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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 13, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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i have just come from a very may and i have just come from a very productive note the magnetic summit. my productive note the magnetic summit. my top priority was getting other nato members to pay their share of the prime minister was right there with me. i want to thank u, prime minister, for the united kingdom's contribution to our common defence. the uk is one of the handful of nations, five out of 29, not good but it is going to get better and really fast, in addition to the united states meeting the 2% gdp minimum defence spending commitment. during the summit i make clear all nato allies must honour their obligations and i am pleased to report that we have received substantial commitments from members to increase their defence spending and to do so in a much more timely manner. in our meetings today the prime minister and i discussed a range of shared priorities, including stopping nuclear
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i thank prime minister made for her partnership in the pursuit of a nuclear three —— free north korea. she has been a tremendous help. we both discussed iran and we both agreed it should never possess nuclear weapons. and i must halt, and we must do it, and i will do it, and we must do it, and i will do it, and we must do it, and i will do it, and we are all going to do it together, we have to stop terrorism. it is the scourge we have two stop, terrorism, and we have to get several countries that have come a long way. the funding of terrorism has to stop and stop now. i encourage the prime minister to sustain pressure on the regime and she needed absolutely no encouragement because she in fact also encourages me and we are doing that together. very closely coordinated. the united kingdom and united states are also strengthening
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cooperation between our armed forces who served together on battlefields around the world. today the prime minister and i viewed serve your —— several demonstrations of the uk and us armed forces. we saw demonstrations that were incredible. the talent of these young, brave, strong people. we saw at the royal military academy at sand hurst sea mless military academy at sand hurst seamless cooperation between our military which is vital to addressing the many shared security threats. we have threats far different than we have ever had before. they have always been out there, but these are different, and they are severe and we will handle them well. we also recognise the vital importance of border security and immigration control in order to prevent foreign acts of terrorism within our shores. we must prevent terrorists and their supporters from gaining admission in the first place. border security is a national
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security problem. and in the united states, we a re security problem. and in the united states, we are working very hard to get the democrats to give us a couple of votes so we can pass meaningful and powerful border security. i also want to thank prime minister may for pursuing fair and reciprocal trade with the us. once the brexit processes concluded and perhaps the uk has left the eu, and i don't know what they are going to do, but whatever you do, that is ok with me, that's your decision. whatever you're going to do is ok with us, just make sure we can trade together, that's all that matters. the united states looks forward to finalising a bilateral trade agreement with the uk and this is an incredible opportunity for our two countries and we will seize it fully. we support the decision of the british people to realise full self—government and we will see how that goes. very compensated
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negotiations, and not an easy negotiation, that is for sure. a strong and independent united kingdom like a strong and independent united states is truly a blessing on the world. prime minister may, i want to thank you again for the honour of visiting the united kingdom, a special place. my mother was born here, so it means something maybe a little bit extra, maybe even a lot extra. we had a wonderful visit. last night i think i got to know the prime minister is better than that any time. we have spent a lot of time together over the last year and a half, but last night i was very embarrassed the rest of the table. we just talked about lots of different problems and solutions to those problems and it was a great evening. as we stand together this afternoon at chequers we continue a long tradition of friendship, collaboration and affection between ourselves and also between our people. the enduring relationship between our nations has never been stronger than it is now. so, madam prime minister, thank you
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very much, it has been an honour. thank you mr president. thank you. thank you mr president. thank you. thank you. we're going to take for questions each. i will start off with laura. —— for questions. thank you very much, prime minister and mr president. mr president, you seem to have changed fortune from what you said earlier this week when you said that on the current brexit plan, that would probably kill the possibility of a trade deal with the uk. our countries are meant to have a special relationship, yet you publicly criticise the prime minister's policy and her personally for not listening to you this week. is that really the behaviour of a friend? and prime minister, is the problem for you that some of the things that mr trump has said about your brexit plan are right, that it will limit the possibility of doing trade deals easily in the future? can you also tell us how it felt for him to criticise you in that
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interview? maybe i will go first, because i did not criticise the prime minister and i have a lot of respect for the prime minister and u nfortu nately respect for the prime minister and unfortunately there was a story that was done which was generally fine, but it didn't put in what i said about the prime minister and i said tremendous things. unfortunately we tend to record stories now, so we will record what we deal with reporters. it is called fake news, and we will sort a lot of problem with the good old recording instrument, and what happens is that the prime minister has said she will make a decision as to what she's going to do. the only thing i ask of the razor is that —— to reza is that we can trade and we have no restrictions, because we want to trade with the uk and the uk wants to trays with us will stop —— trade with us. we are by far their biggest trading partner and we have a tremendous opportunity to double, triple, quadruple that, so if they
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goa triple, quadruple that, so if they go a slightly different route, and i know they want independence. it will be independence, it isjust a definition. but if they're going to goa definition. but if they're going to go a certain route, ijust said i hope you are going to be able to trade with the united states. i read reports where that one be possible, but i believe after speaking with the prime minister ‘s people and trade experts it will absolutely be possible. so based on that, and based on just trade possible. so based on that, and based onjust trade in general, and our other relationship, which will be fine, but the trade is a bit tricky. we want to be able to trade and they want to be able to trade and they want to be able to trade andi and they want to be able to trade and i think we will be able to do that. and i think she is doing a terrificjob, by the way. that. and i think she is doing a terrific job, by the way. thank you, mr president. just to confirm what the president has said, laura, there will be no limit to the possibility of us doing trade deals around the re st of of us doing trade deals around the rest of the world once we leave the european union on the basis of the agreement that was made here at chequers and i have put forward to the european union. and to be clear,
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thatis the european union. and to be clear, that is an agreement which delivers on the brexit vote we had in 2016 in the uk, that delivers what i think is at the forefront of people's minds when they were voting to leave the european union. so at the end of these negotiations we will ensure that free movement will come to an end. the jurisdiction of the european court of justice end. the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice will come to an end. the sending of vast sums of money every year to the eu will come to an end. we will come out of the common agricultural policy, the common fisheries policy and we will ensure that by not being in the customs union that we are able to have an independent trade policy and do those trade deals around the world. as you have heard from the president, the united states is keen to work with us, we are keen to work with them and we will do a trade deal with them and others around the re st of deal with them and others around the rest of the world. jonathan? mr president, two questions, if i may. the first, now you're british
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trip is coming to a close, could you tell us the three or four things you hope to achieve in your meeting with vladimir putin? and the second question, what is the benefit to america of having tens of thousands of american troops stationed in europe? i will be meeting with vladimir putin on monday. we go into the meeting with a tremendous meeting that we had with nato. most of you have reported it correctly. it was certainly testy at the beginning but at the end everybody came together and agreed to do what they should do and actually what they should do and actually what they have committed to do, which you fully adhered to. you didn't have a problem, but some people do it. we left that meeting her bubbly more unified and wealthier as a group than ever before. so we go in strong. we will be talking to president putin about a number of things. ukraine, we will be talking about syria, we will be talking
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about syria, we will be talking about other parts of the middle east. i will be talking about nuclear proliferation. because we are massively, you know, what we've been doing, we have been modernising and fixing and buying, and it is just a devastating technology. and they, likewise, are doing a lot. and it isa they, likewise, are doing a lot. and it is a very, very bad policy. we have no choice. we are massively big and they are very big and i will be talking about nuclear proliferation. that would be a great thing if we could do it. it's not only russia and the united states, its other countries as well. but we would be the leaders, we would be the leader, second would be russia, then china third, and we would all be talking about that. to me, that would be a tremendous achievement if we can do
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something on nuclear proliferation. and we will be talking about other things. i know you will be asking about meddling, and i will absolutely bring that up. i don't think you will have any perry mason here, but you never know what happens. i will absolutely firmly ask the question. and hopefully we will have a very good relationship with russia. the prime minister would agree, we have a good relationship with russia and with china and other countries, that's a good thing, not a bad thing, so hopefully that will happen, jonathan. what about the troops benefit to america? where? there is a benefit, psychological benefit and a benefit, psychological benefit and a military benefit. there is also a benefit not to do it. i was prepared to do things that would have been somewhat harsh yesterday. a lot of people are surprised that nato all came together at the end. and it wasn't a threat it was just an
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unfair situation. the united states was paying anywhere between 70 and 90, andi was paying anywhere between 70 and 90, and i choose 90, depending on how you calculate it. we were paying 90% of the cost of nato and it's therefore europe much more than us. no matter what the military people say, it helps europe more than it helps us. that being said, it is a great unifier and we have 29 countries, and there was a lot of love in that room. and we have a lot more, jonathan, when you say 10,000 troops, we have a lot more than 10,000 troops. tens of thousands i said. oh, i thought 10,000 troops. tens of thousands i said. oh, ithought you 10,000 troops. tens of thousands i said. oh, i thought you said 10,000. in germany we have 52,000 troops and a lot of troops in europe. that being said, helping europe, they are helping us, we altogether, and i am fine with it. and very importantly, they are now paying their way in a much more rapid fashion. thank you.
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francis? prime minister, iwonder if you agree with the president of the united states that immigration has damaged the cultural fabric of europe? and president, could you elaborate on that point? what do you mean by that? do you want to go first? i think it's been very bad for europe. i think europe is a place i know very well and i know what has happened is very tough. it's a very tough situation. you see the same tarot attacks that i do —— terror attacks that i do. we just lost some incredible young men and women, and they were showing us sells and things that frankly, 20 yea rs sells and things that frankly, 20 years ago people didn't even think about. i just think years ago people didn't even think about. ijust think it is changing the culture and i think it is a negative thing for europe. i think it's very negative. i have a great
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relationship with angela merkel, great relationship with germany, but it is very much her germany —— it has very much her to germany and heard other parts of europe. i know that it heard other parts of europe. i know thatitis heard other parts of europe. i know that it is not politically correct to say that but i will say it and i will say it loud. i think they had better watch themselves, because you are changing culture, you are changing a lot of things, you are changing a lot of things, you are changing security. look at what is happening to different countries that never had difficulty or problems. it's a very sad situation, it's very unfortunate, but i do not think it is good for europe and i don't think it's good for our country. we are, as you know, far superior to anything that has happened before we have bad immigration laws and, i mean, we are doing incredibly well considering the fact that we virtually don't have immigration laws. we have laws that are so bad i don't even call
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them laws, it's just that are so bad i don't even call them laws, it'sjust like, you just walk across the border, you put one foot on the land, and now you are tied up in a lawsuit forfive foot on the land, and now you are tied up in a lawsuit for five years. it is the craziest thing anyone has ever seen. i would it is the craziest thing anyone has ever seen. iwould make it is the craziest thing anyone has ever seen. i would make that recommendation to europe and i've made it loud and clear. i made yesterday to 29 countries in total, and that is the way i feel. the uk has a proud history of welcoming people who are fleeing persecution to our country, we have a proud history of welcoming people who want to come to our country to contribute to come to our country to contribute to the economy and to our society. and over the years, overall immigration has been good for the uk. its poor people with different backgrounds and outlooks to the uk and we have seen them contributing to our society and economy. of course, what is important is that we have control of our borders and it is important we have a set of rules that enable us to determine who comes into the country, and that is what as a government, we have been
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doing for a what as a government, we have been doing fora numberof what as a government, we have been doing for a number of years and will continue to do in the future. mr president, you have spent the week taking on the nato allies, criticising prime minister may on her own soil. i wonder, are you giving russian president vladimir putin the upper hand heading into your talks, given that you are challenging these alliances that he seeks to break up and destroy? you see, that is such dishonest reporting, and it happens to be nbc, that possibly worse than cnn. let me explain something. we have left nato with more money, with more unity, with more money, with more unity, with more money, with more unity, with more spirit and nato has probably ever had. we have a strong and powerful nato. when i became president, we didn't. we had people that weren't paying their bills and people who were way down or following their commitments. in addition to that, we have become an
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oil exporter which would not have happened under the past regime or a new regime if it were not us. we have built up our military, $700 billion, and then next year $716 billion. when you look at what we have done in terms of russia, i guarantee whoever it is in russia, they will be saying, oh, gee, do we wish that donald trump was not the victor in the election. we have been far tougher on russia than anybody, and probably, look, i'm not going to go down a hundred years, but we have certainly been extremely tough on russia, including the fact that when the prime minister called when they had a horrible thing happen right here, very close by, she asked if i would do something and maybe i will let you tell the number and it was far greater than anybody else, including the prime minister. we expelled, how many people? 60. and
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germany did three, as an example. germany, big country, powerful country, and the fake news doesn't wa nt to country, and the fake news doesn't want to talk about it. we have been very strong on russia and we'll all that said, if i had a relationship with vladimir putin, i don't know him, i've met him twice, maybe three times, two and a half times. most of you were there when i did. we met at the 620 you were there when i did. we met at the g20 summit, and if we could develop a relationship which is good for russia, good for us, good for everybody, that will be great. if i had a relationship with china, and we are in a big trade situation with china, as an example. we are behind every years china, as an example. we are behind every yea rs come china, as an example. we are behind every years come for many years, $500 billion, but it's not going to happen any more. if we get along with countries, that's a good thing. if we get along with china and russia, that's a good thing. we do see headlines about the fighting. the headlines is not the headline. yes, there was fighting, but as i said you have to put up more money
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and we have to be stronger and unified. the headline you see is what is happening during the morning. the headline he sees is what happens in the afternoon where we came together as one. they are putting up billions of dollars more. i will give you an example. you know that this is a confirmed number. $34 billion more was raised since i became president, in nato. that means that the other 28 countries have put in $34 billion more into nato. do you think putin is happy about that? i don't think so. but we have a lot of false reporting in this country. i don't think you have that in your country, do you, prime minister? go ahead, asked the prime minister. president trump told the sun newspaper that i think the deal she is striking on brexit is not what the people voted for. and i wonder if i could get your reaction to saying that borisjohnson would
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bea to saying that borisjohnson would be a great prime minister? first of all, on the deal we put on the table, the agreement but on the table, the agreement but on the table, asi table, the agreement but on the table, as i said earlier in response to laura's first question, this does deliver on the vote of the british people. the british people voted to leave the european union and i heard the turn of phrase the president used earlier, but let me be clear about this, but we will be leaving the european union and we are leaving on the 29th of march 2019. as we leave the european union we will be delivering on what people voted for, an end to free movement, and into sending vast amount of money to the european union every year, and an end to the european court ofjustice jurisdiction in the uk, coming out of the common fisheries policy, out of the common agricultural policy and ensuring by coming at the customs union that we can have an independent trade policy that enables us to negotiate trade deals with the united states and other countries around the rest of the world. that is what the british people voted for, and that is what
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we will be delivering. we will deliver it a way that protects jobs and livelihoods and meet our commitment to the border between northern ireland and ireland. robert? what about the comments about boris johnson?” robert? what about the comments about boris johnson? i will respond to that. they were unrelated. if you have the tape, you can get it from sarah, and we take the entire interview. they asked about boris johnson, they asked how he would be as prime minister i said he would be as prime minister i said he would be a great premise to. he has been nice to me and he thinks i am doing a greatjob. —— to me and he thinks i am doing a great job. —— a to me and he thinks i am doing a greatjob. —— a great prime minister. i am doing a greatjob, in case you haven't noticed. boris johnson would be a great prime minister. i also said that this incredible woman right here is doing a fantasticjob, greatjob. and i mean that. and i must say that i have gotte n mean that. and i must say that i have gotten to know theresa may much better in the last two days than the last year and a half. we've spent
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more time in the last two days. yesterday we had breakfast, lunch and dinnerandi yesterday we had breakfast, lunch and dinner and i said what are we doing tomorrow? we are having brea kfast doing tomorrow? we are having breakfast and lunch with theresa may. and i will see you later on again. but i have actually gotten to know her better and i think she is a terrific woman and is doing a terrific woman and is doing a terrificjob and that brexit is a tough situation. it is a tough deal, between the borders and the entries into the countries and all other things. she is going to do the best. the only thing i ask is that you work it out so we can have very even trade, because we do not have a fair deal with the european union right now on trade. they treat the united states horribly and that is going to change, and if it doesn't change, they will have to pay a very big price and they know what that prices. they are coming over on the 25th ofjuly and hopefully we can work something out, but we have barriers beyond belief, barriers where they will not take our products, including our cars. they
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charge as tariffs on cars far greater than we charge them. you know all these things. and last year we lost $151 billion with the european union, so we can't have that. we're not going to have that any more. 0k? thank you? robert preston, itv. mr president, how would you characterise the relationship with the united kingdom? more special than with other countries? by the way, on farm products, on the prime minister's deal, you wouldn't be allowed to export many of your farm products. would that be a problem for you? prime minister dahmer the president said yesterday that he gave you —— prime minster, the president said yesterday that he gave you advice on how to negotiate brexit bigi did not ta ke how to negotiate brexit bigi did not take that advice. i wonder what that advice was and if you have any regrets not taking it? lots of people give me advice on how to negotiate with the european union. myjob is getting out there and doing it and that is exacting what i
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have done. as you know, as we have gone through the negotiations there have been one or two sceptical voices, perhaps from some of you arraigned before me today about what we would achieve in december, but we got backjoint we would achieve in december, but we got back joint agreement we would achieve in december, but we got backjoint agreement and joint report on citizens' rights and we got the limitation period in march. now we have put forward a proposal, the two proposals that the european commission had put forward were not a cce pta ble commission had put forward were not acceptable to the uk and we have said no to those that is why we have put our own proposal on the table for the future. as i've said in answer to other questions, and it delivers on the brexit deal. but it also ensures we can smooth trade with the european union in the future. in terms of the united states and trade, there will be questions on some of the trade issues about the standards we have here for certain products and how we wa nt here for certain products and how we want to deal with those in the trade deal, but that will be a matter for negotiations. i would say i give our relationship the highest level of special. we start with special and i
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would give our relationship with the uk, especially after these two days, with your prime minister, i would say the highest level of special. am i allowed to go higher than that? i'm not sure. but it is the highest level of special. they are very special people, it's a very special country and i have a relationship here because my mother was born in scotland. as far as the advice, i did give hera scotland. as far as the advice, i did give her a suggestion, i would not say advice. and i think she found it may be too brutal, because i could see that, and i don't know if you remember what i said, but i gave her a certain amount of suggestion, not advice. i wouldn't give her that. i would give her a suggestion. i can fully understand why she thought it was a little bit tough. and maybe someday she will do that. if they don't make the right deal may be she will do what i suggested she might want to do, but it's not an easy thing. look at the
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united states, how the european union has systematically taken advantage of the us on trade. it is advantage of the us on trade. it is a disgrace. it's not an easy negotiation. john roberts go ahead. cnn is fake news, i don't take it. cnn is fake news, i don't take it. cnn is fake news, i don't take it. cnn is fake news, i don't take questions from it. john roberts, box. let's go to a some people have suggested relations between the us and russia are at their lowest point since the end of their lowest point since the end of the cold war and you have stated many times that you think it is important to have a better relationship with russia. is there a nyway relationship with russia. is there anyway for relations between the us and to improve as long as putin continues to occupy crimea? yes i like to think we have a good relationship together if we spend time together. i may be wrong.
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people say i am different to other people, but i think we are being hurt badly by what i would call the witchhunt, the rigged witchhunt after watching some of the little clips. i didn't get to watch too much and i'm here in a different time zone, but after watching the man who was testifying yesterday, i call it the rigged witchhunt. i think it really hurts our country and relationship with russia. i think we would have a chance to have a really good relationship with russia and a very good relationship with president putin. i would hope so. what is your thinking about improving relations with russia while they continue to illegally occu py while they continue to illegally occupy another country? yes, they do. if you're talking about crimea, primarily, yes. but again, barack obama failed very badly with crimea. i don't think he would have done that if i were president. he took over crimea during the barack obama
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administration, i think you would admit. we will have to see what happens. i'm not bad at doing things. if you look at what i've done compared to other people 160 days in, there's nobody even close, i don't believe. so let's see what happens. but this was a barack obama disaster and i think if i was president then he would not have taken over crimea. during the obama administration he essentially took over crimea but i don't think he would have done that with me as prime minster. ifi could would have done that with me as prime minster. if i could follow up with a question to the prime minister. you said you followed upon things you were left with by the obama balmer administration, but you inherited the occupational crimea, so how do you fix it? we will see what happens. if i knew, i wouldn't tell you. because that would put is ata tell you. because that would put is at a disadvantage. but we will see what happens and how it all rolls out. but i want people to understand
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that crimea, it was another bad hand, igot that crimea, it was another bad hand, i got handed north korea and we we re hand, i got handed north korea and we were doing very well. you saw the letter yesterday. we haven't had nuclear testing, missile launchers, rocket launchers, and some sites we re rocket launchers, and some sites were blown up and we got back some hostages, prisoners. even before i left. so a lot of good things are happening. there is an good feeling and we will see what happens. it is and we will see what happens. it is a process, probably a longer process than anybody would like, but i'm used to long processes to. we haven't taken off the sanctions, and they are biting. but when it comes to crimea, that is something i took over and there's nothing much i have to say about it other than we will look at that like i'm looking at many other disasters that i have taken over. many other disasters that i have ta ken over. i've many other disasters that i have taken over. i've taken over a lot of bad hands and i'm fixing them one by one andi bad hands and i'm fixing them one by one and i know how to fix them. president trump said he made suggestions to you about what to do
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about brexit. could we ask you if you would make a suggestion to him on how to handle his meeting with vladimir putin? it's very simple. we have been talking about this today, which is what is important in meeting with president putin and i've welcomed the meeting. but what is important is that the president goes into this as he is doing from a position of strength, and also from a position of unity in nato. i think thatis a position of unity in nato. i think that is very important, obviously. we have discussed the activity of russia in many ways, including the use of a nerve agent here on the streets of the united kingdom and the impact that has had. i welcomed the impact that has had. i welcomed the strong response that the united states gave to that. we had a response from around the world, but the important thing, particularly following the nato summit, that the president goes into this meeting with president putin from that position of strength and a position of unity around that nato table. jason bohn the daily mail. prime
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minister, you're owed mps in the commons sided with donald trump really yesterday —— your own. they said the deal designed in chequers will be bad for dry, why can't you convince your own mps it is a good idea? mr president, you said brexit isa idea? mr president, you said brexit is a tough situation, would you walk away from the talks to show that you mean business? on the issue of trade deals, we are negotiating and when we come out of the negotiations i wa nt we come out of the negotiations i want to have our ability to have independent trade policy and is set our own tariffs and to be an independent memberof our own tariffs and to be an independent member of the wto to be able to negotiate traders around world as we will be doing and we are looking at the united states and other areas —— trade deals around the world. we are looking at the possibility of trade deals around the pacific as well. we will
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negotiate those deals but i also wa nt negotiate those deals but i also want to have a good trade arrangement with the european union. we don'tjust arrangement with the european union. we don't just replace arrangement with the european union. we don'tjust replace one with the other. the uk is looking for and can negotiate a situation where we can have a good trade relationship with the european union and a great trade relationship with the united states and around the rest of the world as well, and that is what will be good forjobs and livelihoods and prosperity in the uk. if you remember i was opening turn breed the day before brexit and we had a number leave a believe large number of reporters —— opening turnberry d—day before brexit and we had a large number ofjedda vests and they all wanted to know about brexit —— a large number of journalists. i thought brexit was going to happen, andi thought brexit was going to happen, and i thought that was because of
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immigration. one of the reasons i got elected was because of immigration andi got elected was because of immigration and i felt brexit have the upper hand and most people did not agree with me. barack obama said, your country will have to get on the back of the line if that happened which i thought was a terrible thing to say, frankly. i thought it was going to happen, though, and it did happen. i'll so think -- i though, and it did happen. i'll so think —— i also think i would have done what my suggestion was to the prime minister, and she can always do that. she can do what i suggested. yukon walk away, because if she walks away, she is stuck —— you can't walk away. but you can do other things. she can do what my suggestion was. my suggestion was respectfully submitted. she will do very well, i think she is a very tough negotiator and i've been
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watching her over the last couple of days. she's a tough negotiator and a smart and determined person and i can tell you there are many people who are looking up, thinking, she left a lot of people in her wake. she's a very smart very tough and very capable person. and i would much rather have her as my friends and my enemy, that i can tell you. and we are friends come on mr president. go ahead. jeff from reuters. i like your hair. thank you! that is a good solid set of hair. laughter let's have a look! doughboy. go go ahead. you mentioned denuclearisation and syria, what exactly is your message to putin on
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syria, especially given the games of assad in the country? —— gains. syria, especially given the games of assad in the country? —— gainsm will be a slow process, don't forget we are not the only ones who have nukes and it will be a slow process, but it will be us and others. we will have to come along simultaneously, obviously, buti think when the meeting was arranged, we both wanted the meeting, and when it was arranged from my standpoint, idid not it was arranged from my standpoint, i did not go in with high expectations, but you might come out with something different. the proliferation is a tremendous... to me it is the biggest problem in the world. nuclear weapons. i me it is the biggest problem in the world. nuclearweapons. iunderstand nuclear. look up. butjohn trump, my uncle. i used to talk nuclear with
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many years ago. —— unclejohn trott. it is the biggest problem in the world, nuclear weapons, and if we can do something to substantially reduce them, and ideally get rid of them, although maybe that is a dream, but this is a subject i will be bringing up with him stop it is also very expensive. that is the least important. if we can do something... i was telling the prime minister, i did not go in with high expectations. we have a political problem where the united states, we have the stupidity going on, but it makes it very hard to do something with russia. anything you do, it will always be, he loves russia, but i love the united states and i love getting along with russia and china and other countries. it will certainly be something that we'll bring up and talk about, and syria,
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of course, i will bring that up, and also the ukraine, and other subjects. what would you like to hear from him on syria? the red line in the sand was a problem for us. what would you like vladimir putin to do now under your watch?|j what would you like vladimir putin to do now under your watch? i will talk to him about that before i talk to you, and if something happens that would be great, and if it doesn't happen... i'm not going in with high expectations but we might come out with surprising things, but the relationship is very important and having a relationship with russia and other countries as i have said a number of times... i have said a number of times... i have said for many years, having relationships with other countries isa relationships with other countries is a good thing. i can't really overestimate how big the meeting was yesterday with nato. we went with
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something that really was an unfair situation to something that is unified, and the spirit, those people were getting up and they were committing, it is not like they can go immediately back, they have to go through parliament and congress and their representatives and whatever form they have, but they have got to go through the approval process... but i'd tell you what, every person in that room was gung ho to get it done, and even before that, 34 billion, and the secretary—general is doing a terrificjob, by the way, and he said yesterday because of president trump we have taken in $34 billion more for nato and i think the number is actually much higher than that, but $34 billion more at least. that is nothing that my opponent would have done. it would have kept going down. it had kept
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going down, you see the numbers over the years, but now the numbers are way up and they are going higher. he will tell you that was because of me. prime minister, the president during his time in brussels expressed concern about a pipeline between russia and germany. do you share those concerns? and did you feel undermined by president trump's comments in the sun about your brexit plan and borisjohnson? comments in the sun about your brexit plan and boris johnson? i'm clear that our plan will deliver on what the british people voted for and we have had a very good discussion here. as we have said about the possibility and the intent we both have to have an ambitious trade deal going forward. that is exactly where we will be going and thatis exactly where we will be going and that is very important for both countries. we stand and we have
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stood shoulder to shoulder with the united states in so many different ways over the years as a result of our special relationship and we will show that even further through the trade arrangements we will put in place in the future. to finish off, i have to say, i said to the sun, and they seemed like very nice people, what i said, theresa may is... where is that person? did i say nice things about theresa may? we reported them. if you reported them, that is good. on the internet? thank you very much the same that. —— for saying that. i wish they had put that in the headline. she is a total professional. i want to apologise because i said such good things about you, and she said,
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don't worry, it's only the press. don't worry, they've been doing its me and i've been doing it to them. but the pipeline, to me it is a tragedy. it is a horrific thing that is being done where you are feeding billions and billions of dollars from germany primarily, and other countries, but primarily germany, into russia, when we are trying to do something so we have peace in the world. it's a horrible thing that germany is doing, a horrible mistake. as much as i like angela, i was open in saying that, i think that's a horrible thing that you have a pipeline coming from russia andi have a pipeline coming from russia and i believe that germany will be getting 50, 60, even 70% of their energy coming from russia, and how can you be working for peace and
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working from strength when somebody has that kind of power over your country? i don't think that is good. you have given up your strength. it is very bad for germany and the german people and i don't think it is very good for nato, to know the truth. we said we would take four questions each and we have done that stop on the pipeline issue, we have been talking to the germans and other countries within the european union and why we continue to sit around the eu table we will discuss this at that table and we will make our views known. mr president, thank you. we have been discussing this with germany, the president has made clear his concerns about what is happening and angela merkel made her position clear. there are discussions to be held within the european union on the pipeline and
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we are talking to other countries within the european union and i think the president said earlier in response to a question about a future meeting he was going to have that he would tell you what is happening after the meeting. you will see what comes out from the european union. we are still a memberof the eu, european union. we are still a member of the eu, of course, until march next year, then we are leaving. thank you very much, thank you. applause as ever with a donald trump press conference, so many things to take out of it, so many headlines and so many areas and so many controversial things will —— and now we can try to pick out some of the notable comments. the two sides will pursue an ambitious bilateral deal after brexit. not what he said to the sun
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overnight, he said the brexiteer was dead, but he said, —— he said the brexit deal was dead. he has said he doesn't care what we do, butjust make sure that we can trade together at the end of it. he says he supports the british public in the decision they have taken. he said what he has said to theresa may was merely a suggestion and not advice, although i can see, he said, it was tough for her to take. that suggests there were words about the headlines in the sun this morning, maybe because the opening comments from the prime minister there was a coded message," it is all our responsibility that this special relationship endures". the president
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talked about theresa may doing a terrificjob talked about theresa may doing a terrific job but he talked about theresa may doing a terrificjob but he also talked about boris johnson, who terrificjob but he also talked about borisjohnson, who you also thought would be a terrific prime minister. she did smile but because borisjohnson is the one who has poured cold water over her brexit proposals so that can't have been easy for her to listen to. he was asked about the interview he gave to the sun, he did not criticise her, he said repeatedly, he said it was fa ke he said repeatedly, he said it was fake news. we haven't heard what was in the newspaper but sarah signed as has the interview and i did talk about the prime minister in glowing terms he said —— sarah signed as he said the special relationship is the highest level of special. on your screens now, look at the number of protesters on the streets. this
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is the second protest of the day. we have the women's protest earlier. i would say there are several thousand people in regent street right now. they will make their way to parliament square in westminster and they are making their feelings plainly known. we can go back to chequers. norman smith is there. what did you take out of the press conference? i thought it was going to bea conference? i thought it was going to be a lovey—dovey display and it turned into a love fest. donald trump laying it on, talking about theresa may as an incredible woman, wonderful woman. she was doing a terrificjob, he said. he was laying it on thick. understandably. in an effort to repair the damage his interview in the sun has caused. his response to the sun is to say it is
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fa ke response to the sun is to say it is fake news. and that they did not report the nice things he said about theresa may, omitting the fact he spoke about how well she was doing. in other words, move along, nothing to see. that gets you so far but most people will take the view that in private donald trump probably is pretty worried and dismissive about theresa may's approach to brexit and when he was asked about, would you be able to do a trade deal, he didn't say that theresa may's proposals meant it had been killed off, but i detected there were caveats and concerns about how easy it would be to do a trade deal and whether they would be able to do deals when it came to american livestock and american food, for example. he did not completely abandon his qualms about what the deal theresa may has done is going to mean in terms of how easy it will be to get a trade deal. and that
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theresa may, a sigh of relief that the president has not stuck by his remarks in the sun, instead suggesting he has been misreported, but that is his style. as someone who has not been to one of his news conference as before, i was struck by the way any hostile question is dismissed as dishonest reporting or fa ke dismissed as dishonest reporting or fake news, and the poor guy from cnn, the president said, i don't ta ke cnn, the president said, i don't take questions from cnn, that is fa ke take questions from cnn, that is fake news, let's go to fox news. laughter he picks and chooses who he wants to ta ke he picks and chooses who he wants to take questions from. he says united states contributes 90% to the fans of nato, which it doesn't, that is fa ke of nato, which it doesn't, that is fake news in itself —— the funding of nato. this was an exercise in walking it back. what was
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interesting is that he talked about the dinner at blenheim palace and i was surprised that he said that this was surprised that he said that this was a real getting to know you. he said it was embarrassing for the other guests at the table because they talked to each other all night. does that address the fear that they don't have a particularly close relationship? let's be honest. they do not have a close relationship, not in the way you think of other leaders, margaret thatcher and ronald reagan, tony blair with bill clinton. they mashed together and they were similar people, but donald trump and theresa may are poles apart. they have very little in common in terms of how they approach politics and their personality and also in terms of their worldview. donald trump is a man who believes in the primacy of the nation state
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and who views politics as a branch of unarmed combat as far as i can see, but theresa may is a more conventional politician, she tries to avoid confrontation. she is someone who doesn't like to cause upset or controversy, the opposite of donald trump. they are never going to be close. does it matter? at one level it does, because politics is easier when the person you are dealing with is someone you can actually get on with, but the substance is, when it comes to those post—brexit trade deals it is clear that donald trump has real concerns about how far the deal to reza may is negotiating is going to make it attractive or possible for the us to doa attractive or possible for the us to do a deal —— the deal theresa may is negotiating. clearly those reservations remain and they echo
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the reservations of theresa may's brexit critics. we are looking at pictures of marine one which will ta ke pictures of marine one which will take the president back to winfield house, the ambassador's residence in regenfs house, the ambassador's residence in regent's park. and for those who are concerned about international alliances, it is reassuring that he sees the special relationship as the highest level of special which is quite fulsome. but when he talked about nato he said that he was prepared to do some fairly tough things, people were shocked how far he going to go. maybe referring to the suggestion that maybe he might have withdrawn funding and maybe asked the germans to find the american troops in germany. he was spoiling for a fight in brussels —— germany to fund. he's very keen to get other countries to contribute
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the 2% and he views the nato summit asa the 2% and he views the nato summit as a victory because they have all pledged at most of them, to move faster in terms of providing that 296, faster in terms of providing that 2%, and he has said he would like nato to be stronger and better resourced and that is the thing that president trump will notice from the nato summit. —— that president putin. he said he had a great relationship with angela merkel, i would like to know what angela merkel thinks about that. he's not modest about his own abilities. he said the russian invasion of crimea would never have happened if he had been the president. he gives an extraordinarily self—confident upbeat assessment of international affairs. as he heads off to russia, to helsinki, in fact, with the meeting with the russian president
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vladimir putin, clearly the uk government has taken a position on that visit. there's donald trump getting out of the beast and making his way to marine one. as he goes to helsinki, clearly the uk position is that it helsinki, clearly the uk position is thatitis helsinki, clearly the uk position is that it is all right to engage the russian president from this position of strength and from the unity in nato. they have to say that, don't they? presumably in light of what happened in sores bring in the last week they would prefer that this visit had not gone ahead? —— what happened in salisbury in the last week. i think so, happened in salisbury in the last week. ithink so, although happened in salisbury in the last week. i think so, although the president did withdraw 60 or so american diplomats in the wake of the salisbury poisoning, and clearly theresa may would like the president to ta ke theresa may would like the president to take up the issue again with vladimir putin, but the difficulty is he has a lot that he wants to ta ke is he has a lot that he wants to take up with the president in terms of syria and the middle east more
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broadly and in terms of the difficulties with the ukraine. a range of issues which the president will have to talk to vladimir putin about, but for the british government, i think the outcome of today will be the best they could have hoped for because it could have conned badly wrong and we could have beenin conned badly wrong and we could have been ina conned badly wrong and we could have been in a full—scale diplomatic row —— could have gone badly wrong. been in a full—scale diplomatic row -- could have gone badly wrong. yes. the president is making his way to marine one. we saw the president is making his way to marine one. we sanohn kerry, the chief of staff, striding out in front —— john kelly. there will be a short period of rest, and then a four o'clock he will prepare to leave for windsor, the highlight of his visit, because he is coming here for a meeting with the queen and they will have tea for half an hour
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in the company of melania trump. he has spoken many times, about his british roots, and his mother, who was born in the uk, in the outer hebrides and emigrated to the united states in the 1940s. what would she have made of the prospect of one of her sons meeting the queen, he said. she would have liked it, he said. clearly he sees this as the highlight of his visit, next to the fa ct highlight of his visit, next to the fact that he will be going to turnberry golf club over the weekend to play a round of golf. he also has one in aberdeen, of course. there is a marine one about to take off from chequers. norman, laura made the point in the press conference that although theresa may doesn't like the headlines, when you look at what is on paper in that white paper, it will make it very difficult to do a
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trade deal with the united states. that is true. downing street is acutely sensitive on this issue because it is at the heart of the whole purpose of brexit, that by leaving the eu we hope to strike much more lucrative trade deals with countries like america and the president in his interview in the sun said that will be tricky if you are still bound to the eu through this, and eu rule book, echoing the concerns of many tory brexiteers, that this chequers steel cut the ground from underneath —— chequers deal. in what they regard as one of the key advantages of brexit, enabling us to do essential deals. i detected in some of the president's a nswe rs detected in some of the president's answers that he was still harbouring that concern about how easy and how
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practical and how attractive it would be to do those trade deals if we are signed up to eu rules and that will be seized on by theresa may's brexit critics and will embolden them to keep hammering away at theresa may on this issue. the other thing i thought that was striking, the president also clearly believes that brexit was part of a reaction to immigration, he has talked about the impact of immigration on the culture of europe and he clearly feels that drove the brexit referendum and he was one of the few people to predict it, and yet in that area we are still waiting the details of what theresa may's response is going to be in terms of the alternative to freedom of movement. she spoke about freedom
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of movement. she spoke about freedom of movement. she spoke about freedom of movement coming to an end but we really don't know what sort of package is going to be put in place and whether it will be a system which gives preferential or advantages treatment to eu citizens and that is another great uncertainty in the sort of deal that theresa may is trying to negotiate and is another area where tory brexiteers are fearful that she is going to backtrack on what people actually voted for in the brexit referendum. marine one pulling out of picture, the ospreys on the lawn in front of chequers. a reminder that even though this is not a state visit, don't think this is low—key, because what comes with the president is a whole paraphernalia, six different helicopters, always the detail with marine one, and the ospreys will score them back to london to the us ambassador‘s residence. those helicopters will be
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on their way to windsor in just under two hours. norman, on their way to windsor in just undertwo hours. norman, let's on their way to windsor in just under two hours. norman, let's talk about the protests in london, because it was interesting, they brought president trump on an approach to blenheim palace that did not taken over the protests at the front gate. he may see these extraordinary pictures in london on regenfs extraordinary pictures in london on regent's park, thousands of people protesting against his visit. he is acutely sensitive to the demonstrations and he talked about how he felt unwelcome in london and we know he is a man who devours rolling news so i'm sure he will be watching the television later on and seeing the demonstrations and i suspect he will feel wounded by them. clearly he would have liked to have, to london —— like to have come
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to london and maybe have the opportunity to speak in parliament and to have a much more public profile, but instead he has been pretty much kept well out of the way of the public, in chequers for example, where you can't get much more wrong mode. you are really very farfrom any more wrong mode. you are really very far from any prospect at all of any demonstration —— much more remote. he will be disappointed that is the response of many people, of course. norman smith at chequers, thank you very much. we have been watching the press co nfe re nce very much. we have been watching the press conference between theresa may and donald trump which hasjust finished. donald trump is now on his way to the us ambassador ‘s residence in regents park where he will for about an hour and, maybe, as norma will telling us all pass over the thousands of people who are now in regent street outside new
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broadcasting house and portland square. they did say they expected 10,000 people in london for the protest today and this is one of two marches. this is the stop the donald trump march. the earlier one, the women's march, arrived in parliament square mid—afternoon, and this morning, which was the focus for the cameras, the blimp was flown above parliament six metre inflatable president trump as a baby. norman was saying he was very sensitive and he has attacked sadiq khan for allowing the blimp to be flown and took on about the way he tackle crime and immigration but this might be some grist to the mill, because as norman said, he did take on some of the hot button issues, such as nato spending, immigration and the way he perceives that it is changing the culture of the united states and
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europe. taking on europe about trade and tariffs, so those are the sort of things bring out these that protests, under certain percentage of american people, they won't care about these images. they will think he is fighting the issues that he promised he would fight on during the 2016 campaign. not an easy moment for theresa may, when he praised her nemesis borisjohnson who poured cold water over the brexit proposal to put on the table. he could do a terrificjob as prime minister, he said. although on numerous occasions was walking back his comments in the sun newspaper while praising theresa may and saying he had not spoken badly of her. let's get an idea of what has been going on through the day. plenty to discuss and we will get to that into the next hour. always
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highly anticipated, the tension around this moment today was partially heightened. earlier, president trump had criticised the prime minister's brexit strategy in a newspaper interview saying it could kill us —— of us trade deals, but no sign of that, in fact the opposite. we agreed today that is the uk leaves the european union we will pursue an ambitious us, uk trade agreement. the chequers agreement provides the platform for donald and me to agree an ambitious deal that works for both countries right across the economy. the deal that builds on the uk's independent trade policy, reducing tariffs, delivering a gold standard in financial services cooperation and, as two of the worlds most advanced economies, seizing the opportunity of new technology. but did the president agree? once the brexit processes and concluded and perhaps
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the uk has left the eu, and i don't know what you're going to do, but whatever you do is ok with me, that's your decision. whatever you're going to do is ok with us, but make sure you can trade with us, that's all that matters. the us looks forward to finalising a great bilateral trade agreement with the united kingdom. this is an incredible opportunity for our two countries and we will seize it fully. but there were questions about that interview. had he changed his mind? unfortunately there was a story done which was generally fine, but it didn't put in what i said about the prime minister and i said tremendous things. we record when we deal with reporters. it's called fa ke deal with reporters. it's called fake news. and we solve a lot of problems with the good old recording instrument, but what happens is, look, the prime minister, she is going to make a decision as to what she will do. the only thing i ask of theresa is that we make sure we can trade and we don't have any
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restrictions, because we want to trade with the uk and the uk wants to trade with us. theresa may was clear as well. there will be no limit to the possibility of us doing trade deals around the rest of the world once we leave the european union. on the basis of the agreement that was made here at chequers and i put forward to the european union. just be clear, that is in agreement that delivers on the brexit vote that delivers on the brexit vote that we had in 2016 here in the uk, that we had in 2016 here in the uk, that delivers what i believe is at the forefront of people's minds when they were voting to leave the european union. the pair had met earlierfor european union. the pair had met earlier for formal talks and that interview was in the background. donald trump had suggested in the sun newspaper that the brexit negotiations had fallen short. sun newspaper that the brexit negotiations had fallen shortlj would have done it much differently. i actually told theresa may had to do it but she didn't listen to me. she didn't listen. i told her how to do it. his comments landed with a third. he
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had said that if the government stuck to its current plan there would be no trade deal with the us. if they do a deal like that, it will most likely, because we will be dealing with the european union instead of the uk. the president might have changed his tune this afternoon but his earlier comments were already seized upon by some tory brexiteers. in westminster, theresa may is already facing a backlash from the brexit supporting mps. donald trump has fuelled their argumentjust supporting mps. donald trump has fuelled their argument just that she's trying to hold her fractured party together, and it wasn'tjust brexit he shared his views on. just days ago, borisjohnson quit over the government's brexit policy and has long been a thorn in the side of theresa may, but the president praised him. i was very saddened to see he was leaving government. i am not pitting one against the other,
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i'm just saying i think he would be a great prime minister. at chequers today, the tone was more conservatory. this was a demonstration of friendship. boris johnson i think would be a great prime minister, but i also said that this incredible woman, right here, is doing a fantasticjob, greatjob. and i mean that. and i must say that i have gotten to know theresa may much better over the last two days than i have known her over the last year and than i have known her over the last yearand a than i have known her over the last year and a half. so what about those brexit negotiations? you can't walk away, because if she walks away that means she's stuck. you can't walk away. she is a very smart, very tough, very capable person. and i would much rather have her as my friend than my enemy, that i can tell you. but some words cannot be unspoken. his earlier comments are unlikely to be forgotten. i think we
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are quite familiar now, but what president trump says in the presence of world leaders is not necessarily what he thinks in private, or the actions he might take at a later date. you are looking at pictures of the protest now in central london on regent street, making their way from portland square, which you can see on the left side of the screen, down to parliament square in westminster. thousands of people, you'd have to say, in regent street this afternoon. the biggest protests we have seen so far and the second protest of the day. we do have some protesters gathering here at king henry viii gate at windsor although this is a smattering compared to what you are seeing on your screens. let's check in with anita louise downer westminster, parliament square, where the rally will finish. —— louise downer westminster. and that earlier protest, the bring
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the noise protest, which set off at portland place, that arrived in parliament square little earlier, and as we were listening to the chequers news conference, we could hear the voices of protest in the background, right here at the heart of british democracy. so much to talk about from that news conference. joining me to give us their thoughts on that and on the protest today we have the political correspondent from the spectator and john rental. let's begin with the pa rt john rental. let's begin with the part of the news conference that was about trade with theresa may talking about trade with theresa may talking about a us/ uk trade agreement and saying that donald and me we talked about an ambitious deal for us to build on. did you think there was a reciprocal comment from the president, john, or was he rather vague? just about. when he was reading about from his prepared
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script it was like attending a news co nfe re nce script it was like attending a news conference with doctor jekyll and script it was like attending a news conference with doctorjekyll and mr hyde. when he read from the prepared script he just about delivered the words he had to and urged theresa may to do a deal with the european union that would allow her to do a trade deal with the us. but when he we nt trade deal with the us. but when he went off script it was completely unpredictable as to what he would say, and i think theresa mayjust about got away with it because he was effusive about her personally, saying they got on better now than they ever had done. katie, he described the relationship between the us and uk as the highest level of special, not once, not twice but three times he said. do think that theresa may believes that?” three times he said. do think that theresa may believes that? i think it's hard to fully believe that after all what happened last night when she rolled out the red carpet for the president only to kind of had it thrown back in her face with that splash in the sun newspaper suggesting she was wrecking brexit and that this was not something he could work with. in terms of damage
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limitation it went as well as it could for ten downing st. what was key, was when he said having listened to theresa may and her advisers he thought there was room for a deal with this white paper. ultimately, quite a lot of damage has been done and it's only cemented fears in the conservative party that the plan is not the brexit they wanted. i was talking to scott lucas, professor of international relations at birmingham university earlier, and he argued that whatever happened to the uk is collateral damage as far as donald trump is concerned because what he really wa nts to concerned because what he really wants to do is reduce the power of the eu. would you agree with that?” would think so. when donald trump is being mr hyde, that is certainly what he really thinks. he wanted to go on and on about nuclear proliferation and keeping iran in its box. that is what he was keen to talk about. he didn't really want to
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talk about. he didn't really want to talk about. he didn't really want to talk about europe tall. he wanted to talk about europe tall. he wanted to talk about europe tall. he wanted to talk about how big and important he was in relation to vladimir putin, but he wasn't really interested in talking about europe. he was prepared to say the required things in orderto keep prepared to say the required things in order to keep theresa may happy because she was standing next to him. i'd love to get both your thoughts on the protest we are seeing today. obviously the uk has a long tradition of political protest. katie, do you think these will have an impact? what difference might they make? we can probably presume that donald trump is not overjoyed there are protest. we know he is rather thin skinned on this. we will still have visit —— figures like there's visiting the country because despite what has happened overnight, ultimately the government believes in international diplomacy and thinks that is the way to do it but they also think you have a right to protest. i think everybody can get what they want from it. right now, john, the uk needs that trade deal and is rather more concerned about that deal with the us than perhaps
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it is about the protests? yes. theresa may is caught between two impossible positions. she is very, very unpopular for cosying up to a very unpopular for cosying up to a very unpopular for cosying up to a very unpopular american president but she has no alternative with brexit. she has to seek some kind of trade arrangement with america but it's an impossible question as well. sol it's an impossible question as well. so i don't see any easy way out of it. a lot of people down there would like to do a hugh grant and tell donald trump to get lost, and she did defend immigration when she was standing next to him as he attacked it. but beyond that, she doesn't wa nt it. but beyond that, she doesn't want to damage relations with america in any way. was that a difficult moment for her on the immigration question, katie? trying to respond after what donald trump had said because theresa may does not want to be seen as weak on immigration beddau —— nor does she wa nt to ta ke immigration beddau —— nor does she want to take the line donald trump is taking? she did gesture that the
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president should go first on the answer, almost like she wanted to see what he would say and then respond. but i think she probably relished it as an opportunity to put some clear water between the two. she is the type of person who is not going to stand up and do the hugh grant thing, but she has cut a statesman—like figure, and that is in the face of some bad manners, really. she managed to kind of rise above it. just a final thought. donald trump took up the lion's share of the news conference. he really did. how did you feel that theresa may compared in the news conference? i thought she came across a statesman—like where is he came across as this weird combination of man reading from script and the usual kind of donald trump who says whatever comes onto the top of his head. he was rambling about his good mate angela at one point. theresa may, by contrast, looked like a sensible, grown—up world leader. ok, john, katie, thank
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you for your thoughts today. those voices of protest still rising from parliament square below our position here, and it's going to get louder when the second big rally gets here a little later this afternoon. but that protest continuing well into the evening tonight and it's been a very peaceful protest, a massive policing operation around all of this, of course, but everything has been very peaceful according to all reports. and from what we have seen so far. whether donald trump chooses to look at any of these images, we won't know, and during the news conference he said he written would refuse to take a question from one news organisation he dismissed as fa ke news organisation he dismissed as fake news. another question he did not like, he said it was dishonest reporting. let's see whether these images actually hit home with anybody over in the states. from parliament square, it is back to you, christian. the preparations
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starting to build for president from's arrival. you might see behind me there are some protesters who have gathered and they have the placards on the european flag is president trump will not see these protesters when he comes to the castle because he will be coming in to the eastern terrace lawn and will be transported to the quadrangle within the castle when he will meet the queen little later and there will be a guard of honour from the 1st battalion coldstream guards. we will bring you that live as and when it happens, but before that lets get some reaction to the press conference we just had and the comments in the sun newspaper earlier today. nigel farage, former ukip leader, joins me from westminster. good to have your company this afternoon. i saw an interview you did last night on the bbc and there was a suggestion that you had been speaking to people in mr trump's entourage. did you put him up to it? this all gets exaggerated. i will admit the language used in the sun interview
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was similar to the language i had been using since the check agreement, but in a way that's not surprising, because i felt pretty much betrayed by what she had done andi much betrayed by what she had done and i think the american administration are genuinely upset. having a free—trade deal with the uk is really important to them and part of theirforeign is really important to them and part of their foreign policy and the idea that that would be held below the water line made them very upset. let me tell you one thing. i do not need to convince donald trump to be a eurosceptic. he and the rest of his tea m eurosceptic. he and the rest of his team view the european union as being at the very centre of the globalist movement which, in many ways, helu ree clinton was fighting for in the presidential election in they were fighting against —— hillary clinton. on the charge that i put hillary clinton. on the charge that iput him hillary clinton. on the charge that i put him up to it though, not guilty. we know, and i've already been saying it through the day that what we get from president trump when he's standing next to world leaders is not necessarily how he feels deep down or the action he will take. so as he goes away from here, this weekend, where do you
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think we are on this bilateral trade deal? almost nowhere. it was very interesting that trump said again and again in the press conference look, you know, the people voted for full independence and you can interpret that as you see. brexit is up interpret that as you see. brexit is up to you, but we want to have a trade deal. mrs may, and somebody must wind her up at the back, because she says we are taking back control of law, money, borders, fisheries, and we can have free—trade deals around the world. she says this stuff again and again, by rote, and then when you examine the detail of any this you find she is frankly not telling the truth. trump said, mrs may has assured us we can have a trade deal and that is good. frankly, he said it with very little sincerity and i think he will go back to washington, dc and the administration will be genuinely upset that the uk government has
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chosen the path of full regulatory alignment. you and many of the brexiteers were highly critical of the intervention we got from president obama back in 2016 before the referendum when he said we were going to be at the back of the queue. are you not slightly irritated that we have an american president undermining the british prime minister at a time when she is hosting him here in the uk?” prime minister at a time when she is hosting him here in the uk? i get that barack hosting him here in the uk? i get that ba rack obama hosting him here in the uk? i get that barack obama said the president. there is a difference here, the difference that obama was trying to influence the way we voted ina trying to influence the way we voted in a national referendum. what donald trump came here to do, in many ways, was to defend american foreign policy. it is american foreign policy. it is american foreign policy. it is american foreign policy and has been stated quite publicly ever since the inauguration that they will have a trade deal with the uk. the uk have co nsta ntly trade deal with the uk. the uk have constantly been reassuring them that once brexit is dealt with that will be ok and clearly as that came seriously into doubt over the course
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of this week, he felt he was defending not only his own policy position but it was a way of saying to the british government that you are letting us down. but it was different, wasn't it, beat intervention from president obama because he was supporting the prime minister? here he was undermining the prime minister and even when he was putting on the back of the press conference, he was standing next saint borisjohnson conference, he was standing next saint boris johnson could conference, he was standing next saint borisjohnson could be a terrific prime minister. and also pouring cold water on the brexit plan. it is by any historical standards a very remarkable intervention, a bombshell in many ways, what we got overnight, at the heart of the british establishment. i know people are shocked and stunned, but i'm not particularly. because that is who donald trump is. he says it as he sees it. he breaks with all traditional conventions, but he is very consistent. he has backed brexit from well before the referendum and believes it's the right thing to this country. he was
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excited about the prospect of a trade deal and now that is in serious doubt. he does not waver. you told me in brussels a week ago that you were quite enjoying your retirement. you were brown, looking fitter and you said this political game is behind me. and then on your programme on lbc this week you say, look, if this is the brexit plan we're going to get, i will come back and lead ukip again. is that right? i was genuinely shocked by what came out of chequers. i understand in any negotiation there is give and take but not complete, total, abject surrender and frankly a betrayal. it isa surrender and frankly a betrayal. it is a strong word, but a betrayal, not only of how people voted in the referendum but of a general election ma nifesto referendum but of a general election manifesto headed up by theresa may herself. but your party is in ruins at the moment. if we get to the spring of next year and article 50 has been suspended or this betrayal
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has been suspended or this betrayal has continued, then yes, i would very seriously consider chucking myself back into the of this. i can assure you that it is not on my bucket list of things to do, but if i have do, i will. very quickly, have you met him or will you meet him while he is here? no, i'm not. in the dramatic terms that would be worse than the sun newspaper front page. a downing street made it was a red line in the protocol agreements that he would not meet me on this trip. he has left chequers with things ina trip. he has left chequers with things in a slightly more conservatory level, and the last thing he will do now is make me —— conciliatory. nigel farage, thank you very much. i'm joined here at windsor by ron christie, friend mine. we share the platform on a crack at beyond 100 days in the evening. you are over here in london to ta ke evening. you are over here in london to take in the atmosphere? yes, and of course tojoin to take in the atmosphere? yes, and of course to join you on the bbc. what did you make of what you saw in
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the press conference? extraordinary. extraordinary to have the prime minister and president standing next to each other and then he says that borisjohnson would to each other and then he says that boris johnson would make to each other and then he says that borisjohnson would make a good prime minister. i wonder what goes through the head of theresa may when she stands there. she had a frozen expression as if to say, what in the blazes are you saying? what happens once donald trump leaves the uk, what does it mean for the relationship with theresa may or any subsequent government?” relationship with theresa may or any subsequent government? i must remind our view is that you are a republican, a more moderate republican, a more moderate republican and he might construe you as part of the establishment. what with the established republicans backin with the established republicans back in congress make of what they have seen and witnessed in nato in brussels? i have to imagine the leaders in congress and both in the house and senate must be mortified. why would they be? we talk about the special relationship with britain and the way that the donald trump negotiates, it seems he talks first and then retreat and comes back later. it worked for george w bush
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and we carefully talked about what the president hopes to achieve on this trip, what are the objectives, and donald trump seems by his commentary on the last 24 hours, it seems he will shoot first and see what happens later. of course a lot of people here in windsor and out on the streets of london differentiate between americans and the man who has come here as the president of the united states. but what will people think back home when they see these extraordinary pictures at portland place on regent street this afternoon? i can only tell you how it relates to me. i was out in london this morning and it was extraordinary and a bit sad to see so many people with such hateful signs and slogans about the president of the united states, donald trump. you can disagree with the man and there are a lot that do, but as an american, being in london today and in windsor it upsets me that people have this level of vitriol for the leader of my country. so you make a differentiation between the man and the office, and we should be
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respecting the office?” the office, and we should be respecting the office? i do see it that way. i've said repeatedly that the us and uk have had such a special relationship are so many yea rs special relationship are so many years and that will continue but the political landscape changes here and there and the leaders come in and out the strong relationship is the bond that i'm not worried about. but it might be impacted today. people might say it is a two—way street. respect the office and the host and the prime minister and he's done none of that. that's what i've heard from a lot of people in london this morning that they feel he does not respect women or people of colour and they are showing their disrespect back at him, so you are right, it is a two—way street. the only thing i can say is that when people engage me here is they have said, judging by his actions and not his words. look at his actions. his words are offensive to many but his actions have really helped strengthen the us in many ways in the course of his administration. so the course of his administration. so the big event this afternoon is clearly the one he is most looking
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forward to. he would probably have preferred it was the full state visit with all the protocol and paraphernalia that comes with that, but nonetheless, to go in there and meet the queen, you were on the trip with george w bush back in 2008. what does it mean to a us president to meet the monarch? it is significant. you are talking about a state visit and going to buckingham palace, the heart of the monarchy, and as american president, paying respect to a head of state. the fact we are standing here in front of windsor castle, he will meet with the monarch and have tea with her and she is going to explain some of her priorities as head of state and mark and donald trump as a president, he has always wanted him. his friends say he has always wanted an audience with the queen and in a few more hours he will have it. but as an american, representing you, are you slightly nervous given all the protocol that comes with a royal visit and the vigorous handshakes that we see and the picking of
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dandruff shoulders? are you a bit concerned? of course! we were meeting with folks from downing street and the palace for months ahead of time, so now we have a short timeline where the president will meet the queen and who knows what he might say or react. it will be an interesting next couple of hours and until we hear marine one and see what happens with the queen and see what happens with the queen and the president of the united states. i will talk plenty more through the course of the afternoon and i'm very much looking forward to seeing pictures from the quadrangle in the heart of windsor castle. the queen will meet him there, and they will inspect the 1st battalion coldstrea m will inspect the 1st battalion coldstream guards and they will be there as a guard of honour for this afternoon, and we expect him around 4:50pm. marine one is going to land as the eastern side the castle, on the eastern terrace, and he will come in over the royal household golf course, a nine hole golf course on the edge of windsor castle. so he
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will have a look at that as he flies in and we will of course bring you all the pictures live as it happens. but for the moment, let's go, where are we going? let's go back to check is because james cook has been travelling with the president and watching the events —— back to chequers. we've just been watching the events —— back to chequers. we'vejust been hearing from ron christie about what he perceived from the press conference. how has it gone down there? well, it was a pretty extraordinary news conference here in the sweltering heat of buckinghamshire, besides chequers. butterflies flitting past and love was in the air, it seemed. the president held the prime minister's hand as she walked to the podium and that set the tone for the entire event. he lavished praise on theresa may as if the interview in the sun newspaper had never happened at all. but beyond all of that and his reassurances, and there were many, particularly on brexit and the necessity for the uk and the
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possibility of the us of doing a trade deal after brexit, particularly on that, the president said we would do a deal and the prime minister was keen to stress over and over that the two countries we re over and over that the two countries were determined to do a trade deal after brexit but, with that having been said, it was clear that there we re been said, it was clear that there were differences that remain here. not least on the thorny issue of how we do that trade deal, as to whether, if the uk retains standards that pertain to europe, whether the united states will be happy with that. it has different standards for food, for example, and it might not be keen to see the attraction of a trade deal with the uk if it is still staying with the old european rules. so that is one area where the fundamental underlying differences might still remain, and another area that was very stark was the subject of immigration. the question was asked following the interview in the sun newspaper, did the president
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think that immigration to europe was a problem? there were no caveats in his reply. he simply stated that immigration, per se, was his reply. he simply stated that immigration, perse, was a bad thing and changing the culture of europe. that is pretty extraordinary language, language that will alarm some people and probably delight others. but it was language that the prime minister was not at all prepared to repeat. she had a very different answer, talking about how immigration had been good for the united kingdom. as you have been mingling around with the american reporters, did you getan with the american reporters, did you get an oppression that they were shocked with what they had seen on the front page of the newspaper? quite a number of the american reporters who have been covering relations between these countries for a long time, even though they are used to president trump and
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these outbursts, or extremely unusual comments, even though they are used to him, there was still a glass of surprise and shock for some of them at the interview in the sun. as well as in america but also here and certainly in downing street. the americans are intrigued by this relationship between the two, and they would say they spend a lot of time with the president, and you just simply never know what is going to happen next. although sometimes you can discern a possible pattern which is he says something in century and then in private or without being face—to—face with the person in question, and then he appears with them later and is all smiles and it is glossed over —— says something incendiary. a lot of
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the americans in the white house in particular regard this to be honest as something of a warm up, this is not the main event, but and the main event is his meeting with president vladimir putin in helsinki and he was asked about that as well, he is under pressure for alleged ties to russia, being too close to russia, which he denies, but there is pressure on him and many eyes will be watching him to see how he handles mr putin. i'm going to show our viewers the pictures of marine one landing in regent's park, at the us ambassador‘s residence. he will be reuniting with the first lady, who has been out with fill eight. —— who has been out with fill eight. —— who has been out with theresa may's husband philip. they went to the
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chelsea hospital and also they did some bowling together. they will be travelling to windsor in just over an hour. that is marine one, coming into land. one more question on the issue of russia, he was asked whether he is going to raise the issue of interference in the 2016 election and he has talked in terms before that he did not believe it and that it was overblown. now he says he will raise it and he knows thatis says he will raise it and he knows that is the question you are begging to ask vladimir putin. yes, he said that at nato, as well, that he will raise the issue there, and he seemed very relaxed, and i would say that he seemed on excellent form, chocolate at times, —— jocular at
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times and combative at times with the press, after all he brought up fa ke the press, after all he brought up fake news again. but in terms of the election meddling, he says he will raise it, and people are suspicious, his critics are suspicious as to whether he will push it. he said vladimir putin is hardly going to admit it, but he will mention it to him. a more crucial issue that could provoke a crisis is the issue of crimea, he was pressed on whether he would recognise russia's illegal annexation of crimea and if he were to do so that would be a crisis for nato which abhors what happened in that regard, so we have got to keep a check on that, as well. we can go to westminster and talk to anita who
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is watching the protests. yes, the bring the noise protest which began earlier and came to parliament square a few hours ago, it is still going on, the crowd has broken up but we can still hear singers and speakers, and those numbers will be swelling soon with the second big protest of the day against trump, making its way from the same location in central london to the heart of british democracy, parliament square in westminster. earlier today at the beginning of this day we had the baby balloon floating above the tree tops behind me in parliament square. very much a symbol of the opposition to this visit to the uk by the president of the united states. we can talk about this visit, including what the first lady has been doing. i'm joined by
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the vice chancellor for education at manchester metropolitan university. thank you very much joining us. professor, i would like to have your thoughts on the comment by donald trump in the press conference when he called the us relationship with the uk the very highest level of special. it is a very strange but not unusual way of saying things.” can't quite say what that means, but it is an off—the—cuff remark and he is time to butter her up and maybe ward off the critical pressie has been getting about his manners in terms of criticising her. —— reticle press he has been getting. sometimes it seems that melania trump is rather in his shadow. how do you think she has been doing as a first
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lady when you compare her to others? the first lady has a couple of functions, we have to remember donald trump is notjust the head of the government but the head of state and so she has a role as the wife of the head of state, the consort, if you like, like our royalfamily. she has to help america build its soft power in the world and so we see her doing the things she has been doing today, standing by his side and being very well—dressed and making america look like a nice friendly approachable place. she's not doing approachable place. she's not doing a terriblejob. the pictures of approachable place. she's not doing a terrible job. the pictures of her in chelsea were rather charming and we have seen her in saudi arabia and israel and paris, behaving quite well and she's wary photogenic and she comes across very well and she's wary photogenic and she comes across very genuine. the second role is her role as a wife, as someone who humanises the president and makes them look approachable and like a human being, and she is struggling a little bit. we have never seen a first lady who
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looks less at ease with her husband as melania trump. that generates press commentary, as well. indeed. she did meet the chelsea pensioners. and the children. yes, she's very good at that. sorry to interrupts... she's only did charm the chelsea pensioners and the children she met, but if you compare her to her predecessor michelle obama, there is a huge contrast. michelle obama much more vocal in her role as first lady. yes, she was comfortable in the role, she was prepared for it and she relished it and enjoyed it. what we see with melania trump, we have moments where she looks quite natural and where she is enjoying herself, but the interesting thing is, she ready looks like that, so we see a woman who looks like a
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hostage, not enjoying her role, not looking comfortable in it —— she rarely looks. there is the idea and suggestion that she was not happy when donald trump won the election, and that she was in tears. we do see positive pictures of her and her smiling and laughing and looking at ease, but it is more, and to see her looking awkward, standing apart from her husband —— more common to see. those don't play out well, compared with the positive optics of michelle obama who visited london, she seemed to come over as a warm natural person who was enjoying herself and we don't see that with melania trump full -- we don't see that with melania trump full —— melania trump, who does not seem to be enjoying her role or her marriage, frankly. in terms of her
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role, is that something that is going to change? i do think so. she has been silent so far —— i don't think so. she will carry on as she is although she might grow in confidence and she might come across a bit more smoothly. the campaign she is heading is very generic and doesn't have much going for it in terms of something you can latch onto so i can't see that becoming a strong campaign, so i don't expect to see a change. she took a long time to move up to the white house, and there was thought that when she got there she would take more active role but we haven't seen it. we have seen her disappearing from view. she did have health problems, a kidney procedure, but she disappeared off the public radar to the point where the public radar to the point where the press were making comments about it and it became a story in its own right. that is unlikely to change because we have not seen any signals or indication that she would like to ta ke or indication that she would like to take a stronger role. professor,
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from manchester metropolitan university, thanks for joining from manchester metropolitan university, thanks forjoining us. we can have a closer look now at what the first lady has been doing. melania trump arrived in the sunshine at the royal hospital chelsea, to meet an audience of young and old. shejoined in poppy making with pupils from a local primary school and seemed pleased to have their help. the first lady wanted to meet children... and have the opportunity to promote her be best campaign which focuses on young people's well—being. the chelsea pensioners did not know about her visit until this morning, but they were delighted to meet the first lady who was hosted on her visit by the prime minister's husband, philip may. did she win you over? yes, every person, she did.
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she came across magic, absolutely magic. yes, absolutely. we tried to get an invite! i don't think we will be invited to the white house yet but we live in hope! i think she will go back and think this is one of the better things she has done. i do believe it. she rounded off this trip with a game of bowls. despite her high heels, she seemed to take it in her stride. sian lloyd, bbc news, at the royal hospital chelsea. we can talk to peter goodman, a chief economist at the new york times. he is in our westminster studios. let's talk about trade and the news conference at chequers. theresa may talking about donald and me and building an
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ambitious trade eel between the uk and us. donald trump sounded slightly less positive —— trade deal. would you disagree? he had trashed the idea of there being a trade deal in the interview in the sun and he was trying to do some sort of damage control in what looked like the most awkward date of all time from the outside. he seems to be going out of his way to reassure the prime minister that he has respect for her and that it is still conceivable that there can be a trading arrangement, and he made it sound there could be no trade period between the uk and the us, which is a ms construction of how global trade works, we are talking about terms of trade, and tariffs, but it is verse we are talking that this trade deal because in any scenario this was always game to be a trifle —— it is perverse. it is
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about the optics and the promise that the pro—brexit politicians in the uk, as if there is some grand global future the uk, as if there is some grand globalfuture for the uk, as if there is some grand global future for the uk when it is unshackled from the european union. president trump favours bilateral deals because he thinks he can get a better deal that way. the us can ta ke better deal that way. the us can take advantage of any other economy because it is smaller and of course theresa may has weathered the british future to the extent to which this trade eel really matters toa which this trade eel really matters to a president who is now conducting a global trade war —— tethered the british future to the extent to which this trade deal. so it is rather perverse. given what he has said and done and the contradictory nature of some of it, and given that we know that he doesn't like the eu, what is his strategy? maybe he doesn't have one. he tends to wing it and it can be difficult to
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connect through lines between something he said one minute and something he said one minute and something he said one minute and something he says the next minute. that might be difficult for those of us injournalism to that might be difficult for those of us in journalism to absorb the idea that the united states is run by a president who is winging it as he goes along. to the extent there is a strategy, it seems to be to encourage a separation within the european union, he has been consistent, as nigel farage pointed out, of all people, he has supported the idea of a truly hard brexit and a clean break between britain and the rest of the eu. theresa may has come around to the reality that for those who pay attention to economics, there is no scenario where you can engineer a brexit that doesn't involve some loss of treasure for the uk because the european union is the overwhelmingly the largest destination for uk exports so effectively sunni ——
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trump was pushing the strategy which is ready to weaken the eu which he views as a conspiracy against the united states despite the fact that came out of the liberal democratic order that the us and britain together forged at the end of the second world war. president trump, what people find fascinating about him, he seems drawn to those individuals who are leaders of countries that are not traditional allies, and pays less attention to the traditional allies, so he is drawn to the strongman like vladimir putin and kim jong—un. drawn to the strongman like vladimir putin and kimjong—un. does he have a natural affinity with that kind of person which transcends any political and policy considerations? yes. you are onto something. this is
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a president who has openly disdained the media and he has talked about licensing journalists and he has put out on his twitter feed images of a journalist getting beaten up by thugs. this is someone who thinks the laws of asylum should not apply at the american border and that people should be deported, even people should be deported, even people whose legal channel involves showing up at the border to make an asylu m showing up at the border to make an asylum claim, he seems to think of law as a nuisance and thinks that as the president he could simply be in chargeable decisions and forget the legislator and he has some mp for people like president erdogan and vladimir putin and kimjong—un, and if there's a pattern, he seems to be more comfortable dealing with men
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with women. peter, thanks for joining us. chief economist at the new york times. thanks forjoining us. we can hear a clip of donald trump earlier. there were a few insta nces trump earlier. there were a few instances where he was criticising the media during his answers and there was one reporter from nbc and he spoke about that was a dishonest reporter in response to the question he asked and he refused to take a question from another journalist from cnn, calling it fake news. a matter of president trump —— mantra. this is a clip about that.” matter of president trump —— mantra. this is a clip about that. i did not criticise the prime minister and i have a lot of respect for the prime minister. unfortunately there was a story that was done which was generally fine but it did not put in
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what i said about the prime minister andi what i said about the prime minister and i said tremendous things and fortu nately we and i said tremendous things and fortunately we tend to record stories now so we have it for your enjoyment if you would like it but we record when we deal with reporters it is called fake news. we solve a lot of problems with the good old recording instrument. but what happens is, look, the prime minister, as i said, she will make a decision as to what she would do, the only thing i ask of theresa is that we make sure we can trade and we don't have any restrictions because we want to trade with the uk and the uk wants to trade with us. we are their biggest trading partner by far, we are their biggest trading partner byfar, and we are their biggest trading partner by far, and we have eight amanda ‘s opportunity to double, triple, quadruple that —— we have eight amanda ‘s opportunity —— we have a tremendous opportunity. i know they wa nt tremendous opportunity. i know they want independence and it will be independent, but it is just your definition. ijust said, i hope you
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can trade with the united states. i read reports that won't be possible but after speaking to the prime minister's people, it will absolutely be possible, so based on that, and based on trade in general and our other relationship which will be fine, but the trade is a bit tricky, and we want to be able to trade and they do, as well, and i think we will be able to do that. and i think she's doing a terrific job, by the way. just to confirm what the president has said, there will be no limit to the possibility of us doing trade eel is around the re st of of us doing trade eel is around the rest of the world —— trade deal ran the rest of the world once we have left the european union —— round. this will be an agreement that delivers on the brexit vote we had in 2016 and that delivers what is at the forefront of people's minds when they were voting to leave the
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european union, so at the end of these negotiations we will make sure that free movement will come to an end, the jurisdiction of the european court of justice end, the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in the uk will come to an end, sending vast sums of money every year will come to an end, and we will come out of the common agricultural policy and out of the common fisheries policy and we will make sure that by not being in the customs union that we are able to have an independent trade policy and do those trades deals around the world and as you have heard from the president, the us is keen and we are keen to work with them and we would do a trade deal with them and with others around the rest of the world. singing is emanating from below me. this was the earlier bring the noise protest. earlier we saw the trump baby balloon aloft. these are pictures in trafalgar square. as you will know there are a number of
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protests going on today. against the presence of the us president donald trump. this has been making its way towards trafalgar square starting off from the portland place, regents street area of the city. we don't have any official estimate on the numbers of protesters but we have been told something around 60,000 people had signed up to protest but maybe as many as 100,000 were expected to be on the streets, in london and also other locations and we are expecting protests in scotla nd we are expecting protests in scotland this weekend. president trump heading up there for the private part of his visit to his turnberry golf club. trafalgar square, another iconic london location, the setting for more
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protest. joining me here in parliament square, close to it, we have professor scott lucas, professor of politics at the university of birmingham. we were watching the chequers news conference together, what will your thoughts? —— were your thoughts. there are three major takeaway points after you get away from him talking that the special relationship. the first is, he put theresa may on the defensive, she is at the point where she almost effectively abandoned her own deal by saying we are going to have a full uk us deal which you can't have other that, that is how much the pressure from trump has put her in a corner and the hard brexiteers will capitalise on that. and on four occasions donald trump attacked
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germany and the eu and he was so strongly attacking, theresa may tried to cut him off, and that type of american attack on the eu will continue. the third point, the one person he treated as an equal in that press conference, the person who has the massive power versus america was vladimir putin, and russia. that overall, when you get beyond the superficial reference is made to cover this up, that will concern folks. one pointed difference between yourself and some of the other commentators, is on whether this is trump speaking off—the—cuff or with a strategy. you think he has a strategy?” off—the—cuff or with a strategy. you think he has a strategy? i do. often he starts to ramble, but on his core points, and these were the core points, and these were the core
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points from the sun interview. he said his own interview was fake news. yes, he did! that grenade he threw in, which is what will stick with people that came as a result of meetings with advisers around him, and it might be a coincidence but his former chief of staff steve bannon is in london this week talking about how to advance the trump agenda and it might be a coincidence but soon after his press conference nigel farage, a close adviser to the trump campaign, came on the bbc to talk about the great triumph of the president and how theresa may now had to address american concerns about brexit. i think the idea of spitting up the eu and making sure the uk deals with the us one—on—one they came into town without agenda and they will think largely they has exceeded. —— with that agenda. —— they will think
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they largely have succeeded. you have said the sunni presidency is the biggest threat to security is inciting 45 —— trump presidency is the biggest threat to security since 1945? that is right. since then we have had the idea of alliances where you have international order, but those alliances are being shredded economic lead through protectionism and tariffs, shredded socially. we have heard about this in the protests, pushing back environmental rights and women's rights, and they are also being shredded politically, business leader who can trust donald trump from one day to the next in terms of what they say —— there is no leader. the one person who likes that agenda to keep everyone on the back foot again will be the man he meets in helsinki, vladimir putin, and his strategy has been to keep you guessing the many years. the
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latest polling suggests that although he is unpopular with many, more people were accepting of a working visit rather than a state visit, so is that a recognition of the office of the president vladimir —— the office of the president? the office of the president vladimir -- the office of the president? the protesters have said they are protesting the man and his policies, the idea is that far from protesting the man and his policies, the idea is that farfrom upholding the idea is that farfrom upholding the system, donald trump is a danger to the system and that these protests are trying to do something positive about it. professor scott lucas on the university of birmingham, thanks for joining lucas on the university of birmingham, thanks forjoining us. we can move away from talking about the visit of president trump for a moment and get the latest weather forecast. the sum is another day of blue sky and sunshine —— for sum. we
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have had some heavy and thundery showers through wales and the midlands. these heavy showers are hit and midlands. these heavy showers are hitand miss, but midlands. these heavy showers are hit and miss, but pushing further east through the evening and overnight, before fading away so things become dry through the early hours of saturday and it will feel quite warm and muggy with temperatures holding up at 15. saturday, a north west split, the chance of an isolated show in the east, scotland and northern ireland a bit cooler, with a few spots of rain in the north west. temperatures between 22 and 20, and it will be even warm on sunday. —— 22 and 28. plenty of warm air and strong sunshine, cloudy in scotland and northern ireland, but in the sunshine we could hit 30 or 31. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser live in windsor
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on the second day of the us president's uk visit. the headlines at 4 o'clock. hand in hand — donald trump and theresa may have held a joint press conference at chequers. the president said the relationship with the uk has never been stronger. there was also glowing praise for the former foriegn secretary. they asked about boris johnson they asked about borisjohnson and i said yes, how would he be as prime minister and i said said yes, how would he be as prime ministerand i said he said yes, how would he be as prime minister and i said he would be a great primers. he's been very nice about me and said nice things about me as president he thinks i'm doing a greatjob, and i am doing a great job, ican a greatjob, and i am doing a great job, i can tell you. donald trump raise the prime minister has an incredible woman. i don't know what they're going to do, whatever you do is ok with me. it's your decision. whatever you're going to do is ok with us, just make sure you weaken trade together, that's all that
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matters. the united states looks forward to ratifying a bilateral trade agreement with the united kingdom —— we can trade together. i'm annita mcveigh live in parliament square — the heart of british democracy — where tens of thousands of anti—trump protesters will converge within the next few hours. this is the scene live in central london as people continue to march in protest of the president's visit. the president has now left chequers and is preparing to travel to windsor, where he and the first lady melania trump will meet the queen. good afternoon and welcome back to
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windsor. 18 months ago a state visit was extended to donald trump and it didn't turn out that way. it's been a two—day working visit. but this afternoon, about 15 minutes' time, he will arrive at windsor to meet the queen and they will have tea for half an hour. no question that is the highlight of the visit as far as donald trump is concerned. there might not have been the state dinner or carriage procession but the pictures here of him meeting the head of state, the monarch, in the grounds of windsor palace is very much what he wanted, and of course, thatis much what he wanted, and of course, that is an equivalent to president obama who was here in 2016, so they are on the same level and we know thatis are on the same level and we know that is important to donald trump. so what you will see in the next hour is marine one arriving on the lawn on the eastern side of the castle, so he won't see the testers around the corner near the victoria statue. he will come in the opposite side of windsor castle and will be
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driven in to the quadrangle where the queen will be waiting for him. but of course, this afternoon, he has been at chequers, meeting theresa may and we have just had in the last hour a quite extraordinary press co nfe re nce the last hour a quite extraordinary press conference where, on one hand, he was praising theresa may and saying she was doing a terrificjob, but on the other saying he didn't particularly like the brexit strategy. i don't mind what you do, he said, but make sure we can have a trade deal at the end. there you see them holding hands. the interesting thing is that whenever president trump walks up and down stairs with theresa may, they hold hands. he seems to be imbalanced when he goes down the steps, and we saw that in the colonnade area of the white house when he held hands on the first meeting just over 18 months ago. just getting some detail, looking at it, this is a gift that the prime minister presented to the president. it is quite interesting and it speaks of a close affinity
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between the uk and the president, and it was an illustrated ancestral chart of the scottish heritage of president trump through his mother's line. she was maryanne mcleod, born on the isle of lewis in the outer hebrides in 1912, and she emigrated in the 1940s to the us, and the chart, apparently, traces herfamily on both sides back three generations through official records. it goes back on the paternal side to the birth of president trump's great, great, great—grandfather, kenneth macleod, who born near stornoway in 1776. so he has long roots in this country and he talks a lot about those a lot. and he is off to scotla nd those a lot. and he is off to scotland to play golf at turnberry when he is finished at windsor castle. let's check in on the protest pictures in central london because they are extraordinary this afternoon. we have been told tens of thousands would turn out, and i've no idea how many people, but it is certainly in the thousands, making
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their way down regent street towards trafalgar square, perhaps on to westminster and to parliaments whereas well and you can see many of them carrying placards. protesting ona them carrying placards. protesting on a good many things, his record on immigration and his best conference this afternoon when he said it undermined the culture of europe and his own country. some of the banners say he is misogynist. they don't like his attitude towards women and there are a good many remainers who do not like the way he has created theresa may this week. his host two he was sitting with last night for dinner at blenheim palace and soon after the dinner she would have emerged to hear that he had been bad—mouthing the brexit deal she put together, undermining it and at the same time praising her nemesis, borisjohnson, who same time praising her nemesis, boris johnson, who he same time praising her nemesis, borisjohnson, who he thinks would bea borisjohnson, who he thinks would be a terrific prime minister. we saw at the podium alongside donald
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trump, theresa may grinning and bearing it. although the president has been walking back, many of his comments sees him in damage limitation mode. we know by now that what he says alongside a world leader is not necessarily how he feels all the way he will act when he leaves the presence of the person who is hosting him. and speaking to nigel farage in the last hour who has been speaking to people close to the president he thinks, as the current deal is there is not much chance of the deal being struck. we will see. the prime minister was adamant they could do a trade deal with the us. after publicly attacking theresa may's brexit strategy, donald trump says america's relationship with the uk is " very, very strong." the highest level of special, he said. he was speaking at the prime minister's country retreat of chequers, in the wake of controversial remarks he made in an interview with the sun newspaper, our political correspondent alex forsyth has the latest. always highly
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anticipated, the tension around this moment today was partially heightened. earlier, president trump had criticised the prime minister's brexit strategy in a newspaper interview saying it could kill off us trade deals, but no sign of that, in fact the opposite. we agreed today that as the uk leaves the european union we will pursue an ambitious us/ uk trade agreement. the chequers agreement provides the platform for donald and me to agree an ambitious deal that works for both countries right across the economy. a deal that builds on the uk's independent trade policy, reducing tariffs, delivering a gold standard in financial services cooperation and, as two of the world's most advanced economies, seizing the opportunity of new technology. but did the president agree? once the brexit process is concluded and perhaps the uk has left the eu, and i don't know what you're going to do, but whatever you do is ok with me,
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that's your decision. whatever you're going to do is ok with us, but make sure you can trade with us, that's all that matters. the us looks forward to finalising a great bilateral trade agreement with the united kingdom. this is an incredible opportunity for our two countries and we will seize it fully. but there were questions about that interview. had he changed his mind? unfortunately there was a story done which was generally fine, but it didn't put in what i said about the prime minister and i said tremendous things. we record when we deal with reporters. it's called fake news. and we solve a lot of problems with the good old recording instrument, but what happens is, look, the prime minister, she is going to make a decision as to what she will do. the only thing i ask of theresa is that we make sure we can trade and we don't have any restrictions, because we want to trade with the uk and the uk wants to trade with us. theresa may was clear as well.
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there will be no limit to the possibility of us doing trade deals around the rest of the world once we leave the european union. on the basis of the agreement that was made here at chequers and i put forward to the european union. just to be clear, that is in agreement that delivers on the brexit vote that we had in 2016 here in the uk, that delivers what i believe is at the forefront of people's minds when they were voting to leave the european union. the pair had met earlier for formal talks and that interview was in the background. donald trump had suggested in the sun newspaper that the brexit negotiations had fallen short. his comments landed with a thud. he had said that if the government stuck to its current plan there would be no trade deal with the us.
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the president might have changed his tune this afternoon but his earlier comments were already seized upon by some tory brexiteers. in westminster, theresa may is already facing a backlash from her brexit supporting mps. donald trump has fuelled their argumentjust as she's trying to hold her fractured party together, and it wasn'tjust brexit he shared his views on. just days ago, boris johnson quit over the government's brexit policy and has long been a thorn in the side of theresa may, but the president praised him. i was very saddened to see he was leaving government. i am not pitting one against the other, i'm just saying i think he would be a great prime minister. at chequers today, the tone
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was more conciliatory. this was a demonstration of friendship. boris johnson i think would be a great prime minister, but i also said that this incredible woman, right here, is doing a fantasticjob, greatjob. and i mean that. and i must say that i have gotten to know theresa may much better over the last two days than i have known her over the last year and a half. so what about those brexit negotiations? you can't walk away, because if she walks away that means she's stuck. you can't walk away. she is a very smart, very tough, very capable person. and i would much rather have her as my friend than my enemy, that i can tell you. but some words cannot be unspoken. his earlier comments are unlikely to be forgotten. certainly the entourage following
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president trump very much in damage limitation mode earlier this morning. sarah sanders, the white house press secretary, put out a statement as early as the sun newspaper dropping saying he had said lots of positive things, so you got a sense in the press conference that he was trying not to undermine the prime minister. at one point he saidi the prime minister. at one point he said i know what i said was top of the prime minister here, so maybe behind closed doors they had said to the presidential team, look, you need to put this into context and we got a lot of bad at the press conference. let's get the thoughts of norman smith. norman smith is at chequers for us. ami am i right in saying that this really was a walking back exercise this afternoon? a huge change in tone from the president from the sort of shock and anger that greeted at outburst in the sun newspaper where he did notjust attack and
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trasch mrs may's approach to brexit, by extension he also pretty much challenged her whole leadership, really questioning her authority and ability to deliver the sort of brexit that people had voted for. this afternoon, all change. the president at his most effusive, in moly and, supportive of the prime minister. —— emollient. almost embarrassing mrs may by the shovel loads of praise heaped on her, describing her as a remarkable woman, incredible woman, tough negotiator, smart, much rather have her on my side and against me. on and on he went. praising herfor the role she took at the nato summit in standing upfor role she took at the nato summit in standing up for terrorism —— against terrorism and against putin and iran. he could not have been more supportive of theresa may. and quite clearly, he wanted to make amends and make amends big—time. this was a
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major backtrack, if you like, by the president and the brexit, likewise, we didn't hearany president and the brexit, likewise, we didn't hear any of that criticism about maybe she wasn't being tough enough with the new negotiations —— eu negotiators. as per the thought that he told her what he's —— she should do in the negotiations, he said, i made suggestions and she thought they were too brutal and it is her call. there was none of that really bruising criticism from the morning and the simple truth is they knew they had to try and put the jigsaw back together again because otherwise the danger was of a full—scale diplomatic rift, public tussle between the two leaders. the president said when he went to see the prime minister this morning he apologised. not for himself, but the way that this had been reported. his explanation was to blame his old
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favourite fake news. he chided the sun newspaper for not reporting all of the comp entry things he said about theresa may, but the name of the game here was to try and repair the game here was to try and repair the special relationship after the damage done by mr trump's interview. since the press conference, and you did go after the political editor of the sun, but they have put out a statement saying we stand by our reporting and the quotes used, including those where the president was positive that the primers in both the paper and in the audio, because there was an audio tape and we are delighted the president essentially retracted his original charge against the paper later in the press conference to say the president called us fake news with any is serious intent is fake news. this is what he tends to do when he walks into trouble, he blames the reporters who picked up his comments it was almost a theme of the news
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conference. although most of his barbs at the media seemed destined for the american media and accuse the lady of nbc dishonest reporting and flatly refused to take a question from the poor bloke from cnn, saying he was from fake news. that is part of the way that he operates. the truth probably is that he probably did say some, entry things about theresa may, but let's be honest, that's never going to attract much interest from a journalistic of view and, at the same time, we heard him making those critical remarks about mrs may's approach to brexit, because we heard the interview and more than that, he said pretty much the same thing yesterday in brussels and at the beginning of the week. he also praised borisjohnson. beginning of the week. he also praised boris johnson. this beginning of the week. he also praised borisjohnson. this is clearly his view, that borisjohnson would make a very effective leader and that theresa may does need to be
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tougher in the negotiations and that there is a danger that she does not deliver on the real form there is a danger that she does not deliver on the realform of there is a danger that she does not deliver on the real form of brexit. and interestingly, while he did say that he was hopeful they would be able to do a trade deal and he wa nted able to do a trade deal and he wanted to be able to do one, he also warned about the danger of restrictions, saying i hope there won't be any restrictions because it's difficult to do trade. we also went on the attack against the eu about what a bad deal america gets from the eu, and i take it from that that he has not really entirely retreated from his view that the uk will be signing up to an rule book from the eu and that could be an issue when it comes to negotiating a trade deal after brexit. yes, and as you say, we'd see a banner that says, where do we go from here? we interviewed nigel farage about half an hour ago. interviewed nigel farage about half an hourago. i interviewed nigel farage about half an hour ago. i was making the point that those who would be happier with the intervention would be those in the intervention would be those in
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the european research group, the eurosceptics in the conservative party. there is a suggestion that maybe some of them had been speaking to the president's team. do you get any suggestion about that? are they briefing the american side about the contents briefing the american side about the co nte nts of briefing the american side about the contents of the white paper?” briefing the american side about the contents of the white paper? i am absolutely sure that they talked to like—minded americans in the trump administration. whether any of that percolates through to donald trump, let alone has any impact on his views, i would think is pretty questionable. this is a man who speaks his mind and i doubt very much whether politicians at westminster really have much input into the donald trump worldview. all of which said, his remarks undoubtedly give them more mojo, if you like. because he has absolutely echoed their core arguments. one gets the sense that they are beginning to grow ever more confident that they may be able to
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force m rs confident that they may be able to force mrs may to abandon her white paperand, force mrs may to abandon her white paper and, indeed, we know they are seriously talking about trying to defeat the government on two crucial pieces of brexit legislation on monday and tuesday by siding with the labour party and that would be a massive x delaet —— escalation in the sort of gorilla campaign by the brexiteers against mrs may, but they are on a roll, in part fuelled by the sort of support they have been given by donald trump. ok, norman, for the moment, thank you very much. let mejust show for the moment, thank you very much. let me just show you the pictures here outside henry viii gate at windsor castle. you can see it is much more modest and genteel and in keeping with the royal borough of windsor, but a good many people here, similar placards as you have seen on the streets of london, very visible police presence and if we stay on these pictures you will see the guards coming up the road, the
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coldstrea m the guards coming up the road, the coldstream guards 1st battalion will be the honour guard in the quadrangle when donald trump arrives here injust over 20 minutes' time. the 1st battalion coldstream guards, one of the oldest units in the british army, of course and they have worked alongside american units in iraq and also in various counterterrorism operations over the yea rs counterterrorism operations over the years as well so donald trump will be familiar with this, and in fact, this morning they were at a military exhibition this morning at sandhurst and watching us and british special
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forces in a counterterrorism operation, a mock operation before they went off to check is so he will see plenty of the pomp and ceremony when he gets to windsor. you will see above the round tower in windsor castle that the royal standard is flying meaning that the queen is in her private apartment and waiting for the president to arrive. let's cross to westminster and —— let's cross now to westminster and my colleague annita mcveigh. colleague annita mcveigh. extraordinary pictures. they really are. we are seeing the metropolitan police are tweeting that trafalgar square is so full that it is actually approaching capacity and for anyone who has been to trafalgar square, you will know it is a very big area by the metropolitan police saying that that is approaching capacity and they may pause the march to control the flow of people coming in. that is the stop trump protest along with the various other
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protests, the coalition of opposition to donald trump's visit to the uk. it is pretty quiet behind me now in parliament square where one of the earlier marchers arrived and it was here, earlier that we saw the trump baby balloon as well, but i suspect many of the people who we re i suspect many of the people who were here earlier have gone towards trafalgar square. a big day of protests a nd trafalgar square. a big day of protests and we are waiting on officialfigures. protests and we are waiting on official figures. with protests and we are waiting on officialfigures. with me to protests and we are waiting on official figures. with me to talk a bit more about what we have seen today i have a senior lecturer in politics at the montford university and also professor scott lucas, professor of international politics at the university of birmingham. i know you have been down amongst the protesters, carnival atmosphere, almost and a wide range of people represented. absolutely and i think we can see from the size of the
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crowds that this is notjust a gathering of snowflakes. this is people across the board from all ages and walks of life with some really legitimate grievances and you can gather a lot from the humorous placards that people carry. it is basically a check list of the executive orders over the past 18 months or so it's to do with immigration, women's rights, trans—rights, immigration, women's rights, tra ns—rights, climate change immigration, women's rights, trans—rights, climate change so there is a real sense that donald trump as president has been personifying what a lot of people would consider a rollback of the progress that has gone before. and this is beyond party politics or anything like that it is the rolling forward of humanity. and very much a protest against the individual. yes, for sure. of course there are bigger forces at play beyond a single president but he does personify so much of these issues and i think for a lot of people here today it really is important to take a stand and
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bring their children and wave the placards and say it is not a cce pta ble placards and say it is not acceptable and it is not what we want, and whilst we are friends of america and this is nothing to do with the system or the executive, this is about him and what he represents. scott, we saw the women's march in the us after the trump election. what do you think the president makes a protest politics? he hates it. specifically the women's march, he was seeing it is larger than the crowd of the inauguration and say about how he had the big crowd. he sees this as a strike on his ego, but it forces him to recognise that even if he wants to recognise that even if he wants to walk away from it he —— it is about those who feel they are not being represented. we will continue with a discussion in a moment, but as we continue to report on the protest against donald trump's visit, you are watching bbc news. if
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we canjust visit, you are watching bbc news. if we can just pick up visit, you are watching bbc news. if we canjust pick up on visit, you are watching bbc news. if we can just pick up on that point about the women's march is president thinks of the protesters. he hates them, of course, but do they make a difference to him? does it make him think about his policies? not donald trump. if you reduce it to donald trump, you play on his turf and everything around him. donald trump will be gone in a few years. we do not know if he will fall because of the russian investigation or he might not get a second term but theseissues might not get a second term but these issues will be even more important because of the attempt to rollback environmental rights, the attempt to roll back women can choose to do with their lives and bodies so to roll back the lives of evan necessity and minority notjust the decency and respect, so the message of the protest today, like the march last year, is for those people beyond that. just to remind our view is that one of the marches in trafalgar square in the central london is almost at full capacity.
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you are watching bbc news. overlooking parliament square, i have doctor clodagh harrington and professor scott lucas. we were having a chat before this interview, and you were saying to me that you feel a lot of the reaction you were seeing on the streets of london today, and of course these protests, we should add, are very much happening in other parts of the uk as well, are a reaction to the sort of hate speech that has been on the increase since the election of donald trump. that is a huge part of it, for sure. not that long ago elizabeth warren of the us said about donald trump that he has made it ok to hate and i think that statement really resonated. i thought that is how it is. what the
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president says, his words are so important. everything he does and says invites imitation so if he says this is ok, others will follow and surpass him. and that is where it gets really dangerous. but the people on the streets that they are saying it is not ok to hate or use that sort of language. and they are doing it in a way that is trying to show in gauge. it's interesting that fox news has been trying to save that the protest is our raging across london, but what you are seeing, with the music and the spirit here. it is not enough about donald trump, they have to look at a better way amongst themselves. because when they say fake news, about economists and scientists, he is trying to break up that ability to speak with each other. we will come back to in a few minutes but let's cross to trafalgar square. our correspondent tom burridge
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is with the protesters. i hope you can hear me. the met police saying that the square is pretty much capacity. yes, it's pretty much capacity. yes, it's pretty full and it's quite a good atmosphere. it is relaxed, fun and there are speeches you can hear in there are speeches you can hear in the background from the tuc and other people and charities against racism. but we have followed the demonstration right down to trafalgar square, winding its way through central london. a whole chunk of the city has been shot down, essentially. let's talk to sarah and sam, two people who came here to protest. you came from brighton and you live in south—east london. still a trip into the centre. above the noise, sarah, both of you, tell me what particular aspect, something he has done or said, has really riled about donald trump and brought you here today questioned a racist. he hates black people. there are black people in
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the republican party who support him, some people who work with him back. they know nothing about him. he isjust lying to the public. this. what about you? i come here as a mother, a woman, teacher, and i come here because trump represents everything i stand against. he is a racist, misogynist, he believes there is no climate change. he is an incredibly dangerous. my mother was a german due who fought the nazis in the second world war and i feel that what is happening now is like what happened in the 1930s, bashes on the rise and we have divided. do you both accept that like him or loathe him he is the us president and he won the election —— fascism on the rise. the us president does have do come to britain. and we have to spend £10 million to enable him to play golf? i don't think so. put
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that money into the nhs, that's where it belongs, not looking after donald trump. he is a racist, a fascist, a misogynist. that is a strong word. it's difficult to call donald trump that even. he said that the fascists in charlottesville were good and fine people. that is fascism. he has achieved some things, like north korea, here's made progress. yes, he has. but that still doesn't count. a sexist and racist and that still hurts. you reject his politics? yes, and i reject him personally, he is a disgusting human being andl personally, he is a disgusting human being and i don't think he is fit to being and i don't think he is fit to be president of the united states. he is leading us into a nightmare and he is trying to push theresa may into a hard brexit and to make boris johnson be prime minister. he is
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talking about the prospect of a trade deal which is linked with brexit. he is trying to say we should have borisjohnson, one of the hard brexiteers is our prime minister? i don't think so. brexit was won on lies, absolute lies. minister? i don't think so. brexit was won on lies, absolute liesm isa was won on lies, absolute liesm is a good atmosphere here, pretty relaxed. they have been having a party. trafalgar square doesn't normally look like this, it is com pletely normally look like this, it is completely packed with protesters. we can now go back to christian. preparations are well under way. i'm going to come out of the way. the coldstrea m going to come out of the way. the coldstream guards are going to walk past. by going to be the no guard where the queen will be meeting —— they are going to be the dana guard
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where the queen will be meeting president trump —— honour. here they come. there goes the 1st battalion, the coldstrea m there goes the 1st battalion, the coldstream guards, who as i said they will be the honour guard, they will be inspected by president trump in halfan will be inspected by president trump in half an hour when he arrives at windsor castle. one of the oldest units of the british army, they have worked alongside american units in iraq and afghanistan, of course. earlier there was a military demonstration at sandhurst for theresa may and president trump. that will be quite a sight this afternoon and that is what president trump really wanted on this trip, some of the pomp and ceremony that comes with british history. those pictures beamed back to the united states right up his street. a man
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who likes to be the centre of attention and he will be alongside those guards later. let's now talk to former republican advisor ron christie. that is the best of british? spectacular. everything donald trump wa nted spectacular. everything donald trump wanted on this visit, the pomp and circumstance, and we saw it marching behind us and he was soon be here. —— he will soon be here. behind us and he was soon be here. -- he will soon be here. this is not a full state visit but for theresa may, they had to put some of the red—carpet treatment done because otherwise it looks like a snob. —— snub. no question about that. she can also shore up her own political position. that is what she wanted to do because she wanted to give donald trump something he can go home with, he likes pomp and circumstance and he likes pomp and circumstance and he likes pomp and circumstance and he likes parades and he had that
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last night and he had that now. when you came here with george w bush, did he put a lot of store by that? he loved it. the thing he loved there was a picture of him sitting in buckingham palace, at one end of a catch, —— eight so far, the first lady at the other, and he loved the pond and circumstance. —— he loved the pomp. and he of course will love meeting the queen, donald trump. she has met ten us presidents. she had a close relationship with ronald reagan. because they both love horse riding. there are pictures of ronald reagan and the queen riding through the grounds of windsor in 1982. these are the pictures of the
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colston guards who are preparing, on their way to the quadrangle in the centre of windsor castle —— coldstrea m centre of windsor castle —— coldstream guards. that is where the queen will meet president trump and i'm told when bickle —— marine one touches down, she will come out of this offer and's entrance and that is where she will wait for him —— she will come out of the sovereign's entrance. there will be an inspection of the guard. president trump will be on the left of the queen and they will inspect the front rank of the 1st battalion coldstrea m front rank of the 1st battalion coldstream guards. after that they will go into the private apartments of the castle where they will sit down and talk and have a cup of tea over 30 minutes. always protocol in these occasions. you don't sit down
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before the queen sits down and you don't eat and drink before she does and when she decides that the conversation is over and she stands up, that is when it is over, so no doubt president trump will know about the protocol. but he doesn't often observed protocol! he likes vigorous handshakes and he picks dandruff off the shoulders of french presidents. are you nervous?‘ little bit. donald trump is used to being in charge, but how will this work out if he decides he's going to shake her hand first instead of the other way round ? shake her hand first instead of the other way round? the chief of protocol will be more nervous. other way round? the chief of protocolwill be more nervous. but eve ryo ne protocolwill be more nervous. but everyone finds the queen ifjordan reed because of the history —— eve ryo ne reed because of the history —— everyone finds the queen extraordinary because of the history, and she can be intimidating, maybe even someone
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like donald trump. george bush found her intimidating but very warm and personable at the same time and he that she's a great storyteller. so what stories will she share with donald trump? interesting the gift that the prime minister gave to the president. the gifts that they gave to him when he arrived at chequers. afamily to him when he arrived at chequers. a family tree which went back three generations through his family tree on both sides and apparently a bad back all the way to his great great great grandfather who was born in stornoway in? 1776 will stop the year of independence. and that is why he talks about the affinity he has with the uk. that is real. we can talk about brexit and what he
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wa nts, can talk about brexit and what he wants, but the close affinity is real because of his roots? that is right. he has many properties in scotla nd right. he has many properties in scotland and he will leave here and go to scotland. he has affection for the uk and scotland in particular and it was a smart move by theresa may to give him that very important gift. we are watching the coldstream guards lining up. that is major oliver beggs, the captain of the guard. then bass hirst is the major general that commands the household division —— ben bass hirst. we understand marine one is on its way to windsor castle and we understand the transfer will be about ten minutes. for him to arrive here. he kept the prime minister
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waiting for some time yesterday at blenheim palace. it got a little embarrassed —— embarrassing for her as she was stood out waiting. they won't do that today, and the queen will be told when marine one has touched down and that is when she will make her way down, to where she will make her way down, to where she will receive the president when he arrives. let's dip into a bed of whatjeremy corbyn has been saying earlier —— a bit. whatjeremy corbyn has been saying earlier -- a bit. his visit has been an odd one and he hasn't met any ordinary people in britain and he hasn't visited it anywhere other than a hasn't visited it anywhere other thana dinnerat hasn't visited it anywhere other than a dinner at blenheim palace and a visit to chequers and apparently golf with his son in scotland. i wish you well with the golf, but i
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wish you well with the golf, but i wish there had been an opportunity for him to understand something about our society —— i wish him well. but his comments about sadiq khan are not acceptable and his apparent and doors meant —— endorsement of somebody as a rival to theresa may, that is not his business as to who the british prime minister is. he seems to be rolling back his position, he has said it was fake news, even though they recorded it. he was critical theresa may and her ideas for brexit. he seemed to endorse borojohnson to ta ke seemed to endorse borojohnson to take over her job, seemed to endorse borojohnson to take over herjob, though. —— boris johnson. very strange behaviour, but behind it there seems to be something quite serious and that is the question of trade relations in the question of trade relations in the future. this is a president who has unilaterally imposed tariffs on
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aluminium and steel and therefore very damaging to our industries as well as those of many other countries and at the same time as saying that he is prepared to do trade deals on his terms with britain and my concern is that theresa may has been discussing trade with him and she is saying that we will keep the regulatory environment we have with face—macro which we all want to do, but he doesn't want that —— we have with europe. are we going to remove our food standards and import chlorinated chicken or i'll be going to say, we would do trade with people around the world, but this is based on high quality standards and based on high quality standards and based on high quality standards and based on human rights in the countries we are trading with? —— are we going to say, we will do trade with people around the world. jeremy corbyn, there. plenty of
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opposition politicians have expressed their dismay that he is getting the world treatment this afternoon —— the royal. all of them believe you have got to talk to the president, but this is an element of the visit that some people were opposed to, in meeting the queen. the queen will not be opposed to this because she has done this all her life as the constitutional head of state. she knows that she will be meeting all heads of state that are invited by the uk government. she affords them all the same respect, whether it is the chinese president, or the heads of state of saudi arabia or uganda, the leaders of kazakhstan, there are difficult people that she has met but that is what she does as the head of state. and it will be no different on this
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occasion. we have focused on the protests but there have been a number of supporters who have come here to windsor castle. we can see a few flags, make america great again. on the opposite side of the road from where we are standing, those opposing his visit. but what a spectacular sight. the coldstream guards waiting for an inspection and donald trump will walk down the front rank of the guards when he arrives, in the presence of the queen. it will be the captain of the guard, major oliver biggs who will be escorting them down the line. aside from their military duties they have a duty to protect the royal palaces, buckingham palace as
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well. our war correspondent has just joined us —— royal correspondent. this is very much the moment of the trip that donald trump will be looking forward to the most. trip that donald trump will be looking forward to the mostm trip that donald trump will be looking forward to the most. it is the moment he hopes will project the images which will catch the imagination of the american television audiences, it has the setting, windsor castle, and the guardsmen, but most importantly it has the queen. he is said to have a great reference for her which she has inherited from his mother. she of course over 66 years, she's used to taking everything and everyone in her stride and we should not forget no one has more experience at meeting american presidents than the queen. she has met 11 of the 12 predecessors in the white house to donald trump. the only one she didn't meet was lyndonjohnson in
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the 60s. even for someone who has met so many american presidents and so many other leading figures, she will be more than usually curious to see what this man is really like, when you come face—to—face with him. he won't be here that long, just one hour. there will be no other members of the royal family. just the queen. when the obamas the duty of edinburgh accent drove them into windsor castle, giving the secured his services a few headaches! —— the duke of edinburgh actually drove them. she would never say who her favourites were, but ronald reagan stayed here. i would imagine ronald
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reagan would be well up there, partly because he was very charming and also the key ingredient, he was very keen on horses. they were riding in windsor park. they are great pictures, a much younger queen, of course, riding with ronald reagan. the 1980s? yes, 1982. the next year she went to santa barbara to his ranch and clearly there was a great affinity. that is right. there was torrential rain there and she was torrential rain there and she was only just at the ranch was torrential rain there and she was onlyjust at the ranch in time. the other president she got on with was barack the other president she got on with was ba rack obama the other president she got on with was barack obama and michelle obama. there was a rapport there. the state visit in 2011 that they made to this country. there have been so few state visits by american presidents. and for many years they did not want
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state visits because they did not fa ncy state visits because they did not fancy dressing up, and it wasn't until george w bush came on a state visit in 2003 that the american president was afforded this ultimate in hospitality and. the state visit is when the queen invites a visitor to come and stay at windsor castle and buckingham palace. george w bush and buckingham palace. george w bush and the obamas are the only ones who have had that, which is quite surprisingly —— surprising really. this tells you that marine one is imminent. hopefully, yes. i have to tell you, the president is known or prone to the odd vigorous handshake
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and the picking of dandruff off collars but the queen has taken all of this in her stride. she would just take it in her stride, as she does everything. michelle obama put her arm around her, and there was a bit of a fuss. we now have the national anthem as marine one comes into land. god save the queen. the national anthem played by the 1st battalion coldstream guards, the queen on the left of the picture and
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marine one hovering over the trees of windsor castle, coming into the lawn on the eastern terrace of the castle, well out of view of the protesters who are here at henry viii gate. he will not have seen them. he will have come over the household golf course which is over the eastern side of the castle. he will be transported presumably in the beast, the car he uses, to the top of the long walk and towards the quadrangle were the queen is waiting for him. major general ben bathurst will now take his place as well. also alongside the queen, the lord lieutenant of the royal county down of berkshire. and the governor here
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at windsor castle. they will be out greeting president trump, i think. at the helicopter. we saw a royal salute from the band which is made up salute from the band which is made up of the coldstream guards and the grenadier guards. we saw them recently at the trooping the colour. it isa recently at the trooping the colour. it is a splendid site and you can understand why this is such a draw, everything you could possibly want in terms of the visuals but this ancient castle, thousands of years old —— with this ancient castle. and the two senior regiments of the footguards. we see one helicopter landing after another. there is a lwa ys landing after another. there is always a few decoy helicopters i was reminded last night so we never know
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which one the us president is on. yes, use only don't, they usually have three, —— you certainly don't, they usually have three, this provides the entire security for marine one for the president until he is on the ground. we were here just a couple of months ago to welcome meghan markle, another american, who has said some forthright things about the president, of course, she was here for her marriage to prince harry, of course for top she's not here tonight. nothing forthright recently! that would have made a few headlines. you get the impression the queen is spending more of her time at windsor castle? yes, she is. she is still doing the duties of head of state, but the papers and boxes, they can be done just as well
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here as at buckingham palace, but she is spending a few nights at buckingham palace and more time here. the duke of edinburgh is spending more time here at windsor and sandringham of course and the queen will be going to balmoral for her summer break very shortly. in terms of what they will talk about, i'm sure scotland will be one subject, a fruitful area for discussion, since i don't think mr trump is into horses? no, he is into golf. prince andrew is the great golfer in the family and also no sign of the duke of edinburgh who is good for breaking the ice and making a few lively remarks. they will probably talk about the gift, a lovely gift, the prime minister gave to the president this afternoon, a family tree. clearly a good deal of research, ancestral research has
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gone into that, and that is really rather special, and i'm sure there is an image of it somewhere. remarkably thoughtful, and as they tried to solidify their relationship, i think that is a nice way for theresa may to try and make a stronger bond. his great great—great—grandfather was born in 1776 in stornoway, the year of independence. american independence. yes, al in dependence from you! —— our. donald trump was earlier talking about our independence from the eu, maybe not in the way theresa may would have wanted. major general ben bathurst is there. amongst the many things for which he has a keen eye, these military parades. we saw
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at the trooping the colour, although she had recently had her eye surgery, she was still gimlet eyed, looking at her footguards on parade. she enjoys anything which involves the military and especially the household division, is regiments of the footguards, the senior ones involved today and the three other regiments. if there is one thing which is an affinity between donald trump and the queen, it is the military, and these parades, and this is something they can both enjoy, to break the ice. i'm not sure how much he knows about the military... when you look back at the presidents she has met, she met nixon twice. once when he was the vice president under eisenhower and then when he became president, in 1969. people who have been watching
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the crown on netflix, they would know that there was something in the visit ofjohn f. kennedy and jackie kennedy? a very high-profile visit atan important kennedy? a very high-profile visit at an important time in the early 60s, harold macmillan was the prime minister and the uk at adapting its world role but very keen to retain and burnished this important relationship, and harold macmillan had a strong elation ship with president kennedy —— relationship. and then a young queen was part of that togetherness. that drama portrays a certain rivalry between the queen and jackie kennedy, and whether that has any substance to it, i don't know, i would rather doubt, actually. the queen doesn't regard anybody as a rival, because
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if you are the queen of the uk, you are rather above that sort of thing. but fascinating to think back and it reminds us how long she has been there, this symbol of continuity and stability within the uk and that we are able to talk about somebody who is meeting the kennedys in the early 60s. the first president she met was harry truman when she was princess elizabeth shortly after the second world war. as queen, the first one she met was eisenhower, so she really has the memory. she said the centenary really has the memory. she said the ce nte nary of really has the memory. she said the centenary of the raf the other day, she could remember the battle of britain, she could remember watching the dogfights in the skies over the uk and she and her sister were staying here at windsor during the yea rs of staying here at windsor during the years of the second world war. so living history. going back to something you said a few moments ago, meeting with richard nixon as vice president and president, eight
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just time for the united states, the vietnam war, and all of the protests —— eight to mulch —— a turbulent time the united states. and now we have the protests here today. of course, when she has monday meetings with the prime minister she talks about the affairs of state and she has a keen interest and i'm sure she would never disclose whether she had had discussions about matters of state with us presidents but would that be something she would bring up, brexit? i don't think she would initiate that and especially with someone who is known for being on twitter and whose discretion might not be at the level of some other statesman... very diplomatically
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done. so the queen, so many years of practice, at not getting anything wrong, so even if donald trump attempted to lead her on, i think she is far too shrewd to dive all jenny of her own views, but that is not the save that —— divulges any of her own views, but that is not to say that she doesn't have opinions, but she tries to ask the questions. maybe she will indicate this pleasure at the apparent discord to —— discourtesy that president trump has apparently shown? maybe, but i rather doubt it. this is the presidential party coming through the gate, coming to the top of the long walk, into the quadrangle area. he usually travels in the beast.
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yes, but they do have a specially equipped suv vehicle which is as strong as the beast, but given the safety of the area, they have decided for a more nimble vehicle, even though security is still paramount. this is all working as black —— clockwork, we are told he would come here at five o'clock and is now exactly five o'clock. yesterday at wedding palace she was kept waiting for longer than she would have liked, theresa may —— blenheim palace. she did not go on the visit to singapore, balan near trump, and she is recovering from a kidney surgery, but she is on this trip —— melania trump. is very important for the president have his wife by his side, and
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letting it is important for the optics for america to have the president and
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