning inside the times newspaper, most have it in their car. not many in homes. i think for some european capitals think for some european capitals think we are barbaric because we do not have air conditioning on public
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transport. to me having public transport. to me having public transport air conditioning is the height of luxury. in madrid it is normal. there is an amusing article today saying because we are not used today saying because we are not used to hot weather we are not used to how aircon work so you have it in a coffee shop and it is nice and somebody comes in and opens the front door and wedges the front door open. immediately loses the effect. saying what are you doing? i am trying to help everybody because it is so hot. no, you are doing the wrong thing. sometimes i find if you go to the supermarket, it is so cold, i carry a hoodie or cardigan. the first time i went to america i was not used to it and i would go to the supermarket shiver and think it was weird. i have noticed with cars, people who have don't have it in
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their car or it is not working, have their car or it is not working, have their windows down. exactly. this is something we spoke about yesterday. did you see the blimp? the blow—up doll like impression. president trump, showing him as a baby with a nappy on. it will be floated above the skies in london as part of a protest at his visit but he will avoid much of it, it appears. he has no interest in staying in london. this trip is all about one thing and thatis this trip is all about one thing and that is golf. he loves golf and he loves his corporate brand. i think he will spend almost two days in scotla nd he will spend almost two days in scotland at the golf course. that is what it is about matters what he wa nts to what it is about matters what he wants to do, spread a little love for the trump brand. is it part of the visit? it is a private thing and pa rt the visit? it is a private thing and part of his trip in scotland. what i am amused by is the us ambassador
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who has to be the loneliest and unhappiest figure. it used to be the us ambassador'sjob unhappiest figure. it used to be the us ambassador's job was a nice little job, trouble free, us ambassador's job was a nice littlejob, trouble free, no controversy, because whatever was happening, the us and uk governments we re happening, the us and uk governments were on the same page and this was a happyjob, wonderful, were on the same page and this was a happy job, wonderful, no were on the same page and this was a happyjob, wonderful, no problem. now he is at the centre of a nightmare on 24 hours a day basis, getting up in the morning and checking mr trump's twitter feed. getting up in the morning and checking mr trump's twitterfeed. it used to be at least the us president would not insult britain. now it is the case the us president insults britain on a semi regular basis and he is in the front line. that visit will get scrutiny, i am sure. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. iam imagining i am imagining an england themed menu, football... oh, no. we
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football free. that is after this. in fact football free. that is after this. infacti football free. that is after this. in fact i hope sweden will let us win, so we don't have to suffer more brexit chat for another week. we are hoping the special guest today will sing for his supper because it is curtis stigers. we will talk about what is happening with you in a bit. but tell us your food heaven. what is happening with you in a bit. but tell us your food heavenlj really like fruit pie. especially strawberries. that works for me. that was tough i like a lot of food. what about hell? i am not crazy about game, particularly venison. what i really do not like and it is controversial, i do not like celery. do you find when you go somewhere
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and dish is 50% celery, first of all, i don't like the but then they will put a bunch in to fill it in to make the dish ago. that is sceptical! we have jane baxter, nice to have you back. i am cooking clams, prawns and courgettes. and josh katz. you are doing a barbecue. we are doing monkfish kebabs with chermoula. olly smith has booze. today served the colder the better. and all you guys at home are in charge of whether curtis stigers eats his food heaven or hell. we will see you at 10am, football free. you will get hot dogs and burgers in there, i'm sure! hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. coming up before ten, we'll get the weather from ben, but first a summary of this morning's main news.
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millions of people are expected to stop what they're doing this afternoon to watch england take on sweden in the world cup quarter—finals. manager gareth southgate says his players want to make history. if they win, a match against russia or croatia will be all that stands between them and the final. theresa may appears to have faced down hardline critics of the european union in her cabinet to secure an agreement that will keep the uk closely aligned to brussels after brexit. in a letter to conservative mps last night, the prime minister said she expected full support from her ministers. some leave supporters regard the plans as a sell out. the thai boys who have been trapped in a cave for two weeks have written letters to their parents, saying "don't worry... we are all strong". in another letter, their coach, who took them into the complex, has apologised to their parents. emergency workers have now set up an air supply line to the group.
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police investigating the latest nerve agent poisoning in wiltshire say they've begun examining more than 1300 hours of cctv footage. charlie rowley and dawn sturgess remain in a critical condition in hospital, after being taken ill a week ago. investigators believe the couple may have handled a contaminated object. members of a global team of researchers say they've reached an important milestone in the quest to design a vaccine that could protect people from hiv. the trial, which appears in the journal the lancet, involved 400 people. scientists acknowledge there are still huge challenges to overcome, but say they are cautiously hopeful. and while "football's coming home" is the anthem of england fans this week, firefighters at shoreham station have been keen to show their red hot support for the team. # it's coming home! # it's coming
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home! # it's coming home! get in there! # it's coming home, it's coming home, it's coming, football's coming home, it's coming, football's coming home. we hope it's coming home. enjoy the football and be safe. don't drink and drive. i bet they were red—hot in their full kit. mike is at wimbledon. not much sport going on this morning. if matt tebbutt is not going to give you burgers, you know where to go. the queues have been here all night to get into wimbledon. a huge day for kyle edmund. can i have muffin and an orangejuice, please? they
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need refreshments, so i am getting brea kfast need refreshments, so i am getting breakfast at the catering tent. fully supporting the england team here at the catering van. where are you going to watch it? it is even hotter here than i am in my waistcoat. we are going to the pub. you are shutting the catering van for the match? yes. a lot of tennis fa ns for the match? yes. a lot of tennis fans say they will come out of wimbledon for the england game and go back in afterwards to see kyle edmund taking on novak djokovic. first, let's show you this amazing scene. hundreds of people were here all night on a camping to get their chance to go into the queue. people had to pack their tents away by seven o'clock this morning. people are now beginning to wilt in the sun. it's very organised. there is a whole guide here to the rules of camping and queueing. one chap was found out because he put his tent up in the queue, then went to a luxury
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hotel and came back, but he was found out and was evicted from the queue because you have to stay in the tent all night to book your place for centre court this morning. we will talk about the tennis, but first let's concentrate on this afternoon. at 3 o'clock we of course turn our attention to the world cup...and samara. it's around 600 miles to the east of the russian capital moscow, where gareth southgate's england side take on sweden in the quarterfinals. it is hotter here at centre court than in samara. our sports news correspondent natalie pirks is there. # one, two, three, four! # looking back on when we first met...# it's the terrace chant that's sweeping the nation. # southgate, you're the one, you still turn me on. # you can bring it home again! either in russian stadiums or english pubs, it's as ubiquitous as three lions. # southgate, you're the one...# and the new updated lyrics haven't escaped
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the england manager's notice. # football's coming home again! not as questionable as most of the lyrics of songs that have been sung about me in the past, frankly. so, um, no problem with that. long may that continue. # football's coming home again! no chance he's going to escape it over here either. a heatwave may have caused a water shortage in samara, but there's been an outpouring of love for the manager. southgate is the best thing that's happened to england lately. he's got a positive attitude, he's letting the players play the game the way it needs to be played. i can see absolutely no reason why we can't win the world cup now. they have to get past sweden first. they're 12 ranks below england, but this is not a world cup that's followed the script. well, sweden stands between england and their first world cup semifinal in 28 years, and england's record against them is poor, just two wins in their last ten games. the swedes are more than confident of pulling off an upset. the last time they played each other
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in a world cup, sven goran eriksson was england's swedish manager. the beat of my heart is in england as well, so it's a difficult one. and who's going to win it? hope sweden, but very tight. 50-50. come 3pm, england is on lockdown. appropriately, against the homeland of abba, the winner takes it all. natalie pirks, bbc news, samara. we've heard so much about how this england team has connected with its supporters again at this tournament. well, england's captain says they'll be dedicating today's performance to one young fan in particular. five—year—old ben williams is being treated for a brain tumour at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. his family presented him with a replica world cup trophy to celebrate his bravery after five weeks of radiotherapy, and they asked captain harry kane if he'd bring the real thing back for ben in a week's time. well, kane responded and said he'd
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go out there this afternoon to put a smile on that little boy's face. there were some french fans saying it may be coming home to paris, or to brussels. france and belgium are looking really good, except there will have to play each other in the last four. let's concentrate on belgium. the first two world cup semi—finalists have already been decided, and the big news is the five time champions brazil have been knocked out by belgium. brazil were many people's favourites to go all the way in this tournament but an own goal and then this brilliant strike from manchester city's kevin de bruyne saw them beaten 2—1 in a brilliant game in kazan. and belgium will play france in the last four after they beat uruguay 2—0 in nizhny novgorod. an awful goalkeeping mistake let antoinne griezmann's shot in for the second. we now know that it'll be a european side that wins this world cup. here at wimbledon, and one man who'll be doing his best not to be
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distracted by england's exploits in russia is kyle edmund. the british number one's playing in his first ever third round match here, and he won't have it easy. he's playing the three—time champion novak djokovic on centre court. he may well be playing at the same time that england take on sweden in russia, causing a friendly rivalry between edmund and his swedish coach fredrik rosengren. it could be the best day of his life in terms of his career. the british number one is now playing this important third—round match against djokovic. if the other games don't last very long, he might be playing at the same time that england are taking on russia. but he and his coach have been having fun on social media in their respective country's shirts. it has been a big wimbledon for upsets. whilst lots of the game's big stars have found the first week something of a struggle here at wimbledon, roger federer‘s still on for a record equaliing ninth title.
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he swept aside germany's jan—lennard struff in straight sets to cruise into round 4.... ...as does the seven—time champion serena williams. she passed herfirst proper test at this years tournament by beating france's kristina mladenovic. not such good news for sister venus, though, who was beaten in her third round match. england's cricketers have levelled their t20 series with india to set up a decider in bristol on sunday. eoin morgan's side won by 5 wickets in cardiff. chasing down 149 to win, david willey hit the winning runs. such a busy sporting weekend, amongst all the tennis and the football there's also the small matter of the british grand prix. lewis hamilton is going for a fifth win in a row at silverstone, but his championship rival sebastian vettel set the pace in yesterday's second practice session. qualifying starts this afternoon. the tour de france also starts later today and as britain's chris froome goes for a record—equalling fifth tour title he's received a mixed
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reception from the home supporters. froome's anti—doping case was dropped by cycling's governing body last week. i have been talking about some any sport that i have lost my place in the queue. i was hoping to get a muffin and an orangejuice. oh, they have remembered, bless them. and the final word goes to our catering staff. have you got a message for gareth and harry? come on, england! i had gareth and harry? come on, england! ihada gareth and harry? come on, england! i had a feeling you might say that. he can't wait to get stuck into the food. now, we are going to talk about wildflower meadows. a wildflower meadow in full bloom can be a stunning sight, but experts warn they're under widespread threat. the charity plantlife says that since the 19305, the uk's lost almost all of its meadows,
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and that's also bad news for the wildlife that lives in them. with us now is trevor dines from plantlife. thank you for decorating the studio for us. why are we seeing such great decline? since the 1930s, 9796 of our wildflower meadows have disappeared. ifi wildflower meadows have disappeared. if i said no to 7% of our woodland had disappeared, there would be outrage and people would be restoring wouldn't like nothing else. but 7.5 million acres of flower rich habitat has disappeared. why? it is the intensification of agriculture since the 1930s. wildflower meadows are farmed habitat. my stock and meadows are intricately linked, but we have pushed that production just a little
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bit too far. people today will be familiar with silage fields which are cut in april and then a few times a year, with lots of animals grazing on the field. that doesn't give a chance for flowers to blossom, so they rapidly disappear. the 1930s was a long time ago. what has happened in the last 15 years? this is what we call death by a thousand cuts. even in the last few weeks, we have seen pastors that are being ploughed up and treated with herbicide. and we are getting reports of old wildflower meadows being converted into arable fields. so it is not a case of many of them being built on? that is part of the problem, but it is mostly farming. so what is the cost of turning wildflower meadows into agricultural land? these species in front of us, like the yarrow at the top, 114
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different species of insects live on yarrow. these are the biodiversity powerhouse of our countryside. can't they live on plants in other areas? they don't exist. so when people ask and the bees have gone, where have the flowers gone that they live on? and what is the consequence of that? well, the fact that we are seeing the bees and butterflies disappearing. and bees are really important. absolutely. the other consequences that we are forgetting that connection. with 97% of the meadows gone, 97% of the experience ofa meadows gone, 97% of the experience of a meadow has gone as well. so today we have 80 events happening around the country and is about getting people back out into these meadows so they can enjoy the wild flowers. we have things like tai chi
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happening and a glow—worm hunt. flowers. we have things like tai chi happening and a glow-worm hunt. and what else can people do? today is national meadows date, but what can people do in general? if the world or the country is changing in terms of how we use agricultural land, there's not much that everyday people do. our ask today is to the government and to defra. we are launching an action plan that is calling on them to restore 120,000 hectares of wildflower rich meadow. and this is about working with farmers and providing support for farmers and providing support for farmers do that. but you're right, everybody wants to do their bit. everyone with a garden can do their bit. the last wildflower refuges are now on our roadside verges, and we are campaigning to get council is not to cut the roadside verges on early. we have petitions that people
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can sign. defra says it is working to restore wildlife as part of its 25 year environment plan. but thank you for highlighting it, trevor. and there is nothing that wildflower meadows like more than a good dose of sunshine. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. some of those meadows might be wanting a little more rain now, but there was precious little sign of that in our weekend forecast. nice weather to get out and enjoy it. it will be mostly dry, with lots of hot sunshine. in the satellite picture, there is some cloud in the mix. some cloud lapping at irish sea coastlines and more cloud creeping into northern ireland and western scotland. for the most part, it is a sunny day and a pretty hot day. let's look at three o'clock this afternoon, the kick—off for a certain football match. tending to
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cloud over across the west of scotla nd cloud over across the west of scotland and northern ireland. for eastern scotland, we will see sunshine. across wales and england, lots of sunshine. small chance of a shower in the south—east. let's look at the forecast for samara in russia for that big kick—off. a bit of patchy cloud and blue skies overhead. barely a breath of wind. it is going to be hot for some of the players. what about wimbledon? a beautiful day if you are heading there. and things are not going to cool off very quickly as we go into the evening. any showers will fade away. then we see dry weather and
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clear and starry skies overnight. and more cloud will creep into the north—west of the country. ahead of that band of cloud, a warm and muggy night. behind that cloud, there are some cooler air working into the mix. sunday's forecast is a bit different. cooler and fresher conditions in scotland. but down across england and wales, we are looking at large amounts of sunshine. plenty of heat to be had. the cooler weather will spread further south for a time to the coming week. temperatures will take a bit ofa coming week. temperatures will take a bit of a tumble before bouncing back upwards again. no real end to this dry spell as we head to the next week. ben, you will be fascinated by this.
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imagine the whole england team created in sculpture in the eye of a needle. these needle sculptures are terrifyingly good. we have got the man behind them today. our next guest's achievements are simply mind—boggling, and when you see what he can do, you won't believe your eyes. micro—sculptor willard wigan creates painstakingly small artworks, many of which can only be seen through a microscope, and he's with us now. tell us how you got into it, and let's look at what you do. you have to see it through a microscope. that isa ship to see it through a microscope. that is a ship and that is on a pinhead. how did you get into this? school was difficult for me because i suffer with a bit of mild autism, asperger ‘s which was a blessing in
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disguise, because if i didn't have iti disguise, because if i didn't have it i wouldn't be who i am. but when my mother discovered that i could make sculptures, i had made a house for ants because my dog destroyed an ants' nest. when my mother saw that, she was so overwhelmed with disbelief that she said to me that ifi disbelief that she said to me that if i made them smaller, my name would get bigger. she said i would get bigger by going smaller. she said, you can't read or write very well, but this is what you're going to do. make it a bad habit and now it's your way of life. you had a fantastic word to describe it when you were on a couple of hours ago. somebody tweeted and said, i have had what is called a learning difficulty all my life, and i hated it. but a learning difference is what you called. and the person said, that is brilliant. i am so happy to hear you put it that way. and that must have helped you in
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terms of the discipline you need. give me some insight into what physically happens? you can slow down your heart and you are using an eyelash... paint a picture for me? ifi eyelash... paint a picture for me? if i can explain, if you see something big and you get a saw and saw it in half, if i said to get a microscopic sore and do it, it becomes very difficult. so i have had to learn to control my whole nervous system. your pulse can be pa rt nervous system. your pulse can be part of the external interference that stops you from moving in the way you need to move. so the dexterity has to be controlled. i have learned to breathe in and wait for my heart to stop and work between heartbeats. i have one of the half seconds to move between the beat, or less than that. all the tools are complicated to make. to
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keep my hand still and keep my mind focused for 16 or 17 hours a day, sometimes i think i need to get counselling! you have got an exhibition at the museum at broadway in the cotswolds. if i put my hand underneath, you can't see this on the telly, but i can see a man on a saxophone in the eye of that needle, which is astonishing. and it's for real. and you are going to do the whole england team in the eye of a needle. if england win? well, this is going to be an unfortunate situation. it is of course fortunate if england win and it will be u nfortu nate for if england win and it will be unfortunate for me to put 12 of them inside that needle. i would struggle to get a piece of cotton through
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there. it has been lovely talking to you. the super small: world's tiniest is on channel 4 tomorrow at 10pm. just over five hours to go until this afternoon's big kick off. let's get an idea of how fans are feeling here and in russia. first off, sarah rainsford is in samara. you have been talking about the heatwave back in the uk, but it's pretty warm here in samara and we are on the beach on the river volga, which is where a lot of fans have been co—creating as they build up the big match. that of course includes england fans. we have a group of them on the bench from various places. you can see rotherham here. we have a rather than and a sheffield wednesday fan here, usually big rivals but they are here for the england game. you arrive at the last minute. tell us what brought you here? it basically took us 24 hours to arrive. my
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brother—in—law came and it were a moment that we needed to live and to do. we have come to enjoy the atmosphere of the world cup and hopefully get a result. and one of your friends left his hopefully get a result. and one of yourfriends left hisjob hopefully get a result. and one of your friends left his job to be here. it is a big moment for england. yes, he had been out to the belgian game but they wouldn't let him have the time off, so he left. i am his uncle. a huge moment for everyone. give me your predictions. we are taking it home! marvin dixon is 2—0, england. we are taking it home! marvin dixon is 2-0, england. both of you are confident. semifinalfor is 2-0, england. both of you are confident. semifinal for england? final! coming all the way home according to these gentlemen on the beachin according to these gentlemen on the beach in samara and their friends on the bench. it is a great atmosphere.
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it has been extremely friendly all the way through. the crowd is not big, but they are hopeful that england can bring this trophy home. let's go to wimbledon where lots of people are waiting to watch the tennis. but they might have one eye on tennis. but they might have one eye o n eve nts tennis. but they might have one eye on events in russia? it's a dilemma for everyone. they are of course doing up to see the likes of kyle edmund and rafa nadal. kyle edmund will be hoping the england match against sweden will have finished by his match. they have even got the likes of harry kane donning their sunglasses. i have got a swedish fan as well, in the interests of balance. how are you feeling today and would you watch the match?m will be recorded at home and i guess i will watch it when i get home. tennis is the priority. your
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prediction? 50-50. is there an equivalent of "football's coming home" in swedish? yes! that sounded good. what does it mean? we are going to win and go, sweden!‘ good. what does it mean? we are going to win and go, sweden! , meet the harry kanes and gareth southgates. gareth, how is it going to go for you? we just heard 50—50 2-1, to go for you? we just heard 50—50 2—1, england. and how are you going to watch? you are here to see the tennis. on the phone. not in centre court, surely? free wi-fi! some people say they are going to leave temporarily. let's have a word with harry kane. what is your name? rebecca. are you more nervous about the tennis or the football? tennis. how will kyle edmund do? good. where
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are you going to watch?|j how will kyle edmund do? good. where are you going to watch? i am leaving the tennis early to watch the match. quite a few are saying that. but if nadal‘s match doesn't last long, you might miss djokovic versus kyle edmund. buffer the one day, it's watching england. they have been itching to do this all morning. they have got a certain song that i think they know the words to. so the wimbledon crowd does three lions. apart from tina, who is from sweden. # it's coming home, it's coming home, it's coming, football's coming home. i hope they have better voices on centre court later. i hope so too. we have had some interesting singing on breakfast this morning. we are sorry. enjoy your day whatever you're doing. that's it from us for today, the england match kicks off at 3 o'clock here on bbc one.
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i'll be celebrating with chris tomorrow morning from 6! have a good day, bye—bye. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 10. theresa may warns ministers that public dissent over brexit will no longer be tolerated after they backed her plan for the uk's future relationship with the eu. some brexiteers have expressed reservations about the plan. can theresa may sell it to her peas and brussels? the country expects england play sweden in samara for the chance to make their first world cup semi final in 28 years. iam in i am in sunni samara where england and sweden fans have gathered ahead
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of the big match. —— im the samara sunshine. the boys trapped in a cave in thailand write letters
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