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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 3, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at 8pm. china makes a bid to become an "aerospace power" after landing the first unmanned spacecraft on the far side of the moon. pictures from the surface of the moon have already been sent back to earth, as scientists begin to analyse the unexplored region. translation: if our lunar exploration is a success, we can make bigger contributions to mankind and improve china's ability at technology. the democrats take control of the new us congress, with nancy pelosi elected as speaker of the house of representatives, and promising to end the shutdown. democrats will be offering the senate republican appropriations legislation to reopen government later today. applause. the son of the banned radical cleric abu hamza is arrested as part of the investigation into the murder of a security guard at a new year's eve party in park lane. more than £40 billion is wiped off the value of the technology giant apple.
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they blame a slowdown in sales in china. and tributes forjulia grant, the first trans woman to share her story on primetime british tv, who's died aged 64 hello, good evening. china has successfully landed a spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the side that is never seen from earth. it's the first ever such landing, and is being seen as a major milestone in space exploration. the probe has already sent back an image of the largest, deepest, and oldest crater on the moon's surface. the landing is the latest step for china in its race to catch up with russia and the united states,
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and become a major space power by 2030. the chinese are also planning to begin building their own manned space station next year. from beijing, here's our china correspondent, john sudworth. "commence landing", the control room says. and then comes the extraordinary sight, the first close—up images of the far side of the moon ever recorded. after a few more tense moments, chang'e—li safely touches down inside the moon's largest and deepest crater. "it's all gone according to plan," this scientist tells chinese state tv. "the landing was the most important part. " although the far side of the moon always faces away from earth, orbiting spacecraft have photographed its surface. but no attempt has been made
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to land on it, until now. this animation shows how the probe‘s thrusters were fired to slow it, before its sensors guide it gently to the surface. a surface far more rugged and obstacle—strewn than the moon's nearside. another major challenge has included the need for a relay satellite to carry radio signals from the far side back to earth. well, the moon has already sunk below the smoggy beijing skyline, so there's unfortunately no chance tonight for people to gaze at it in wonder. not that they had much warning, mind you. the landing attempt was accompanied by an almost complete news blackout, giving you a sense of the sensitive propaganda value of this huge leap forward in china's space race ambitions, and the perceived cost of failure. china plans to follow this mission
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with another that will bring mineral samples back to earth and, eventually, a reported plan for a lunar base, capable of supporting humans. translation: if our lunar exploration is a success, we can make bigger contributions to mankind and improve china's ability and technology. so, i don't think our exploration will stop. it will only go deeper, further, and we will invest more. for now, chang'e—a‘s lunar explorer will begin examining the surface of its landing spot. the moon's deepest crater is expected to offer important insights into the formation of our solar system. but beyond the science, china has just signalled that it's a space power to be taken seriously. john sudworth, bbc news, beijing. let's speak now to dr namrata goswami, an independent space
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analyst who has followed china's space programe closely. she joins me via webcam from montgomery, alabama. thank you for being with us. how significant do you think this achievement is? thank you, ben. the achievement is? thank you, ben. the achievement is? thank you, ben. the achievement is actually extremely significant, both symbolically and technologically, as you mention in the video, that they had to put up a relay satellite. and also in terms of being the first country to land on the far side of the moon. secondly, if you look at the ambitions that china has set for itself for the next 20—a0 years, it is to build a lunar base that is to be used for further deep space exploration. so to the extent, the successful landing of the craft, and also the ability to study the most important part of the moon, the far side, where you have rich resources
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to include pure iron ore, water. i see it as very significant for their long—term ambitions to colonise the moon, and then use that as an industrial base for further deeds place expiration. and what you think, in terms of the week and find out about the mood, what can we find out about the mood, what can we find out about the move from the far side that we don't already know? the one thing you could discover from the far side is how accessible other resources park, secondly by studying radiation that comes from the oldest crater. you can analyse whether you can have a human lunar base. and finally, to continue china's exploration on earth, and is it really possible to establish a lunar base in the long—term by also studying whether you can have seeds of plants and flowers grow on the lunar surface? this is connected to the programme that they ran for a yearfor the programme that they ran for a year for about 365 days, studying
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whether human beings can survive on the surface of the moon without having any support system from earth. i think in terms of understanding the crater where the far side of the moon, where we have the most light, and also the possibility of water, which can be used as rocket propellant, to then used as rocket propellant, to then use spacecrafts for deep space apps —— exploration, it is extremely significant for china's longer space goals. to think this is partly about china trying to get into the space race, to compete with the us and russia? it's interesting you ask that question, because i get asked about a lot here in the us. in my analysis, what i have observed, including my fieldwork in beijing, but i realised is that china's ambitions in space goals have gone far beyond the logic of getting somewhere first, it took achieved —— achieve a presence and come back.
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what is significantly different, which i think is not analysed are understood much, is that china —— intends to establish permanent presence because it has long—term goals of asteroid mining, and also to see space as a geography, not just as a functional unit or place you go and come back. so in that context, the race between the us and the soviet union was very much about getting somewhere first. but i think china is going far beyond that. to look at space as a geography where you can have resources that can then be used for the origination of the chinese nation. so you think this is about exploitation, industrial exploitation of the moon? yes, i see it as exploitation of the moon? yes, i see itasx —— exploitation of the moon? yes, i see it as x —— industrial exploitation, andi it as x —— industrial exploitation, and i say this because —— with a measure of seriousness. within my analysis of china's space programme, what i noticed is that china has articulated its goals very quickly, despite the accusation is not transparent, so it is very
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interesting that in 2001, china said it would explore the far side of the moon in the next 10—20 years, and that will establish a lunar base, of which he released a video, some would argue it is a propaganda video, but i see that most of the propaganda material turns and actual missions. so it is interesting to see that. last year on 824 april, 2018, the china national space and attrition released a video in which it argued that the moon is very critical for deeper access to space, especially deep space exploration. soi especially deep space exploration. so i see it as an industrial base that will incrementally depth and. fascinating to talk to, thank you for being with us. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are jason beattie, head of politics at the daily mirror, and owen bennett from city am. there's continuing deadlock
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in washington, after donald trump and congressional leaders failed to reach agreement on ending the partial shutdown of the us government. as the democrats took back control of the house of representatives, veteran congresswoman nancy pelosi was elected to serve as speaker of the house for the second time. despite congress meeting again, the president is showing no sign of backing down from his demand for $5 billion to build a wall along the us—mexico border. laura trevelyan reports from washington. nearly two weeks into the partial us government shut down, and here's the scene in washington, dc. iconic monuments are closed, some federal workers are home without a pay cheque. now democrats are taking control of the house of representatives, but the president is warning the government won't reopen unless he gets money for his border wall. could be a long time,
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and it could be quickly. could be a long time. it's too important a subject to walk away from. donald trump has demanded $5 billion to build a wall along the us border with mexico. and he hosted democrats at the white house on tuesday for a briefing on border security to underline how important it is that he gets the money. afterwards, democrats said they are going to introduce bills to reopen the government, trying to call the president's bluff. we're asking the president to open up government. we are giving him a republican path to do that. why would he not do it? congresswoman nancy pelosi, the incoming leader of the house of representatives, has little incentive to make a deal with the president, especially after he made this declaration last month. i am proud to shut down the government for border security. nancy pelosi and donald trump are now the faces of divided government in washington.
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their relationship is key to ending this government shutdown and to whether anything is achieved here ahead of the 2020 presidential election. gentlelady from california, nancy pelosi. nancy pelosi was the first—ever female speaker of the house of representatives back in 2007, and she's a highly experienced political operator who learned machine politics at her father's knee when he was mayor of baltimore. well—connected in democratic circles, she even met presidentjohn f kennedy at an early age. though she wasn't elected to congress until the age of 47, this prolific fundraiser has deep roots on capitol hill. she just saw off a leadership challenge from democrats eager for a new generation. the question now is who blinks first over the government shut down, and which side feels they have most to lose by prolonging it? laura trevelyan, bbc news, washington.
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anthony zurcher is on capitol hill. for the first time since trump came to power, a divided government? exactly, divided government, meaning oversight of this white house the likes of which donald trump has not had in his first two years as president. the democrats will control the house of representatives, they will have subpoena power, but also be able to try to pass some legislation. in her speech later today, nancy pelosi talk about democratic policies, government reforms, jobs package, ethics in government, but she also addressed the business of the day, the first order of business, which is trying to reopen this government. here's a little bit her speech from earlier. we will debate and advance good ideas, no matter where they come from. and in that spirit, democrats will be offering the senate republican appropriations legislation to reopen government later today. applause.
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we will do so to meet the needs of the american people, to protect our borders, and to respect our workers. and i pledge that this congress will be transparent, bipartisan, and unified, that we will seek to reach across the aisle in this chamber, and across divisions across our nation. what chance of an end anytime soon to this partial us government shutdown? the democrats have their strategy, they will pass as nancy pelosi spoke about, some republican passed senate versions of the budget that they think they could hand back
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to the senate, get approved. but the senate has said they are waiting on donald trump and will not pass anything that he does not agree to. he said he will not sign anything until he gets his $5 billion in wall funding. i spoke to dick durbin and asked him what he thought of the chances of a government opening up, and he said he was realistic, not optimistic, and there was no end in sight. this is the first app. democrats will try to play, republicans will be rejected, and at that point, they will go back to the negotiating table and come up with some sort of solution that perhaps include more bird —— border security funding, probably not a wall, but something trump can declare as victory and give democrats the opportunity to open the government back up again. thank you very much, anthony. a man arrested as part of the investigation into the murder of a security guard outside a new year's eve party in park lane in central london is the son of the banned radical cleric, abu hamza. imran mostafa kamel, who's 26, has appeared in court charged with firearms offences unrelated
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to the incident. jeremy cooke reports. police were called to a violent incident at a party in london's park lane early on new year's day. one man had been killed, three other people, two men and a woman, had also suffered stab wounds, although their injuries were not life—threatening. the dead victim has been named as 33—year—old tudor simionov, who was working at the venue as a security guard after arriving from romania a few weeks ago. on her facebook page, his girlfriend says her loss is "impossible to understand". it's being reported that mr simionov had not been scheduled on shift that night, but had been covering for a colleague. as part of the police operation, 26—year—old imran mostafa kamel was arrested for questioning. he has now appeared in court, charged with possession of a firearm with intent to cause fear or danger, and possession of a firearm while banned for life.
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it's now emerged that imran mostafa kamel is the son of the banned radical preacher abu hamza, seen here in 2004. scotland yard is saying that the firearms charges are not directly connected to the killing of mr simionov, and that no firearm was discharged during the incident at the club. jeremy cooke, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. the first pictures from the far side of the moon, as china's successful mission marks a milestone in space exploration the new us congress has been sworn in, with the democratic party saying it will take action to end a partial government shutdown. the son of the banned radical cleric abu hamza is arrested as part of the investigation into the murder of a security guard at a new year's eve party in park lane.
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sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's lizzie greenwood hughes. liverpool very nearly scored, we are talking about the match this manchester city are laying and what many decide will be the decisive game of the season. it has been going for 18 minutes and was pretty sketchy and nervous, 0—0 at the moment. liverpool very nearly scored, marnie has a shot that went past the keeper and hit the post. somehow it did not go in. it is the
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moment, liverpool will go nine points clear in the table if they win tonight. they're looking to win their first league title for 29 yea rs. we their first league title for 29 years. we will have more for you later here on bbc news with the score, but you can follow all the action from the manchester city stadium against liverpool on bbc radio five live right now, you can also follow the match by the bbc sport website and app. still a football, jermaine defoe is set to move to scotland to join rangers on an18 move to scotland to join rangers on an 18 month loan deal, the 36 euros has made four appearances as —— 36—year—old. .. steven has made four appearances as —— 36—year—old... steven gerrard will hope he can but —— boost their bid for the scottish premiership title. they are second in the table, level on points with celtic who have a game in hand. craig bellamy is temporarily stepping down from his role as city under a as coach following the club's decision to investigate a bullying claim against him. the investigation follows reports of a complaint about the
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former welsh striker‘s alleged treatment of a young player who has since left the club. need a denies the allegation. they say the creation of a full—time professional by creation of a full—time professional rugby 15 side is a game changerfor the sport. sarah hunter and katie >> david: mclean are amongst 28 players who have been awarded full—time contracts for this here, england will begin their six nations campaign against ireland next month. those young girls picking a ball up and going that is a real—life dream and going that is a real—life dream and ambition, to be a professional by and ambition, to be a professional rugby player. you have people coming of universities that are still studying who have just been —— the first employment as a professional by first employment as a professional rugby player. that is game changing for everyone involved now and in the future. the british super middleweight boxers james to gail and chris eubankjunior will meet at the 02 in london on february 23. the
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title... the former ibf world champion suggested the clash with eubank isa champion suggested the clash with eubank is a retirement fight because it will be came over for the loser. he also called his opponent limited. eubankjunior claimed to gail is in for a painful lesson next month. tennis, and kyle amann faces a race against time to be fit in time for the australian open. the world number 14 has withdrawn from next week's sydney international after picking up a knee injury. it was his final tournament before the first grand slam of the year in melbourne in11 grand slam of the year in melbourne in 11 day's time. he says he will do everything he can to be set. staying the tennis, there was a memorable victory for vector... they beat serena williams and francis jeffcoat, while gb had already been knocked out of the tournament. the clearly meant a lot to balter, who is the world number 97. she posted this on twitter, saying... that's
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all a sport for me to now. still goalless, you can find out more on that and all the day's sports news, including live commentary, on the bbc sport website. we will have more for you in sportsday at half past ten. thank you. shares in the technology giant, apple, fell by almost 10% today, wiping more than £40 billion from its value. it came after the company announced it was expecting lower earnings than previously forecast. the firm blamed a slowdown in sales in china, as well as the trade war between beijing and the united states. however, some analysts say it's also because consumers are increasingly reluctant to upgrade their phones. our business editor simonjack reports. now let's talk about iphone. it is arguably the most successful consumer product of all time. the launch of a new model is a global event and so, therefore, is a surprise warning from the chief executive that
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sales are not on target. the value of the company slumped $60 billion in seconds. this once $1 trillion company has now lost $400 billion in value, that's nearly two shell oil companies, since october. we all have smartphones, and there are tonnes of competition. apple's high prices are very, apple's high prices, very ambitious expectations for consumers to keep buying the next new big shiny thing are not quite being met. it is notjust about these, the iphones. embedded in the surprise message is a warning that could have implications for big companies and employers all over the world, including here in the uk. the warning is this: everything is not going exactly according to plan in the second biggest economy, china. this manufacturing and exporting superpower had hoped to shift more towards an economy
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in which the spending of increasingly affluent chinese consumers would drive growth. if that plan bore fruit, it would be great news for producers of consumer goods everywhere in the world, including in the uk, the us, and everywhere else. apple, jaguar, all other consumer goods and so on would find an export market in china. unfortunately, the last year or so, they have backtracked and gone into reverse on that process of trying to unlock the chinese consumer. china is the biggest car market in the world now. in november, sales fell 20% and jaguar land rover has said a slump in china was a major reason for cutting over 1,000 jobs last year. this is all playing out against a us—china trade war, which is encouraging many chinese consumers to buy chinese products. i think the lesson we have learned already from the trade war that has happened so far is nobody wins a trade war. the idea is to inflict more damage on your opponent than they can on you,
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and in this respect, apple's news tells us something about how american companies are being hurt by this conflict. china is not apple's only problem, convincing consumers they need ever flashier phones is up there. it won't be the last company to discover china is a tougher market than many hoped. simon jack, bbc news. well, joining us now from san francisco is dave lee, our north america technology reporter. do you think that apple is a casualty of the trade war between china and the states?|j casualty of the trade war between china and the states? i think that is what we will see become more apparent as the year progresses. is what we will see become more apparent as the year progressesm is tempting to look at the problems of the iphone as an issue around innovation and overhyped of the device as it passed itself as being
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too expensive, but i think what we will learn from this is that apple is the first major company to really sound a warning about what is happening in china, what has been the result of those ongoing trade disputes, as simon mentioned in his piece. in timko's letter that he sent to investors on wednesday, —— tim cook, he said consumer confidence has been hit by the trade war. it has gone down to people not going out and buying as many of his products. if a luxury product like the iphone is not selling, you can bet many other major products are also not selling either. while there are several aspects of this that apple is in control of, like the quality reputation of its products, there is a lot that it really cannot control on its own. that is why we saw such a lengthy explanation from tim cook on wednesday. also in the longer term, do you think it is probably about iphones being so good that to get an improved iphone and spent all that money, the marginal
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improvements are quite small, so consumers think they will not bother? i think that is a major factor of this. the iphone out is a device that is 11 years old, and in the first 5—6 years, every time a new one came out, there was something genuinely new about it. if i was to ask 500 people on the street and a place like seven disco what the difference between this iphone and lester's iphone is, they would struggle to tell me. that has been a problem for the entire spoke with industry, globally smartphone sales have been on the client, not just for apple but everybody. we're beginning to see the beginning of the winding down of the smartphone era, the same wayjust over a decade ago, we saw the beginnings of the desktop computer... four something for —— wrong with our technology there. here's a story that is most read on the bbc website. up to 270 containers have fell off one of the world's largest container ships into the north sea.
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the cargo fell off the msc zoe near the german island of borkum, but the tide carried many of them to the south—west toward dutch waters. initial picitures show items including flat—screen televisions and children's toys on dutch beaches. but officials said three containers carried toxic substances, and dutch and german coastguards are warning local people to avoid them. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. many of us have had to contend with quite a lot of class today. where we keep the cloud tonight, it will not get too chilly. the weather cloud does break up, and for some of us, it will. we are likely to see some frost and patchy fog. as we go through the night, the fog and frost most likely across the midlands, wales, down towards the south of england. we are expecting that cloud could break up. also some clear skies for eastern scotland, so here it might turn chilly. milder for northern ireland and western scotland,
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some slightly milder air pushing in here. further south, you might get down to minus six degrees. tomorrow, there could be some quite dense patches of fog to contend with. but for the southern half of the uk, they are expecting some spells of sunshine for northeastern england, more cloud towards the northwest. but here, it will be mildest. as we head into the weekend, a lot of dry weather and climate, but those temperature slowly creeping upwardsjust a bit. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... china makes a bid to become an "aerospace power" after landing the first unmanned spacecraft on the far side of the moon. pictures from the surface of the moon have already been sent back to earth, as scientists begin to analyse the unexplored region. the democrats take control of the new us congress, with nancy pelosi elected as speaker of the house of representatives, and promising to end the shutdown. democrats will be offering the
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senate republican appropriations legislation to reopen government later today. the son of the banned radical cleric, abu hamza is arrested as part of the investigation into the murder of a security guard at a new year's eve party in park lane. more than £40 billion is wiped off the value of the technology giant apple, they blame a slowdown in sales in china. and tributes forjulia grant, the first trans woman to share her story on primetime british tv, who's died aged 64. eight years ago, sally challen, a mother of two, attacked and killed her husband richard with a hammer, after 31 years of marriage. she was convicted of murder in 2011. but now in what's believed to be a legalfirst, she will attempt to have her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter
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on the grounds that for 30 years she was a victim of her husband's coercive control, a form of extreme psychological abuse. next month, her lawyers will argue that it was the damage her husband did to her mental state which led her to kill in what will be a landmark case. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly reports. 0na summers on a summers day in 1979, sally and richard challen were married. she was just 15 when they met, he was their only boyfriend. their wedding was in surrey which was where they made their home and raise their family. throughout their marriage, richard challen was at to control and emotionally abused his wife. in 2010, she killed him. you don't like or having any independence in terms of friends. they were only friends together. he was in total control. sally challen is now serving life as
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a convicted murderer. since the killing, source of control has become a criminal offence. its domestic abuse which is psychologic rather than physical. financial abuse, psychological manipulation, you know controlling herfreedom of movement, just controlling every facet of her mind and that should have to answer to him. was almost like she was a robot, and he punished her. richard challen was unfaithful throughout the marriage visiting brothels, and even posing with glamour models on his christmas cards. it did us at nine, sally challen filing with that of the family home and left her husband, but months later said to be still emotionally dependent on him, she appealed for a reconciliation. richard challen agreed and with strict conditions. in an e—mail to her he wrote, this constant talking to strangers is rude and inconsiderate. he ordered her to give up smoking and to give up your
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co nsta nt give up smoking and to give up your constant interruptions when i'm speaking. his wife appeared ready to put up with this demand and set off to see him without it handbag was a hammer. after she got back into her old home, sally challen went out to buy food for her husband, but still suspicious of him when she were turned and she checked his phone. she discover that he had been in contact with another woman. she cooked in bacon and eggs, and as he ate he killed him. she hit richard challen more than 20 times that the hammer, and from the start she admitted her guilt. but despite her appearing to have killed in cold blood, her lawyers will be fighting to have her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter on the grounds that she was suffering from decades of publication and abuse. nobody is there but —— nobody is denying that sally challen it killed
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her husband what is it argument is whether that was murder or whether it was manslaughter so there are standards and defences for anybody, anybody who is charged with murder to have that reduced to manslaughter, and one of the things is your state of mind when you did that. what happened in this marriage will be scrutinised in this landmark legal case. a muslim convert who plotted a terror attack on oxford street despite repeated attempts by authorities to deradicalise him over a decade has appeared at the old bailey ahead of sentencing. 27—year—old lewis ludlow from rochester in kent said he was filled with "animosity and hatred" when he swore allegiance to islamic state. the former royal mail worker pleaded guilty last year to plotting an attack in the uk and to funding the islamic state group in the philippines. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani has been following the case at the old bailey. this is a very difficult and
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troubling case here at the old but a lea p troubling case here at the old but a leap of lewis has been a cause of concern that although it back to 2008 which is around the period that the government started to try and find ways to prevent people from getting into terrorism. there were numerous attempts at the time and on words 16 at times in the six months before he was arrested to get him to de—radicalized wow that was going on, the security services were not convinced he was engaging with the de—radicalization programme. he was in fact being secretly followed, and he was also unbeknownst to himself talking on to an undercover police officer, and those two operations established that he effectively wa nted established that he effectively wanted to drive a car down 0xford street in the middle of london invitation giving up to 100 people in the process. he pleaded guilty to those charges earlier this year, and he be sentenced in a few weeks' time
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because the judges say he needs to his count very complex evidence about his health. the amount of electricity we're using is at its lowest level since the 1980s, thanks in large part to the humble low energy light bulb, and modern energy saving appliances. according to research by environmental analysts, new product standards, which force manufacturers to use less electricity in their goods, have proved more important in tackling carbon emissions than wind and solar power. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin reports. 0ur lives are dominated by electrical gadgets, so here's a surprise. less electricity per person is being generated then since the mid—19 80s. it's partly because of eu rules instructing manufacturers to make appliances that use less power, and therefore create fewer admissions that are damaging the climate. this table bmp damaging the climate. this table lamp used to have an old—fashioned incandescent bulb, and now it's
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going to be lit by a new led. using a fraction of the energy. in fact an led bulb uses 78% less energy than an old incandescent bulb. and here's what makes the difference is that this old halogen bulb is really hot to touch. and led bulb produces light not heat. it's simply better designed. here is another example. the eu says more efficient vacuum clea ners the eu says more efficient vacuum cleaners will save the energy output of eight medium—sized power plants the product vendors were introduced there was a lot of fear mongering about how we would have dirtier homes and weaker movers and other appliances was up what actually happened is because of design innovations we have cleaner homes and energy is reduced as expected. it's a similar story for kitchen appliances. a new dishwasher uses 49% less energy than an old model.
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in the —— a new freight uses 40 members power than a decade ago. but last energy efficiency has helped save efficiency, its when and solar power that have grabbed headlines. today's report share that last year they generated a third of the uk's energy and that's a record. it also said that efficiency matters coupled with other factors contributed slightly to more than renewables cutting carbon emissions. improving electrical appliances alone isn't remotely enough to stave off the prospect of dangerous climate change, but it has been achieved and it isa change, but it has been achieved and it is a start. south korea's spy agency says the north korean ambassador to italy has disappeared. jo song—gil, who is thought to be one of north korea's most senior diplomats, reportedly fled the country's embassy in rome with his wife in november. if they are confirmed to be seeking asylum, it would be the highest—profile
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defection from the repressive regime in nearly two and a half years. the scale of the dramatic collapse of the indonesian volcano that led to a devastating tsunami is becoming clear as new satelite photographs have been released showing the aftermath. these pictures, ta ken a week after the disaster, show how a new bay has formed where the volcano slipped into the sea in a colossal landslide. while this photo, taken a week before the explosion, shows how the volcano used to look, still intact. shares in the clothes retailer next, have risen after it reported better than expected sales in the christmas period. they were up 1.5% overall, with in particular, a sharp rise in online sales. it's prompted next‘s chief executive to describe the general health of the consumer economy as, "not bad at all". our business corresondent emma simpson reports. the celebrations are over.
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a new year and time for a fresh start. retailers are also taking stock and starting to produce their all—important christmas trading updates. first up, next. although sales at its shops were down 9%, this was more than made up by online sales, which were up by 15%. but next did trim how much it expected to make in annual profits. i think this is a pretty resilient performance from next. it's managing the shift online well and i'm sure it's picking up competitors' sales because it's so efficient online. it's managed its margins really well, and its profit, because it hasn't been slashing prices like the rest of the high street. what does this tell us about how christmas went for the rest of the high street? i think we will probably see a mixed performance across other retailers. some will do well and some will fall well below that standard. like other retailers, november was a bit of a wash—out for next. its christmas was saved by stronger sales in the last
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few weeks of december. according to its boss, brexit uncertainty is making consumers a little bit more cautious. but he says we are still spending. at this retail park in nottingham, we asked shoppers if they had spent more this year. more. i think every year i spend more and more, as my son gets older and older. i thought, it's christmas and my kids deserve more. i've just bought what they wanted. probably more, to be fair. a hell of a lot more. i have a baby now, so more is her! many retailers have had to offer huge discounts to get us to part with our cash, but at what cost to their profits? there won't be much to celebrate this christmas for retail, after one of its most challenging years. we will know how other household names have fared in the coming days. emma simpson, bbc news. more now on the news that shares
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in the technology giant, apple, fell by almost 10% today, wiping more than £40 billion from its value. it came after the company announced it was expecting lower earnings than previously forecast. the firm is blaming economic weakness in china, and the trade war between the us and china. welljoining us now is global business analyst, ryan patel. thanks for being with us. is this all about china do you think? there is multiple things. 0bviously all about china do you think? there is multiple things. obviously there is multiple things. obviously there is this china piece where the economic is affecting, and a lot of the news or talk about us companies and us consumer spending, the news or talk about us companies and us consumerspending, but the news or talk about us companies and us consumer spending, but with ceo tim cook talking about how it is slowing down in china particularly about purchases of their product, but also don't forget there is a piece that the iphone sales are a pa rt piece that the iphone sales are a part of this. they have obviously declined a little bit because there are declined a little bit because there a re less declined a little bit because there are less upgrades, and apple is more
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than that but they are feeling that affect specifically in china. and how damaging is this the apple? can they recover from this in the short term? is this likely to be part of a sort of gradual decline, or is this a blimp? i would not say damage. that are going from the number one publicly traded company to the numberfor publicly traded company to the number for publicly traded company. 0bvious number for publicly traded company. obvious and this is not good news to them. they set themselves up to be more than i think a hardware company, they are a services company and that is how they're going to get out of this dip for this innovation will get them to continue to get on the top. there more than just iphones and may have to be, and because the composition has gotten so stronger and they don't to get the content services data, all those types of advice. is this partly because i those are, let's face it really good? it's very hard to think i need a new iphone, i want to spend
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a lot of money on a new iphone, because actually the improvements are quite marginal sometimes in the next—generation iphone. are quite marginal sometimes in the next-generation iphone. yes, the smartphone itself has changed is that the game from three years ago to this year is different. they are not the $700, the upgrades not what eve ryo ne not the $700, the upgrades not what everyone is upgrading and the competition are offering similar if not comparable attributes, so it's going to cause a trickle—down effect of the consumers to let you say, do i need to spend as? there will be a less of a market for the amount of people willing to spend that, so those who automatically by apple phones and upgrading automatically now they're holding onto it. and, is a trade war with china, is this really a casualty of that trade war thatis really a casualty of that trade war that is in the last few weeks a month? this is something that at least investors would apple have not priced in, and that's how you've seen the dip from nine or 10% today.
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a few months ago, tim cook came out and said you know, eventually this trade war will be resolved, and he was giving were you fact that this doesn't really affect apple too much but today and yesterday was big news talking about well, would you go to shareholders and you have expectations, that means you out at the budgeted number for the expectations, that means you out at the budgeted numberfor the quarter, and the obvious and change the valuation of the company until we get further notice. 0k, thank you so much for your time. the headlines on bbc news... the first pictures from the far side of the moon, as china's successful mission marks a milestone in space exploration. a divided government in the us as the democrats take control of the house of representatives, promising to end the shutdown, but refusing to support the border wall. the son of the banned radical cleric abu hamza is arrested as part of the investigation into the murder of a security guard at a new year's eve party in park lane. an update on the market numbers for you, here's how london's
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and frankfurt ended the day. and in the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. farmers and food producers have warned the government that it needs to make decisions on how it will secure the nation's food supplies once britain leaves the eu in less than 90 days. in a speech to the farming industry today, the environment secretary michael gove said leaving without a deal would cause "considerable turbulence" to agriculture. he also encouraged farmers to back the government's deal on the table. 0ur correspondentjon kay reports. tom's family has been farming here in devon for nearly 100 years. but what will this year bring? brexit will affect his dairy exports, the regulations he has to stick to, and the foreign workers he employs. so, he wants some clarity, and soon. it does leave a lot of uncertainty. i mean, trying to plan when you don't know where
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you stand, is hard work. a lot of people don't know what's going to happen, so it needs to be resolved quick, i think. tom's views were echoed today by the national farmers union, who say every aspect of what we eat, where it comes from and how much it costs will be affected by brexit. the nfu says it wants action from the government, to prevent cheaper imports, lower standards and long border checks. we need to make sure that we agree this in an orderly manner, otherwise it is going to lead to friction and challenges with getting food across here. we saw it last year in the snow. it doesn't take much to take food off the shelves and that, of course, creates absolute meltdown. the environment secretary, who campaigned for brexit, told farmers today that the best way to avoid what he called "turbulence" would be for mps to vote for the prime minister's withdrawal deal this month. nobody can be blithe or blase about the real impact on food producers in this country of leaving
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without a deal. that isjust one of the reasons why i hope my colleagues in parliament support the prime minister's deal. it isn't perfect, but we should never make the perfect the enemy of the good. mr gove called on farmers to embrace technology, to make production more efficient after brexit. back on tom's farm in devon, they've installed a laser—guided milking unit. this machine goes around 12—14 times every day... and a robot, to make sure the cows are fed. so, that's saving you an awful lot of time every day? yes, it is, yeah, several hours, yeah. but tom wants to know how the government will help farmers buy this kind of kit after brexit. what will happen to subsidies and grants? after nearly a century as a family farm and after four decades in europe, the next generation faces some big changes. jon kay, bbc news, devon. scientists are testing a new breathalyser that
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could revolutionise how cancer is detected and diagnosed. the device is designed to find early signs of the disease in molecules in the breath of patients. in england almost half of all cancers are diagnosed at a late stage. one of the company's founders, billy boyle, lost his wife to cancer when she was just 36 after a late diagnosis. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns reports. on a summer's day in 1979, sally and richard challen were married. this looks very simple and it is, but it's also highly sensitive. the idea that patients breathe into it for ten minutes or so, and idea that patients breathe into it forten minutes orso, and in idea that patients breathe into it for ten minutes or so, and in the sample will be tested for chemical signs which could show cancerous cells. the revolutionary thing about this is the second applied to more than one type of cancer. we get not only diagnose it earlier but the
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patients they're much more effective treatment and completely turned their survival statistics around. rebecca is one of 1500 people who will help to test it. she is a condition which means she has a higher chance to developing cancer. 0ver higher chance to developing cancer. over the years i've had ten plus is operations and i get worked up and anxious about it, so to have a breath test instead it will take just 15 minutes and it will be so much better. endoscopy is our invasive like other cancer test such as biopsies. 0thers invasive like other cancer test such as biopsies. others are simple scans and blood test, but researchers showed that mac —— researchers hope that this breathalyzer can help replace these. the ability to be told that they do have a high chance of having a specific cancer, and so be referred to more test, or hopefully be given the all clear.
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cancer research uk says that this trial could mean that getting cancer diagnosed earlier, vital to increasing survival rates. the vast majority of bladder cancer patients will survive for at least one year if they are diagnosed early. but at diagnosis comes later, that drops to 33%. in stomach cancer, and early diagnosis means a high chance of surviving for five years or more, but if it's not out until stage four, that falls dramatically to 5%. the tryout for this protest is that the earlier stages but the team behind it says that if it works it could potentially diagnose other diseases as well. but that's a long way off. julia grant, who was the subject of a high profile series of bbc documentaries about transgender people, has died at the age of 64. ms grant, who was born george roberts, has been described as a "pioneer" who helped spark a change in public attitudes. mark edwardson reports i'm more lonely and out and then i
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was before i started. julia grant in 1979, when britain was a different, perhaps less accepting praise for people with coping were struggling with gender issues. from midnight tonight i will no longer be known as george i will be known asjuliet. the bbc two documentary notice a change of sex told the story of julie and grant was watched by 9 billion. julia you did it your way, my god you certainly made a difference. and in financial moments and according to her friend john was alongside instrument in the now hugely successful manchester pride. she was courageous as well. she became a figurehead for a lot of younger people who are considering transgender assignment i'm a and she we nt transgender assignment i'm a and she went through a lot. —— transgender
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assignment, and she went through a lot. the building behind me was the sight of her club. for me personally i new that the place that she created and the environment she created, 11 to be myself. created and the environment she created, 11 to be myselflj created and the environment she created, 11 to be myself. i think it was one of the main venues around here along with others. anybody do it and everybody went there as well. julia grant was born george roberts. she never felt at home and gay male culture. she felt inside that she was a woman, and she is described by many as a pioneer. i honestly think that a lot of the gains that we've seenin that a lot of the gains that we've seen in the last 20, 30 years with the trans community we have not seen those without julia's work without i am privileged honestly to have known her. julia worked at various points asa her. julia worked at various points as a shaft and an nhs adviser. latterly she thought a campaign to co—development and manchester's gay
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village. —— she worked as a chef... would you call her an angel?” village. —— she worked as a chef... would you call her an angel? i don't think anybody would. we all have our own demons and i think it's everything in her believe that made her who she was. julia was active in the trans community for most of her life was that she passed away yesterday. a dog abandoned at a roadside to fend for himself is now settling in at a rehoming centre. millions watched cctv footage of snoop the staffie, left alone on a pavement in stoke—0n—trent a few days before christmas. he's since had hundreds of offers of new homes. amy cole has been to meet him. safe and secure but snoop has had a sad time of it lately. this is the reason why, take a look if you can bear to. a reason why, take a look if you can bearto. a man reason why, take a look if you can bear to. a man is caught on cctv in trenton getting out of his car, and taking snoop across the road with his bed and dumping him on the
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pavement. the man runs back to his car with snoop in hot pursuit. he posit the window in disbelief, but sure enough the card eventually drives off with snoop running after him. he was found an hour later by a passer—by or from the our spca. hello snoop. rachel, what did you make of the footage beside?” actually gasped because i couldn't believe it that someone could be so careless to just dump an animal like that. it was horrible. it was heartbreaking. others think so as well both of the footage is gone viral on social media, with the american rapper snoop dogg offering him a home, and the comedian sue perkins, but the our spca says it still has a lot to do before a new owner can be found. we just need to find the best offer him whether he can be wet cats dogs children, so that's what we're doing at the
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moment. of course snoop isn't the only dog looking for a new home in the new year. these feisty triplets we re the new year. these feisty triplets were found abandoned in the forest of dean. and this old lady was 15 and she is seeking at home as well. the our spca is trying to find who abandoned him, luckily snoop is a strong lead, don't i know it and his sorry tale is all set for a happy ending. good luck to snoop. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich good evening it's been another day for web parts of the cat uk the skies have been predominantly cloudy. the clouds trapped underneath a area of high pressure which is taken up residence across the british isles and is showing no real sign of moving, certainly not for the next couple of days without keeping it dry yes, but as we got through tonight we see large areas
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of clouds floating quite aimlessly around the area of high pressure. there will be some areas of pressure, there will be the for fraud and present as well, but it will be drive for the majority underneath the area. —— there will be some areas of frost... it looks mostly like that we will seek cloud brea ks mostly like that we will seek cloud breaks the eastern scotland so it will get chilly here but also for the midlands, wales and the south of england. it could be a particularly cold night, and it kid beat between —4 and minus six degrees is that there will be some freezing fog patches new the midlands for that is a good or tomorrow we're likely to see since both of such in the southern areas of the brightest guys across the east and land in eastern scotland. an west of the brightest quys scotland. an west of the brightest guys across the east and land in eastern scotland. read west of scotla nd eastern scotland. read west of scotland and england, and western scotla nd scotland and england, and western scotland we see about is whether with winds coming off the atlantic
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elsewhere. a decidedly chilly feel to the date that is a got there friday night, again where we have clear skies and will turn chilly and will see patchy fog where we keep our area of will see patchy fog where we keep ourarea of high will see patchy fog where we keep our area of high pressure and the start of the weekend. this frontal system out to the west will start to slide its way and later on saturday, so it's going to be a dry start. again there could be some dry fog we re again there could be some dry fog were central and southern areas, but through the day the best of the sunshine will be bound to the eastern half of scotland and the eastern happens it would —— eastern half of england. it will bring a patchy rain across northern ireland and in my sunday morning of flipping to be sitting across the midlands, wales and in moving back into northern ireland. mostly just wales and in moving back into northern ireland. mostlyjust a band of cloud by this stage. with that, bringing mostly cold air particularly down the southwest, per cardiff and planted back up at the double digits. —— and backed up into double digits. —— and backed up into double digits. hello, i'm kasia madera,
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this is 0utside source. having received a majority of the votes cast, is duly elected speaker of the house of representatives for the 116th congress. and nancy pelosi hasjust become the most powerful woman in us politics. in china, people are celebrating, because their space agency has landed a probe on the unexplored far side of the moon, sending back images that have never been seen before. a bad day for apple. more than £40 billion is wiped off its value.
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it blames a slowdown in sales in china. and after 270 containers fall off a ship, people in the netherlands are finding chemicals, shoes, and plastic ponies washed

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