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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 18, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. our headlines today: the massive relief operation to help hundreds of thousands left trapped and homeless by the worst floods in southern india in a century — forecasters warn of more heavy rains to come. a plastics tax could be part of the next budget in a bid to tackle vast amounts of non—recyclable waste. a warning of travel chaos for many as one of britain's busiest railway stations, london euston, is closed for engineering work. a major test for ben stokes, as he makes his return to the england cricket side, just four days after the end of his trial. the royal navy's new £3 billion aircraft carrier prepares to leave portsmouth for the latest stage in its preparations for active service. good morning. mixed fortunes this weekend — some of us will see some rain, some will stay mainly dry, it will be quite windy at times and for many feeling fairly humid. i will have the full forecast in about 15 minutes. it's saturday 18th august.
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our top story. a massive relief operation is underway in southern india to help hundreds of thousands left homeless by the worst floods in the area in 100 years. the south western state of kerala has been most severely hit. at least 170 people have died there in the last ten days. katy austin reports. rain comes to kerala every year. not like this. people are walking miles to safety through what officials say are the worst floods for a century. translation: after 36 years, it is the first time that such flooding is happening here. it is a disaster for the whole population. a third more rainfall than usual has fallen this season with devastating effects. boats and helicopters are being used to rescue people, including this pregnant woman.
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hundreds of thousands are now homeless and living in 1,500 emergency relief camps, waiting and hoping while volunteers cook for them. men, women and children forced to flee to safety but the camps are increasingly crowded and some are under threat from rising waters. flooded roads are making it difficult for badly needed humanitarian aid, like food and bed sheets, to reach kerala. india's prime minister narendra modi has now arrived in the region to see people are trying to reach out, like relief agencies which are now the choppers, there has been very intense activity from them. india's prime minister narendra modi has now arrived in the region to see an area whose deluged infrastructure and population are struggling to cope. across india, close to 1,000 people have been killed in the current rainy season and there
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are more downpours to come. katy austin, bbc news. retailers selling single—use water bottles, takeaway boxes and coffee cups face a new tax on plastics expected to be announced in the next budget. it comes after a record 162,000 responses to a government consultation on how to reduce waste and improve recycling. 0ur political correspondent tom barton reports. how best to reduce the tonnes of plastic that end up in landfill and the oceans every year? that was the question posed by the treasury in a consultation earlier this year and it received a record response. among the ideas being considered by ministers are new taxes. some of these could target the demand for disposable coffee cups and takeaway boxes while others are likely to encourage manufacturers to change their products. we want to see if there are smart, intelligent incentives that we can create to encourage the producers of plastic to take responsibility
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when they are designing the materials that end up on supermarket shelves and ultimately in our own homes, to use recycled materials wherever possible, not to use those materials that are very difficult to recycle such as black carbon plastic and of course, over all, to reduce the amount of plastic and use other materials such as cardboard, paper and foil wherever possible. ministers also say they want to encourage recycling for waste that is currently incinerated. the final details of any proposals will be revealed as part of the budget later this year. tom barton, bbc news. italy's head of state, sergio mattarella will lead mourners during a state funeral later for 18 of the victims of the genoa bridge disaster. at least 38 people were killed when the motorway bridge collapsed on tuesday with five still missing.
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many of the grieving families have refused the offer of a state funeral in protest as they blame the authorities for the disaster. rail passengers are facing major disruption today as london euston station closes for the whole weekend for engineering works. that will affect the west coast mainline, while a one—day strike means there'll be a reduced service on south western railway. michael cowen is at london euston for us this morning. give us the big picture. it is a very quiet london euston. a little bit busier in the last hour, we have seen people going in with their suitcases only to be turned around and sent out. this is part of a major rail upgrade. they are upgrading the tracks at north wembley which is one of the country most busiest interchanges, which will take out the entire west coast main line notjust this weekend but for the following three weekends from today. that's very difficult
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with the bank holiday but it's part of this big regeneration programme. with 200 million miles of track across britain, sorry, 20,000 miles, network rail say this is crucial to safety to ensure passengers and freight travelling on this line. but it is cutting off lots of big cities, living paul, manchester, birmingham, glasgow, that's going to be incredibly frustrating for lots of passengers trying to travel today and over the next three weekends. couple that with also disruption on south—western because of an ongoing strike to do with the role of their guards and we've got ongoing disruption with more than post those timetable changes, and still issues on the bolton to manchester route teach weekend until later in the year. the level disruption today. if i travel on the 833 from london euston to liverpool, it will take me four hours and 38 minutes. that is more than double the time it
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normally takes, it normally takes over two hours. people are facing enormous delays and the advice from rail bosses is, if you don't need to travel, don't go anywhere. if you do, if you absolutely have to do, make sure you have checked your exact routes and the exact amount of changes you will have to make because it's going to be a very frustrating few weekends of travel for everyone on that west coast main line. thank you. the number of children and young adults in england and wales with type 2 diabetes has risen by more than 40—percent injust four years, according to the royal college of paediatrics. council leaders described the increase as "extremely worrying" and called for a boost in public health funding. the department of health says its "new childhood obesity plan will get children exercising more in schools and reduce their exposure to sugary and fatty foods." the funeral of barry chuckle, one half of the comedy duo the chuckle brothers, has been held in rotherham. the coffin of the comedian, whose real name is barry elliot, was carried by his brother paul to a service at rotherham united football club where he was an honorary life president.
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hundreds of fans gathered outside the stadium to pay their respects. former international cricket star imran khan has been sworn in as the next prime minister of pakistan. after winning the general election injuly, mr khan's appointment was confirmed by a parliamentary vote yesterday. however, opposition leaders have claimed elements ofjuly‘s ballot were rigged. britain's new aircraft carrier, hms queen elizabeth, will leave portsmouth later today sailing to the east coast of america. two f—35 test aircraft will conduct a number of take off and landings from the £3 billion carrier while she's at sea. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale reports. the largest warship ever built for the royal navy is now preparing to leave portsmouth with 1500 sailors, aircrew and marines on board. hms queen elizabeth which cost more than £3 billion is about to sail to the east coast of america.
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what the royal navy says will be an iconic moment in the latest stage of the trials. the first time fast jets will fly off her massive deck. hugely symbolic for the country, very exciting and of course, it was eight years nearly to the day since i was in command of ark royal and we took off the last harrier from the north sea. so eight years later, here we are, getting the first one back. these are the kind of aircraft that will be taking part in the trials. the us has already been flying the new f—35 stealth jet off their warships. two test aircraft will be embarked on the british carriers with british pilots among those who will be conducting 500 take—offs and landings from the deck of queen elizabeth. the royal navy says she and her sister ship, hms prince of wales, will ensure that britain remains a first—class sea power but it all comes with a price and at a time when the defence budget is already under strain. hms queen elizabeth is expected
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to be ready for her first operational deployment with british jets on board by 2021. jonathan beale, bbc news. weather and sport coming up a little later. the deaths of at least 38 people following the collapse of a motorway bridge in genoa on tuesday has ignited a fierce debate over the safety of italy's infrastructure. the transport minister has begun proceedings to strip the company, who managed the highway, of their contracts. it comes as state funerals for some of the victims will take place later. we can talk now to the italian journalist cristina nadotti, who joins us from rome. can you just explain why it is that some families have opted for the state funeral that was offered to them and others have said no? i'm
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afraid to say first of all that the number of victims has raised to 41 during the night, four other people we re during the night, four other people were actually found under the debris. the reason why some people don't want what they call a political parade and a showcase is that, well, there are two motives. firstly, people are angry. they are blaming the state and the government for not doing the due control to do maintenance work. the second reason is you have do take into account that many of the people who were on that many of the people who were on that bridge not from genoa. some families said, we want to grieve in our cities, in families said, we want to grieve in ourcities, in our families said, we want to grieve in our cities, in our villages, families said, we want to grieve in our cities, in ourvillages, in other... with other peoples. we don't want a big event of the state
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funeral. it's very sad to hear that the death toll has risen. we certainly knew they were still looking for five people who were missing, thank you for bringing that up missing, thank you for bringing that up to date. what about concern in general about the safety of italy's infrastructure? presumably there must be great focus now on the road systems, other bridges around the country? absolutely. for example, yesterday the mayor of a town in the south of italy, a famous italian politician, he actually was a big member of the government some years ago decided to close one of the bridges in the town because that bridges in the town because that bridge was actually built by the same engineer who actually built that bridge in general. there are
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many that bridge in general. there are ma ny tests that bridge in general. there are many tests and works that are done, of course people are concerned about that, i can tell you that some days ago i covered the story and checked how many administrations and towns in italy decided to go through extraordinary tests on their bridges and so on. i received so many e—mails from people saying, you should write about this bridge here, you should write about that. because we see that there are things that are not going well. of course, this is also people'sfeeling. 0ne are not going well. of course, this is also people'sfeeling. one of the things we had to consider is that in italy, this kind of feeling against the government, this kind of idea that we are not safe comes from the
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fa ct that we are not safe comes from the fact that we have so many catastrophes, natural disasters. they remember the earthquake. in those cases, the government and the general system of control and works, public works done, was under... it's a terrible personal tragedy for those involved, for the families of those involved, for the families of those killed in nests. it's also a tragedy for the city of genoa and the region around it, i didn't realise, i was reading this morning it was one of the most bombed cities during world war ii, reconstructed over the last few decades. now something like this cuts off such an important route through to the very busy port, i understand. it will affect the lives of hundreds, possibly thousands of people.
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exactly. 0ne exactly. one of the things that emerges, together with all the families, because there are more than 400 people who cannot go back to their flats, to their houses, because they were built under the bridge. together, as i was seeing, together with the tragedy of the people who are grieving for their beloved, the people who do not have a house any more, they lose the big problem of genoa harborough, italy's first harbour. morandi bridge actually led to the harbour. —— genoa harbour. many of the traffic of goods and production is done through the harbour. it will be
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really tough for genoa. in the last few years, much debate was going on about the fight that genoa was once one of the first italian industrial cities, and it does not have its main economic sources any more. so this is going to be a big problem, not only for the people who had to pass on that bridge to move around town. if you want to go from, let's say turin, rome, to milan, it may happen that you have to pass. you have to go through there. real challenges lie ahead for the city. no doubt about that. thank you for your time this morning. it is the middle of august. lots of people
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have plans for the weekend. i am sorry, i am looking the wrong way. i never know. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. it is fine. there is a thin amount of dry weather around this weekend but there is some rain in the four cats, sunshine in short supply. it is speaking through the cloud on the north yorkshire coast and the further east europe the better chance you haven't seen sunshine today. away from the far north of scotland, everywhere will feel humid and it was more rain overnight to come. this rain is attached to this weather front. patchy rain across northern ireland, more persistent through the central belt of scotland and north. this will develop into more persistent rain overnight. to the north of the rain in scotland, sunny spells and showers. sunny spells in the far east of scotland as well. the cloud will try to break through the afternoon to bring sunny
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spells. a breezy day for northern ireland and everywhere has a noticeable breeze. strong winds for the western islands this morning, touching gale force and gusty in western coastal areas. in the sunshine across central and eastern parts of england, temperatures up to 24 celsius. it will be cooler than the far north of scotland. it should be mostly drive for the cricket. i cannot relate the odd spot of rain but hopefully the cloud will break. temperatures around 23 degrees. further west, overnight we will see outbreaks of rain pushing their way over northern ireland, northern england and central and southern scotland, some of the rain heavy and persistent. further north, it is dry and cool, named degrees. further south, it will be very warm and humid overnight. the rain will linger over some parts, and slowly it will fade away. it becomes drier
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through the afternoon. lots of cloud, which will thin and break. the best of the dry spells will be in the north of scotland. it will be cooler. high temperatures of 25 degrees across the rest of the uk. this weather front will generate further surely raynor parkinson parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—western england. —— will generate further rain. most of ours will stay in the warm air, so temperatures getting up to 25 or 26 celsius. can a robot pick a strawberry? that is all i ever think about. this
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is apparently a real difficulty, when we're talking about automation within different industries but picking soft fruit is particularly human in its requirements. now researchers around the world are trying solve this problem, to help farmers who can't recruit enough workers. 0ur science correspondent richard westcott has more. they have been making tiptree jam for more than 130 years, technology speeding up the process as the company grew. but there is one thing that hasn't changed in all that time. grab the stem and twist them round. and they're off, ready for the punnet. the company's workers pick a billion strawberries a year, and it is all still by hand. it is relatively straightforward. i will look after one of those for you, thank you very much. you are very welcome. such beautiful berries. but it gets more complex, doesn't it? it does. looking at the strawberries, the human brain has half a second to make all these decisions.
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what is the level of ripeness, is it ready, the size of the berry, in which punnet is it put, and also the colour of the berries. humans are really good atjudging the fruit. when you twist it, you can see actually the white shoulder. 0ur hands are great at picking, too. robots, on the other hand, really struggle. so now, a global race is on to develop a robot that is as good at picking soft fruit as a human being. but it is much more complex than you would think. humans find it very effortless. but when you try and build a system which does the same thing, it's a complex integration of vision, touch, force, movement, and on top of it, the ability to learn. scientists at the university of essex have teamed up with tiptree to try to solve the problem. robots are great when things are predictable, but nature doesn't do predictable. strawberries can be tucked away all over the plant. even changing light and weather can throw a computer. so lesson one is using colour
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to work out where the fruit is. ask a two year old to pick a berry, and if it's sunny, if the weather changes, if it starts raining, if the wind is blowing, he will effortlessly go and pick the berries. but making robots pick and place in changing environmental conditions is a very big challenge. some growers say fruit is already rotting in the fields because of a global shortage of people willing to do this kind of work. a recent study in scotland found they had 10% to 20% fewer pickers than they needed last year. are there issues getting labour every year, finding enough people, and training them up, and so on. is it difficult? we have been ok so far, but yes, we are seeing the pool of labour is decreasing year—on—year.
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and it is a hard job, and that is the onlyjob, probably, left on the farm which has no mechanical help or nothing mechanised. teams across the world are working on fruit—picking robots, many in secret, because there is so much money at stake. in essex, they are designing a new robot hand, but they should be ready for testing in the fields by christmas. there you go. it isa there you go. it is a work in progress. i was picking blackberries with my own hands yesterday bet i could have done with a robot because you get so many thorns in your hands. i was getting stung. a robot cannot do it. that is the problem. i know. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. poet and broadcaster ian mcmillan is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. good morning. do you have a position on robots? i hope
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they never take over the work of poets? that would be terrible. i rattled a long, lonely as a cloud. it would be a terrible thing for a robot to do. i think you might be right. we will speak to ian in a moment. the times, the uk's failure to tackle rich foreign criminals. assets freeze only three times, apparently. a rise in child diabetes. doctors warning that cases have rocketed by 40% in four years. normally only seenin 40% in four years. normally only seen in adults but increasingly in children and young adults. sorry. as the obesity crisis worsens. lots of chat about plastics and what to be done about it. this is the possibility of a levy on coffee cups and things that are not recyclable.
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her colleague is pictured in the guardian. the lead story concerns a silent stickers who spend a long time, decades, waiting for decisions from the home office about the right to stay in this country. when are you going to start? i would like to start with language and this story in the times about the fact that gender doctors do not like being called junior doctors because somehow to be called ginger doctor isa somehow to be called ginger doctor is a belittling term. we think about the words we use to describe each other. the word doctor has a power to it. i am going to see the doctor. junior doctors sounds like they are winning short trousers and a skill by cab. they are thinking of words like postgraduate doctor and it got me thinking about the presenter versus the journalists. we would like to be called journalist, not presenters. the poet feels wishy—washy, but as a boy, i always wa nted wishy—washy, but as a boy, i always
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wanted to be a writer. it makes me think about our titles, what we call each other, to remind us who we are. is there an alternative? several. they have talked about postgraduate doctors, which does not seem quite right. registrars. because we are used to american dramas we call people things like residents, fellows a nd people things like residents, fellows and interns, but none of them have the resid —— the resonance of one doctor. junior doctor is like reading a glass before you're about to start a speech. i have got no solutions apart from the fact that we need to think about what we call each other. i will be the bard. that is nice. very shakespearean. poet, people think of that as being someone who is wise, creative, thoughtful. think of that as being someone who is wise, creative, thoughtfullj think is wise, creative, thoughtful.” think people think of it as someone who sits about in a hammock with as
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a writer works hard. do you said about ina a writer works hard. do you said about in a hammock? i tried it once but i fell out causing great hilarity to everyone else in the campsite. once you're in it is fine. the next story. this is the telegraph, iman who donated some kid to the police to help the increase in knife crime. it struck me that we are sleepwalking without pyjamas on file into a crisis and masculinity. lots of yeongnam are not sure what they are for. that is part of this crisis in knife crime. —— lots of young men. as men we should provide exa m ples of young men. as men we should provide examples of a wider range of what masculinity can be, a softer, more gentle range, to be role models. i am being very simplistic, but surely as men we should start thinking about presenting ourselves as role models in a different way. part of this can be put at the rusty door of
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austerity because councils do not have enough money and youth clubs are being shot and that may change one day but as men we should give young men examples of what lives can be. there is always a discussion around these issues about the absence of fathers but male role models come from across the community. i think so and we should present ourselves as role models. tell us about this site are swelling. it charmed the cotswold village. 100 years swelling. it charmed the cotswold village.100 years ago it went to live in gloucestershire. you may be able to see the faint outline.” have been there, it is a lovely place. apparently it had its own bedroom, and it had a light switch and drank tea insider. that reflects my own life. it struck me that they are going to build a statue to the eighth. they are worried that hundreds of people will go along and see it. it is interesting to me that this is what the village might
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become known for. the for old used to be, the home of the tubular bandage. if you go to blackburn, it says, a lancashire town. not the lancashire town. this village will become the home of the side are swelling it. it is a good thing or a bad thing. does the story explain howjohn daniel came to be there in the fourth —— in the first place? people often bribed rescue animals from circuses. it was brought back from circuses. it was brought back from new york. they had to sell it in 1921 because it became too large to be cared for. a bit like me. there are couple of stories about lost and found in the paper. one will make people cringe, especially if you have contact lenses. i have spectacles today but i sometimes wear contact lenses for work. a woman lost a contact lens and it got to the back of her wry and it was there for was da bang
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there for was dabang drive for 28 yea rs there for was dabang drive for 28 years then it reappeared. these things often happen. that is why i wear glasses all the time. did it suddenly go, i am here? wear glasses all the time. did it suddenly go, iam here? in wear glasses all the time. did it suddenly go, i am here? in one of the other papers, there is a story that someone lost a carrot. not carried, a ring, but they lost a ring and it turned up on a canet 12 yea rs ring and it turned up on a canet 12 years later. there is a whole subculture of things that you lose and it turns up somewhere else. i do not wear contact lenses but you assume it's something is in your eye, you know about it. you would know, when you? she was hit by a shuttlecock playing badminton and she thought the contact lens had fallen out but it had went bang to rights and cause problems under her eyelid and when they investigated the find the contact lens. it would have been terrible if the shuttlecock had got stuck bank arrive for 20 years. we would love to you from you this morning if you have lost something and you thought it was gone forever and it suddenly
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turned up. it does not have to be within your body. that could take us ona within your body. that could take us on a different direction. that is another television programme. within the garden, it could appear on any kind of root vegetable. i was going to give the radio five number. sorry. how do you contact this programme. they will have no idea why people are calling in. they would be like, i have just found are calling in. they would be like, i havejust found my are calling in. they would be like, i have just found my cat. really? are calling in. they would be like, i havejust found my cat. really? at bbc breakfast. is that where we are? the get out clauses, contact us in the usual way. yes, if you know where —— what it is. thank you. we will see your bit later. we have the headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast
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with charlie stayt and rachel burden. coming up before nine, alina will have all your weekend weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. a massive relief operation is under way in southern india to help hundreds of thousands left homeless by the worst floods in the area in 100 years. the south western state of kerala has been most severely hit. at least 170 people have died there in the last ten days. our news correspondent yogita limaye has just sent us this report. scores of people have lost their lives in flooding. torrential rain
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has also caused other disasters like here behind me, the mode of became loose because of continuous rainfall and slipped all the way down onto this which used to be a two story house. nine people were killed here. there was one family, some relatives and neighbours as well. that is really how difficult this rescue operation is. it's notjust about evacuating people who are stranded in flooded areas, a large part of kerala is also hilly, so it's about taking people who might be at risk in parts like these out of here. thousands of troops have already been pressed into action and more are coming in from other parts of the country. and if operations are being conducted, people are being rescued by boat. basically any way possible. india's prime minister has beenin possible. india's prime minister has been in the state assessing the damage and there is a real sense of
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fear and despair among people hear about just when is fear and despair among people hear aboutjust when is this nightmare going to stop? retailers selling single—use water bottles, takeaway boxes and coffee cups face a new tax on plastics expected to be announced in the next budget. it comes after a record 162—thousand responses to a government consultation on how to reduce waste and boost recycling. the levy is likely to be applied to businesses to encourage them to switch to more environmentally friendly materials. italy's head of state, sergio mattarella will lead mourners during a state funeral later for 18 of the victims of the genoa bridge disaster. at least 38 people were killed when the motorway bridge collapsed on tuesday with five still missing. many of the grieving families have refused the offer of a state funeral in protest as they blame the authorities for the disaster. firstly, people are angry. they are blaming the state and the government for not doing the due control to do maintenance work. the second reason is you have to take into account
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are not from genoa. some families said, we want to grieve in ourcities, in our villages, in other... with other peoples. we don't want a big event of the state funeral. rail passengers are facing major disruption today as london euston station closes for the whole weekend for engineering works. that will affect the west coast mainline, while a one—day strike means there'll be a reduced service on south western railway. train operators are urging passengers to checkjourney times before setting off. the number of children and young adults in england and wales with type 2 diabetes has risen by more than 40—percent injust four years, according to the royal college of paediatrics. council leaders described the increase as "extremely worrying" and called for a boost in public health funding. the department of health says its "new childhood obesity plan
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will get children exercising more in schools and reduce their exposure to sugary and fatty foods." former international cricket star imran khan has been sworn in as the next prime minister of pakistan. after winning the general election injuly, mr khan's appointment was confirmed by a parliamentary vote yesterday. however, opposition leaders have claimed elements ofjuly‘s ballot were rigged. britain's new aircraft carrier, hms queen elizabeth, will leave portsmouth later today sailing to the east coast of america. she is the largest warship ever built for the royal navy and has 15—hundred sailors, aircrew and marines on board. two f—35 test aircraft will conduct a number of take off and landings from the 3—billion pound carrier while she's at sea. it's one of the most famous dresses in history — and now the white gown worn by marilyn monroe in the seven year itch is going up for sale. the dress, which was blown up
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by a gust of air from a subway grid, has gone on display in california among other costumes and personal possessions, including a message to the studio executive who changed her name from norma jean. after the desert auctions they put an estimate price on but i don't think they have done that time. who knows what they will will go for. more than anything i own! what have you got for us? ben stokes back in action today. this has been such a stressful 11 months. the court case only ended this week, four days ago he was found not guilty of affray, now he will be back in action for the third test against india so the pressure really will be on. as trevor bayliss said this week, it's probably better for his well—being to be brought back into the fold. joe root did say
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ben stokes is desperate to get back on the field. he missed the second test against india but will be back at trent bridge later in place of sam curran. group said that was one of the most difficult decisions he's had to make since becoming captain but he does believe stokes is ready. we had two days practice to gauge that on, in terms of fitness, making sure he was physically right to play. sat him down last night, just me and him, asked him quite brutally and honestly, are you in the right place to play for england? he assured me he is absolutely ready to go and perform at his best. from that perspective, i have no worries or doubts that he won't be able to go and deliverjust like he has done on so many times for england. england's women have reached the under—20 world cup semi—finals for the first time, by beating the netherlands 2—1 in france. england went a goal down but a great run and finish from manchester city striker georgia stanway brought them level. and thanks to some real persistence, she
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scored the winner too. england will face japan next. and in the premier league, there's a big london derby today, amid all the talk of rifts at manchester united — dan's here to tell us what's coming up on football focus today good morning. it's an interesting weekend. paul pogba, jose mourinho, who is right or wrong. mourinho says their best relationship, the best it has been in some years. that will rumble on for quite some time. we have an interview with kevin de bruyn this week. we have timed it well as he is out for three months! we scheduled it on monday and he got hurt on wednesday. we had nothing to do with it. he hobbled his way into the premiere of their big new documentary this week. fascinating on his relationship with pep guardiola. and the success of that
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season at man city. we also have jonjo shelvey on the programme. newcastle play cardiff. a young man who seems quite volatile and a bit on trustworthy by some managers but some suggest he should be in the england team for the world cup squad this summer. he's been going do quite a process of anger management. i spent quite a process of anger management. ispenta quite a process of anger management. i spent a bit of time with a psychologist and i still do, to be fair. we just go through certain bits and bobs. i could not even tell you what we talk about because before you know it, it's two hours down the line. i'm 26 years of age, so down the line. i'm 26 years of age, so obviously it was time to mature and grow up and i feel i am now. very honest interview with jonjo shelvey. one or other sports i can think of him doing. it does work for some people but i can see some raised eyebrows. we also have kenny miller talking about playing at
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livingston. a nice piece with alex got who has gone to see katie stoneleigh, the man united winning team. they have their first competitive game coming up this weekend against liverpool in the cup. we'll be live at leicester against wolves, west ham against bournemouth and everton against southampton. we are on from midday. i only forgot about eight things during that! we will let you get away with it. earlier rachel was just giving out random phone numbers, you are in good company!” was in the office is bringing it. it's actually mine. dan, thank you. in other news... gloucester rugby have been sticking by their fly—half danny cipriani after his conviction for assault this week — and now they say they are "surprised and extremely disappointed" that he's been summoned to an rfu disciplinary panel next week. cipriani has been charged with "conduct prejudicial to the interests of the game" by the rfu, after the incident outside a jersey nightclub. but gloucester say he's been singled out unfairly. the wbc world heavyweight
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champion deontay wilder says there is "no question" he'll fight tyson fury this year. just to warn you, there's some flash photography coming up wilder engaged in some seemingly friendly exchanges with fury‘s dad, john, at yesterday's weigh—in for fury‘s bout with francesco pianeta in belfast tonight. but it all got a bit heated... wilder says that the deal has been done, with the fight expected to take place in the united states towards the end of the year. as soon as we get this guy to weigh, it's done. that's how simple it is, you know what i mean? when two fighters want to fight each other, it will happen. you know, me and fury, we talked to each other and we made the fightjust in. i told him to get with his people, he told me to get with mine so we got together and it happened over night. just like that. when two parties want to fight,
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they going to fight. carl frampton is top of the bill in belfast — he takes on luke jackson for the wbo featherweight title — all the action will be live on bbc radio 5live tonight. great britain's alice tai has won her second gold medal in as many days at the european para swimming championships in dublin. she won the s8 100m freestyle, to add to the backstroke title she picked up yesterday. britain's medal target for the championships was 30—40, and they've already won 35 with two more days of competition to come. and ellie simmonds now has two silvers to her name, in an event she didn't really expect to be at. she came close to quitting after losing her love for the sport in the build—up to the last paralympics but she's now hoping to make the next, in tokyo 2020. it's a lot to come back but to think after rio i was going to return and now i'm representing my country at a european games, like, i can't imagine anything better.
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i love swimming and the whole team and it's definitely really good. i'm looking forward to having a good swim now and then having some cheesecake and a prosecco! she laughs that's what i'm really excited for! she definitely deserves that p rosecco she definitely deserves that prosecco and cheesecake! warrington's preparations for next week's challenge cup final didn't go to plan last night. they were beaten 28—18 at castleford tigers, so they have some re—grouping to do before their next match, which is that final against catalans dragons at wembley in a week's time. in last night's other match, huddersfield beat hull fc 26—6. there has been so much more action to go throughout the day, it's nice to go throughout the day, it's nice to have the premier league back and stand. all i to have the premier league back and stand. alli can to have the premier league back and stand. all i can think about is cheesecake and prosecco.” stand. all i can think about is cheesecake and prosecco. i love it when sportspeople explain, silver medal great, cheesecake and prosecco, that's what it's about.
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very good. see you later on. wheelchair rugby league can be fast, furious and at times brutal but the sport is experiencing a rise in popularity. the challenge cup finals take place later today and mike has been finding out what it's all about at a training session with the leeds rhinos. if you think that rugby league is tough, look at the wheelchair version. the thrills, the spills, the dives for the line. this is the sport developed by a frenchman in 2004 that aims to replicate the fast, furious and brutal game of rugby league, but in wheelchairs, and there's a try! when we start getting a good run and some good pace and then just chairs banging into each other, people getting flipped out of chairs and things, it gets quite competitive. it is pretty hard—core, pretty gnarly. you can only pass the ball backwards like in the running game so you're always moving back and knock—ons are a big thing, if you lose control of the ball.
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it has been life changing for former soldierjames who lost both legs in an explosion in afghanistan. it has made a massive impact on my life and recovery and it's got me more comfortable with myself. i'm going out there without prosthetics on and my legs are out and i'm in a wheelchair in front of people. it has had a huge impact on me that way but also i have got something to train for now. but this is an all—inclusive sport for all. at least two players on each team can be able—bodied, likejosh. anybody can play. when you're in the wheelchair and all strapped up, there is no real advantage over anybody else. it is your skill compared to theirs. it turns it all on its head really because the person in the wheelchair all the time is probably the more able because they have more skills in a wheelchair than a person that doesn't use one every day. it is very different to the paralympic wheelchair rugby, or murderball as it's known. this is far closer to the actual rugby game with conversions and drop goals. try and get your fist up and under. dave the cameraman got it between the posts. a drop on the floor, straight over.
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beautiful. it is a lot harder than it looks... as you can see. the first challenge is the learning to catch and carry the ball while pushing yourself along. it is only when you enter into a proper game that you really appreciate how physical this can be. apart from smashing into your opponent, you gain possession by removing the tags from their arms, that is the tackle. for newcomers, speed and quick passing seems essential because the longer you hold onto the ball, the bigger the metal battering you can get. i'm known for hitting people... quite hard! it's being able to make that contact and it's the speed as well. anybody is invited to attend a try out session and there are now 20 teams playing in three leagues across the country.
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the sport is also set to grow with england hosting the wheelchair rugby world cup in 2021. mike bushell, bbc news, in leeds. it does look like great fun. but some serious tumbles. it is physically brittle, fast and technically skilful. good luck to eve ryo ne technically skilful. good luck to everyone involved today. —— brutal. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it is a fairly cloudy and in places damp morning. a little sunshine coming through in pontefra ct sunshine coming through in pontefract but for most people, there will be large amounts of cloud. rain at times, but not for everyone. away from the far north of scotla nd everyone. away from the far north of scotland it will be humid overnight and across the weekend. this weather front will generate outbreaks of rain across central scotland, pushing into parts of ayrshire, and surely reign for northern ireland.
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sunny spells and showers to the north, and to decide, cloud and humid. some surely rain for the far north—west of england, wales and the south—west of england. elsewhere it should be dry. the cloud is trying to break, so we may see sunshine. a windy day for the western isles where we will see gale force gusts of winds. that will tend to ease during the day. temperatures up to 24 degrees in england. more like 15 degrees for the far north of scotland. it should be dry for the cricket today. perhaps the odd spot of rain around in the morning. the cloud will break. brighter spells in the afternoon. 0vernight we see the re m na nts of the afternoon. 0vernight we see the remnants of the next tropical storm. it is bringing heavy rain into northern ireland, sutherland central
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scotla nd northern ireland, sutherland central scotland and the far north of england. it will be humid overnight, temperatures not falling lower than 14 degrees. still outbreaks of rain around tomorrow through parts of central and southern scotland, into parts of northern england. that will fizzle out and through the afternoon most fizzle out and through the afternoon m ost pla ces fizzle out and through the afternoon most places will be dry. the cloud will break and we will see sunny spells, the best probably for the far north of scotland, where temperatures will not get much higher than 15 degrees. in the south, temperatures around 24 degrees. we hold on the humidity on monday. 0n weather front will clear away but this will linger over northern ireland and scotland. showers feeding their way down over northern england, perhaps reaching parts of wales. for england, it should be mainly dry day. more sunshine than at the weekend, and it will feel warm for central and eastern parts of england, with temperatures getting up to 25
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degrees. help us to get into this next item. is it going to be a bit nippy at night? away from the far north of scotland we will have warm, humid conditions. temperatures not much lower than 16 degrees. that was no help whatsoever. but thank you. you did not know what we we re thank you. you did not know what we were talking about. sorry. i'm talking about duvets. iam i'm talking about duvets. i am snuggling up. there is a reason. we are looking at the problems with bacteria on our bed sheets more generally. do you even think about how often we should be washing sheets? there are all kind of weird stuff that lurks in these because of the skin we discard and the amount we sweated night. according to microbiologist from new york university, bacteria and fundi can thrive. we are talking about sheets, pillows but things like this as well.
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ricky boleto has been finding out who needs to change their bedtime habits. what was that? don't worry, these clothes are staying on. we've got the bbc breakfast duvet, i want to find out how often people really clean their bed sheets. may i ask you how often do you clean your sheets? every two weeks. i clean my bed sheets once a week on my day off. and is that the honest truth? that is the honest truth. yes. once a week, once every two. probably two, right? we'll go with that one, yeah, just in case. every three weeks, i try. every three weeks, you try? yeah.
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so it doesn't always happen every three weeks? it generally happens. i will get told off. every two weeks. every two weeks? be honest with me, seriously. yeah, because i get fake tan on them! so it has to be done! laughter otherwise they are just orange! yeah. every six weeks? six weeks?! so, not mine, mine are like every one or two! ok, that sounds a bit more respectable. all the jobs are done on a sunday, wash the bed sheets, do all your your shirts ready for the week. food prep, done on a sunday. iam impressed. ajob i don't want to do but has to be done. i got rid of the duvet because goodness knows what is lurking inside it. we're joined now by microbiologistjoe latimer. these stories, frequently but who has ever died as a result of dirty
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sheets? that is the thing. people like to talk about it. it is a good talking point, but people think there is a bit of a gross out factor. the press like to do the stories and they feel a bit scared, but i do not think there is too much to worry about. there are all sort of stuff that grows inside our bedding. that is true? yes. if you put that in context, we are about 60% bacteria anyway. we have trillions of bacteria living honours, and they are doing is good. the fact we have bacteria on our beds as well, somewhere where we spend a lot of time and sleep, it is not that surprising and it probably will not hurt us. have you heard of anyone who has been ill because they have not wash their bed sheets were a couple of weeks? weight is the crossover point between the bacteria issue and basic hygiene? hygiene is important, isn't it? there is a health issue at some point, isn't
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there? of course. i am not saying you should wait months before washing your sheets, but i think people generally can use common sense. they know when things have been going on too long. generally, we wash sheets anyway, because as you were saying before, we sweat on our sheets, and they get dirty. i have a two—year—old daughter and she comes in in the morning with serial 0liver hands and gets everywhere. comes in in the morning with serial 0liver hands and gets everywherem is that kind of thing. it depends on generations. certainly i can remember a generation where people said, bit of bacteria, bit of dirt, the idea of playing in dirt, it is good for you. some of that is healthy because it builds up your immune system. is any of that releva nt to immune system. is any of that relevant to this? yes, again it is balance. there are a few bacteria in the world that will cause us harm. for example, if you are talking
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about hospital beds, it is very, very important that we clean those, and the nhs has lots of strict rules and the nhs has lots of strict rules and regulations about that, but in terms of our own beds, it is mostly the bacteria that come from us. that is not going to be harmful to you? it is not going to be harmful. if harmful bacteria get the fiddle, the chance of them causing disease will be pretty slim. you are conducting an experiment involving your bed sheets? is that right, did i misread that? that is not what my researches but there is an article about someone who had done that. there was a suggestion in our notes that we we re a suggestion in our notes that we were not to ask you about how often you wash your own bed sheets. ok, i made a joke to one of yourjournal is that i do not wash my bed sheets because i am conducting a large—scale microbiological experiment on them. is that not true? know you're going to be the
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microbiologist to never washed his bed sheets. that will be your official title. i have a toddler, i have to wash my sheets all the time. i was going to say, the bottom line is it is fascinating. we are all curious about this sort of thing, but ultimately, it does not matter that much. it isjust one of those funny personal things. no one knows what everyone else does. i think people probably are not completely honest when they talk about it. some of those people were brave to be questioned about it. nice to see you this morning. thank you. i am glad your sheets are clea n. it's a sound like no other, the skirl of the bagpipes are in full flow at the world pipe band championships in glasgow. around 8,000 pipers and drummers from 13 countries have descended on glasgow green to compete for the chance to be crowned champion. catrina renton has been to meet some of the pipers taking part. they play bagpipes
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it may be seen as a scottish tradition, but this competition has drawn bands from all over the globe. from as far away as canada and new zealand. for pipers and drummers, this is the equivalent of the world cup and despite the rain, 8000 people from 13 different countries are willing to take part this weekend. it's hugely important. we travelled for 40 hours or something to get here. we have been fundraising since two years ago so it's a huge deal and we are really excited to compete. this is the goal, to come here and be here every year. from preseason training like football, to here today, this is the last competition of the season. we look forward to it every year, like. glasgow first hosted the world championship 70 years ago. now, it's part of a week—long festival celebrating all things piping. there's acts from all over the world that come to perform at our festival.
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it's really a huge festival promoting piping in general but also traditional music. anna started playing the bagpipes when she was seven. while t‘s not the easiest instrument to learn ten years on, she says practice makes perfect. my first time was definitely awkward, it was one of the most awkward things to try to get your head around but once you've nailed it, you know, you are always improving so it's easy once you've got it! over 200 bands are competing this weekend. they have put in hours and hours of practice, hoping they will be able to walk away with the much coveted title, world pipe band champions. an amazing sound when you hear pipers gathered together. it is spine tingling. stay with us. headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. 0ur headlines today.
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