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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 20, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: amid signs the attempts to force a vote of confidence have stalled, theresa may prepares to head to brussels to discuss the uk's future with the eu after brexit. for the first time, the nhs has failed to meet its waiting time targets for cancer, a&e, and routine operations for a whole year across the uk. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor thought to be his ex—fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. there are some injury problems for two of the whole nations ahead of their final two of the whole nations ahead of theirfinal rugby two of the whole nations ahead of their final rugby union are some internationals. no leigh halfpenny for wales, chris ashton set to miss out for england. thanks, and ben rich has all the weather. temperatures on the thermometer today might be between 4—8. when we add on the strength of the wind, it
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will feel more like freezing. i will be explaining all about winter chill plus the full forecast at 2:30pm. thanks, ben. also coming up, the wonderful reaction from this six—year—old deaf boy as a cbeebies bedtime story is told using makaton sign language for the first time. good afternoon. theresa may will travel to brussels tomorrow to meet the european commission president, jean claude juncker, ahead of a summit on sunday, when she hopes her brexit deal will be agreed by eu leaders. mrs may appears to have seen off attempts by backbenchers to mount a vote of no confidence in her leadership, but her critics in the party went back on the attack today, accusing her of not delivering a ‘proper brexit‘. this morning, the prime minister chaired her first cabinet meeting since a series of ministerial resignations last week. our political correspondent, chris mason, has this report.
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when reporters like me set up camp in shabby tents next to parliament for days on end, you know things are a bit fruity at westminster. and while plotting rumbles on here to ditch the prime minister's plan, or ditch her, she rolled up down the road to sell it. there's one paramount issue facing our country at the moment. her back against the wall, business leaders in front of her, this is what prime ministerial defiance looks like. it was never going to be easy or straightforward and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. that package first rant yesterday. we will get today's package later on. but now it falls on you, vicky, to get us out of this! where are we?
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theresa may focusing on the trip tomorrow. as she out of the woods for the moment? it's groundhog day, but that's taking it a bit far, it's groundhog day, but that's taking ita bit far, going it's groundhog day, but that's taking it a bit far, going back to yesterday. she had another cabinet meeting this morning and this issue was looked at again. i think we do seem to be any slight holding pattern and it seems as if she has fought off those people for now eve ryo ne fought off those people for now everyone to have this vote of no—confidence in her. but the trouble is you can never say that because there is no deadline and these letters can go in whenever they like, she can never be totally sure. we had one brexiteer mp saying in the last hour that they were pretty certain that 46 had gone in. no one knows, of course, but that threat. a hanging over her. i think it is still the case there are many who feel it would be the wrong time to hold that no—confidence vote no because she would be right likely to win itand because she would be right likely to win it and then she would be safe for another year. she is focused on
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this meeting tomorrow, going to brussels to meet with the eu commission president. those who are looking for changes at this late stage won't be thrilled to hear that the withdrawal agreement has been pretty much a signed off. theresa may won't get a chance on sunday at that council meeting to end anyway speak or lobby the other eu leaders for any changes. so it's going to be pretty difficult for her to get any substantial changes between now and then, whether anything could then happen between that and the voters is the big issue. that meaningful vote when it comes at the beginning of december, they are still the numbers that really matter. whether dup apparently trying to threaten the prime minister with a pulling out of that agreement, it looks increasingly hard for the government to get those numbers. and we've heard from jacob rees—mogg this morning, is there a sense that the drg is now a busted flush on
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this issue of the no—confidence vote ? possibly, although as we say we can never be sure of that, but i think the bigger, most pressing issue for the bigger, most pressing issue for the prime minister is the numbers in the prime minister is the numbers in the house of commons when it comes to the vote on the deal that she brings back. it's notjust 25 who have gone public with saying they wa nt have gone public with saying they want a vote of confidence, if you add to that all the others we know are add to that all the others we know a re really add to that all the others we know are really unhappy with it, plus those on the remain site, think aboutjo johnson who was those on the remain site, think aboutjojohnson who was on the remain silent, resigned his ministerial post, presently didn't do that in order to back the deal he resigned over. if you add those numbers up, it looks incredibly difficult for the prime minister despite the arm—twisting that they will no doubt be. the chief whip, whose job it is to do the persuasion, as he came out of cabinet today, he still sounded a little bit confident. the negotiations are ongoing, the prime minister will be at the summit on sunday. i think everybody‘s behind her,
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couldn't be more positive. a big focus on making sure we get the best deal for families, for business and for delivering on the commitments we made to respect the referendum. so it's a really exciting week and i think the prime minister is going to have a very busy time. is there a possibility of renegotiating parts of the withdrawal agreement? there's a focus on getting the deal done. she'll get the deal done and in a few weeks‘ time, i've got a job to do in parliament. and what ourjob he does have to do. you'll have a couple of weeks to do so. you'll have a couple of weeks to do so. the hope must be that, presented with a deal that has taken all this time, thousands of hours of negotiation, they will look very closely at it and not want to risk the no deal alternative. but they can't be sure of that. there's even talk of the vote coming before the house a second time injanuary. but i think if it is voted down, that is a moment of extreme danger for the
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prime minister. two meaningful votes? can you have two meaningful votes goes right anything is possible at this point, yes. we want to attempt to answer any questions you have on how the brexit process develops from here. we'll be joined by our reality check correspondent chris morris atjust after 3.30pm this afternoon, so do send us your brexit questions by text to 61124, you can tweet using the hashtag as well. for the first time the nhs has failed to meet its waiting time targets for cancer, a&e, and routine operations for a whole year right across the uk. our health correspondent nick triggle is here. how do we know this? what does this say about where we are? we've been looking back at performance over the last 12 months of both nationally and locally at individual health services. they show that in england,
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i6 services. they show that in england, 16 out of 13! individual trusts failed to meet their monthly targets. and that's any of their monthly targets. in scotland, it was three out of 11! health boards. in wales, it was five health words out of seven. in northern ireland, all five health and care trusts missed every single target for the whole year. that's the first time this has ever happened since targets started to be introduced over ten years ago and nhs staff i've spoken to say it shows going into winter the nhs is once again under huge pressure. pressure particularly because of the increasingly aged population. yes indeed. it is a combination of rising numbers but also the fact that the patience, the conditions they have a more complex. patients are older, often have multiple conditions, heart disease mixed in with dementia, and it means hospitals have to spend longer caring for them. they often have to
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stay in hospitalfor caring for them. they often have to stay in hospital for longer. caring for them. they often have to stay in hospitalfor longer. as we've heard so often, there's a problem sometimes getting them out into the community. here's what one hospital chief executive had to say the problems. we are seeing increasing numbers of patients coming to hospital but perhaps most interestingly, they are coming with increasing complexity. they often have diabetes, asthma, they are very elderly, so they come with multiple needs and they take a lot longer to help and if they get admitted, they tend to stay in hospital a lot longer as well. these figures raise a question about whether the targets will ever be met again but the government department of health in the two nations say they are committed to the waiting time targets and are investing more money into the health service in the coming years and expect to see the delays patients face reduced. thanks very much. if you'd like to find out how your local services are performing, you can find out
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using the bbc‘s nhs tracker. at bbc.co.uk/tracker. four people have died after a shooting at a hospital in the american city of chicago. the gunman shot a doctor — believed to be his former fiancee — outside the building before storming inside and killing a trainee pharmacist and a police officer. he then turned the gun on himself. peter bowes reports. another city, another shooting, this time at a hospitaljust south of downtown chicago. the police say it started with a row in the car park between people who knew each other. the gunman first shot a woman with whom he was in a relationship, and then headed inside the building, closely followed by several police officers. more shots were fired, apparently at random. it was like pow pow pow, pow pow pow, pow pow pow pow pow. it was extreme, it was very loud and it was close, so this is what happened. i don't know, after that, swat came and got us out of the utility room and made us walk across the street.
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literally as i was stepping onto the pavement i heard five shots, bam, bam, bam, bam, bam. i dropped my groceries, i head to take cover, so we take cover, and at this corner there was really nowhere to seek shelter. and we heard about six more shots. a doctor, a pharmaceutical assistant and a police officer were all killed. the gunman is also dead. those officers that responded today saved a lot of lives, because this guy was just shooting. that poor woman that got off an elevator had nothing to do with nothing, and he shot her. why? there's no doubt in my mind that all those officers that responded were heroes, and they saved a lot of lives because we just don't know how much damage he was prepared to do. the city of chicago is no stranger to gun violence. it's everyday life for people who live here. but this shooting has hit home harder than most. this tears at the soul of our city.
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it is the face and the consequence of evil. at about the same time in another us city, another shooting was unfolding, in downtown denver. the police say the suspect is still at large. it leaves two more american cities in mourning today. the scourge of gun violence once again to blame. australian police have arrested three men in melbourne, who they say were planning a mass shooting. the suspects, who are australian nationals with a turkish background, have been under investigation since march. the police say the men had been inspired by the islamic state group and by an attack in melbourne earlier this month, in which a man was stabbed to death. a video showing police officers being attacked in south london has been shared widely on social media. the footage, taken in merton on saturday, shows a man kicking a female officer,
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who is left clutching her head just yards from a passing bus. her colleague is shown being dragged across the road, as he tries to stop a suspect. a warning, this report from jon mcmanus contains footage some people may find disturbing. everybody‘s flying, look, they've got him. this is the moment a routine a traffic police stop in south west london turned violent. one of the occupants of the car attempts to run away, the male police officer is dragged around the road while trying to stop him. a female officer tries to help. only to be violently drop kicked to the ground by another man, an oncoming bus narrowly avoids hitting her. dear me, hejust kung fu kicked her. both officers were treated in hospital but their injuries were not serious. the incident was recorded on a mobile phone. i'm getting this all live. and it's this and the tone of the commentary that has prompted the chair of the metropolitan police federation to criticise the behaviour of some members of the public. is it becoming acceptable we can build constantly police officers
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executing their warrant, do absolutely nothing about it and it's a big joke? ken marsh says officers might have to start letting suspects go if they don't receive public support but he doesn't mean he expects them to jump in to physically help. assaults on officers are growing, there were 26,000 in the past year. and other emergency workers have also been targeted with over 17,000 nhs staff attacked in some form. the senior policeman responsible for officers' welfare says the public should be cautious. this isn't a green light for have a go heroes, many members of the public do incredibly brave things to keep us safe as well as themselves safe on a day—to—day basis. all we are saying here is there is a difference between helping us and hindering us and glorifying some of the things that are being filmed at the moment. i'm getting this live, boys and girls. among those who drove by, a passing motorcyclist appears to aid the officers.
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police say they are grateful for help from the public but should only get involved if it is safe to do so. one person has been charged in connection with this incident, police are searching for two others. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister will meet the president of the european commission tomorrow to discuss the political declaration on the future relationship between the uk and eu. for the first time ever, no part of the uk has hit any of its key nhs waiting time targets for cancer, a&e and routine operations. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. half of british adults say their sex education at school did not
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prepare them for real life, according to a survey carried out for bbc radio 5live. the station is broadcasting a whole day of programming focused on sexual behaviour, relationships and attitudes. 0ur correspondent fiona trott is in sunderland for us now. welcome to a very wintry sunderland. welcome to a very wintry sunderland. we wa nted welcome to a very wintry sunderland. we wanted to show you this picture of the river this afternoon. we are very happy to be indoors at the national glass centre in the city where this big conversation has been taking place about sexual relationships. as you mentioned, that poll suggests half of us don't believe sex education in schools prepared us for real life. 43% of us say they believe lgbt queue relationships, education about that should be made compulsory in schools. i want to introduce you to a man who threw his research knows a lot about this. we are going to be
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talking about sex so the conversation will be frank. you are a senior lecturer at sunderland university. we know that in 2020, the sort of discussion will be on the sort of discussion will be on the school curriculum. but how should that be taught? what do you think as a former teacher? it needs to be taught well like every other form of sex and relationship education. we need to be taking a model from scotland to have embedded lg bt model from scotland to have embedded lgbt issues across the entire curriculum not just sex lgbt issues across the entire curriculum notjust sex and education. we need to be looking for other and i education. we need to be looking for otherand i am education. we need to be looking for other and i am aware that the consultation as closed so we will see the results coming up within the next year or so. role models, that kind of thing? yeah, poets and image classes, historical figures that have been edited out of history, like genghis khan. we need to have a holistic curriculum for people. why should lgbtq holistic curriculum for people. why should lg btq relationships holistic curriculum for people. why should lgbtq relationships be taught
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in schools? what has your research told you? i research people living with hiv in the uk and 100% of the sample of gay men that i interviewed in that research project also they believe that their hiv transmission was due to appear sex education in schools. i find that dangerous and worrying, especially since hiv rates are still increasing. so if you were ina are still increasing. so if you were in a classroom now, what would be the main message to children? what would you be teaching them? first of all, us protection, but also i would severely point out that sex is something that should be treated with care and should be open to discussion and debate is, not something that should be censored or edited or hidden away from people. also, they were talking about what should be compulsory on the common curriculum, but at the end of the day, parents can make the decision to opt their children out of those lessons of the wanted. they currently can't remove children and we don't know what that will look
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like in terms of the consultation coming back. will they be able to t coming back. will they be able to opt the children out or not of sex education? because if so, that is creating a feedback loop and is in dealing with the issues at hand. it is just editing sex education out of certain children's lives, which i find worrying. do you think you a lot of children as a consequence might get their education from social media? absolutely, and maybe coming across a false ideas of what sex is and also the harm that they see online regarding sex. i would rather they accessed from a safe source, trained teachers, rather than the social media. do we know that teachers will be properly trained in this field? it will be on the curriculum, but can teach us all about? this is the worrying thing because there is a generation of teachers who want to touch sex and religion should education and one teacher. there's a hangoverfrom clause 28 to this day where some teachers are still worried about
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teaching about lg bt teachers are still worried about teaching about lgbt issues in the classroom. we does the one that will look like in the future but i believe the should be able out of training with this new curriculum. teachers need it and it is vital. thank you for chatting to us today. we are also hearing some recent research that says one in six lgbt -- lg btq research that says one in six lgbt —— lgbtq education in schools. all the more reason policymakers in the future get this right when it comes to sex education. president trump's immigration policy has hit a stumbling block. earlier this month, the president signed an order barring people from claiming ayslum if they enter the country illegally. but a judge has blocked the order, saying it exceeds the president's authority. the intervention comes as a group of migrants, who set off from countries in central america, reached the mexican city of tijuana on the border with the united states. donald trump has called the caravan an invasion and an avalanche. 0ur correspondent, will grant, has been travelling with them.
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this is a sports centre and for the people who have reached this point, the united states is moments away. they have to decide what to do next. it won't be simple to cross the busiest border crossing in the world. some are signing up for a foul on behind me. they are receiving advice on the process of how to do that and are putting their names down via migrant rights groups who are supporting them. the mere of tijuana have said they can spend up to six months in the process and has described the script as an avalanche that the city is ill—equipped to deal with. but those who are en route are still planning to make it to this point. we expect them to arrive in the coming hours. many who have encountered greater facility across the way, there has been a
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hardening of attitudes towards the migrants in the northern states of mexico that they didn't see in the southern states. for example here in tijuana over the weekend, there was a small but vocal anti—migrant protest which was quickly broken up by police. but it reflected that greater hostility, that outpouring of anger, particularly seen online and on social media that's the migrants are not welcome here. resident drop off course has told them to go home in no uncertain terms. —— president trump has told them. but when they get here they will decide what to do next. some will decide what to do next. some will choose to break away from the ca rava n will choose to break away from the caravan and try and cross on their own via a dangerous people trafficking gangs, human sparklers, with all of the risk involved in that process. 0thers with all of the risk involved in that process. others may choose the safer option of settling here in mexico itself if they can find work. millions of children have enjoyed cbeebies book at bedtime over the years —
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but last week — for the first time — it was told using makaton sign language. six—year—old tom mccartney, who's deaf, watched it with this mother. his reaction was filmed as he understood the story for the first time. he was so excited that she posted the footage online. it has since gone viral online. lorna gordon reports. bedtime story. hello, i'm rob... it's become part of the bedtime routine for many parents and their children but when actor rob delaney recently took on cbeebies storytelling duties, it led to a very special reaction from one young boy. as soon as he saw rob come on and he was using makaton, hejust, yeah, he wasjust so engaged and excited by it. although tom doesn't have any speech, he has a very expressive little face and he uses, he doesn't just sign, as you can see, but he uses his entire body, as you saw, including standing up in his chair, to be able to get across how excited he was. six—year—old tom has complex medical needs. during one of his trips to hospital, his mum and dad started using makaton sign language to help
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communicate with their son. there is something like! million people using makaton out there today as we speak to help their communication, ranging from those with learning disabilities, as we saw with tom, but also helping babies to acquire speech, looking at developing wider literacy skills and even working with people with dementia. the young boy's joyful response has been shared thousands of times online. it even caught the attention of the storyteller himself, who has said tom's response was beautiful. rob delaney's own links to the language came about after he learned makaton to communicate with his own son, henry, who had been seriously ill with a brain tumour, and who died earlier this year. i'm so glad that it was him that they chose to do it, i think because he has a personal connection to makaton, with his son, henry, and made it even more special for us, knowing what he had been through, and the kind of personal journey with makaton.
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mum laura said her son's reaction had left her in tears. the family's hope now — that makaton will make it into more children's television, so tom can enjoy more of his favourite programmes in a language he understands. i'll take you back to downing street and stay with us because it's worth it. there are lots of coming and goings at downing street over the last few days. but take a look at this: number ten's mouser in chief — larry the cat — it appears does not always get access all areas through number ten. he was left waiting on the doorstep this morning in the rain until a friendly policemen stepped in to help. i put that out on twitter earlier and one response was, 5—1 he will be the next brexit secretary. another one says the last street in england
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to see a copper, suggesting the british sense of humour is alive and well. time for a look at the weather. this is not funny, i know to my cost. not if you have to stay outside of westminster for hours on end. what is winter chill? insights ofjournalism from the bbc! well, i'm going to tell you, and we really have thrown the production budget at this point because we have a little bit of... beef followed the cbeebies graphics. it goes away and we bring only help. this is me. i'm going to struggle to get through this! the thing about wind chill is that we are and our bodies have a layer of air that we
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used to keep warm, you can see it around me. when it gets windy, that layer of air gets blown away. the wind comes in, the layer of warm air gets blown away and we then feel colder. but the wind also does, particularly if it's dry air, as evaporate the moisture from the skin, taking more energy out of your body and makes you feel even colder. that's how i was looking yesterday! there is a formula that meteorologists can use to calculate the wind chill. that was it and what we do is condense all of that formula down into a number. your thermometer in the garden at the five celsius but because of the winter chill factor, it might feel sub zero. we got on about it in our
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forecasts, this feels like number, and that is where it comes from. that is excellent. good to space, too, look at that! —— toothpaste. i know i am smiley, but that's a bit much. let's get into the forecast. a few are on the east coast it looks and feels cold. we have quite a lot of cloud around, some showery weather as well. you can see these clowns are racing in from the east on the satellite picture and that is going to produce some shambles. some on the heavy side, most falling as rain but some sweet and small perhaps mixing in on high ground. a strong easterly wind, goss of a0 mph on the easterly wind, goss of a0 mph on the east coast. a—7 on the thermometer but because of the wind chill, by
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five o'clock, freezing for birmingham, norwich and cardiff. through the ceiling and tonight it will be chilly because it stays windy. a lot of cloud around. 0utbreaks windy. a lot of cloud around. outbreaks of showery rain and of high ground, say above 300 metres, the pennines, high ground of scotland, were likely to see sleet and snow. temperatures themselves not particularly slow but is the far south—west might get some frost. 0n the warning rush—hour on wednesday, not a bitter butcher across scotland. the wind will shave the edge of the temperatures. similar story for northern ireland, northern england, some snow over the pennines and welsh hills. there could even be snow over the murders of the west country. some quite heavy, thundery showers expected to drift further northwards through the day, moving into east wales and is the west midlands. for northern ireland and scotland, some cloudy and damp
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weather. further seven days, things start to come down. the wind will ease a bit and we will see more sunshine. it might feel a bit better. but conversely, as the windsor stay later through wednesday and thursday, it will be a colder nights. a widespread frost for a time. thursday not a bad looking day. there will be dry weather and also more cloud of streaming in from the east which could produce the odd spot of rain at times. the temperatures begin to notch up words a bitand temperatures begin to notch up words a bit and that is the trend continuing to the end of the week. low pressure in the south—west so instead of the cold easterly winds, more of a southerly wind. it won't bea more of a southerly wind. it won't be a heat wave but slowly, surely the temperatures will be climbing. enter the weekend, something less cold on the way and some rain at times. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. theresa may prepares to head to brussels tomorrow to discuss the uk's future with the eu
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amid signs attempts to force a vote of no confidence in her leadership have stalled. for the first time, the nhs fails to meet its waiting time targets for cancer, a & e, and routine operations for a whole year across the uk. four dead at a chicago hospital, after a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. sport now on afternoon live with 0lly foster. waiting patiently, as ever, now, let's talk about rugby, and some injury worries for the home nations. not really surprise in, such an intense month of november, every single weekend, autumn internationals, home nations in action. intriguing result, the impact, the collisions on players, they begin to take their toll as we get into what is the final weekend next weekend. wales are going for
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their first clean sweep in the autumn series. they have wins against scotland, australia and tonga but for their final match in cardiff they will have to do without full—back leigh halfpenny. he was concussed in this collision with the wallabies‘ samu kerevi ten days ago. he still has not recovered. warren gatland accused the australian player of being reckless at the time so it is disappointing that they will be without him, as they go for the clean sweep. chris ashton, what about him? it‘s australia next for england and they are going to be without wing chris ashton. he has a calf injury. he has featured in all three of the autumn internationals so far but was replaced in the first half of saturday‘s win against japan. jack nowell and jonny may are expected to be the wingers
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for the match now. we have come to know and love and understand the nation ‘s league, over the last few months. england, switzerland, the netherlands and portugal, they will be into the mini tournament, a new trophy on offer. it is the final round of group matches tonight, and if scotland beat israel, they will top their group, get promoted to the second tier, in the nation ‘s league, next time it is played, in a couple of yea rs, time it is played, in a couple of years, more importantly, they will earn a play—off spot, should they need it, for euro 2020, that is if they fall short in next year ‘s regular qualification process. scotla nd regular qualification process. scotland and israel are level on points. scotland need only a draw to —— israel need only a draw to top
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the group themselves, because they beat scotland in haifa last month. it isa beat scotland in haifa last month. it is a huge game for us. we took on a huge game at the weekend, after the disappointment against israel, and we absolutely nailed it. we just have to take that forward and realise... and the players are under no illusions about how big a game it is. the uefa president alexander ceferin says they might look to increase sanctions against clubs that break financial fair play rules. european football‘s governing body recently said that they could re—open investigations into manchester city and paris st germain. we should not speak only about manchester city and p56, we speak about all the clubs, this is the most important, perhaps you could call them the usual suspects, but i ee, call them the usual suspects, but i agree, here we have to see what is
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going on, our independent bodies will check it. we know that we must keep credibility. breaking athletics news. british olympic sprinter nigel levine has been banned from all sport for four years after failing a drugs test. this dates back to last year, when you initially failed the test, in november. the european indoor gold medallist was provisionally suspended in february after he reportedly tested positive for banned asthma drug clenbuterol. and uk anti—doping have now confirmed the ban. he does have the right to appeal. we will have more on that story as we get it. sir mo farah will make another attempt to win the london marathon next april. he finished third this spring, in his first race over the distance since quitting the track, but went on to win the chicago marathon last month
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in a new european record. he expecting another world class field in london that will include the kenyan world record holder eliud kipchoge. i think anything is possible, having run my first two marathons, third la st run my first two marathons, third last year, pretty good, and winning chicago, two hours, five minutes, i have got to face eliud kipchoge, he is the best out there, he has run decent chimes, he has not lost too many marathons, i am excited to take him on, i will give many marathons, i am excited to take him on, iwill give it many marathons, i am excited to take him on, i will give it my all and many marathons, i am excited to take him on, iwill give it my alland i will see what happens. i will mix it with them and the rest of the athletes. that‘s all the sport for now. let‘s return to our main story this afternoon. theresa may will travel to brussels tomorrow to meet the european commission president,
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jean claude juncker, ahead of a summit on sunday, when she hopes her brexit deal will be agreed by eu leaders. this morning, the prime minister chaired her first cabinet meeting since a series of ministerial resignations last week. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at the house of commons for us now. the big question, is there any more room form and move for the prime minister in those negotiations with brussels, at this very late stage. she is saying that the withdrawal agreement has been decided and agreed in full, still the political declaration, but there are of course many in the house of commons who wa nts to many in the house of commons who wants to see some changes even at this stage, let‘s speak with a member of the dup, you are clearly unhappy with what you have seen, and you say you cannot support the prime minister. what do you say to some of the northern irish businesses, who have heard from the commission that this is the best deal they have ever given to any country, because those businesses would have unfettered action to the single market and continuing access to the single market —— eu market.
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continuing access to the single market -- eu market. three things, many of these business organisations we re many of these business organisations were saying the same thing coming up to the referendum, that if we did not vote to stay in the eu, there would be disastrous things happening. secondly, ican understand the nervousness, nobody wants to see a no deal scenario, because it leaves uncertainty, which businesses cannot afford, i understand that. thirdly, i can't understand that. thirdly, i can't understand why those business organisations having looked at this deal think it is a good deal, that we hand over for the future, for the indefinite future, the ability for the eu to make rules about how those businesses operate, not knowing what those rule changes are going to be, not knowing whether they will be detrimental to the businesses, but knowing, for sure, that they can't be changed, that they can't be rejected, and then, of course, already, in the agreement, spelt out, that there will be and could be
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a border between northern ireland and great britain. if the eu rules demand that there has got to be such a border. and thirdly, there will not be able to participate in future trade deals, which uk make with other parts of the world, i cannot see how anyone thinks that is a good deal for business. see how anyone thinks that is a good dealfor business. no see how anyone thinks that is a good deal for business. no deal is the option you think there is, there is a problem, northern ireland voted m, a problem, northern ireland voted in, are you really representing the voters of northern ireland? we have had this argument, the united kingdom voted to leave, it was a united kingdom vote, if we start segmenting the united kingdom and say, this part voted to leave and this part voted to remain, where do you stop? my constituency voted to leave, do you draw the line around my constituency, and the constituency of jason my constituency, and the constituency ofjason turck, you have a national referendum or you do
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not, the national referendum was a vote to leave the eu. as far as a no deal situation, i still take the view that a no deal is the an indefinite deal, which can be damaging to the northern ireland economy in the long run, and damaging because it separates us from the rest of the uk. last night, your party did not support the government in a finance bill, that means that your deal with the conservative party, is over, that confidence in the supply deal? no, there is a message to the conservative party, two parts to the deal, first of all, they would deliver brexit and deliver it on the terms that the prime minister had laid out in her manifesto and also the promises made to the people of northern ireland, that we would not be separated. let's get it straight, the deal was broken, by... you are going to have a chance to vote
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against that, if you want to, you have ahead of that broken the confidence of supply agreement, you have do support it on the supplied bill. the extensions we have engaged in last night, they have little consequence in far of —— in terms of delivering the finance to see it is programmed through, or the delivering the finance to see it is programmed through, orthe main essence of what the economic thrust is of the government, they were all votes about reports, etc, things about that, no fiscal consequences. . . about that, no fiscal consequences... it was still a finance bill. it was, but people have been bewildered, if given the depth of opposition that we have two this brexit deal, and to the fact that the prime minister says she will push it as hard as possible, that there is not some response from us, people have said, what are you playing at? and... will you vote against the withdrawal agreement? we
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will, as it stands at present, we will, as it stands at present, we will be voting along with many others in the conservative party and opposition parties against it, this is united remainers and levers, and thatis is united remainers and levers, and that is how bad this is, uniting labour and conservative and dup, all the people that have spoken to us, they have said they are voting against it because of the impact on the union. we even have a northern ireland minister voting to remain common he is taking a principled stand, he looked me in the eye and said, i could not have voted for this, i could not have stayed in a government that imposes this on the people of northern ireland, who have come to know over time, i have been there and! come to know over time, i have been there and i know this is a betrayal. while there has still been speculation about whether there will bea speculation about whether there will be a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister, a8 ministers,
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probably pressing on the mind of the chief whip. we want to attempt to answer any questions you have on how the brexit process develops from here. we‘ll be joined by our reality check correspondent chris morris atjust after 3.30pm this afternoon so do send us your brexit questions by text to 6ii2a, email askthis@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaskthis the letting company airbnb says it will stop renting out homes in israeli settlements in the west bank. the company says it made the decision because settlements are at the "core of the dispute between israelis and palestinians". it‘s been welcomed by palestinians but israel is threatening legal action. yolande knell reports. israeli homes in the occupied west bank. this is a jewish settlement that welcomes holidaymakers. this property is listed on airbnb and rented out for short stays. a source of income for the owners. but now, airbnb says it won‘t allow such properties on its website. it says settlements
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are at the core of the dispute between israel and palestinians. and that‘s provoked a furious reaction from israeli officials. it‘s upsetting because the idea behind airbnb was to get people to meet people, where they actually live, to understand their surroundings, to understand their needs and to maybe understand even their dreams. it‘s giving into extreme people who don‘t have any intention in promoting peace but rather bringing people further away from one another. settlements are built on land that israel captured and occupied in the 1967 middle east war. they‘re seen as illegal under international law although israel disagrees. tourism is an important source of income for palestinians who have long campaigned for airbnb to take action in the west bank. we very much welcome this decision and we believe that this decision is very, very important. and we hope that all companies, all travel companies, will do the same as soon as possible.
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israeli authorities say they are now looking at possible legal action. about 200 properties are due to be removed from the accommodation rental website in the coming days. yolande knell, bbc news, jerusalem. the bbc has launched a consultation on the future of tv licences for people over 75. in 2020, the corporation takes over funding of the licence fee from the government, at an estimated cost of £7a5 million a year. the bbc says maintaining the exemption for older viewers could cost around a fifth of the bbc‘s budget and would fundamentally change the bbc because of the scale of cuts that would need to be made. vishala is here, in a moment she will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not
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in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live the prime minister will meet the president of the european commission tomorrow to discuss the political declaration on the future relationship between the uk and eu. for the first time ever, no part of the uk has hit any of its key nhs waiting time targets for cancer, a&e and routine operations. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex—fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. carlos goen, the boss of car maker nissan, is under fire for what prosecutors say are "significant acts of misconduct". he‘s expected to be fired from nissan after being arrested in japan. he‘s also set to be fired from his role leading an alliance that includes mitsubishi motors and french car—maker renault. easyjet said it flew a record number
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of passengers over the year, up 10.2% to 88.5 million. profits were up a2%. but the group has warned that revenues per seat, the amount of money it makes from each passenger, are set to fall in the first half of the new financial year, hit by factors including the timing of easter. the bank of england governor mark carney is backing theresa may‘s brexit deal. the governor who has previousuly warned of the hit to economic growth from the decision to leave the eu said there were limits to what the central bank could do in the event of a brexit shock to the economy. more on that story we were told about, air be and be says it will remove from its listing all homes that are on the west bank, in israel settlements. —— airbnb. that are on the west bank, in israel settlements. -- airbnb. welcomed by palestinians but israelis have called it shameful and threatened legal action. let's talk to michelle fleury,
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new york business correspondent. airbnb is not a publicly listed company, you will not find stock traded where we are standing, but investors are paying attention, the company has been under pressure for some time, there is a lobbying group, urging companies to boycott doing business because of the west bank, this is a quick history recapture, israel ceded control of the west bank in 1967 —— seized control. airbnb is now saying that it struggles with the decision but has decided it is best to pull re ntal has decided it is best to pull rental listings, some rental listings that are expected to be pulled in the next couple of days. human rights watch have responded: the air being the decision to end its listing is an important recognition that such listings cannot square with its human rights responsibilities, but it is worth pointing out that airbnb made this announcement on the eve of
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publication by human rights watch, looking at rental companies in the we st looking at rental companies in the west bank. not the first company to yield pressure. interesting, airbnb said that the decision was one which raised hackles, we know that people will disagree with the decision, and if you look back, as we point out, they are not the first company that have struggled with this, soda stream, not that long ago, we talked about the company deciding to put a factory there are, ultimately they suspended the decision because of political pressure, but this has been called disk rumination by the israelis, there has been a call to landlords to possibly file lawsuits against this. —— this has been called discrimination. brexit, fears a "brexit" have failed to deter easyj et a "brexit" have failed to deter easyjet passengers, they have sold all their seats for the first half
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of next year already. interesting climate in the air industry, because fuel costs a re climate in the air industry, because fuel costs are up, but still easyjet reporting a profit, amid strikes and rising costs. healthy profit, a lot of competitors have fallen by the wayside, the likes of monaco, air berlin, they have gone out of business. they are now a dominant player, they have capitalised. —— monarch. their boss also said today, whatever the deal, whatever the scenario on "brexit", they will be 0k, they will continue flights across the european union, because they have established a headquarters in the n, which operates as business as usual. all flights would be grounded on march 2019 it has been said. the ceo, lundgren, he has said, we will be fine, we have taken
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precautions of every scenario, business as usual. markets. let's look, ftse a little bit choppy. brent crude is interesting, about a quarter of its recent peak in october, because we have seen supply in the market, thanks largely to the us, breaking up the iran nuclear deal by giving waivers to certain countries, production has increased more than anticipated. trump has put pressure on saudi arabia as well. so the brent crude oil prices down a little. and the pound sterling? up a little this morning after the comments by mark carney that he is backing theresa may‘s brexit deal. carney that he is backing theresa may's brexit deal. more from you later. people with incurable cancer are being told that even a small amount of exercise can help them live not just better, but possibly longer.
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macmillan cancer care says, contrary to traditional doctors‘ advice, rest is not always best. jayne mccubbin went to see gemma ellis, a mum with secondary cancer who is gearing up to run herfirst 5k. gemma was diagnosed and treated for cancer in her early 30s. at that point, i believed that i was clear. but — there was always a but — there was a shadow on my spine. the cancer had spread. aged 37, with two young girls, she was told it was treatable but not curable. it was there and i knew i‘ve got it, i‘ve got to live with it. that was the moment gemma knew she would make a change. and left leg... are you out of your comfort zone right now? very much so, thank you. yeah. totally. but you look like a ninja! yeah, that‘s me! with stage two cancer and two new training buddies, she‘s gearing up for her first ever 5k parkrun in 12 weeks. ijust keep thinking,
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right, well, you know, if the treatment lasts that long, and then i‘ve got another line of treatment there, then another one might come out and i might be able to have that. you know, you never know. that‘s where this comes in. team gemma. well done. good start today. how was it? honestly? laughter. none of this journey is easy, but her training partners, tony and helen, know exactly what she‘s going through, and how this could help. i was actually only diagnosed in may 2017, and i went from training for an ultra—marathon to being terminally ill in 36 hours, which was a bit of a shock. i was diagnosed with stage a breast cancer in april 2016, six months after doing a half—ironman. my first question to my oncologist was, can i still do it? and his reply was, absolutely, i could. and knowing that has kept me sane. and i really hope that, as part of this process,
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you're really going to kind of find that works for you too. yeah, that‘s what i‘m hoping. and march. macmillan, the cancer charity, says this is about more than hope. exercise can help patients with incurable cancer notjust live better, but live longer. doctors have always advised their patients to rest. rest is not always best. small amounts of physical activity, not running marathons, or leaping around in lycra, can make a really significant difference. there certainly does seem to be an effect on some of the growth factors that stimulate cancer to grow. 5k, had you ever thought about a 5k before? no. laughter. how's she going to go? we've worked out a training plan for gemma. i think gemma might learn to hate us over the course of the next 12 weeks. gemma's gonna be amazing. it's slippy, innit? yeah. i don‘t know my prognosis and i never want to know my prognosis. but i know that it‘s probably not great.
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but somewhere in the back of my mind, i keep thinking, i will be here, i‘ll be here to see that, i keep giving myself little milestones. i‘m hitting them already. and i intend to do so for a long time. london‘s had the gherkin, the cheese grater and the walkie talkie. now, if plans are approved, a new tower called the tulip willjoin the skyline. at 1,000 feet it would be the second tallest skyscraper in the capital behind the shard. the design features internal slides and moving transparent pods running outside the building. if planning permission for the unusually—shaped building is permitted, construction will begin in 2020 and be completed five years later. called the tulip because, obviously,
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it looks like a tulip. time for a look at the weather. here‘s ben rich form any part of the country, not only feeling cold, it looks cold, —— for many parts of the country. apple buyout, quite a few shoulders, continuing as we had through the re st of continuing as we had through the rest of the afternoon, some showers over the highest ground likely to be wintry, you will notice the strength of the wind, wind gust around 40 mph for some eastern coasts, thermometer by the end of the afternoon may read four to 7 degrees, and on the strength of the wind, this is what it will feel like in birmingham, cardiff, norwich, it will feel like it is freezing. through the evening and tonight, areas of showery rain, increasing chance of sleet and snow mixed in over higher ground, quite
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cloudy, breezy as well, holding up temperatures, but across the far south—west, as we stick into clearer skies, we may get a touch of frost. into tomorrow morning, the rush—hour will look like this, hill snow, across scotland, all being driven in ona across scotland, all being driven in on a brisk, raw easterly wind. similar story for northern ireland, bit of snow over the pennines, and for the welsh hills. we may even see snow over the hills and tours of the south—west, as showers gather. ale and thunder, hefty downpours drifting into parts of east wales and the midlands as the day wears on. for scotland, northern ireland, rain, hill snow, continuing to move through, south and east, the wind will these, spells of sunshine, dealing a little bit better at seven or8 dealing a little bit better at seven or 8 degrees. wednesday night, wind continues to ease, skies clear, so for a continues to ease, skies clear, so fora time, we continues to ease, skies clear, so for a time, we are likely to see a touch of frost, chilly start to
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thursday morning, but thursday, overall, quieter day, what a lot of cloud around, patchy rain. best of the brightness out west, temperaturesjust the brightness out west, temperatures just beginning to the brightness out west, temperaturesjust beginning to nudge upwards, and that is a trend that continues as we move towards the end of the week, low—pressure spinning down. potential for rain, as we picked up more of the southerly wind, those temperatures will slowly start to recover. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3pm: amid signs the attempts to force a vote of confidence have stalled — theresa may prepares to head to brussels to discuss the uk‘s future with the eu after brexit. nearly one in five local hospital services have failed to hit any of their key waiting—time targets for a whole year, bbc analysis shows. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor thought to be his ex fiancee and then fires at random before killing himself. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly foster.
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we‘ve had some big athletics news in the last hour. british sprinter nigel levine has been banned for four years after failing a drugs test. all the details coming up. thanks olly, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben rich has all the weather. we have some cold air in place across the british all. while the monitor might say a—7, it will feel more like freezing. the full forecast is on the way. also coming up, the wonderful reaction from this 6 year old deaf boy as a cbeebies bedtime story is told using makaton sign language for the first time. good afternoon.
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theresa may will travel to brussels tomorrow to meet the european commission president, jean claude juncker, ahead of a summit on sunday, when she hopes her brexit deal will be agreed by eu leaders. mrs may appears to have seen off attempts by backbenchers to mount a vote of no confidence in her leadership , but her critics in the party went back on the attack today, accusing her of not delivering a proper brexit. this morning, the prime minister chaired her first cabinet meeting since a series of ministerial resignations last week. our political correspondent, chris mason, has this report. conservative mpjacob rees—mogg can attract a crowd. of reporters, that is. he and his colleagues in the brexiteer european research group have not managed, yet, at least, to muster up a big enough bunch of tory mps to force a vote of confidence in the prime minister, despite suggesting it was imminent. reporter: are you disappointed in your colleagues?
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of course i am not disappointed in my colleagues. i have always said that the erg does not have a collective view, people must make their minds up themselves. and people will do what they think is right at the time they think it is right. mr rees—mogg was chairing an event including businessmen and the brexit secretary before last, david davis, among others, setting out its alternatives to the government‘s plan. meanwhile, the cabinet was gathering up the road. the less time they met the government started self combusting shortly afterwards. and this morning we saw the smile of a newbie, third brexit secretary, stephen berkley, and the return of amber rudd as work and pensions secretary. have you steadied the ship or is it panic stations?
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i think the situation is the choices for the country are becoming clearer and it is either the prime minister‘s deal or we leave with no deal, which would be bad forjobs and living standards, or we don‘t implement the brexit result, which would damage trust in the political systems. but this is what the latest headache for downing street looks like, northern ireland‘s democratic unionist party who prop up theresa may in downing street don‘t like her brexit plan and last night refused to vote with the conservatives on bits of last month‘s budget. we took the view that since the government had broken one of the fundamental agreements they had with us, namely they would deliver brexit for the people of the united kingdom as a whole and not separate northern ireland constitutionally or economically from the united kingdom, that we had to do something to show our displeasure. the dup flexed their muscles last night, how do you persuade them back around to backing the deal? we will continue to talk to the dup and make the case that this deal
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is good for the whole uk, but in particular for northern ireland. the prime minister has rightly focused on ensuring that northern ireland is not in a different customs arrangement from great britain and she has risked the whole deal in order to win that, and she has won that point. they don‘t believe you, that is the point. we will continue making the case. making the case about the withdrawal agreement and the future partnership with the european union continues for the government, from different places to different audiences. tomorrow night the prime minister is heading to brussels to meet european commission president jean—claudejuncker ahead of the big brexit summit at the weekend. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at the house of commons for us now. theresa may might be quite relieved to get on a plane out of here for a
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while. i think she might. they are looking at two sets of figures, one is the number of conservative mps who are calling for this vote of no confidence in her hand, as we‘ve heard at length, they still haven‘t reached that magic number of a8. the other number they will be looking at very closely as the number of those willing to back her deal in the house of commons when the vote comes in december. it‘s not looking good if you look at those who have publicly said they want back it, that‘s on the brexit and remains side of the arguments, even people resigning over that, and the dup as well say they would vote against it. the numbers are not looking good but of the cabinet today, the man whose job it is to make true that gets through parliament seemed quite confident. the negotiations are ongoing, the prime minister will be at the summit on sunday. i think everybody's behind her, couldn't be more positive. a big focus on making sure we get the best deal for families, for business and for delivering on the commitments we made to respect the referendum. so it's a really exciting week and i think the prime minister
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is going to have a very busy time. is there a possibility of renegotiating parts of the withdrawal agreement? there's a focus on getting the deal done. she'll get the deal done and in a few weeks' time, i've got a job to do in parliament. he certainly does have a job to do. i‘m joined by the conservative mp vicky ford. the chief whip saying he has a job to do when it gets through parliament. what would your message be to those on the brexit side of the argument to say they cannot accept this? my message would be that before we vote, which might be a little while yet, is to think about what‘s in this deal, was the other options would be added to look at whatever other information becomes available between now and when we vote. first of all, this deal is a deal that delivers on that referendum promise, so we will be leaving the eu, taking back the
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control of borders, money, laws, but also a deal that protects jobs and security. i believe that was also a promise made to people when they voted. the backstop which is some of their concern cannot become the longest. it‘s implicit in the deal but that cannot be there for ever and it‘s nobody‘s entrance to make it there for ever. the other options, either we fall into no deal, leaving the eu. we have had the governor of the bank of england today warning about the economic uncertainty of that. and i certainly have lots of different businesses, large and small, warning me about how concerned they are about the new deal option. we have had northern irish businesses saying that as well. another option is a second referendum. i think that‘s hugely uncertain and it would be very divisive and the country, not decisive. the other options they
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think my work, a canada plus that gives hard borders are somewhere and doesn‘t cover all of the uk. the norway solution is not attractive because it leaves us with no say in key areas like financial services. none of the other options are attractive. this is the best option that we have. and the third point lookout is what more information is available. before we vote, we are expecting to find a lot more about the long—term relationship between the long—term relationship between the uk and the eu and when you know that, that actually helps to answer your lots of the questions that people have put today. there are those on the remains side of the referendum io who actually look at the steel and say it is so bad that we would be much better off staying in. i think if you try to rewind the clerk... i voted in. i think if you try to rewind the clerk... ivoted remain in. i think if you try to rewind the clerk... i voted remain at because i think the eu is perfect but because i think it is always better to try and change things from within and
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try to negotiate a new relationship when you have 27 countries on the other side of the table was always going to be enormously complicated and challenging. that is where we are now. but if you went back and try to do a second referendum, where does that leave you? i don‘t necessarily believe it would be more pro—europe or less appropriate, i just think it shows the country is divided and we need to find a solution, a way forward that works for all. that‘s why i think it‘s important we try and have this new relationship will start we are leaving the eu but let‘s have this relationship that also protects our jobs and security, and that‘s what this deal is that the prime minister is trying to get our support for. there‘s a certain irony in that lots of people pressure to get that meaningful vote in the house of commons, lots of brexiteers are very much still against it, and now it looks as if they will use that to block what the prime minister is to bring through. and i would again urge them to look at the other
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options. one of the things that happened in the house of commons last night was the government ministers agreeing that before we vote they will be giving as much more detailed economic analysis about what it would look like with the deal, without the deal, compared to where we are now. i think it‘s really important that we look at that properly. very few mps have a chilly even been to look at those sector by sector impact assessment andi sector by sector impact assessment and i think it‘s important that we look atjobs. we need to deliver on the referendum, people voted to leave, we have to do that, but we also need to protect the jobs and livelihoods. thank you very much indeed. a lot of work for the government to do between now to visit tomorrow to brussels that the prime minister will do and certainly not much expectation that there can bea not much expectation that there can be a lot of change to that withdrawal agreement that there is a very late stage due to be signed, of course, on sunday.
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thank you very much. we want to attempt to answer any questions you have on how the brexit process develops from here. we‘ll be joined by our reality check correspondent chris morris atjust after 3.30pm this afternoon so do send us your brexit questions by text to 6112a. email askthis@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaskthis for the first time the nhs has failed to meet its waiting time targets for cancer, a&e, and routine operations for a whole year right across the uk. the key targets are for cancer, when each patient can expect it started the gym and within 62 dayjob and urgent referral. for accident and emergency, wherever you are you should be seamless within four hours of arrival. and for routine operations, agent nation has a different target. what the bbc also found is that the whole of the uk
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has missed all the targets for more than a year. the first and this has happened since the targets were introduced. the shadow health secretaryjon ashworth is at westminster for us. your reaction first of all to this analysis. these are absolutely shocking figures and behind all these statistics are real people, people waiting longer and longer in pain and agony for a operation are vulnerable elderly people languishing in a trolley in a crowded a & e. imagine if you are waiting for cancer treatment and waiting for cancer treatment and waiting beyond two months. the pain and anguish must be intolerable. the government need to get a grip. the nhs is in crisis and yet we have a government paralysed by brexit and not able to put patients first and sort out the nhs. it is totally unacceptable. ministers need to be getting a grip of the situation. how do you suggest they do that? we would be putting more money into the nhs. even you must see that the announcements in the last few months
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suggest that is exactly what the government is doing, and quite a lot of money. more than you have pledged. they will be putting more money in an 2023, but you have revealed shocking analysis of what is happening to patients now, with cancer patients waiting beyond 62 days for treatment. we need more investment now, more investment in the staff. we have 107,000 vacancies. we even have hospitals closing a & e overnight, even looking at closing chemotherapy units because they don‘t have the nurses and those cancer units. this is absolutely shocking. the government are putting some extra money in an five years‘ time and that extra money is important, but we need investment in the nhs now and investment in the staff of the nhs now. the government are absolutely paralysed by brexit. we don‘t know whether theresa may will survive or not because we have a tory mps trying to no confidence. the whole thing is a shambles and westminster but it is patients who
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are suffering and they shouldn‘t suffer in this way. if that is your priority, would you suggest your collea g u es priority, would you suggest your colleagues vote for theresa may‘s brexit plans as you can turn her attention to the nhs? i'm afraid her up attention to the nhs? i'm afraid her up and doesn‘t deliver on any of the proms and she has made to the british people. it is not in the national interest, the plan. we don‘t think it is good for the jobs or economy. if that plan goes through, it will damage the economy and in turn damage the nhs because the core economy won‘t be growing and we won‘t have the proceeds of that growth to invest in the national health service. the tories told us we would have all this extra million on the side of the backs, we are not getting that. you are getting more. she has promised more money than was on the side of babos. well, in five years‘ time. there isn‘t an extra penny piece for the nhs this winter and you have had people on the bbc all day long from staff to representatives say the nhs is heading into a desperately difficult winter. we are hearing
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that this winter could be even worse than the most recent winters, when the red cross was forced to come out and say it was a humanitarian crisis. ministers cannot bury their heads in the sand. they have been in power for heads in the sand. they have been in powerfor eight years, heads in the sand. they have been in power for eight years, they should have been getting a grip of the situation earlier. you have over a million on the waiting list, people waiting beyond for a resonant a & e, like pushing on trolleys, not able to get a bread and acrobat, and cancer patients waiting longer and longer. how do you deal with a population, and this is going to be problem whatever government is in public, for the rest of that time in this country because the country is getting older, and every trust says thatis getting older, and every trust says that is the problem. every nhs trust is having problems making these targets. is it time to say they are simply realistic? as we get older we live and work on the gate as conditions, so an ageing population isa conditions, so an ageing population is a good thing but it means we have
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to look at how to support people in the wider community. other governments next year will be cutting £1 billion of investment from health services, including community health services. a spokesperson husband is another giving you a quote saying the money is coming in five years‘ time but next year they are cutting £1 billion worth of money from the community and those budgets and what support people who are living longer with various different conditions. we‘ve lost 1000 gps, district knock yourselves out in the commuting numbers have gone down by 50% over the last eight years, so we need to be investing in these committee health services to support people in the wider committee but we are actually cutting it back. and that is before you start with the social ca re is before you start with the social care and support for the very elderly and vulnerable people to live independently at home or perhaps have support in local authority care homes. all that has been absolutely decimated in the last eight years. this ageing
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population didn‘t fall out of the sky, it hasn‘t happened overnight, we have been warning the government consistently for years but we need to be investing in social care and the wider community to deal with ageing population. thank you very much for your time this afternoon. if you‘d like to find out how your local services are performing, you can find out using the bbc‘s nhs tracker at bbc. co. uk/tracker. you put your postcode in there and the information is available on the website. a0 people have been killed and another 60 injured in an explosion in the afghan capital, kabul. according to local authorities the blast took place at a meeting of top clerics, who were reportedly gathering at a wedding hall to mark the prophet muhammad‘s birthday. joining me now live from kabul with the latest is the bbc‘s auliya atrafi. tell us what happened because this
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isa tell us what happened because this is a breaking story at the moment. today was the day when the prophet muhammad was born but also the day when he departed this world, so it‘s a kind of day of reflection for afg ha ns a kind of day of reflection for afghans and muslims throughout the world. these are normally gatherings where there are speeches of what we can learn from his life. it is a reflective, calm mood. that makes it... and then this attack happens. the pictures on social media show chaos and bodies all over the place. because eyewitnesses that the place was crammed with hundreds of people who had come to attend this gathering. this is one of the worst of these attacks in the capital for some months now, isn‘t it? of these attacks in the capital for some months now, isn't it? that's right. but with the american special envoy, a piece to keirin kabul and
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meeting people and signs from the taliban about possible peace talks, these were promising last couple of weeks. nobody was expecting such a thing. and especially what makes this particular interest and —— incident curious is that religious scholars are very rarely attacked. normally she scholars are attacked by the islamic state. —— shia scholars. the last time sunni scholars. the last time sunni scholars were attacked was that they we re scholars were attacked was that they were trying to prevent suicide bombings being attacked as islamic. that kind of made sense. for this attack now, all eyes are on social media to see who claims responsibility. thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister will meet the president of the european commission tomorrow to discuss the political declaration on the future relationship
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between the uk and eu. for the first time ever, no part of the uk has hit any of its key nhs waiting time targets for cancer, a&e and routine operations. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctorthought to be his ex fiancee and then fires at random before killing himself. and inspired, great britain‘s relay champion nigel levine has been banned from all sport for four years after missing a drugs test. —— failing a drugs test. leigh halfpenny was concussed after playing against a sherry and hasn‘t fully recovered. scotla nd fully recovered. scotland will finish top of the nation ‘s league group f they beat israel to know that hamdan. that would also see them wearing a euro 2020 play—off spot if they needed. i will be back with full details on the next 15 minutes. a video showing police officers being attacked in south london has been shared widely on social media.
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the footage, taken in merton on saturday, shows a man kicking a female officer, who is left clutching her head just yards from a passing bus. her colleague is shown being dragged across the road, as he tries to stop a suspect. a warning, this report from jon mcmanus contains footage some people may find disturbing. everybody‘s fighting, look, they‘ve got him. this is the moment a routine a traffic police stop in south west london turned violent. one of the occupants of the car attempts to run away, the male police officer is dragged around the road while trying to stop him. a female officer tries to help. only to be violently drop kicked to the ground by another man, an oncoming bus narrowly avoids hitting her. dear me, hejust kung fu kicked her. both officers were treated in hospital but their injuries were not serious. the incident was recorded on a mobile phone. i‘m getting this all live. and it‘s this and the tone of the commentary that has prompted the chair of the metropolitan police federation to criticise the behaviour of some members of the public. is it becoming acceptable we can
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build constantly police officers film constantly police officers executing their warrant, do absolutely nothing about it and it‘s a big joke? ken marsh says officers might have to start letting suspects go if they don‘t receive public support but he doesn‘t mean he expects them tojump in to physically help. assaults on officers are growing, there were 26,000 in the past year. and other emergency workers have also been targeted with over 17,000 nhs staff attacked in some form. the senior policeman responsible for officers‘ welfare says the public should be cautious. this isn‘t a green light for have a go heroes, many members of the public do incredibly brave things to keep us safe as well as themselves safe on a day—to—day basis. all we are saying here is there is a difference between helping us and hindering us and glorifying some of the things that are being filmed at the moment. i'm getting this live, boys and girls. among those who drove by, a passing motorcyclist appears
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to aid the officers. police say they are grateful for help from the public but should only get involved if it is safe to do so. one person has been charged in connection with this incident, police are searching for two others. back to our top story, and theresa may travels to brussels tomorrow for talks with the head of the european commission, jean claude juncker. they‘re expected to discuss future relations between the eu and uk. let‘s speak to the ukip leader gerard batten. if you were at that meeting with junkjunk, if you were at that meeting with junk junk, what would if you were at that meeting with junkjunk, what would you be saying tomorrow? something a little different from mrs may, i think first of all i wouldn‘t be in this position because i wouldn‘t have asked how we could leave, because we are bound to get a silly answer, they don‘t want us to leave, so i
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expect theresa may will give them a update on the brexit betrayal process and ask the instructions ron jean—claude juncker on what they process and ask the instructions ron jean—claudejuncker on what they do next. we are in a terrible position precisely because we have gone about this the wrong way. the only way it can be salvaged as to get rid of fraser and put someone in her place a genuinely wants to leave the european union. and do what? tell the european union have it all work and not keep asking them. we leave under our law, not theirs, and then we say this is having to work. we can have tariff treatment trade or you can have wto threat terms, tell us what you want and we can do either. then over a period of time we will untangle ourselves from the bits of european legislation that will take time but we will address it in terms of our priorities and our timescale. we want to trade and have friendship and cooperation and this is how it is going to work. the
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difficulty with all of that is that we are a member of the eu, we have to do it under those terms. that's precisely what i just said. we repeal the 1972 european communities act so we have left on our law and constitution. and don‘t forget article 50 says that any nation may leave according to their own constitutional requirements. our requirements are that we cannot bind a future parliament, have our laws made by an outside body. the whole of our membership for the last a5 yea rs has of our membership for the last a5 years has been unconstitutional, unlawful and actually void under our law, so we can take that position straightaway and then tell them how it will work going forward. but we need someone who actually believes in this country, believes in our law and our constitution to tell the european union how we‘re going to make that work in a friendly way because of course we want to keep trading with them, they want to trade with us. if you were
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jean—claude juncker and a theresa may comes and says, how can we make it work? he doesn‘t want to make it work anyway, it‘s not and says, how can we make it work? he doesn‘t want to make it work anyway, it‘s not in his very much in what we found that senseis his very much in what we found that sense is that it‘s not that simple. it was not simple because we were not in charge of the process. the only way you‘re going to leave is by unilateral and unconditional withdrawal and we got sucked into this whole article 50 procedure which i wrote... ignore the concerns of people from europe leaving here, brits living abroad, ignore all the issues were, frankly, for the last six months there has been so much intense debate, just read that all i canjust intense debate, just read that all i can just go? intense debate, just read that all i canjust go? but intense debate, just read that all i can just go? but you haven't listened to what i‘ve just said because i said once we leave, the second thing on the agenda apart from trade would be citizens‘ rights. we could see everybody living here continues with the same rights they have now. but you're
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absolutely ignoring the un this. presumably you are thinking they will just say, you‘re presumably you are thinking they willjust say, you‘re absolutely right, we are sorry you‘ve gone, let‘s help you do it? right, we are sorry you‘ve gone, let's help you do it? they have got about 3.2 million of their citizens living here, we have approximately 800 thousands of their citizens living there. why would they not wa nt to living there. why would they not want to reach an agreement with us where they are getting the better pa rt where they are getting the better part of a deal because it affects more of their citizens than a dozen hours? they sell us for more than we sell them on trade, so why can‘t we have a pro—minister and parliaments that actually understands the strength of their position and then represents that to the european parliament? we are dealing with a foreign power and with a foreign power, obviously you have to understand the real politics of the whole thing. but we also have to understand strengths and weaknesses. we have lots of strengths and theresa may is completely the wrong leader to represent those because she doesn‘t understand those at all
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and is in the slightest bit interested in representing our real national interests. very quickly, is there a name in mind who should be doing this on our behalf? me. i thought it would be! thanks for your time. there are lots of coming and goings at downing street over the last few days, but take a look at this. number ten‘s mouser in chief, larry the cat, it appears does not always get access all areas through number ten. he was left waiting on the doorstep this morning in the rain until a friendly policemen stepped in to help. twitter has been enjoying that. one suggestion is that he will in fact be the next brexit secretary, 5—1 odds, apparently. one joke be the next brexit secretary, 5—1 odds, apparently. onejoke and say thatis odds, apparently. onejoke and say that is the last street on which will see copper. the producers of humour is much alive and well and we put that out on twitter as well if
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you want to see that again. i know it‘s a category three door, it‘s not that big, but it‘s just fine! now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. is one of those days where it‘s not only feels cold but looks cold out there, particularly where we have a lot of cloud and showers. from earlier on today you can see the showers mostly affecting estate areas and something wintry beginning to show up over some of the high ground. there‘s the potentialfor sleet and snow mixing in with the showers, particularly later in the afternoon. 5—8 degrees but adding on the strength of the wind, it will feel colder than that. overnight areas of showery rain continued to drift northwards with some snow mixing an ovary high ground. quite breezy so not cold for most of us but the far south—west might get down to freezing. enter tomorrow, the worst of the cloud and rain and hills no confined to northern
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ireland and scotland. apart from a feud showers for the south—west and wales, many places will be drier and brighter. it will feel a little bit better, highs of 7—8 degrees. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: theresa may prepares to head to brussels tomorrow to discuss the uk‘s future with the eu, amid signs that attempts to force a vote of confidence in her leadership have stalled. for the first time the nhs fails to meet its waiting time targets for cancer, a&e, and routine operations for a whole year across the uk. at least a0 people are killed, and another 60 injured, in an explosion at a meeting of clerics in the afghan capital, kabul. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex—fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. news of a lengthy ban for a british
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athlete. it's been dragging on for quite a bit. we knew in february that nigel levine had been suspended. he is a mainstay of the british four by a00 relay squad for a number of years. remember, he had a really nasty motorbike accident with a team—mate in tenerife early last year and suffered a pelvic injury. but during his recovery he was drugs tested in november and failed a test for clenbuterol. he let the testers in willingly, he said he had nothing to hide. he was provisionally suspended in february but in the last few months he has tried to prove that the positive test was a result of taking
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contaminated supplements. uk anti—doping say that he was was unable to prove that the presence of the banned substance was unintentional, and as a result they have hit him with the maximum ban of four years, backdated to last december. he‘s 29, and eligible to compete again at the end of 2021, so this realistically ends his athletics career. let‘s move to rugby. injuries have hit the home nations. it‘s been a full—on month for them. wales are acually going for theirfirst clean sweep in the autumn series. they have wins against scotland, australia and tonga but for their final match in cardiff they will have to do without full—back leigh halfpenny. that match is against south africa. he was concussed in this collision with the wallabies samu kerevi ten days ago. he still hasn‘t recovered. warren gatland accused the australian player
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of being reckless at the time. australia next for england and they are going to be without wing chris ashton. he has a calf injury. he has featured in all three of the autumn internationals so far but was replaced in the first half of saturday‘s win against japan. jack nowell and jonny may are expected to be the wingers for the match now. the final round of nations league group matches takes place tonight — if scotland beat israel at hampden park, they‘ll top their group and get promoted to the second tier. and perhaps more importantly they will earn a play—off spot, should they need it, for euro 2020, that‘s if they fall short in next year‘s regular qualification process. the sides are level on points at the top of their group. israel only need a draw to finish top, because they beat scotland in haifa last month. so plenty at stake. sir mo farah will make another attempt to win the london marathon next april.
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he finished third this spring, in his first race over the distance since quitting the track, but went on to win the chicago marathon last month in a new european record. he‘s expecting another world class field in london that will include the kenyan world record holder eliud kipchoge. i think anything is possible, having run my first two marathons, third last year, and winning chicago, two hours, five minutes, i have got to face eliud kipchoge. he's the best out there, he's run decent times, he's not lost too many marathons. but i'm excited to take him on, i will give it my all and i'll see what happens. i believe i can mix it with them and the rest of the athletes. laura davies will be a vice captain for the european team at next year‘s solheim cup at gleneagles.
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the 55 year old holds the record for appearances and points scored in the competition. she‘ll support captain catriona matthew in september alongside suzann pettersen and kathryn imrie. the usa have won the last two solheim cups. that‘s all the sport for now. much more from me on afternoon live in the next hour, but now it‘s time for bbc ask this. you‘ve been sending us your questions about brexit following the announcement of a draft withdrawal agreement between the uk and eu and the ensuing political turmoil. chris morris, the bbc‘s reality check correspondent and georgina wright, europe researcher at chatham house are here now to answer them. georgina, this from anonymous from manchester, the draft withdrawal agreement has the word draft in its title would suggest there is room for change. so why are theresa may
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and the eu 27 treating it as a final document? it is a draft agreement at the moment because you want to allow the moment because you want to allow the uk parliament and eu governments to review the agreement to make sure they are happy, so we have heard that spain had problems around gibraltar and how it would be treated in a future trade agreement, france had reservations around fishing and a lot of discussion here, so it‘s not final but how much scope there is to change it is unclear. it‘s the outcome of long tedious negotiations, many in brussels believe it‘s the best possible deal on the table and they are not clear what we could change but everything is up for grabs in these negotiations, so it might be that you could make tweaks but they would not be fundamental changes.
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and it‘s not sorted until it is all sorted. we can move on to question two. alan boyd at, i continually hear that exiting with no deal would bea hear that exiting with no deal would be a disaster, but what would actually happen? the honest answer is that no one is sure because no one has done anything like that before but we have all these rules that govern everything from how you fly a plane, sell cheese can do a financial transaction. we fly a plane, sell cheese can do a financialtransaction. we have had the boss of easyjet this morning saying that they have sorted that rule about flying a plane, so these are concerns. they now have a bigger presence in the eu so that means if there are rules about having to have a certain amount of ownership in the eu, that is done but any regulations
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you have come if you have no deal, we have no common rules on anything with our nearest trading partners and that would be problematic. what about the word nightmare, is that overstating it? nobody would know how to operate border controls or buy and sell things across borders, they would be no rules to regulate any of that. you would hope if it got to the crunch a couple of weeks before the 29th of march, with no deal in sight, side deals would start to be done, like what happens to eu citizens here and uk citizens in the rest of europe? they would become illegal aliens. you would hope good sense would prevail but a raft of things would happen to happen quickly and there would be a fairamount of happen quickly and there would be a fair amount of chaos to begin with. all this requires time and for
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businesses it will require expensive paperwork, so there are questions around that. we need more time. geoff butler has e—mailed, could you clarify whether we have to play that £39 million whether or not we leave the eu with a deal? this isn't really a divorce payment but more about financial liabilities, like when you joined a gym and want to end your membership early and jim say they have factored in payment for trainers and infrastructure so in that sense we would know some money, how much is unclear but even some parliamentarians have indicated that even if we leave with no deal, we would have to pay something. initially it was a bigger figure than 39 billion. it could still be bigger. this is an estimate and the
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bill has to be paid in euros so if the value of the pound fell, that could have another 3.9 added onto it. it is not at lump sum, it includes things like pensions for employees of eu institutions which may be paid in small amounts for decades, so it is staggered but if we tried to leave without paying at all, it would almost certainly end up all, it would almost certainly end up in court and you don't want to be at the international court of justice when you are trying to rebuild relationships. angela says, what are the consequences of no deal on the irish border? are the dup in danger of shooting themselves in the foot? if the uk were to leave without a deal it would mean the return of a hard border so all this
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talk about how we maintain frictionless trade would be out of the window. who puts up the border? presumably you would have to have one for going in and one for leaving. a lot of brexiteer say we will not put up a border but if you look at basic wto rules which in the event of no deal we would operate under, they don't say you have to secure your borders but they say you have to treat all your trading partners equally so if we were to say we cannot have a border, irish milk could still come from the republic to northern ireland, we would have to allow french milk to come in from france tariff free without any checks, or beef, if you let irish beef across the border, argentina could send their beef to the uk without any checks which wouldn't go down well with beef
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farmers, so there are constraints and rules which mean you cannotjust have an entirely open border without an agreement. so we would have opened borders and they wouldn‘t necessarily have to open their borders in the same way. nigel fe nton borders in the same way. nigel fenton has asked what are the terms ofa fenton has asked what are the terms of a deal regarding the free movement of people and uk citizens in eu countries? at the moment the agreement talks about the terms of the uk‘s exit so we haven‘t talked about our future relationship yet. that starting tomorrow. if the withdrawal agreement gets through parliament, it would enter the implementation period which would go from march 2019 to december 2020, talking about our future trading arrangement and during that time the
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uk would be a non—member so it would still be part of the single market and customs union but would have no say about the rules and freedom of movement would continue. and no work in the draft agreement does it say freedom of movement will come to an end, it is one of the benefits or drawbacks of being in the single market so when you leave that, you do longer have to have freedom of movement of people but we don't know what it will be replaced with because we have been waiting patiently for an immigration white paper which will set out future immigration policy at the end of this period. and reynolds, could the next party in power rests the brexit agreement and enable the uk to rejoin the eu? depends when they get into power. if we get past the 29th
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of march and we have left, then we have left. i was at a lecture by gordon brown when he said we need an agreement before we leave which would give us at road map of how to get back in. we don't want tojust leave and have to start again. we would have to reapply and there were those who would like to campaign to rejoin who says we need to make sure the french and germans would make that easy but there are no guarantees. there might be more demand from the eu, we might have to join schengen which we are not part of now and join the euro, there are lots of questions around, could rejoin on the same terms? last question from kathleen, who says some people seem to believe that it would be straightforward for the uk to revert tojoining
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would be straightforward for the uk to revert to joining the would be straightforward for the uk to revert tojoining the eu as if nothing had happened but with the eu allow us to stay without having to reapply? she's talking about before the deadline so if this draft agreement is voted down and it's likely that will happen in the house of commons, from what we know, then you have a few options, parliament could try to persuade the government to renegotiate although we have heard from the eu that they have no intention of that. if you've got to january with no deal, then the government has to tell parliament what it plans to do next and there has to be a debate and you're looking at leaving with no deal for some political change which would delay or stop brexit, a general election or the possibility of another referendum, so if you listen
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to theresa mail, she says my deal or no deal, in the last few weeks she has begun to emphasise that it is heard deal or no deal or it could be no brexit. that was the first time she said that. it's a complex negotiation and the outcome of those discussions was always going to be a compromise between the uk and the eu. everyone in the uk doesn‘t agree what that should look like so it will cause unhappiness and disagreement but i think we shouldn‘t lose sight that the eu wa nt shouldn‘t lose sight that the eu want a deal, we want a deal and that is the aim. could i react for a second, you said that talks on the future begins tomorrow and the formal negotiations begin after we have left. so is just
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formal negotiations begin after we have left. so isjust informal chats between theresa may and jean—claude juncker. thank you, chris morris and georgina wright. millions of children have enjoyed cbeebies book at bedtime over the years, but last week, for the first time it was told using makaton sign language. six—year—old tom mccartney, who‘s deaf, watched it with this mother. his reaction was filmed as he understood the story for the first time. he was so excited that she posted the footage online — it has since gone viral online. lorna gordon reports. bedtime story. hello, i'm rob... it‘s become part of the bedtime routine for many parents and their children but when actor rob delaney recently took on cbeebies storytelling duties, it led to a very special reaction from one young boy. as soon as he saw rob come on and he was using makaton, hejust, yeah, he wasjust so engaged and excited by it. although tom doesn‘t have any speech, he has a very expressive little face and he uses, he doesn‘t just sign, as you can see, but he uses his entire body, as you saw, including standing up
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in his chair, to be able to get across how excited he was. six—year—old tom has complex medical needs. during one of his trips to hospital, his mum and dad started using makaton sign language to help communicate with their son. there is something like a million people using makaton out there today as we speak to help their communication, ranging from those with learning disabilities, as we saw with tom, but also helping babies to acquire speech, looking at developing wider literacy skills and even working with people with dementia. the young boy‘s joyful response has been shared thousands of times online. it even caught the attention of the storyteller himself, who has said tom‘s response was beautiful. rob delaney‘s own links to the language came about after he learned makaton to communicate with his own son, henry, who had been seriously ill with a brain tumour, and who died earlier this year. i‘m so glad that it was him that they chose to do it,
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i think because he has a personal connection to makaton, with his son, henry, that made it even more special for us, knowing what he had been through, and the kind of personal journey with makaton. mum laura said her son‘s reaction had left her in tears. the family‘s hope now — that makaton will make it into more children‘s television, so tom can enjoy more of his favourite programmes in a language he understands. lorna gordon, bbc news, falkirk. vishala is here to tell us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister is preparing to meet the european commission president, jean—claude juncker, in brussels tomorrow to discuss the future relationship between the uk and the eu. analysis by the bbc shows that waiting time targets for a&e, cancer and routine operations have not been met across the uk for the past year. a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex—fiancee, then kills a pharmacist and a police
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officer at a chicago hospital. hello. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. carlos goen, the boss of car maker nissan, is under fire for what prosecutors say are "significant acts of misconduct". he‘s expected to be fired from nissan after being arrested in japan. he‘s also set to be fired from his role leading an alliance that includes mitsubishi motors and french car maker renault. easyjet said it flew a record number of passengers over the year, up 10.2% to 88.5 million. profits were up a2%. but the group has warned that revenues per seat — the amount of money it makes from each passenger — are set to fall in the first half of the new financial year, hit by factors including the timing of easter. the bank of england governor mark carney is backing theresa may‘s brexit deal. the governor, who has previousuly warned of the hit to economic growth from the decision to leave the eu, said there were limits to what the central bank could do
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in the event of a brexit shock to the economy. the french finance minister has said carlos ghosn should not remain in charge of renault following his arrest injapan over claims of "misconduct"? he‘s the boss of an alliance called the nissan renault mitsubishi alliance and that‘s why the french government are concerned because they have a 15% stake in that company and the board of directors of renault are meeting to discuss his temporary replacements and we should hear about that this afternoon. he was arrested injapan yesterday and prosecutors say he had under reported his income by £3a million overfive years. under reported his income by £3a million over five years. the japanese broadcaster nhk also reported the company had spent
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millions buying luxury homes for them, a huge shock to the industry and business world, he is seen as a titan of the car industry, credited with turning around nissan and renault, journalists like him as he is generous with his time so interesting to see what comes out in the next few days. shared parental leave is rare — not many companies offer it? it is an issue for women who have to leave work to bring up babies. it's one of those photos that once you start looking at it, you cannot take your eyes off it. is itjust one
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hand, though? it's lovely. let‘s talk to caroline prendergast, interim chief people officer at aviva. you‘ve been trialling this in the uk for the last year but take—up has been loads generally, what is it like at your company? in the last year we probably had about 700 people who have taken parental leave and 300 has been men. typically they ta ke and 300 has been men. typically they take 21 weeks off so it has been successful and we are pleased. have you seen an impact on productivity? it'sjust the fact you seen an impact on productivity? it's just the fact that when they come back they are so thrilled to have been allowed the time off to enjoy their family at such a
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critical time and they are thoughtful going forward about looking after their teams, so it has beena looking after their teams, so it has been a success and one of our values is caring more and it shows from these policies that we do care about our people. shared parental leave, how does that work? is it a case of both mother and father having access to the same amount of lead? parental leave is designed so it's either the mother or father, if we employed them both we would give them equal leave, typically what happens is that either the mother or it could be the father who works for ask who takes the lead, so they take roughly about 21 weeks, and then coming back here. are you going to extend this
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even more? it's completely extended in the uk, our global operations have been picking this up, so singapore and france and ireland, and in the next year we expect more of our markets to take it on. thank you, caroline prendergast. let‘s have a look at the markets. can we not have a quick look at the baby seat again? oh, no. the ftse is done today, even though it reported those positive results and that is due to rising fuel costs so we will talk more about that later. let's get a weather update with ben rich. for many parts of the country, not only feeling cold, it looks colds. whether coming for the east,
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bringing this to chill in our direction, that‘s indicative of quite a few showers through the rest of the afternoon, some of these likely to be wintry. you will notice the strength of the wind, wind gusts around a0 mph for some eastern coasts. the thermometer by the end of the afternoon may read a—7 degrees, add on the strength of the wind, this is what it will feel like in birmingham, cardiff, norwich. it will feel like it is freezing. through this evening and tonight, areas of showery rain. increasing chance of sleet and snow mixed in over higher ground. quite cloudy, breezy as well, holding up temperatures, but across the far south—west, as we stick out into clearer skies, we may get a touch of frost. into tomorrow morning, the rush—hour will look like this. cloud and outbreaks of rain. hill snow, across scotland, all being driven in on a brisk, raw easterly wind.
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similar story for northern ireland. bit of snow over the pennines, and for the welsh hills. we may even see snow over the hills and tors of the south—west, as showers gather. these could have hail and thunder, hefty downpours drifting into parts of east wales and the midlands as the day wears on. for scotland, northern ireland, rain, hill snow, continuing to move through, but south and east the wind will ease, spells of sunshine, feeling a little bit better at 7—8 degrees. on wednesday night, wind continues to ease, skies clear, so for a time, we are likely to see a touch of frost. chilly start to thursday morning, but thursday, overall, a quieter day, quite a lot of cloud around, patchy rain. best of the brightness out west, temperatures just beginning to nudge upwards, and that is a trend that continues as we move towards the end of the week, low—pressure spinning down. potential for rain, as we pick up more of the southerly wind,
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those temperatures will slowly start to recover. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at a: amid signs the attempts to force a vote of confidence have stalled, theresa may prepares to head to brussels to discuss the uk‘s future with the eu after brexit. nearly one in five local hospital services have failed to hit any of their key waiting—time targets for a whole year, bbc analysis shows. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex—fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly foster. some big news in athletics. british sprinter nigel levine has been banned for four years after failing a drugs test. all of the details coming up. thanks, olly, and ben rich
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has all the weather. it's it‘s cold this week, in a word. you put a it‘s cold this week, in a word. you puta gun it‘s cold this week, in a word. you put a gun monitor outside, it will be between two 7 degrees and, with the strength of the wind, it will feel even colder. —— you put a thermometer outside.|j feel even colder. —— you put a thermometer outside. i will see you in the studio later. also coming up, the man who thought he was a millionaire after hitting the jackpot on a betting app, but has been told he won‘t be seeing the money. that‘s in news nationwide in half an hour. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. theresa may will travel to brussels tomorrow to meet the european commission president, jean—claude juncker, ahead of a summit on sunday, when she hopes her brexit deal will be agreed by eu leaders. mrs may appears to have seen off attempts by backbenchers to mount a vote of no confidence
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in her leadership, but her critics in the party went back on the attack today, accusing her of not delivering a "proper brexit". this morning, the prime minister chaired her first cabinet meeting since a series of ministerial resignations last week. our political correspondent, chris mason, has this report. conservative mpjacob rees—mogg can attract a crowd. of reporters, that is. he and his colleagues in the brexiteer european research group have not managed, yet, at least, to muster up a big enough bunch of tory mps to force a vote of confidence in the prime minister, despite suggesting it was imminent. reporter: are you disappointed in your colleagues? of course i am not disappointed in my colleagues. i have always said that the erg does not have a collective view, people must make their minds up themselves. and people will do what they think is right at the time they think it is right. mr rees—mogg was chairing an event including businessmen and the brexit secretary before
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last, david davis, among others, setting out its alternatives to the government‘s plan. meanwhile, the cabinet was gathering up the road. the last time they met the government started self combusting shortly afterwards. and this morning we saw the smile of a newbie, the prime minister‘s third brexit secretary, stephen berkley, and the return of amber rudd as work and pensions secretary. have you steadied the ship or is it panic stations? i think the situation is the choices for the country are becoming clearer and it is either the prime minister‘s deal or we leave with no deal, which would be bad forjobs and living standards, or we don‘t implement the brexit result, which would damage trust in our political systems. but this is what the latest headache for downing street looks like, northern ireland‘s democratic unionist party, who prop up
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theresa may in downing street, don‘t like her brexit plan and last night refused to vote with the conservatives on bits of last month‘s budget. we took the view that since the government had broken one of the fundamental agreements they had with us, namely they would deliver brexit for the people of the united kingdom as a whole and not separate northern ireland constitutionally or economically from the united kingdom, that we had to do something to show our displeasure. the dup flexed their muscles last night. how do you persuade them back around to backing the deal? we will continue to talk to the dup and make the case that this deal is good for the whole uk, but in particular for northern ireland. the prime minister has rightly focused on ensuring that northern ireland is not in a different customs arrangement from great britain, and she has risked the whole deal in order to win that, and she has won that point.
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they don‘t believe you, that is the point. we will continue making the case. making the case about the withdrawal agreement and the future partnership with the european union continues for the government, from different places to different audiences. tomorrow night the prime minister is heading to brussels to meet european commission president jean—claudejuncker ahead of the big brexit summit at the weekend. let‘s speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young in westminster. the prime minister leaving the uk tomorrow for a short time, but her critics are not in full voice behind her. there are two things going on, the ongoing row and speculation about whether those letters will go in from conservative mps to trigger a vote of no confidence, and that seems to have petered out, but there was no deadline for that, it is ongoing, so no one can be sure it
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has finally gone away, that mutiny. and then there is the issue of arguably a more important vote in december on the actual deal that she brings back. the numbers are not looking good for her there. we‘ve heard the dup saying again this afternoon to me that they will not back the deal. we know labour are saying they will not, and we know there are dozens of conservatives who have gone on record to say, no, i can‘t back this. some are on the remain side, some on the leave site, but for different reasons they say they can‘t back it. the question is what happens if it is defeated, what are the alternatives? the government line has been very much, it‘s no deal, which means we leave at the end of march with nothing much in place. the opposition parties are starting to think about how they could fight that the snp, nicola sturgeon, their leader, in london today, saying they will not be boxed in and forced to accept that. this is what she had to say to laura
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kuenssberg. we are fairly certain there is a majority against the deal. there is suddenly a majority against no deal in the house of commons, and that takes us so far, but only so far. it is now important that we work together to come up with an alternative. i've been very clear that i think the options are a single market, customs union, or possibly another vote on membership, but unless the opposition comes together on that we will not be to make those things work. an interesting and unusual development, for nicola sturgeon to work alongside other party leaders such asjeremy corbyn. there is an ongoing debate about how mps could stop no deal happening, because it is disputed whether they could not. labour have said in the past that, if theresa may‘s deal is voted down, the government has to bring forward a motion saying what it will do next, and they feel they could vote
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against that in some way, but there would have to be lots of legislation between now and the end of march for no deal to happen, so mps feel they can make their views known, but interesting that they are starting to work together. this is the gamble that theresa may is playing, because the she says, the one way that you no deal is to back mine?” the she says, the one way that you no deal is to back mine? i think they are still hoping that mps on their own site and maybe even some labour mps will come round to that way of thinking. the issue is that the withdrawal agreement has been agreed. theresa may is going to brussels tomorrow afternoon. the question is, how much more room for negotiation is there? even though the eu will be saying, look, it‘s finished, it‘s about to be signed off, there are others who feel that, certainly with that political declaration about the future relationship, there is more to be done there, and some are hoping that that might do lot to win around those who feel there is no clear indication of where we are going
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after a ll indication of where we are going after all that that he withdraw from the eu but what goes in its place? they feel that the document, when it comes out on sunday before, that will help bring people over to their side. none of that is guaranteed and i think it‘s fair to say that the chief whip, whosejob it is i think it‘s fair to say that the chief whip, whose job it is to get that through parliament, has got some tough days ahead. what thank you, vicki young. nearly one in five local hospital services are consistently failing to hit any of their key waiting time targets, according to analysis by the bbc. the key targets are... for cancer, where each patient can expect to start their treatment within 62 days of an urgent referral. for accident and emergency — wherever you are in the uk, you should be seen within four hours of arrival. and for routine operations — each nation has a different target. what the bbc also found was that the whole of the uk has missed all three key nhs targets for over a year — the first time this has ever happened since targets were introduced. for more on this, let‘s talk to anna crossley, who leads on acute, emergency and critical care for
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the royal college of nursing. thank you for coming in. does this come as a surprise to you? our research has shown that, looking at this summer, and we all know it was hot, and we are used to seeing pictures, especially from the bbc, where you see in the winter people in corridors waiting, queues of ambulances. well used to sing a winter crisis in the nhs, but what we such as shown is that this summer was for the nhs. compared to the last five summers, we have seen a 177% increase in admissions, 150,000 people waiting for a bed, so those are people who are sick enough to need a bed in hospital but are waiting, not necessarily in a bed, but waiting in a corridor, on a chair... in the summer? in the summer. what's going on? because we
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are now living longer, we are living with lots of medical conditions, and lots of these can be exacerbated by the heat, so things like hot conditions, diabetes, respiratory conditions. this has meant that people have had to come in for admission in the nhs during the summer months. we are used to seeing a bit ofa summer months. we are used to seeing a bit of a lull normally in the summer months, and then obviously, as the weather gets colder, more people need admission but actually, because of the summer we‘ve had at the hot weather, people have become affected by the heat and their illnesses have got worse and they‘ve had to be admitted. this week, the weather turns out it gets much colder, so the predicted that we see every time the weather dips, you are already on the back foot? that's exactly what the problem is. we have had a difficult summer with more people admitted to hospital, so
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there were 7000 fewer available beds overnight for this summer compared to five years ago. we are already seeing an nhs that is struggling from the effects of summer and the number of people that needed to be seen, admitted, treated, and now the cold weather is coming, it will start to be an increase for children, for older people, in terms of respiratory illnesses, heart conditions, and that will place more pressure on the nhs. anyone who's beenin pressure on the nhs. anyone who's been in hospital tops of nurses and doctors working so hard —— talks of nurses and doctors working so hard. if you ask a doctor or nurse had to make things better, what is the answer? it isn‘t money, is it? the tories would say that money is coming. how would you improve things on the front line customer staffing. you need more staff, more investment in staff, nursing in particular. of the 20 billion that‘s been pledged for the nhs, we need to see at least
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1 billion of that money going into investment for nothing. we have evidence that investment for nursing bat we need to encourage people to join nursing. it‘s a really great career, to be able to care for people the way they were trained to do, and they want to care for people, and to do that we need more investment in the long term. if we do not invest, in the next five yea rs we a re do not invest, in the next five years we are going to see a8,000 nurse vacancies, so we need that money. we need over £1 billion to go into nursing. the issue of targets, and you must get sick and tired of saying it on the news, another target missed. when so many targets are being missed on such a regular level and across the country, is it time to scrap the targets and allow you to get on with what you are doing? i don't believe it's time to scrap the target and i don‘t think any health care professionals want
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to see the a&e target removed, because it is for patient safety. people should be seen in a decision made about their treatment within that time for their own safety, and the staff are working as hard as they can, but we need more investment in health and social care to try and get people discharged back either to home or to an appropriate place up there in a timely enough manner to allow more beds to become available for those people coming in thick. is there any hope, any good news?|j people coming in thick. is there any hope, any good news? i think all of the staff will always work as hard as they can. i think it‘s definitely down to their hard work that the nhs still stays running. luckily for us, those staff are wonderful and they will keep working throughout winter to keep it going. i know anyone who is watching who has been in hospital or used any of your services would wa nt to or used any of your services would want to say thank you. perhaps it isn‘t said often enough. thank you for coming in. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: the prime minister
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is preparing to meet the european commission president jean—claude juncker in brussels tomorrow to discuss the future relationship between the uk and the eu. analysis by the bbc shows that waiting time targets for a&e, cancer and routine operations have not been met across the uk for the past year. a man shoots a doctor — thought to be his ex—fiancee — then kills a pharmacist and a police officer at a chicago hospital. in sport, great britain‘s former european relay champion nigel levine has been banned from all sport for four years after failing a drugs test. leigh halfpenny will meet the match against saturday. he was concussed playing against australia. scotla nd concussed playing against australia. scotland will finish top of their nation ‘s league group if they beat israel tonight. it would also see them in the euro 2020 play—off spot. i will be back in 15 minutes with full details on those stories. at least 50 people have been killed, and another 60 injured,
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in an explosion in the afghan capital, kabul. according to local authorities the blast took place at a meeting of top clerics. they were reportedly gathering at a wedding hall to mark the prophet muhammad‘s birthday which, as the bbc‘s auliya atrafi explained to me earlier, makes today an important date today was the day prophet muhammad was born, but also the day he departed this world, so it is a day of reflection for afg ha ns departed this world, so it is a day of reflection for afghans and muslims throughout the world. these are normally, these gatherings, there are speeches about what we can learn from his life, it is a reflective and calm mood, so that makes it, and then this attack happens, and the pictures on social media show bodies all over the place. eyewitnesses say that the place. eyewitnesses say that the place was crammed with hundreds of people who had come to attend this gathering. this is one of the worst
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of these attacks in the capital for some months, isn‘t it? of these attacks in the capital for some months, isn't it? that's right, and the american envoy for afghanistan, peace talks in kabul, meeting people, and some signs from the taliban about possible peace talks, so these were promising in the last couple of weeks. so nobody was expecting such a thing, and especially what makes this particular incident curious is that, you know, religious scholars, sunni religious scholars are very rarely attacked. normally shia scholars are attacked. normally shia scholars are attacked by islamic state, and the last time a sunni gathering was attacked was by the insurgents, but in that gathering the scholars were trying to four bit to declare suicide bombings as un—islamic, so that kind of made sense. for this attack, all eyes are on social media to see who claims this possibility.
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four people have died after a shooting at a hospital in the american city of chicago. the gunman shot a doctor — believed to be his former fiancee — outside the building before storming inside and killing a trainee pharmacist and a police officer. he then turned the gun on himself. peter bowes reports. another city, another shooting, this time at a hospitaljust south of downtown chicago. the police say it started with a row in the car park between people who knew each other. the gunman first shot a woman with whom he was in a relationship, and then headed inside the building, closely followed by several police officers. more shots were fired, apparently at random. it was like pow pow pow, pow pow pow, pow pow pow pow pow. it was extreme, it was very loud and it was close, so this is what happened. i don‘t know, after that, swat came and got us out of the utility room and made us walk across the street. literally as i was stepping onto the pavement i heard five shots, bam, bam,
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bam, bam, bam. i dropped my groceries, i head to take cover, so we take cover, and at this corner there was really nowhere to seek shelter. and we heard about six more shots. a doctor, a pharmaceutical assistant and a police officer were all killed. the gunman is also dead. those officers that responded today saved a lot of lives, because this guy was just shooting. that poor woman that got off an elevator had nothing to do with nothing, and he shot her. why? there‘s no doubt in my mind that all those officers that responded were heroes, and they saved a lot of lives because we just don‘t know how much damage he was prepared to do. the city of chicago is no stranger to gun violence. it‘s everyday life for people who live here. but this shooting has hit home harder than most. this tears at the soul of our city. it is the face and the consequence of evil.
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at about the same time in another us city, another shooting was unfolding, in downtown denver. the police say the suspect is still at large. it leaves two more american cities in mourning today. the scourge of gun violence once again to blame. australian police have arrested three men in melbourne, who they say were planning a mass shooting. the suspects, who are australian nationals with a turkish background, have been under investigation since march. the police say the men had been inspired by the islamic state group and by an attack in melbourne earlier this month, in which a man was stabbed to death. a sperm whale found dead in a national park in indonesia had nearly six kilogrammes of plastic waste in its stomach. the park is popular among divers for its diverse marine life. park officials say the 9.5—metre whale was found with plastic
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bottles, cups, bags, sandals, and a sack with more than 1,000 pieces of string inside its belly. a video showing police officers being attacked in south london has been shared widely on social media. the footage, taken in merton on saturday, shows a man kicking a female officer, who is left clutching her head just yards from a passing bus. her colleague is shown being dragged across the road, as he tries to stop a suspect. a warning, this report from jon mcmanus contains footage some people may find disturbing. everybody‘s flying, look, they‘ve got him. this is the moment a routine a traffic police stop in south west london turned violent. one of the occupants of the car attempts to run away, the male police officer is dragged around the road while trying to stop him. a female officer tries to help. only to be violently drop kicked to the ground by another man, an oncoming bus narrowly avoids hitting her. dear me, hejust kung fu kicked her.
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both officers were treated in hospital but their injuries were not serious. i‘m getting this all live. and it‘s this and the tone of the commentary that has prompted the chair of the metropolitan police federation to criticise the behaviour of some members of the public. is it becoming acceptable we can build constantly police officers executing their warrant, do absolutely nothing about it and it‘s a big joke? ken marsh says officers might have to start letting suspects go if they don‘t receive public support but he doesn‘t mean he expects them to jump in to physically help. assaults on officers are growing, there were 26,000 in the past year. and other emergency workers have also been targeted with over 17,000 nhs staff attacked in some form. the senior policeman responsible for officers‘ welfare says the public should be cautious. this isn‘t a green light
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for have a go heroes, many members of the public do incredibly brave things to keep us safe as well as themselves safe on a day—to—day basis. all we are saying here is there is a difference between helping us and hindering us and glorifying some of the things that are being filmed at the moment. i'm getting this live, boys and girls. among those who drove by, a passing motorcyclist appears to aid the officers. police say they are grateful for help from the public but should only get involved if it is safe to do so. one person has been charged in connection with this incident, police are searching for two others. john mcmanus, bbc news. millions of children have enjoyed cbeebies book at bedtime over the years, but last week — for the first time — it was told using makaton sign language. six—year—old tom mccartney, who‘s deaf, watched it with this mother. his reaction was filmed as he understood the story for the first time. he was so excited that she posted
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the footage online, it has since gone viral online. lorna gordon reports. bedtime story. hello, i'm rob... it‘s become part of the bedtime routine for many parents and their children but when actor rob delaney recently took on cbeebies storytelling duties, it led to a very special reaction from one young boy. as soon as he saw rob come on and he was using makaton, hejust, yeah, he wasjust so engaged and excited by it. although tom doesn‘t have any speech, he has a very expressive little face and he uses, he doesn‘t just sign, as you can see, but he uses his entire body, as you saw, including standing up in his chair, to be able to get across how excited he was. six—year—old tom has complex medical needs. during one of his trips to hospital, his mum and dad started using makaton sign language to help communicate with their son. there is something like! million people using makaton out there today as we speak to help their communication, ranging from those with learning disabilities, as we saw with tom,
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but also helping babies to acquire speech, looking at developing wider literacy skills and even working with people with dementia. the young boy‘s joyful response has been shared thousands of times online. it even caught the attention of the storyteller himself, who has said tom‘s response was beautiful. rob delaney‘s own links to the language came about after he learned makaton to communicate with his own son, henry, who had been seriously ill with a brain tumour, and who died earlier this year. i‘m so glad that it was him that they chose to do it, i think because he has a personal connection to makaton, with his son, henry, that made it even more special for us, knowing what he had been through, and the kind of personal journey with makaton. mum laura said her son‘s reaction had left her in tears. the family‘s hope now — that makaton will make it into more children‘s television, so tom can enjoy more of his favourite programmes
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in a language he understands. lorna gordon, bbc news, falkirk. we love their graphics department! you asked what they are up to when they are not doing cbeebies, and i can show you, because ben has got the weather. some body has spent a lot on that! the funny thing is that we have! when we go through this, you will see it live, because it gets better. what is wind-chill? why have you asked that? i am here to explain, or this would look weird. it was good in rehearsal. we are talking about it because it‘s so cold today, and notjust is it chilly but it‘s windy out there. why do we get the thing called wind—chill? it starts with the human body. michael white it‘s the
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graphics department! look at this! that‘s you, in the cold! graphics department! look at this! that's you, in the cold! but... you‘ve got a warm glow. that's you, in the cold! but... you've got a warm glow. yes, because iam warming you've got a warm glow. yes, because i am warming a layer of air around my skin, and the winds stay light, that stays around me and keeps me relatively warm. it's a bit orange. anyway, a warm glow, let‘s leave it there. sometimes i feel like you are missing the point. on a windy day, the wind comes and it blows away that layer of warm air, and not only that layer of warm air, and not only that dry air will evaporate moisture from the surface of the skin, it will take energy away from the body, it calls me down, a complicated formula, and that is what meteorologists use to work it out. that is the formula whizzing around, and it takes into account humidity, temperature and wind speed, but what works out for us is that, as i said
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at the start, your thermometer might say one temperature, it might save 5 degrees but, add on that wind—chill effect and it might feel like it is below zero. but you are still smiling! even though i have turned blue. this can be a problem for all of us, if we are out in the cold... particularly if it rains first, so you are wet foot yes, and especially news p rese nte rs you are wet foot yes, and especially news presenters outside westminster for any length of time. in tribute to your valiant efforts, if anybody was working yesterday! this is tomasz schafernaker, believe it or not, who created this simon mccoy. you have tried to make me a bit older with more grey hairs. we have tried to make you older than me! that is my gift from us to you.” think you‘d better get on with the
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forecast. very cold in here suddenly! wind—chill a big feature of the weather today, that‘s why we are talking about it. not only does it feel chilly, it looks chilly. there have been some glimmers of brightness, but also quite a few showers. as you can see from the radar, they have been spreading from the east. a bit of white on the radar picture as well, that shows wet weather is starting to turn to sleep, even some snow in some places, blown in on this strong easterly wind, which is why we have our wind—chill if you are out at about 6pm, six or seven the top temperature but, with the strength of the wind, it will feel more like this, three degrees in belfast, 1 degrees in london, and some places feeling like below freezing. tonight, that chilly air stays in place, it stays windy and we get further areas of showery rain moving north—west. temperatures generally around two to 5 degrees, but it may get a bit colder than that in the
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far south—west, the skies stay clear of longest. tomorrow, this is the rush not particularly pretty in eastern and southern scotland. some snow accumulating over the mountains, say, above 600 metres. some showers for northern ireland and northern england, with some snow on the top of the pennines, the welsh hills, and perhaps the west country moors. with some sweet downpours pushing in across the south—west, they will drift into east wales as the day wears on. for scotla nd east wales as the day wears on. for scotland and northern ireland, a lot of cloud with outbreaks of showery rain and some snow over the hills. further south and east, drier and brighter with some sunshine, and temperatures a touch higher, and we will have lost the strength of the wind in the south. the wind drops tonight for all of us as we go into the early hours of thursday, and that will give quite a widespread frost, and certainly a colder night than we have been used to recently. after a chilly start on thursday,
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not a bad looking day with a fair amount of dry weather. some cloud feeding in from the east will produce the odd spot of rain at times. temperatures nudging upwards, seven to 11 degrees. that is the theme for the end of the week, this area of low pressure spinning down to the south—west, will essentially cut off easterly winds and will bring in more of a southerly wind. not such a strong wind either. that will bring something a little bit less cold for the weekend, and some rain at times. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: theresa may prepares to head to brussels tomorrow to discuss the uk‘s future with the eu, amid signs that attempts to force a vote of confidence in her leadership have stalled. for the first time, the nhs fails to meet its waiting time targets for cancer, a&e and routine operations for a whole year across the uk. at least a0 people are killed, and another 60 injured, in an explosion at a meeting of clerics in the afghan capital, kabul. four dead at a chicago hospital after a man shoots a doctor,
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thought to be his ex—fiancee, and then fires at random before killing himself. olly foster has the sport now. we are talking about a british athlete facing a ban. nigel levine has won nine championship medals with great britain. he‘s been a main—stay of the british axa00 relay squad for a number of years. he peaked in 2013/201a, european champion indoors and out. remember, he had a really nasty motorbike accident with a team—mate in tenerife early last year and suffered a pelvic injury but during his recovery he was drugs tested in november and failed a test for clenbuterol, an asthma drug that can be used to enhance performance. levine had tried to
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prove that the positive test was the result of taking contaminated supplements. but uk anti—doping say that he was was unable to prove that he took it unintentionally, and as a result they have hit him with the maximum ban of four years, backdated to last december. he‘s 29, and eligible to compete again at the end of 2021, so this realistically ends his athletics career. perhaps not so unusual at this stage of the rugby season but some injury worries. eight tenths november, the autumn internationals playing every weekend. wales have been going great guns, they are going for their first clea n swee p guns, they are going for their first clean sweep in the autumn series. they have wins against scotland, australia and tonga but for their final match
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they will have to do without full—back leigh halfpenny. he was concussed in this collision with the wallabies‘ samu kerevi ten days ago. halfpenny still hasn‘t recovered. warren gatland accused the australian player of being reckless at the time. it‘s australia next for england and they are going to be without wing chris ashton. he has a calf injury. he has featured in all three of the autumn internationals so far but was replaced in the first half of saturday‘s win against japan. jack nowell and jonny may are expected to be the wingers for the match now. that is against south africa. the final round of nations league group matches takes place tonight — if scotland beat israel at hampden park, they‘ll win their group and get promoted to the second tier. and perhaps more importantly they will earn a play—off spot, should they need it, for euro 2020, that‘s if they fall short in next year‘s regular
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qualification process. the sides are level on points at the top of their group. israel only need a draw to finish top, because they beat scotland in haifa last month. so plenty at stake. the uefa president alexander ceferin says they might look to increase sanctions against clubs that break financial fair play rules. a german publication recently claimed that manchester city and paris st—germain overvalued sponsorship deals to get around the regulations. we should not speak only about manchester city and p56, we speak about all the clubs, this is the most important. perhaps you could call them the usual suspects, but i agree, here we have to see what is going on, our independent bodies will check it. we know that we must keep credibility.
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much more of that exclusive interview on the bbc sport website but that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to gill dummigan in salford, where north west tonight have been examining the impact that poor health has on the northern economy. we will talk to her in a moment. and peter leavy is in the fall, i don‘t wa nt to peter leavy is in the fall, i don‘t want to give it away because it‘s a heartbreaking story but we will find out ina heartbreaking story but we will find out in a moment. jill, this report
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suggests that if we work better, we feel better. i went to a factory in burnley yesterday where they work rolling shifts but the at the end of each shift, they have access to an on—site gym and spinning classes, they also help workers give up smoking and the boss told me this is about helping staff but also the economic benefits are obvious and although they haven‘t measured it, they have noted people are more productive but most people don‘t have an on—site gym and that is what this report is about, saying more money needs to be spent on public health. they are saying that the poorer health means poor productivity and £22 billion from people missing work because they are on long—term sick and become
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unemployed and it is a vicious cycle. they want public health investment to go up and a lot of people would say this is paid for by councils and as their budgets get squeezed, so does public health. what was interesting was that the area studied here is across the north and a similar picture.” area studied here is across the north and a similar picture. i only looked at the north—west but the picture historically has been that health is much worse in the north, partly because of the industrial background and the economic decline, but this problem does not seem to be getting any better however much people tried to improve it and the hope is that this will change things. i know you're an other regions in the north will cover that time eight at 6:30pm. peter leavy, this story breaks my heart. it‘s a
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gambler who thinks... you tell it.l 51—year—old father of two from lincoln thought he had won £1.7 million only to be told he had not. he was gambling on his mobile phone and a few hours later, he hit the jackpot, that is the game there, he hit the jackpot and won £1.7 million. bet fred confirmed that he had won and andrew apparently cried withjoy, he said it would change his life, he said the feeling of being a millionaire was amazing and he treated his pals to a celebration. the bill came to £2500, a feeling i'm sure you know, simon. hang on, so he won £1.7 million, he
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thinks forfour days he has hang on, so he won £1.7 million, he thinks for four days he has won hang on, so he won £1.7 million, he thinks forfour days he has won it and then what happened? bet fred called andrew to say there had been a glitch which meant he had won nothing. he said he thought it was a joke and he says it was so traumatic that the stress is affecting his health. if they are still sticking by the story, we're not sure when anybody the malfunction, then pay the money. if you cannot prove it, then pay me. he says bet fred offered him £65,000 because of the ever but he is pursuing this through the courts. betfred say they love to play out winners but it would be
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inappropriate to comment further. andrew says they have not produced any evidence of the glitch and he is hopeful of getting the money, he could have gone out and bought a house or a car or anything. you could buy me that drink you owe me. like the train ticket you were going to buy to hold, which is never materialised. if he does get the money on the strength of appearing on afternoon live, i know two presenters who would be very humble. two ex—presenters! plenty more on the programme tonight. thank you, thatis the programme tonight. thank you, that is nationwide tonight. and if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them on the bbc iplayer. we go
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nationwide every afternoon at four —— every monday afternoon at a:30pm. president trump‘s immigration policy has hit a stumbling block. earlier this month, the president signed an order barring people from claiming ayslum if they enter the country illegally. but a judge has blocked the order, saying it exceeds the president‘s authority. the intervention comes as a group of migrants, who set off from countries in central america, reached the mexican city of tijuana, on the border with the united states. donald trump has called the caravan an "invasion" and an "avalanche". our correspondent, will grant, has been travelling with them. this is benitojuarez sports centre in tijuana and for the migrants in the caravan to reach this point the united states is within touching distance. now they must decide what they are going to do next. it won‘t be simple to cross what is the busiest border crossing in the world. some are signing up for asylum here behind me. they are receiving advice on the process of how to do that and they are putting their names down via migrant rights groups
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who are supporting them. of course the mayor of tijuana has said they could spend up to six months in that process, he described this as an avalanche that the city is ill equipped to deal with. nevertheless those who are on route are still planning to make it to this point. we expect them to arrive in the coming hours. and many have encountered greater hostility along the way, there‘s been a hardening of attitudes towards the migrants in the northern states of mexico that they did not see in the southern states, for example, here in tijuana over the weekend there was a small but vocal anti—migra nt protest which was quickly broken up by police but reflected that greater hostility, that outpouring of anger, particularly seen online, in social media, that the migrants aren‘t welcome here. president trump of course has told them to go home in no uncertain terms. nevertheless, once they get here they will decide what to do next, some may choose to break away
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from the caravan and try to cross on their own via dangerous people trafficking gangs, human smugglers, with all the risks involved in that process. others may choose the safer option of settling here in mexico itself if they can find work. will grant with that report. vishala is here. in a moment she‘ll be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister prepares to meet the european commission president in brussels tomorrow to discuss the future relationship between the uk and the eu. analysis by the bbc shows that waiting time targets for a&e, cancer and routine operations have not been met across the uk for the past year. a man shoots a doctor, thought to be his ex—fiancee, then kills a pharmacist and a police officer at a chicago hospital. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live.
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carlos ghosn, the boss of car maker nissan, is under fire for what prosecutors say are "significant acts of misconduct". he‘s expected to be fired from nissan after being arrested injapan. he‘s also set to be fired from his role leading an alliance that includes mitsubishi motors and french car maker renault. easyjet said it flew a record number of passengers over the year, up 10.2% to 88.5 million. profits were up a2%. but the group has warned that revenues per seat — the amount of money it makes from each passenger — are set to fall in the first half of the new financial year, hit by factors including the timing of easter. more on that shortly. the bank of england governor mark carney is backing theresa may‘s brexit deal. the governor, who has previousuly warned of the hit to economic growth from the decision to leave the eu, said there were limits to what the central bank could do in the event of a brexit shock to the economy.
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easyjet reported some great results today, but its share price is down quite a bit today? it sounds like 5—6% which is shocking given that profits are good, so it may be done to headwinds, future factors that might affect revenue so they are concerned that the revenue per passenger might be hit by things like rising fuel costs a nd be hit by things like rising fuel costs and the timings of specific holidays like easter, so group a nalyst holidays like easter, so group analyst who make recommendations of shares have changed their outlook for easyjet, so we can hear more about this from shanti kelemen, senior portfolio manager at coutts. they did do really well because
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higherfuel costs, they did do really well because higher fuel costs, disruption in terms of industrial action, they posted a profit but it‘s largely because competitors have gone our way and they can come back. the airline industry is competitive, it's easy to enter and leave, you can lease planes, and it's a market where consumers are very price conscious. across the market, results were solid but people were worried about future fuel costs and revenues that are driving shares lower. moving on to boil, that impacts planes, the oil price down today and that‘s generally because we have seen a huge increase in production from the us. a lot of shale production in the us has come as oil price has gone up, that's encouraged more adrenaline, the
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impact behind today's prices is that there is more supply, so data coming out about the supply of crew in crew in inventories in the us and worries about whether opec will keep to their word and reduced production or other countries like russia will keep pumping to bring more money in. coming back to companies, if you haven‘t heard of a0 world, they have reported another loss and the share price has been taking a knock, the online retailer, we are that they do well and high—street retailers need to adapt, but they don‘t seem to be getting it right. part of it is their market, white home goods like refrigerators and if you look at the wider economy, there are fewer
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housing transactions, when you buy a new house you buy new stuff, and with the uncertainty about the future, people are putting off decisions about remodelling the kitchen so it's the bigger economic headwinds rather than anything wrong with what the company is doing. so lower housing transactions. thank you, shanti kelemen. we‘ve been looking at what‘s going on with sterling, it‘s up at the moment. yes, after those comments from mark carney, there is a current stock sell—off in us markets over concerns a boat they trade war between the us and china and how it impacts technology companies and thatis impacts technology companies and that is a record low point that the s&p 500 has hit to date so we will
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see what happens later on because we have seen quite a bit of volatility in the us markets relating to technology so it‘s interesting that has appeared today and analysts say it is because of the trade war. thank you. prince charles has held at reception at the palace today. it was for members of the association ofjewish refugees and was being held to mark the 80th anniversary of the kindertransport, which brought some 10,000 mostly jewish children aged between three to 17 to safety in the lead up to the second world war. tomas gutwin was one of those brought over by sir nicholas winton from czechoslovakia and he was at the reception today. iam8a i am 8a coming up but i came over as the youngest winter and child, i arrived in england at three and
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three quarters, i travelled on my own from prague and was met at liverpool street station by an adoptive person because my mother died at childbirth and my father had just disappeared and he didn‘t actually appear till i was 1a, 15. people with incurable cancer are being told that even a small amount of exercise can help them live not just better, but possibly longer. macmillan cancer care says, contrary to traditional doctors‘ advice, rest is not always best. jayne mccubbin went to see gemma ellis, a mum with secondary cancer who is gearing up to run herfirst 5k. gemma was diagnosed and treated for cancer in her early 30s. at that point, i believed that i was clear. but — there was always a but — there was a shadow on my spine. the cancer had spread. aged 37, with two young girls, she was told it was treatable but not curable. it was there and i knew i‘ve got it, i‘ve got to live with it.
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that was the moment gemma knew she would make a change. and left leg... are you out of your comfort zone right now? very much so, thank you. yeah. totally. but you look like a ninja! yeah, that‘s me! with stage two cancer and two new training buddies, she‘s gearing up for her first ever 5k parkrun in 12 weeks. ijust keep thinking, right, well, you know, if the treatment lasts that long, and then i‘ve got another line of treatment there, then another one might come out and i might be able to have that. you know, you never know. that‘s where this comes in. team gemma. well done. good start today. how was it? honestly? laughter. none of this journey is easy, but her training partners, tony and helen, know exactly what she‘s going through, and how this could help. i was actually only diagnosed in may 2017, and i went from training
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for an ultra—marathon to being terminally ill in 36 hours, which was a bit of a shock. i was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer in april 2016, six months after doing a half—ironman. my first question to my oncologist was, can i still do it? and his reply was, absolutely, i could. and knowing that has kept me sane. and i really hope that, as part of this process, you're really going to kind of find that works for you too. yeah, that‘s what i‘m hoping. and march. macmillan, the cancer charity, says this is about more than hope. exercise can help patients with incurable cancer not just live better, but live longer. doctors have always advised their patients to rest. rest is not always best. small amounts of physical activity, not running marathons, or leaping around in lycra, can make a really significant difference. there certainly does seem to be an effect on some of the growth factors that stimulate cancer to grow. 5k, had you ever thought
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about a 5k before? no. laughter. how's she going to go? we've worked out a training plan for gemma. she‘s pulling tongues of camera here! i think gemma might learn to hate us over the course of the next 12 weeks. gemma's gonna be amazing. it's slippy, innit? yeah. i don‘t know my prognosis and i never want to know my prognosis. but i know that it‘s probably not great. but somewhere in the back of my mind, i keep thinking, i will be here, i‘ll be here to see that, i keep giving myself little milestones. i‘m hitting them already. and i intend to do so for a long time. that was gemma alice talking there to jane mccubbin. london‘s had the gherkin, the cheese grater and the walkie talkie. now, if plans are approved, a new tower called the tulip willjoin the skyline. at 1000 feet it would be the second tallest skyscraper in the capital behind the shard.
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the design features internal slides and moving transparent pods running outside the building. if planning permission for the unusually—shaped building is permitted, construction will begin in 2020 and be completed five years later. and if it‘s called the tulip when it goes up, i will be surprised. there are lots of coming and goings at downing street over the last few days. but take a look at this — number ten‘s mouser in chief larry the cat not impressed with access at number ten. he was left waiting on the doorstep this morning in the rain until a friendly policemen stepped
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in to help. twitter has weighed in saying that he had a letter to write. i‘m sure we all need a bit of cheering up on days, weeks, months like this. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5pm with huw edwards. time for a look at the weather. here‘s ben rich. good afternoon. for many parts of the country, not only feeling cold, it looks cold. weather coming from the east, bringing these speckled clouds in our direction, that‘s indicative of quite a few showers through the rest of the afternoon, some of these likely to be wintry. and you will notice the strength of the wind, wind gusts around a0 mph for some eastern coasts. the thermometer by the end of the afternoon may read a—7 degrees, add on the strength of the wind, this is what it will feel like in birmingham, cardiff, norwich. it will feel like it is freezing. through this evening and tonight, areas of showery rain. increasing chance of sleet and snow
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mixed in over higher ground. quite cloudy, breezy as well, holding up the temperatures, but across the far south—west, as we stick out into clearer skies, we may get a touch of frost. into tomorrow morning, the rush—hour will look like this. cloud and outbreaks of rain. hill snow, across scotland, all being driven in on a brisk, raw easterly wind. similar story for northern ireland. bit of snow over the pennines, and for the welsh hills. we may even see snow over the hills and tors of the south—west, as showers gather. these could have hail and thunder, hefty downpours drifting into parts of east wales and the midlands as the day wears on. for scotland, northern ireland, rain, hill snow, continuing to move through, but further south and east the wind will ease, we will see spells of sunshine,
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feeling a little bit better at 7—8 degrees. on wednesday night, the wind continues to ease, skies clear, so for a time, we are likely to see a touch of frost. chilly start to thursday morning, but thursday, overall, is a quieter day, quite a lot of cloud around, patchy rain. best of the brightness out west, temperatures just beginning to nudge upwards, and that is a trend that continues as we move towards the end of the week, low—pressure spinning down to the south—west. potential for rain at times, as we pick up more of the southerly wind, those temperatures will slowly start to recover. today at 5:00pm, the state of the nhs, as no part of the uk hits key waiting time targets for a year. one in five local hospital services have failed to hit any of their waiting time targets for cancer, accident and emergency and routine operations. nhs hospitals blame rising demand.
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we will have more capacity for the emergency worker, the trauma work, that we do at our other hospitals. that will enable us to improve the services that we have in cancer, in waiting times for patients for surgery, as well as our emergency department. we‘ll have the detail and reaction, and we‘ll be talking to the head of the royal college of nursing. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00pm... the first cabinet meeting since last week‘s resignations over the brexit plans, as the prime minister prepares for more talks in brussels.
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