Skip to main content

tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 16, 2019 9:00pm-10:00pm GMT

9:00 pm
hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. all looks calm at westminster now... but we've had another day of political turmoil here in the uk. theresa may's government has survived a vote of no confidence. i do not take this responsibility lightly, and my government will continue its work to increase our prosperity, guarantee our security and to strengthen our union. that doesn't resolve the core issue — parliament cannot find a version of brexit it can agree on. and europe is watching. translation: we want to keep the damage, and the exit of britain will be damaging, toa minimum. so we will of course continue to try to find a solution for an orderly exit. the prime minster will make a statement from downing street in an hour's time. between now and then we will take you through every element of the brexit story. christian fraser and rob watson
9:01 pm
ready to answer your questions. send them in — the hashtag is bbc 0s. breaking news to begin this programme. we start with the news that the prime minster will make a statement from downing street in at 10pm tonight. the prime minister to make a statement in an hour, no doubt with a further update with what has been happening in parliament over the last 48 hours. if you're counting, it's 72 days until brexit. yesterday, theresa may's brexit deal suffered a severe defeat in parliament. today, she survived a motion of no confidence in her government. here's that moment. the ayes to the right, 306. the noes to the left, 325. cheering. the ayes to the right, 306.
9:02 pm
the noes to the left, 325. so the noes have it, the noes have it. unlock! that is a majority of 19. here's the prime minister addressing mstust after she won the vote. we have a responsibility to identify a way forward to secure the backing of the house. i have secured a series of meetings between senior parliamentarians and representatives of the government over the coming days. i would like the leaders of parliamentary parties to be with me immediately and i would like to start these meetings tonight. mr speaker, the government approaches these meetings in a constructive
9:03 pm
spirit and i urge others to do the same. but we must find solutions that are negotiable and command sufficient support in this house. we will return to the house on monday to table a commendable motion and table a motion about the way forward. there had been speculation early in the day the prime minister wasn't willing to have a meeting with the leader of the opposition. this was the response of the leader of the opposition. the government must remove... must remove clearly, once and for all, the prospect of the catastrophe of a no—deal brexit from the eu, and all the chaos that would come as a result of that. christian fraser is in westminster. you will be helping us through this edition of outside saul but normally a vote of no—confidence in the government is a huge moment, but i wonder what has changed because of it? there is a strange paradox at
9:04 pm
the moment that the prime minister is strong in one sense, she has seen offa is strong in one sense, she has seen off a vote of no—confidence from her backbenchers and now she has seen one off from her labour party. if she went back to brussels she could say she has the confidence of the house. in that sense she is strong but nobody in their right mind would say she is in a particularly strong position in the house. but she cannot control her own backbenchers and she cannot find the numbers to get her withdrawal agreement through. not at the moment anyway. ifi through. not at the moment anyway. if i were a betting man, i would not put my money anywhere near this. what we want to see a monday is where we go with a number of indicative vote. we know what the parliament is not for at the moment, but what might they get a majority for? that is the interesting point. there is a talk today about maybe a customs union. but it is about three dimensional chess. if you talk about
9:05 pm
a customs union and perhaps limiting the independent trade policy the uk would have into the future, then you will lose some of those eurosceptics who want to pull completely away from the eu, while pulling in perhaps, some of those labour mps. can you get enough of the labour mps to counteract 100 eurosceptics on the conservative benches that might walk away? stay with us. here's the bbc news website with the most important question — it's also the hardest to answer. what next? let's take it on. the default position here is a no—deal — that means the uk exiting on 29 march without any arrangements in place. the government's own predictions say this will damage the uk's economy — though some brexiteers argue this is an exaggeration, and support this outcome. next, theresa may could keep talking to mps til she finds a version of brexit that she thinks parliament will support — and then goes to brussels to renegotiate.
9:06 pm
that almost certainly requires two things to happen — article 50 being extended so the brexit date is pushed back. and the eu agrees to renegotiate — something it's repeatedly said it won't do. the next option is a second referendum. again, that would need time. it's already too late to hold a referendum before the uk is due to leave. there's also the small matter of deciding what the question should be — there's no agreement on even that. nor, at the moment, does there appear to be parliamentry support for this. lastly, theresa may could call a general election — in order to get her deal a political mandate. a number of problems here — polling suggests her deal is unpopular. the last time she called a surprise election it was a disaster — and she lost her majority. plus she's said repeatedly she doesn't want to do it — and even if the prime minister
9:07 pm
changed her mind, two—thirds of all mps need to support the idea. each option has plenty of catchers. i have run you through your options, where is your money? i will rule out a general election. i don't think there is a majority for it. —— a second referendum. the general election, labour has called a motion of no confidence again and if theresa may has picked the line, some of the rebels would vote against the government. anna soubry, who is a remainer said if it came to no deal she would put the interests of the country first and vote against the government. so there could be a scenario where we could fall into a general election. i will
9:08 pm
put my money on some format of that deal going through. first of all, the european union has said it will not renegotiate the withdrawal agreement, not at any length. the attorney general said yesterday, whatever happens, even if it was a ge‘e'erfi'fisr‘z'i empower, ' ' ' ,. ’ ..., .. ge‘z'erfiflsr‘z'i empower, a' ' ' ,. ’ ..., .. labour government empower, a format of the withdrawal agreement the £5? ofj the 532 of the g; é ‘ both sides is not difficulty for both—sides—is—het is in agreement, difficulty for both—sides—is—het is in - there | agreement, with the and ‘ the that would have to dup, that would have to come out. the problem is go in the the problem is where we go in the future, the future relationship. we had today from senior labour figures that if they could get more flesh on the bones about the relationship if they could get a customs union, a closer relationship with the single market you wouldn't have to open up there with drop —— withdrawal agreement much and if you could get that in the non—binding part of the agreement, that could go through on
9:09 pm
the second or third reading of the vote. one of the many mysteries of brexit is working out exactly what the labour party wants to happen. at the moment, jeremy corbyn is prioritising a general election. no sign of that so far and losing today's vote didn't help his case. and look at this. earlier, 71 of them, came out for this photo op to demand a second vote. but for the moment, mr cobyn hasn't called for a second referendum to renegotiate brexit, not to put it back to the people. this isjeremy corbyn earlier. mr speaker, the prime minister has consistently claimed that her deal, which has now been decisively rejected, was good for britain, workers and businesses. if she is so confident of that, if she genuinely believes it, she should have nothing to fear from going to the people and letting them decide.
9:10 pm
christian, we had jeremy corbyn saying he doesn't want to talk to the prime minister unless no deal is out of the equation. he doesn't want to support a second referendum. he wa nts a to support a second referendum. he wants a general election but you cannot force one, he lost the vote today. he is running out of options? this is one of the interesting subplot about the brexit issue across the road. what is labour going to do? every had had a scenario where in 1a days there was no confidence in any government and there was a general election, what is it labour will campaign on? 71 mps wanta is it labour will campaign on? 71 mps want a peoples' vote and they will be campaigning for remaining in the european union. but we know jeremy corbyn is a supporter of brexit. but many north and
9:11 pm
north—west, north—east english mps who are in labour, brexit supporting areas and bespoke to one tonight, who would be nervous they would be forsa ken who would be nervous they would be fo rsa ke n by who would be nervous they would be forsaken by the labour party's ma nifesto. forsaken by the labour party's manifesto. that is an issue, what would they campaign on. and he will come under pressure from those remainers in his party and he would say, if we couldn't get a general election, we would have a peoples' vote and the shadow front bench seems to be saying, maybe we will have a second motion of no—confidence and a third motion of no—confidence and a third motion of no confidence because we want is a general election. at the moment, he is not saying he's going to push for a peoples' vote. we are going through this brexit story at the moment. nick robinson says through this brexit story at the moment. nick robinson sasteremy corbyn will not talk unless no deal is off the table. won't decide about
9:12 pm
a referendum but wants to keep it on the table. perhaps it would be better just to get the table. perhaps it would be betterjust to get rid of the table. emma vardy betterjust to get rid of the table. emma va rdy has betterjust to get rid of the table. emma vardy has said arlene foster and nigel dodds have met with the prime minister, pledging at the same time both to keep theresa may empower and get rid of the backstop. the dup‘s ten mps were crucial in helping the government survive the no—confidence vote. as laura kuennsburg has pointed out... emma vardy was referring to the backstop, one of the sticking points for theresa may's deal. it is an agreement within the droll agreement saying if there is no trade agreement between the uk and the eu by next day, northern ireland will
9:13 pm
stay in the customs union until there is. it is extraordinary leverages for ten mps from northern ireland? which they have had throughout. the backstop has to come out, according to nigel dodds. it has to come out for many of those within the european research group, those eurosceptics on the conservative benches. it is a real problem for the prime minister because the irish taoiseach has said that as far as they are concerned, it stays and as we know, the european union is stored as one when it comes to the backstop. the interesting thing i think about tonight's debate, you are hearing some backbenchers talking themselves into a customs union. but that is what is. it was extended . the ~ it is 52» it is a whole of the uk. it is a customs union, the backstop and that is what has been rejected by the eurosceptics. it gives you an
9:14 pm
indication that if the government we re indication that if the government were to sign up to a customs union to satisfy labour, there would be the dup and the erg who would walk away. if you have questions the christian and rob watson, send them our way. i can see christian and rob watson, send them our way. i can see one christian and rob watson, send them our way. i can see one of you are saying, can you explain the backstop in simple terms. i have tried to ta ke in simple terms. i have tried to take it on in the last few minutes. it isa take it on in the last few minutes. it is a stipulation in the withdrawal agreement which says if there is new trade deal between the uk and the eu by next year, the uk will remain within the eu's customs union and it is designed to ensure there is no hard border between northern ireland, which is within the uk, and the republic of ireland. i hope that helps. there is a great jargon buster on the bbc news website which takes you through all of these phrases. stay with us on outside source — still to come... we'll have the international reactions to the turmoil in british
9:15 pm
politics after parliament rejected theresa may's brexit deal. prior to the no—confidence vote in the commons, mps had the opportunity to speak. here's labour's deputy leader tom watson. and it was disraeli who said, "a majority is always better than the best repartee". laughter. she is a prime minister without a majority for a flagship policy with no authority and no plan b. 432 to 202. mr speaker, that is not a mere flesh wound. laughter. no one doubts her determination, which is generally an admirable quality, but misapplied, it can be toxic. and the cruellest truth of all is that she doesn't possess the necessary skills,
9:16 pm
the political skills, the empathy, the ability and most crucially, the policy to lead this country any longer. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: the ayes to the right, 306. theresa may wins a vote of no confidence with the support of conservative and unionist mps who voted against her brexit bill yesterday. let's turn to some of the other stories from bbc world service. theresa may wasn't the only prime minister to win a no confidence vote tonight —
9:17 pm
so too did the greek prime minister, alexis tsipras. the no confidence vote in athens was triggered after mr tsipras‘ coalition broke down in a row over the renaming of macedonia. 21 people are now confirmed to have died in an attack by the somali militant group al—shabab on a luxury hotel in. nairdbi enftue/sde‘fg' u., f" the siege ended after 19 hours when all five gunmen were shot dead. the european union is watching this political car crash play out with mounting concern. members of the european parliament met in strasbourg today to discuss theresa may's defeat yesterday. the overall consensus — this is britain's problem, and the deal should not be changed. here's the eu's chief brexit negotiator. translation: we must remain calm, we
9:18 pm
must be united and we must maintain dialogue and we must be transparent. it is up to the uk government to explain to the uk how to take things forward to get the orderly withdrawal it asked for. in germany, the finance minister called it "a bitter day for europe." and this was angela merkel. translation: we want to keep the damage and the exit of britain will be damaging, to a minimum. we will try to find a solution for an orderly exit. but we are also prepared for the eventuality there will not be an orderly solution. we still have time to negotiate, but we are now waiting to see what the british prime minister will propose. the president of the european parliament says the vote "is bad news". and here's emmanuel macron. translation: first losers of this
9:19 pm
are the british people, who will have two negotiate a transition period because they cannot afford not to have planes taking off or landing in their country. and 70% of what is in their supermarket comes from continental europe. next this is the chief brexit coordinator for the european parliament. "what we will not let happen, deal or no deal, is that the mess in british politics is again imported into european politics." and here's his characterisation of the whole saga. the brexit started as a catfight inside the conservative party. on the back of the european union, that was the start of the discussion. but todayit was the start of the discussion. but today it is something completely different. it is no longer a catfight inside the conservative party, it is an existential problem of britain, britain's future.
9:20 pm
then there's this from donald tusk, president of the european council. last night he said "if a deal is impossible, and no one wants no deal, then who will finally have the courage to say what the only positive solution is?" sounds like a man who's keen on a second referendum. an keen on the uk remaining in the european union. and we should definitely turn to ireland. the irish border backstop is the arguably the single biggest reason theresa may's deal was turned down. the backstop is an agreement that says if there's no new trade deal between the uk and the eu by the end of next year, the uk will remain in the eu's customs union until there is a deal. here's the irish prime minister. the ball is very much in westminster‘s the ball is very much in westm i nster‘s cord. the ball is very much in westminster‘s cord. this problem started in westminster with the brexit referendum. we found a solution and they rejected that
9:21 pm
solution. now they need to come up with something they can get through parliament, but it needs to be something that the european union and ireland can accept. for analysis of the story from the eu's perspective, this is damian grammaticas in brussels. what pe you see is at this point is this sort of fog of political confusion enveloping london and they will not move. they have made very clear today, and tell that lives a bit, until there is of bit, until there is an idea of what is now going to happen i the uk is now going to happen on the uk side. the eu believe they have is on - table it does lots on - table it does lot of)n - table it does lot of the i table it does lot of the issuese it does lot of the issues that oes lot of the issues that have to a lot of the issues that have to be addressed if the uk is leaving. citizens and money on things and thoseissues citizens and money on things and those issues don't go away. the questions now are one for the uk parliament and government to answer, ab out what sort of deal does it want? interestingly, what we heard from the irish premise and from
9:22 pm
michel barnier, was this statement that if the uk's red lines, theresa may's original negotiating position that shaped the deal on the table, if those red lines change, the eu would respond very quickly. that would respond very quickly. that would not change most of the deal, but it could change the sort of prospect for what future relationship there was an backward shift things in parliament in london. but at the moment the eu looks at this and says the uk has to work out what it once. —— wants. needless to say businesses in the uk are desperate for some certainty on brexit — there's also plenty of concern about the propsect of no—deal. this is is the business lobby group the cbi earlier. the most important thing is certainty in terms of investment and employment. knowing where we are going is key so you can invest in a model for future
9:23 pm
going is key so you can invest in a model forfuture trade going is key so you can invest in a model for future trade arrangements. it is critical. some see any elongation of the process or further twists and turns as a source of further uncertainty and they want a respite from it. the road ahead looks chaotic and leads to paralysis. kim gittleson. they don't sound very happy? you have to watch what the markets have done. i have spent all day on the floor of ba rclays bank, done. i have spent all day on the floor of barclays bank, huge british bank and usually they have big swings, but nothing pretty much happened. it is interesting because we have seen this political turmoil in westminster and investors seem pretty much unmoved. maybe because they know there is more coming down they know there is more coming down the track before we find out one way or the other? they said look, this is probably because investors think the prospect of a no—deal brexit is lower. they hate the idea of a
9:24 pm
no—deal brexit and many now think the article 50 extension might happen, we might be going past the end of march with these negotiations. that is something businesses like, they think it might lead to a soft brexit, something many of them want. can you explain a bit more about what no deal means, because we hear brexiteers saying no deal is ok, we will trade with the eu under wto rules. deal is ok, we will trade with the eu underwto rules. in deal is ok, we will trade with the eu under wto rules. in practical terms, what does it mean? there is a new british phrase i learned today, cloud cuckoo land land. the head of the cbi, the big business lobbying group in the uk said the idea the uk could get on wto terms with the eu was a terrible idea, it is cloud cuckoo land, pie in the sky. you get most favoured nation status if you are on wto terms. it is a bad thing. when you trade with some on, the eu,
9:25 pm
japan, most—favoured—nation status means everyone is japan, most—favoured—nation status means everyone is subject to the same tariffs of your most—favoured—nation unless you have struck a different trade negotiation. what if you are only on those wto rules for a short period of time? did you not hear what those business leaders are saying, it is 0k business leaders are saying, it is ok but in the short term and the long term you don't know how much your goods are going to cost, you cannot price them and you have no idea what your profit will be. not a good thing for business. thank you very much. that is one of the questions we have been getting, what are the wto rules? it is what the uk might have to trade under if there is no deal. send your questions are way, we will take them on with christian and rob in the next half an hour. we are ending the week on a cold
9:26 pm
note than we started the week with sleet and snow in the forecast. the reason for this area of low pressure pulling away in supercontinent is opening the floodgates to be arctic in this cold air will be pushing south across the uk tonight. also bringing sleet and snow to the northern parts of scotland where some of the snow will be settling in the hills across northern scotland. we have a band of rain sinking south overnight and there could be sleet in this as the air turns much colder. as a consequence there will bea colder. as a consequence there will be a risk of ice to central and northern areas. temperatures will be falling close to freezing in towns and cities but even colder out in the countryside. we start tomorrow morning on a cold, frosty note, watch for the early ice across central and northern areas and we continue with sleet and snow showers across northern and eastern scotland, being driven on by a strong, cold northerly wind. it will be feeding wintry showers into the
9:27 pm
eastern side of england as well and more prolonged into east anglia for a time as the weather front clears away south eastwards. elsewhere, crisp sunshine to start the day. we hold onto the wintry showers across northern and eastern parts with the strong wind throughout the afternoon. thanks to a ridge of high pressure, a glorious day with plenty of crisp, winter sunshine. but it will be cold, temperatures in too low to mid single figures. ridge of high pressure pushes eastwards during thursday night into friday morning. a cold and frosty start to friday. but this next feature will be moving into western areas bringing more cloud and outbreaks of rain, sleet and snow. we think the rain, sleet and snow. we think the rain will be over the hills but as it bumps into the cold air as it moves eastwards during friday we could see sleet and snow to lower levels through central and southern scotla nd levels through central and southern scotland and perhaps across parts of wales and south—west england. another chilly day to come. not as cold as thursday but largely dry
9:28 pm
with sunshine across eastern areas. as we head into friday evening and overnight, the mixture of rain, sleet and snow will push slowly eastwards but will fizzle out. the weekend not looking too bad, it should be mostly dry. on the chilly side. best of the sunshine will be on sunday. more cloud around on saturday. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. straight to westminster, where another day of political turmoil has seen theresa may's government survive a vote of no confidence. i do not take this responsibility lightly, and my government will continue its work to increase our prosperity, guarantee our security and to strengthen our union. that doesn't resolve the core issue — parliament cannot find a version of brexit it can agree on. and europe is watching. translation: we want to keep the damage, and the x. britain will be damaging, toa
9:29 pm
damage, and the x. britain will be damaging, to a minimum. —— and the exit of britain. so we will try to find a solution for an orderly exit. the prime minster will make a statement from downing street in an hour's time. until then — we have christian fraser and rob watson ready to answer your questions. send them in — the hashtag is #bbcos. here is the brexit countdown clock! it's 72 days until brexit. there are still huge questions over what exactly brexit will mean. yesterday, theresa may's brexit deal suffered a severe defeat in parliament. she cut that a deal with the european union. because of that, the opposition labour party tabled a motion of no—confidence. that went
9:30 pm
the way of the prime minister. the ayes to the right, 306. the noes to the left, 325. cheering. the noes to the left, 325. so the noes have it, the noes have it. unlock! let's bring in christian fraser and rob watson, i will westminster dream team, ready to take on all of our questions. let's start with this, is there an increased chance of a no—deal brexit because of yesterday's huge defeat? go on, christian. well, in statute, the uk is leaving the european union on
9:31 pm
march 29, in law. you can only replace statute, law, with more statute and law. so the big question, the puzzler for people watching, is how do you get to that point? there is a majority, probably, in parliament to try to stop no deal, and the parties meeting with the prime minister tonight have said their terms for having more in—depth discussions with the prime minister is for her to take no deal off the table, but she has been loath to do that because it gives her similar bridge over her own backbench mps. she wants them to vote for this deal, if they don't, it is no deal. it gives hersimilar they don't, it is no deal. it gives her similar bridge, not much, because everybody in europe knows britain does not want a no deal in the uk. -- it britain does not want a no deal in the uk. —— it gives her some leverage. do you think it raises the risk of no deal? i don't think so. i would merely adds that i think the way to look at it is with any prime minister, never mind if there was
9:32 pm
some sort of mechanism that parliamentarians could use to block it, would any prime minister really be willing to go ahead with a no—deal brexit, knowing how risky it is? all of the evidence on the briefing the prime minister and others have had. knowing when things go wrong they could not turn around and say at least parliament was behind us? it is more about politics. the business secretary la st politics. the business secretary last night said they had to try to stop no deal and they seem open to the nick boles amendment which would try to take no deal of the table. i think it is unlikely. not impossible. michael says is it still possible but article 50 might be extended? still possible but article 50 might be extended ? and still possible but article 50 might be extended? and an extra question of my own, if the government wanted to extend, what is the process?|j will to extend, what is the process?” will take adverts, seeing as he did last time. —— i will take it first. i have been reporting on politicians, diplomats and officials for 30 odd years and in my humble
9:33 pm
experience, often when they get into a fix they press the delay button. in many ways it is not such a dumb thing to do. if you are not sure about the way forward, maybe it is not such a bad idea. i would not rule it out, i don't know about you, christian? the fact that the deal we nt christian? the fact that the deal went out last night causes a real backlog in the timetable and even if you got it through last night, we are not sure they could have put it into legislation inside two months. so, legislation perspective they would have to delay anyway. what we always forget is that the eu is part of the negotiation as well, they say we could extend, but what for? you need to come up with a plan, if we are just extending it so you can keep argue are creating more uncertainty on the continent. absolutely, and could you imagine the moment when
9:34 pm
you pick up the phone, hello, is thatjean—claude juncker? theresa may in london. it will be a horribly awkward moment all round, there needs to be legislation passed in the westminster parliament which would also be tricky. and as a veteran of many brussels summit is, if you say we will extend the cut—off point, you might as well keep extending it. i think mps are right, unless you give the european union a deadline then you will not get to the finish. a couple of quick fire once and then a bigger one. denise has asked something i would like to know, why does the speaker showed unlock after he has called out the votes in the commons? —— showed unlock. —— shout unlock. cracking question, our colleague laura kuenssberg has made a great little film, you can search bridge on social media, she was allowed in with the camera, that has never happened before, to see how voting works. it is a crazy system,
9:35 pm
denise. they don't put a cross on a piece of paper, they do do anything electronic or show their hands, they walk through doors, one door says yes and the other no. so the unlock and the lock is a reference the doors. are they kept on until their heads account counted on the doors unlocked? exactly. a few people are asking was a democratic the way the no—confidence vote when the prime minister's way only with the help of people outside her party? that is com pletely people outside her party? that is completely normal, isn't it? the dup have said all along that they don't wa nt have said all along that they don't want a change of prime minister. they want a change to the deal but not a change of prime minister and think a general election at this moment would cause more confusion and uncertainty, so they are backing the prime minister. there is an historic issue, if they brought down
9:36 pm
the government they would have jeremy corbyn and his here history in northern ireland, the fact that he sat down with sinn fein, there is back story as to why they would not wa nt back story as to why they would not want him in power. they have got her through, but i think it puts them in a stronger position. just to emphasise christian's points and a nerdy point on the maths, if the democratic unionist party mps did not votes with the government, she would have lost by one vote and that would have lost by one vote and that would be that. you two are very much in demand, i have more questions than i have time for but we will speak to christian soon. they disappeared and boris johnson speak to christian soon. they disappeared and borisjohnson popped up, we will not be having boris johnson later, we will have more of robertjohnson and christian fraser. billboard posters featuring pre—brexit quotes from prominent politicians have gone up around dover and london. a pro—remain group is behind them. the group posted quotes on twitter and asked followers to choose their favourites. this was one.
9:37 pm
it's a quote from 2017 by international trade secretary liam fox: "the free trade agreement that we will do with the euroean union should be one of the easiest in human history." this is another poster spotted in london from michael gove, "the day after we vote to leave, we hold all the cards and we can choose the path we want." that's clearly not happened. one person who was a big leave campaigner was boris johnson. here's what he said last night. what she needs to do is, with a high heart fortified by, you know, the massive rejection of the house of commons, go back to our friends and partners and say, "look, we need another way out of this. "we know, you know, that we don't need a hard border "in northern ireland. "we know that we can negotiate a free—trade deal. "we know we've got the time to do it. "let's do it together." let's bring in a christian and rob.
9:38 pm
clearly remainers like to highlight things that were said and say that during the campaign promises were made that could not be capped. have any of the brexiteers acknowledge that was the case? i think the most interesting thing over the last few weeks is that michael gove, the senior brexiteer in the cabinet, is the one that has stood back from no deal, he has looked over the cliff edge and thought, i don't fancy that. he might argue that we're not prepared to go over the cliff at the moment because the chancellor has not putting enough money. in fact, i think we have put less intimate than the netherlands, they seem to have more people ready for customs in their ports than we do, maybe that is reason why. there is no doubt that this has been a learning experience for both remainers and brexiteers within the cabinet. some of these issues also complex, it is
9:39 pm
40 of these issues also complex, it is a0 yea rs of of these issues also complex, it is a0 years of integration and i think everybody accepts that many of the issues we now discuss openly with regards to brexit were not being discussed at the time when we took that important vote in 2016. to chip ina that important vote in 2016. to chip in a briefly, what we are not saying, anybody on the remain site was thinking that either leave people within the campaign of voters would be saying at the moment we are sorry, it is a horrible mess, we realise that now. there is no evidence of that. we had a labour mp from stoke—on—trent, from a brexit constituency, and he made the point, as wasjohnny mercer from plymouth, that their voters voted on an issue of sovereignty. they didn't vote on an issue of all this minutiae that we are discussing. it is a good feeling this of the leavers, they wa nt feeling this of the leavers, they want their sovereignty back and was told quite a... in his post by by
9:40 pm
many of his constituents in stoke—on—trent central, that they did not want it, which is why he voted against it. i never know how much time we have got... studio: for you two, as much as you like.” think the complaint you would make against what you would call the politicians who are in power, the influence, i think whether they won the remain or leave side, i am not sure that they have levelled with the british people entirely, it is one of the reasons we are in such a mess. whatever you feel about the european union, ao years of membership, it has been a cornerstone of how the uk projects power, alan tate economic model, our trade policy. —— our entire economic model. in some ways international cohesion and our relationship with ireland. it would be very difficult to disentangle from the european union, whatever side you are on. i am not sure politicians have levelled at the people about that.” will let you get a cup of tea and we
9:41 pm
will let you get a cup of tea and we will have the more questions for you in around ten minutes, so if you're watching, keep the questions coming in to #bbcos orfind me on watching, keep the questions coming in to #bbcos or find me on twitter. someone we haven't heard much — if anything — since the referendum is the person who called it: david cameron. is the former british prime minister. but he has spoken today. i regret the difficulties and the problems that we've been having at trying to implement the result of our referendum, but i don't think it's going to be helped by me giving a running commentary. i support the prime minister, i support her aim to have a partnership deal with europe. that's what needs to be put in place, that's what parliament needs to try and deliver now, and she has my support as she tries to do that. so how is the rest of the world viewing brexit? italy's la stampa newspaper lead with jean—claude juncker‘s warning that time is almost up. dutch centre—left volkskrant daily describes the "greatest political crisis since guy fawkes tried to blow up parliament four centuries ago." and then there's this in a german newpaper — it calls brexit a monstrosity.
9:42 pm
there is a reasonably grotesque cartoon in that. katya adler sums it up — "european press less than impressed with current #brexit dramas in parliament." she is the bbc‘s europe editor and i would argue that she is the best person to follow. germany's bild newspaper reports on a farce. france's le monde calls the brexit process a shipwreck. they are running out of words, frankly. tonje iversen is a norwegian journalist, and antonello guerrera works for the italian newspaper la repubblica. you are both based in london and you get a very close view. when you look at what is happening, what do you tell your readers back home? everyone is fascinated by the drama unfolding in the house of commons, all the drama and infighting has suddenly gained a lot of attention
9:43 pm
in norway. although the norwegian public might not be as heartbroken about brexit as lots of other european countries, simply because we're not a member of the eu, so we do not feel like the uk is divorcing is, but we are closely tied to the uk through the eea, we have a strong relationship with the uk and many people worry that we will not have such a good arrangement and trade agreement with the uk as to brexit. what about you ? agreement with the uk as to brexit. what about you? well, i mean... the thing is that in italy we have a populist government that in the past representatives have spoken about a possible italexit, so many people that the uk and say this may happen to us. so mostly they are really scared about that. and also we are trying to tell them also because in
9:44 pm
the uk there are so many italians, every family has a friend or a relative here. so there is a lot of concern with the issue of citizens‘ rights, which is within the withdrawal deal? in the case of a no deal, which is closer and closer. apart from the detail of the policy, is this changing your readers‘ perception of the uk, impacting how you see us? i think a lot of norwegians would have thought that the uk would deal with this a bit better, that by this date the uk would have done a lot more in this negotiation with the eu, that you would have some certainty and clarity. i think many people are surprised that we have come this far and not further. the uk i seen as a and not further. the uk is seen as a great european power - a great european power with a great history and we have big expectations
9:45 pm
the if but i feel lots to the uk, but i feel lots of people will feel a lot of the world and confusion, what is really going on? why can‘t the british parliament seem why can‘t the british parliament seem to agree about almost anything? asi seem to agree about almost anything? as i said before, every teenager in italy, all the young people, fa have to go out of italy to look for a job, to study, they prefer to come here —— if they have to go out of italy. they prefer to come here to the uk, and not to france or germany. so brexit has changed the perception of how many italians are excepted here. before we wrap up, lots of people talk about norway‘s relationship with the eu as one possibility for the uk‘s relationship with the eu. do you
9:46 pm
think most people in norway would recommend it, do they think it is a good status? i know that the norwegian politicians mostly talk about the eea is a great compromise, because norway voted twice to stay out of the eu, so according to them it is the great solution. the norwegian public is more split, people who are pro—eu think we should be completely in, it is ridiculous to pay this money and adhere to the rules without having a say. but the argument on the opposite side is similar, why are we halfway in? we should be completely out and take control. very useful, thank you for your time. we will continue to talk about brexit, we will be answering some questions. one person has said is there any precedent for what is happening in parliament and how long can this disagreement continue without resolution? we will put that to rob
9:47 pm
and christian in westminster. the shoreham air crash happened purely because of pilot error a court heard today. andrew hill was flying the vintage fighterjet when he lost control and the plane crashed into a dual carriage way killing 11 people. tom symonds was in court. it happened on a beautiful summer‘s day. a high—performance vintage jet fighter dropping from clear skies onto a crowded road. some of the 11 men who died were in cars just passing, perhaps on their way to jobs of football matches. one - a ts a but had a record of taking risks. but hac fast cord of taking risks. but hac fast and of taking risks. but hac fast and loose ing risks. but hac fast and loose with isks. but hac fast and loose with safety in training and at our shows. —— air
9:48 pm
the prosecutor thomas kark 0c told ,, wrong with the plane but, using a model to demonstrate, he said andrew hill‘s flying that day was seridusly negligeetg ~ ~ he was approaching shoreham airport in the hawker hunterjet, planning to perform a loop. ahead was a busy a road. experts estimate the jet came in at around 185 feet it reached the top of the loop at approximately 2800 feet, thejury heard, around 1000 feet too low. but andrew hill did not abort the manoeuvre. as he descended he was too lohan too slow to pull up. the plane came down fast, hitting the busy a27 in a fireball. people had gathered all around this area to unofficially watch the airshow. the plane ploughed along the road, ending up in scrubland over there. mr hill was lucky to survive, but has no memory of what happened. he is expected to say he may have suffered the effects of g—force. he denies all the charges.
9:49 pm
tom symons, bbc news, at the old bailey. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... this live shot at downing street. we expect a statement from theresa may at10pm, in nine expect a statement from theresa may at 10pm, in nine minutes‘ time. let‘s continue talking about brexit here, a statement coming in nine minutes. we have christian fraser and rob wotton in westminster, any talk behind the c is about what the prime minister might want to say?” am glad you are so sure it will be in nine minutes, this is timed for the evening bulletins, the ten o‘clock news on the bbc. she was due
9:50 pm
to come out at three minutes past ten. but the ten o‘clock news is delayed because of an fa cup game in the uk, derby scored two goals late on to take it to extra time. so the news bulletin has been delayed, it will be interesting to see whether downing street have taken latin and delay their speech so it coincides with the delayed bulletin. football trumps politics, as is entirely right. that explains why there has been some whooping and cheering in the bbc newsroom as i have gone through this edition of the programme. catalina is watching and wa nts to programme. catalina is watching and wants to know if article 50 was delayed, would that mean the uk would have to ask once again to leave ? would have to ask once again to leave? there are two different things, one is revoking article 50, effectively saying you know when we told you two years ago that we wanted to leave the european union? a bit ofa
9:51 pm
wanted to leave the european union? a bit of a mistake, wanted to leave the european union? a bit ofa mistake, and wanted to leave the european union? a bit of a mistake, and we would go back to being members under the current conditions. i suppose at some other point we could say we have change our minds again and still want to leave. that is revoking article 50. i think what people have been talking about more, correct me if i'm wrong, is more delaying it. not saying we have changed our minds but, please, we are ina changed our minds but, please, we are in a horrible mess, can we have changed our minds but, please, we are irtime ‘rible mess, can we have changed our minds but, please, we are irtime to nle mess, can we have changed our minds but, please, we are ir time to decide? . can we have changed our minds but, please, we are ir time to decide? that we have changed our minds but, please, we are ir time to decide? that is: have changed our minds but, please, we are ir time to decide? that is not ve that is not justis that is not just is straightforward, actually, we just want to extend it, the french and germans have asked why you want to delay, as what they want is clarity from the guys and ladies across the roads as to what plan they can get behind and get a majority for. you have to appreciate that this is an certainty for business in the eu as well. they don‘t want to extend that for the uk parliaments have another row among themselves. the concern is that our children will be standing here doing
9:52 pm
this in 20 years. a tough 1-2 finish on, andy, and a few people have asked this, lots of talk about amendments on monday when the deal comes back into the comments. how does that work and wide to amendments matter? we know what the parliament is against, not what it is for what it can get behind. to get there, you have to test the alternatives, there are various alternatives. indicative votes, they would go through the lobbies and what would be important is in which order they came, what might get support first, and would it be a free vote or dictated to by party politics, would it be a freefall and they could vote whichever way they wanted? all i they could vote whichever way they wanted? alll can they could vote whichever way they wanted? all i can say is watch the bbc on monday evening. thanks for the plug, i suspect you might be involved. just before we finish,
9:53 pm
here is the live feed from downing street, the podium is set for theresa may in front of her front door, she will address as in the next few minutes. see you later. —— she will address us in the next few minutes. hello, there. we‘ve got some typical british winter weather for the next few weeks. typical temperatures for january. although they could be a little bit below average in to next week. and certainly we are ending this week on a much colder note than how we started the week, because we‘re importing winds down from the north, an arctic northerly. and that will feed in some snow showers through thursday across northern and eastern scotland, some wintry showers down the eastern side of england as well. it will feel raw in the strong northerly winds, there. but for most, you can see lighter winds thanks to a ridge of high pressure, and plenty of dry conditions with crisp winter sunshine. but it will be cold, temperatures two to 5 degrees for most of us.
9:54 pm
as we head on into thursday night, it looks like we start to lose that northerly wind and also the wintry showers. but will still be under the ridge of high pressure, with light winds, largely clear skies, so it‘s going to be another really cold one. a widespread frost, perhaps some ice where we had wintry showers throughout the day. but notice temperatures not so cold out west, and that‘s because we‘ve got this weather system pushing it off the atlantic and bringing south—westerly winds. but this weather front will bring outbreaks of rain. it could be quite wet for some western areas through friday. and as it pushes increasingly into that cold air, will start seeing an increasing amount of sleet and snow. notjust up to higher ground but even down to lower levels, perhaps central, southern scotland and potentially into wales and the south—west of england late in the day for the evening commute. so stay tuned for this. but much of the east will stay dry, some hazy sunshine, and it will remain cold for all. this area of low pressure begins to get consumed by high pressure around, so it will slowly fizzle out as we head on in towards the weekend. however, there could still be a legacy on saturday of some cloud,
9:55 pm
some rain, sleet and snow. and as that tends to ease away it will leave a legacy of cloud into the afternoon. so i think sunshine will be in short supply for most of us through saturday and again it will feel quite chilly. so grey and chilly, temperatures four to maybe 10 degrees in the far south—west. sunday, on the other hand, is probably looking at being the best day of the weekend as we should see more cloud breaks, more sunshine around and it should be dry with lighter winds. a bit more cloud, though, for the north—west corner of scotland. and, again, temperatures chilly, a little below the seasonal average. high pressure still wants to hold on into the start of next week, though. this feature will start to bring increasing winds, cloud and some rain for the far north—west corner of the country, with the chance of some sleet and hill snow. but for most of us again, because of the ridge of high pressure, monday should be largely dry after a chilly, frosty start
9:56 pm
with plenty of sunshine. temperatures of four to seven celsius. that feature continues to move eastwards, though, through tuesday. could bring a spell of rain, sleet and snow. and beyond then, for the rest of next week, it‘s now looking like many of the computer models want to build this big area of high pressure in across the atlantic. what that will do is bring some cold air from the north all the north—west. —— orthe —— or the northwest. so still some uncertainty to this forecast, but it does look like for much of next week we should have a lot of dry weather around. that‘s because we‘ve got the influence of high pressure. it will be a little bit colder than normal, temperatures a bit below the seasonal average, so we‘ll also see some pretty cold and frosty nights. but like i mentioned, there still remains some uncertainty to this. so stay tuned to the forecast. so stay tun bbc the forecast. so stay tun bbc two forecast. so stay tun bbc two is recast. so stay tun bbc two is a cast. so stay tun bbc two is a special news programme. the prime minister is going to make a statement. i am led to believe it does not concern
9:57 pm
var. then there will be a main bulletin a total of 325 mps voted to declare confidence in theresa may‘s confidence. it included the dup for northern ireland. 360 airfrom opposition parties. a majority of 19 votes. the prime minister has invited leaders of all parties to meet her and explore the way forward and brexit be jeremy meet her and explore the way forward and brexit bejeremy corbyn said it is essential in his view, theresa may rule out any prospect of
9:58 pm
9:59 pm
10:00 pm
10:01 pm

94 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on