Skip to main content

tv   Click  BBC News  November 25, 2018 12:30pm-1:01pm GMT

12:30 pm
best on. we have the best deal available and it is the only possible deal as has been reiterated today. you've talked about moving beyond brexit to domestic responsibilities. ba rely brexit to domestic responsibilities. barely a day goes by at the moment without stories about cabinet ministers or ministers or mps making strongly worded comments about this deal and you've had several of your own mps calling for a vote of no confidence. wouldn't it be understandable if the public concluded your party used too divided to govern, even if this deal goes through? no, what we're doing isa goes through? no, what we're doing is a party in government is not only what the british people asked us to do, negotiated the brexit deal. as i said, i believe this is the best possible deal available, i believe it isa possible deal available, i believe it is a good deal for the united kingdom because it delivers on the vote and in a way that protects jobs, security and the integrity of the united kingdom. alongside that we have been doing quite a lot in
12:31 pm
relation to other issues which do matter to people. i reference to my statementjust matter to people. i reference to my statement just now, our significant commitment to the national health service. a long—term plan for the national health service, that £394 million extra a week going into the national health service. those are exactly the sort of priorities that the british people want to see us focusing on. gary? you are busy very clear you want to win that vote, but could you categorically rule out you won't be back here in brussels injust under three weeks asking for some concessions? there must be, if you wa nt to concessions? there must be, if you want to avoid division and uncertainty the other side of the defeat, there must be a plan b. you're not telling us there is just a boyd, a black hole, nothing on the other side of defeat? you've heard what was said today by the commission and other european
12:32 pm
leaders, that this is, this deal is the result of significant, tough negotiations over a period of time. it is, jean—claude juncker's phrases we re it is, jean—claude juncker's phrases were the best possible deal and the only deal possible. i want to deliver brexit for the british people. this is a good deal that delivers brexit to their british people and i have every member of parliament will see that and the importance of that. are there any non—britishjournalist importance of that. are there any non—british journalist to ask questions? the lady in red? the german chancellor next door said in her press conference, she was speaking of her genuine sadness that britain is leaving. do you share this sadness? well, no, buti this sadness? well, no, but i recognise that others do. i recognise some european leaders are sad at this moment that some people back at home in the uk will be sad at this moment. the way
12:33 pm
i look at it is actually this is for us now i look at it is actually this is for us now to move onto the next stage, to move on, as i said i'm full of optimism about the future of our country. i believe that we can, with this good deal with the european union, we will remain friends and neighbours. i've said many times, we're leaving the eu but we are not leaving europe. we will continue to have that good, close partnership and relationship with countries within europe, within the european union and more widely. well... the spanish prime minister said spain hasa the spanish prime minister said spain has a position of strength, what do you have to say to that? i think you heard what i said in my statement. i'm very clear that when they united kingdom negotiates, we negotiate for the whole uk family and that includes gibraltar. i am proud that gibraltar is british. we have ensured gibraltar is covered with the withdrawal agreement and
12:34 pm
the implementation period. as i say, in future negotiations i will negotiate for the whole of the uk family and that includes gibraltar. over here? . you spoke about making the case to mps next month in westminster. can i ask a more specific question, do you plan meetings with opposition mps order your ministers plan meetings with opposition mps, specifically to try and persuade some of labour, liberal, snp mps to back the deal?|j think liberal, snp mps to back the deal?” think what will be important for parliamentarians across the whole houses they have the information available on which to be able to make the judgment when they come to the vote. as a government we will be publishing analysis that we have undertaken to publish previously to give that information to members of parliament. as i've said before and said again today here, i believe when it comes to it, mps will be
12:35 pm
thinking about the need to deliver oi'i thinking about the need to deliver on the vote for the british people and will be thinking about the impact of this deal and their constituents. i think that constituents. i think that constituents want to make sure their jobs and livelihoods are protected and that's what this deal does. i would take a couple more. some of your mps would take a couple more. some of yourmps and would take a couple more. some of your mps and ministers want a plan b that involves the norway option of staying in the single market. given that you said that would be a betrayal of the referendum vote, is it something you wouldn't rule out under your premiership? i'm clear we've negotiated the best possible deal available. crucially, it isa possible deal available. crucially, it is a deal but delivers on the vote. i think this is so important to me. the people voted for brexit andi to me. the people voted for brexit and i believe it's right, in a sense of duty for politicians who asked them to make that choice to then deliver on that choice. this is a deal but delivers that because what people want to see as an end to free movement and the jurisdiction of the european court of justice.
12:36 pm
movement and the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. and enter those vast annual sums of money being given to europe, to the eu every year and that is what this deal delivers for them. gordon? thank you. from the daily telegraph. prime minister, you have said today a lot of the things you have said are very well rehearsed arguments, taking back control of borders, laws, money. these are arguments that have been going on for months now. has anything changed today? what is the one thing you will be saying to those 90 odd tory mps who have said they will vote against this deal, what is the one thing you will say to them to try and convince them they should back your deal after today? well, i have spoken before about taking back control of our money, laws and borders. that is what i believe led to people to vote to leave the european union. it's important we deliver that for people. when you ask me what i will be saying to mps, what i will be saying to mps across the whole house
12:37 pm
is we have that duty to deliver on brexit. this is a deal which delivers an brexit but it does it in a way which ensures we are protecting the united kingdom, we are protecting the jobs and livelihoods of constituents up and down the country and we protect our security. this is a deal that is good for the whole of the uk. thank you. there is the british prime minister at the end of her two days here in brussels. lots to pick out of that. this, she says, marks the start of a crucial national debate in the uk. the most significant debate facing the house of commons are many years. the british people she says once this deal and she is confident it fulfils the referendum vote, taking that money, laws and borders. she ducked a number of questions on that press c0 nfe re nce . ducked a number of questions on that press conference. notably on whether she would resign if the vote failed in the house of commons. she
12:38 pm
rejected questions on whether the government would collapse or whether there would be a government of national unity at the other side of it and she ruled out importantly attaching any conditions to the deal that will be presented to the house of commons for the vote. it will be the deal, she says, as it stands. so very clearly ucb prime minister only wants to talk about plan had not plan bi other important point, i think there was a bit of the prime minister firing think there was a bit of the prime ministerfiring one think there was a bit of the prime minister firing one across the bowels of the spanish prime minister. gibraltar, we negotiate as the uk family. we want to ensure gibraltar is covered in our negotiations. it is covered by the withdrawal agreement and political declaration. its constitutional status will not change. we can bring in chris morris from our reality check team. very much on message, the message of the day, there is no other deal. it feels like we have come full circle. the british prime minister quoting the president of the european commission no less. jean—claude juncker said this is
12:39 pm
european commission no less. jean—claudejuncker said this is the best deal and the only deal. i'm not suggesting for a moment it was all carefully choreographed but that was clearly the message that people wa nted clearly the message that people wanted to emerge from this summit. it is this nothing. is that true? i think it would be very, very difficult, almost impossible, to see the other eu 27, if this deal was voted down in the house of commons, reopening the legal text of the withdrawal agreement. i think there is more possibility that you could see tweaks to the short political declaration, that aspirational document which sets out where the two sides hope the future relationship is going. but it is not going to be a major renegotiation. i think that would only happen if the eu was convinced that there was major political change within the united kingdom. and in a different political perspective, which they would be negotiating with. you and i have stood here many, many times over the years. to many some might say! with negotiations over greece and cyprus. there is always a
12:40 pm
plan b. there is always a plan b but at the moment i don't think it is kind of a fully form to plan b. both sides have do think carefully, if this deal proves impossible to ratify, what do they do next? there is or is going to have to be a plan b but don't think it is a plan b which is fully formed sitting on some and's drawer to be pulled out and say, how about this? it is possible that the uk may have do come back and sakes, well, other ways we can tweak anything in that political declaration? as i say, i don't see a renegotiation of the withdrawal agreement, because it is dense legal text which took months and months to agree. but the political declaration, perhaps a little more wiggle room. but a fundamental change in what this deal really means. . . change in what this deal really means... i don't think so. i want to put you on the spot for a moment, there is a tweet from tony conneuy moment, there is a tweet from tony connelly talking about something that he has picked up. the eu warns
12:41 pm
britain will not have any decision—making role in the eu's foreign and security policy, despite promises in the political declaration of flexible consultation and meetings at ministerial and senior level. the warning comes following confirmed by cyprus that any privileged access for the uk to the eu's foreign and security policy would set a precedent for turkey. a fabulous example of how complicated this is and how other countries look to their own interests and see if are there any precedents in there which might do damage to what they see as their national interests. we know cyprus is obsessed with turkey. i was based in turkey forfour years. is obsessed with turkey. i was based in turkey for four years. cyprus's mentorship of the european union is largely involved with making sure that turkey is kept at arm ‘s length, as long as it continues to hold the northern part of the island. here is an example of where one country can hold up these things. how can you not be involved in the making of security and
12:42 pm
foreign policy when you have air force bases and cyprus? hazard that's nothing to do with european membership. if you have no membership. if you have no membership of the european union, your formal decision-making role within european foreign policy is diminished. we see that across—the—board. if you take a prime minister's press conference as a whole, she was in a way saying, listen, items at least, we can have some of our cake and eat it. that is what it basically said. we can take back control of free movement of people coming to an end. we pay much less money into eu budget. we lose the directjurisdiction of the european court in the uk, and yet, we can still have this fabulous trading relationship. different countries during the long negotiation to come on the future relationship are going to put spammers in the works. it's going to be very difficult. to sum up what this latest line shows us is that there are going to be difficulties for the uk family at large, posed by
12:43 pm
brexit. that is the simple fact, whether with cyprus, gibraltar, northern ireland. as we've talked about through the morning, there will always be this clash of those who want greater sovereignty versus the integrity of the united kingdom. and these are massive changes. this is the biggest political and economic change in the way our country is governed in our lifetime. if we move beyond trade, look at security... police officials, for example, in the united kingdom are desperate to keep access to a variety of eu databases, which they used to cooperate and fight against crime. and yet, some of those databases, the crime. and yet, some of those data bases, the eu crime. and yet, some of those databases, the eu insisting if you're not a member, you can get access but not necessarily real—time access, not as good as what you have at the moment. the uk will try to negotiate that but there are some very clear messages hidden within the political declaration
12:44 pm
that don't think you'll get everything you want, don't think some of these things will be the same after brexit as they are before. chris morris, for the moment, thank you. all these press conferences going on at the same time, of course. we had from theresa may. we can hearfrom time, of course. we had from theresa may. we can hear from the german chancellor angela merkel, giving her reaction to the endorsement of the withdrawal agreement. translation: we strive for close cooperation and close cooperation in the field of internal security. these are important aspects, as theresa may said herself. we continued to live ina european said herself. we continued to live in a european area, even after great britain has left the european union. plus, there is still a lot that needs to be done. a lot of work for us. needs to be done. a lot of work for us. the house of commons will now be seized of the draft agreement, but i think we have, this has been very successfully, a very successful endeavour in a situation without
12:45 pm
previous circumstances. we have been successful enough in this attempt of reaching an agreement that balances the interests of both sides, paying respect to paying heed to the interests of both sides, allowing at the same time for a close partnership and all that took place ina spirit partnership and all that took place in a spirit that implied tough negotiations, while never losing sight of the fact that we could only work for a win—win situation for both sides. as i say, sad, my feelings are divided. i feel very sad but also i feel a certain sense of relief that we have been able to achieve what we have achieved. the german chancellor angela merkel speaking of the sadness that is around and theresa may spoke where
12:46 pm
that today. while we were listening to angela merkel we were talking about this line that the uk would not have any decision—making role and you were saying that is the case that the night is stated as military basesin that the night is stated as military bases in germany. and the united states still has a lot of influence so states still has a lot of influence so that would be the case in the uk as military power. they would not disappearfrom as military power. they would not disappear from the eu security scene. it talks of the new reality that the uk is facing in areas has just gibraltar —— such as gibraltar and in cyprus. what have we seem here? it went reasonably smoothly and discussions were short and there area and discussions were short and there are a few eu leaders were not happy and be sure that by turning up late to stop there were some last—minute
12:47 pm
stu m bles to stop there were some last—minute stumbles around gibraltar for example and people are mostly group read that it is over now. —— relieved that it is over now. they're not sure this will pass through the uk parliament and as far as the consent is a five—year seven—year trade negotiation. they think this is the easy bit. we had mr brock thinks that a trade deal is possible within four years. the most important part is that the uk and the eu start on the same regulatory page. that might be some divergence seas and limits on what we put into that trade deal but it isa we put into that trade deal but it is a better starting position than any other trading partner has when they come to that table with the eu. asa
12:48 pm
they come to that table with the eu. as a possibility but still complicated. if they had to come back, and nobody is talking about the plan be at the moment, and put some lines into the text and i satisfy those of the conservative party with concerns about the integrity of the letter kingdom, can you imagine what those lines would be? would it be something about regulatory border in the isc? would it be about the assembly if it is refund? it be about the assembly if it is refund ? would it be about the assembly if it is refund? would have a say what happens? it might be fleshing out some of the ideas that made their way back into the political declaration in the last few days. a previous ideas bar customs arrangements. they disappeared on the scene and are suddenly and as a possibility. they don't take fisheries into the long grass. i think eu leaders are pretty firm and will not fundamentally renegotiate. you need more than a back—up if you
12:49 pm
wa nt to you need more than a back—up if you want to achieve a tweak here and there. the two things that really strike me, one thing has been foremost in the minds of european leaders is fishing and one is this level playing field. these are the priorities for the europeans. absolutely and i think that the eu did not want to see kiosks at the border as well. even though they now need to kick this over to the uk and say you have to come up with the goods, you have together to parliament before we start talking about this again. they do not want to see planes grounded at airports and miles of lorries on the french side of the channel as much as you do want to see them in kent either. at the end of the day people will reflect on all of those very severe immediate consequences. if the clock is ticking down in the last few days. we have had from the foreign
12:50 pm
secretary about all the options and the chaos that could ensue with deal or no deal are a general election. —— ora or no deal are a general election. —— or a general election. do you think the preparations for no deal continue? i do and they are more advanced than the european than the uk site. from the european direction are facing towards the uk it is much smaller section of the eu economy but when you have assets for the uk facing the eu it is half of all their exports but not half of all their exports but not half of all the eu exports into the uk so it is less of a hit for them whatever hecht comes from and no—deal brexit. —— whatever hecht comes. i wonder if pa rt —— whatever hecht comes. i wonder if part of the strategy is dig in on this deal now and the more that is done perhaps the bigger the possibility that the referendum on
12:51 pm
the british side is backtracked. you think this is undermined? i do and if you start making more concessions now you encourage the hard brexit yea rs now you encourage the hard brexit years to keep demanding. so it does increase the chance of a second referendum and decreases the chance of brexiteers asking for a new deal so of brexiteers asking for a new deal so the eu gets two things from this tactic. if we get to this second stage of the process michel barnier seemed to be gladhanding his team. would he be the man to dig it on? michel barnier is a viable candidate to replace jean—claude juncker in 2019. he was not able to seek his parties official nomination and
12:52 pm
finished second to jean—claude juncker in 2014. he is officially not running but did a very good job in this process so the elections did not work out, you might see michel barnier re—emerging and we would not be the begg negotiator —— brexit negotiator and you would need to bring someone else in and it is rumoured that at french head of the trade department here is someone who could easily fill the slot of michel barnier. is he a mountain walker to? he has a lot of summits ahead of them and is beyond official retirement age. they are thinking what they can do with them after the next changeover of top jobs. ideas say he has never walked summits like this one. as you say we will keep
12:53 pm
the british feminist and watch at a say at the back of summit today. she had about half an hour to talk to european leaders today, all 27 of them keenly aware of her situation back at home. she attempted to sell the deal to the british public. she didn't speak directly to reporters, she did speak directly to the borders about how good the steelers. —— this deal is. borders about how good the steelers. -- this deal is. there were those who said that reaching a brexit agreement worked for both sides an impossible task. i rejected that counsel of despair and set about negotiating the deal the word for the uk and the eu and delivered the result of the referendum set is on course for a prosperous future while maintaining a close relationship with our friends and neighbours.
12:54 pm
banks to the hard work of both sets of negotiators that is what we have today agreed. —— thanks. i want to ta ke today agreed. —— thanks. i want to take a few moments to speak directly to the british people and explain what this deal means. first, control of our borders. not an emergency brake on free borders but an end to the free movement of people for once and for all. that is what this deal delivers. it will allow us to put in place an immigration system based not where people come from but on the skills and talents they have to offer. that is in our national interest. second, control of our money. not a reduction in a membership fee or a bigger budget rebate at membership fee or a bigger budget re bate at an membership fee or a bigger budget rebate at an end to vast annual payments being sent to the eu. that is what this deal delivers. instead we will be able to spend taxpayers money on our priorities like the £394 million per week of extra
12:55 pm
investment we are putting into our nhs. that is in our national interest. third, control over our lives, notjust the return interest. third, control over our lives, not just the return of some areas of the control from brussels by the end to the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in the uk with our lows are being made in our country by democratically elected politicians, interpreted and e nforced elected politicians, interpreted and e nfo rce d by elected politicians, interpreted and enforced by british courts. that is what this deal delivers and that is in our national interest. theresa may setting out the benefits of the deal as she sees it. she said in that press conference that this marks the start of a crucial national debate in the 19 kingdom. —— united kingdom. through the course of this press conference she avoided a number of questions weather she would resign if the vote field and weather the government would collapse and weather there
12:56 pm
would collapse and weather there would be a government of national unity. as far as she's concerned she is sticking to plan a and there is no plan b. you'll be watching special coverage of the brexit summit here in brussels. hello, if you were stuck underneath the cloud yesterday the prospect of something a little brighter today but still quite large amounts of cloud and still some showers around. here's yesterday's area of low pressure which brought the spells of rain across southern parts of the uk. it's left in its wake a legacy of cloud. still some showers running along channel coasts affecting parts of sussex and kent. we also have got this easterly wind pushing more showers onto eastern coasts and we're still in this cold air — it's not until the middle of the week when we start to see something a little bit milder. so through sunday afternoon we've got further showers, particularly for eastern and north—eastern coasts. so through sunday afternoon we've got further showers, particularly for eastern and north—eastern coasts. some of these working their way further westwards, may make it as far away as the eastern side of northern ireland. there will also be some bright or sunny spells, of northern ireland.
12:57 pm
there will also be some bright or sunny spells, spells, the best of the sunshine for western scotland. but temperatures tempered by this brisk easterly north easterly wind. so we will see highs between seven and nine celsius. a fairly chilly feel wherever you are. so we will see highs between seven and nine celsius. a fairly chilly feel wherever you are. through this evening we will keep further showers, particularly for eastern and north—eastern course. where we see the clear skies across scotland and ireland and northern england we will see spots as temperatures get freezing but in towns four or five celsius. tomorrow will be a fairly quiet day and most places will be dry. once again it is easterly course likely to see those showers. a bit more scattered than they are today and temperatures still struggling to get close to double figures. seven celsius to nine celsius the top temperature tomorrow afternoon. once again it is easterly course likely to see those showers. a bit more scattered than they are today and temperatures still struggling to get close to double figures. seven celsius to nine celsius the top temperature tomorrow afternoon. then we'll an atlantic front moves eastwards as we go into tuesday. some windy and wet weather to start the day over south—west england and wales and eventually working into northern then we'll an atlantic front moves eastwards as we go into tuesday.
12:58 pm
some windy and wet weather to start tuesday over south—west england and wales and eventually working into northern as advancing across northern england and southern scotland on tuesday afternoon we could see some snow over the pennines and higher areas of scotland later on tuesday. quite a windy day particularly on western coasts. these average speeds but gusts will be higher on tuesday afternoon. still chilly across the eastern side of the uk at five or six celsius. from wednesday onwards it turns milder but an increasing risk of deals and there will be some heavy rain. they could be wintry in nature over the higher ground of yorkshire and southern parts of scotland. elsewhere there will be some clearer skies and under the clear the skies across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, i'm christian fraser, live in brussels for a bbc news special. european union leaders have endorsed the terms of theresa may's brexit deal after 18 months of negotiations. they have also agreed the text which will outline the terms of britain's relationship with the eu for years to come. the negotiators now hoping they will be
12:59 pm
able to move onto the next stage of the brexit talks. today we have in fa ct the brexit talks. today we have in fact reached a fair and balanced agreement with the uk. this is the best deal possible given the circumstances. with the deal approved it will face a much tougher examination in westminster. theresa may has written an open letter to the british public appealing for support. throughout the hour,
1:00 pm

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on