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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 24, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am. and these are the main stories this morning: scotland's former first minister alex salmond has been arrested and charged by police. he's expected in court later today. the family of a woman who died in a speedboat crash on the thames say the man convicted of her manslaughter, jack shepherd, is not taking responsibility responsibility for his actions despite his arrest in georgia. as we saw, and increasing feelings of anger to be honest with you. to see him just stroll into the police station smiling and waving, was just unbelievable. "as big a threat as climate change" — the health secretary announces a five—year plan to tackle antibiotic resistance. latest crime figures show a big increase in violent crime. it rose by by 19% in england and wales in the year to september. the chief executive of airbus says
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it's a ‘disgrace' that businesses can't plan for brexit. he warns the company may have to make "very harmful" decisions for its uk operations in the event of no—deal. and, if you're confused by terms like ‘no deal‘, we're here to help. throughout the day, bbc news will be breaking down the brexitjargon — on radio, tv and online. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the former scottish first minister, alex salmond, has been arrested and charged with an offence. it is not yet known what mr salmond has been charged with. police had been investigating, following a scottish government inquiry into complaints of sexual harassment, which he strongly denies. this is sending shock waves around
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these scottish political world this morning. all police have said is that a 64—year—old man has been arrested and charged. it has been confirmed that man is alex salmond, he is not in custody. it is expected he is not in custody. it is expected he will appear in court, though we don't know which court, presumably this afternoon. this follows allegations made last january by two female staff members at the scottish comedy made formal complaint about mr salmond's conduct dating back to december 2013 when he was first minister of scotland. an investigation was launched but mr salmond complained that confidential information about him had been late
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and he resigned from the snp. and when he took the scottish government to court over the process carried out where, indeed, that case was dropped by the scottish comment, it was ruled in mr salmond's flavour. police had been investigating claims against the first minister and that is what we expect to find out more about today when he appears in court. we must stress that mr salmond has always denied any criminal wrongdoing and anybody in any of these two processes that have been reported. we will find out more this afternoon about what it is he has been arrested and charged with. the family of a woman who died in a speedboat crash on the thames have said justice is close — after the fugitive convicted of her manslaughter handed himself in to police. jack shepherd turned up at a police station in georgia yesterday — six months after he was sentenced over the death of charlotte brown. her family criticised him for showing "unbelievable arrogance" when he appeared on tv shortly before he was arrested. chi chi izundu has this report. 0n the run for 10 months,
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now surrounded by lawyers, this is the momentjack shepherd handed himself into police. he'd been hiding in the georgian capital, tbilisi. before being arrested, he gave an interview to a local tv channel. i hope that, you know, justice will be done and that my appeal will succeed and i canjust, everyone can move forward with their lives. lastjuly, he was sentenced in his absence to six years in prison for the manslaughter of 24—year—old charlotte brown. in december 2015, the pair had been on a first date and, after dinner and drinks, shepherd took out what he claimed was his speedboat on the thames. this footage was recovered from charlotte's phone. he let her take control, but they were both thrown into the water after the boat hit branches. he was found clinging to the hull. charlotte was pulled out unresponsive.
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charlotte's family have been appealing for shepherd to return to the uk, but had this reaction at the news. to see him just stroll into the police station, smiling and waving, wasjust unbelievable. his arrogance over everything. under current diplomatic agreements between georgia and the uk, shepherd is eligible for extradition. the crown prosecution service said it is drafting a request. for now, he remains in a detention centre awaiting a court hearing for the next step in his legal process. chi chi izundu, bbc news. 0ur reporter rayhan demytrie is in the georgian capital of tbilisi for us now. any update ? any update? jack shepherd is still
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in this pre—trial detention, which is right behind me. as we know, he has not spoken to his lawyer since wednesday night, they are planning to meet him later today. we know that the court hearing, in which a judge will decide on the terms of mr shepherd's extradition back to the uk will be held on friday morning. people also decide on his detention terms. we know about the british authorities are cooperating closely with georgian officials on this case. but we don't know whether the extradition request was handed into the georgian officials. all eyes are on this court hearing that will take place on friday morning. we will have more information about the terms under which jack shepherd, what happens to him next. her lawyer said that this procedure might take weeks —— his lawyer. the maximum
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detention time will be mine months. —— nine months. i'm joined by katherine tyler, a barrister specialising in extradition, from the international law firm, kingsley napley. thank you forjoining us. can you shed some light on some of the legalities surrounding this? extradition is the process whereby states can request the return of people, to either serve a sentence or stand trial. in this case, jack shepherd has handed himself into police and will be appearing in court an exhibition request. we heard that will on friday morning, but when we heard it could take weeks and the maximum time is nine months. does that make sense to you? it is difficult to predict these things. it depends on the issues. it will be open to jack shepherd to
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raise human rights issues, which might prevent his return to the uk depending on the validity of the issues he raises. what would be counted as a valid issue? issues that are revelled raised an exhibition cases, particular cases from the uk, our prison conditions and fertile rights. articles three and fertile rights. articles three and six —— fair trial rights. and fertile rights. articles three and six -- fair trial rights. jack said he wanted to prove his innocence, is that puzzling considering his trial has already happened? i assume that he was a combat and big effort here to clear his name. that would involve an appeal? yes. on the face of it, it
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seems rather puzzling he didn'tjust get back on a plane and return to the uk are saying, i want to do this straightforward. there are certain benefits that the protected person gets, if they return to the requesting state through the activation process rather than of their own volition. 0ne activation process rather than of their own volition. one of those is a little town called specialty, that effectively with certain restrictions on the card offences that the uk government can build on hand that might have taken place before his extradition. issues like skipping bail? exactly. the likelihood is, since we do have sensible presidents and justice systems, the likelihood is that this exhibition will go ahead? systems, the likelihood is that this
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exhibition will go ahead ?|j systems, the likelihood is that this exhibition will go ahead? i wouldn't like to say. it depends very much on the substantive request, whether thatis the substantive request, whether that is in order. also on issues that is in order. also on issues that might be raised by mr shepherd during this process. even if georgia we re during this process. even if georgia were to refuse a religion, i have no doubt there will continue to be a valid extradition request in the offing should jack moved to another country. the uk authorities will be alerted to his presence there and another because with the forthcoming. thank you for explaining all of that. theresa may is meeting union leaders today to talk about the next steps of her brexit plan. the prime minister is hoping to find a compromise with the tuc, unison, unite and the gmb after her deal was overwhelmingly voted down by mps last week. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is outside number ten. and what on earth would be the shape of such a compromise, norman? well,
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some movement on some of the guidelines which mrs may is adamant she will not budge on. neville has be some sort of movement on customs union, employment rights, above all, no deal would have to be taken of the table and edward have to be some sort of delay to article 50. all this think that mrs may has said that she will not do. some of the union leaders have been in for talks on friday. —— in for cox already. my senseis on friday. —— in for cox already. my sense is that they will not be coming out singing hallelujah, until they are just getting coffee. the prospects of some sort of agreement did seem great. i think the prime minister, frankly, has to stop playing to the bad boys at the back of class and start listening to where and start
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listening to where parliament is, which is wanting no—deal off the table and more time for genuine talks to take place. but get onto the priorities that matter to people in britain, working people in britain who have had ten years of austerity, rubbish living standards, and want a change. we want our rights protected, and we want working people to be put first for a change. why this matters for mrs way is partly because of the acoustics of brexit. she wants to be seemed to be reaching out. she studies some labour mps to come on—board. 0ne reaching out. she studies some labour mps to come on—board. one way to try and make it easier to do this is if some of the big union leaders give mrs may a hearing if they suggest that there could be progress
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on workers' rights. that could be enough with it some labour mps on board. the mall, ahead of that crucial vote on tuesday when mrs may comes back with her brexit statement, we learned this morning that those mps behind the so—called people's vote campaign have decided to shelve plans calling for a fresh referendum. the soon—to—be precious little chance of it getting passed withoutjeremy corbyn backing it. rather going down in defeat, they have decided to pool the possibility ofa have decided to pool the possibility of a people's vote amendment next tuesday. they are really relying on mr —— jeremy corbyn do decide that he will back a second referendum, something that he has avoided doing. they say the consequences could be
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significant. here is one of them. i believe that if labour doesn't back a people's vote, we will haemorrhage support right across the country and we will suffer as those elections boxes whenever the next general election will come. whenever it will be. that is a responsibility for the party to reflect upon. you think it could split the labour party? the issue is that we want to see a resolution, it's the most critical issue in our country. we're all coming together in the national interest because we think this is the most pressing thing we should be resolving at this time. what is interesting is that although they have decided to pool the idea ofa they have decided to pool the idea of a fresh referendum, the bubble in behind those other amendments, taking no deal of the table, crucially to delay brexit day. that seems to be the real pressure point on mrs may when they get to next
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tuesday's vote because the does seem to bea tuesday's vote because the does seem to be a leading block behind that amendment. what we don't quite know is whether the lead of party will whip their mps to back it. it was suggested that they will wait until tuesday, want to see whatjeremy corbyn says before making a final decision to back that amendment. if they do, it seems to me that it will have a very short chance of being passed and with it, is the threat of brexit been delayed. european plane—maker airbus has warned that it could move wing—building out of the uk in the future if there is a no—deal brexit. the firm's chief executive, tom enders, said the firm "will have to make potentially very harmful decisions for the uk" in the event of no deal. our business correspondent victoria fritzjoins me now.
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a boss is not dependent on the uk, these workers was here. please don't listen to the recipient madness which are satisfied because we have huge party, we will not move and will always be here. they are wrong. they are one of the biggest manufacturers in britain, and employ about 111,000 people around the uk. they are making wings for airplay that i'd use by a line is right around the world such as what people and goods, helicopters, satellites— it's huge is this. the nucleus of that business is another 100,000 10,000 jobs in the supply chain, so it really matters what he is saying.
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he is basically talking about the threat of a no—deal brexit? he is basically talking about the threat of a no-deal brexit? these words are very much about a no deal scenario. it's not the first time he hasissued scenario. it's not the first time he has issued a good likeness. there was a risk assessment published last year by the company that said it would force property to reconsider investment in the uk if there was a no deal. but these words are certainly stronger, was like disgrace, madness suggest a new urgency and the bottle teat of a no deal scenario that cooperates like airbus are taking very serious indeed. and staying with brexit — all day bbc news is breaking down the brexitjargon routinely used by politicians and by the media, but which is rarely explained. one of those terms is the single market. here's our reality check correspondent chris morris to make sense of it. the clue is in the name,
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and the idea behind the eu's single market is pretty simple. to make trade between countries as easy as trade within countries. and on the customs union, which removes tariffs or taxes on goods crossing borders, and you've got pretty much the closest economic relationship between different countries anywhere in the world. instead of having different rules and regulations on safety, standards, packaging, and all sorts of other things, all of the rules are the same. and that means the single market is based on the free movement of four things. goods — the stuff we make. services that we buy and sell. capital, that's money and other forms of wealth. and most controversially in the brexit debate, people. let's take them one at a time. free movement of goods around the eu is a guaranteed. the single market in services doesn't cover everything, but again, it's more integrated than anywhere else in the world.
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capital can flow freely across eu borders. and then, there's people. now, eu citizens have the automatic right to travel to, and work in, any other eu country. but immigration was one of the big issues that fuelled the vote to get out of the eu. and now, one of the main reasons why theresa may insists the uk will leave the single market is that she wants free movement of people to come to an end. it's a two—way street, of course. if the government ends the free movement of eu citizens to the uk, the eu will do the same for uk citizens wanting to double for uk citizens wanting to travel in the opposite direction. both sides say they want to avoid visa for short—term travel, like holidays. but a future immigration system to replace the ribbon between the uk
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and the eu has yet to be negotiated. as you can be in the single market but have been in the eu, like norway or iceland, but you still need to allow the free movement of people. and if you don't, says the eu, you can't have trade which is quite as free or as frictionless as it is now. outside the single market, the uk will have the ability to set its own rules and regulations. but the more it changes them, the more barriers to trade with the eu will eventually emerge. and we'll have more of those explainers from chris morris throughout the day — we'll be speaking to our political correspondent chris mason later in the programme and you can also use ourjargon busting guide online to check the most used terms and phrases. go to bbc.co.uk/brexit — and click on brexit jargon explained. the total number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales rose by 19%, in the year to september 2018, the latest figures show. the number of cases of murder and manslaughter was at its highest level for 12 years.
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our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is here. and, these are shocking. it's a very worrying for the government. last year, they launched a series of islands strategy from amber rudd. they've understood to try and get on top of the problem which has been brewing since the 2014, particularly in the mission to murder and manslaughter. we are seeing a continuation in the rise in violence and no end of it. in the case of manslaughter, of 90 in two months. these are a little clips, an significant crisis. these are substantial rises in the most series of by others. is the strategy wrong?
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is it being overwhelmed?” of by others. is the strategy wrong? is it being overwhelmed? i think that's a question that the home 0ffice that's a question that the home office and the state address. there is no lack of will amongst ministers and senior police officers to try and senior police officers to try and get on top of this problem. at the moment, the figures don't suggest it's working or they have started to do that. it isn't a problem that has come overnight, as isaid, is problem that has come overnight, as i said, is that google in 2014. they are going on in a number of different ways — knife is up, particularly in london and other big cities. robberies are also up substantially, another major issue. that are also signs that domestic abuse is going up. some of that is affected to the changes of recording practices and the willingness of victims to report crimes. known as
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one interesting figure which doesn't come on dogs by liz, that is public order offences which has gone up by 24 up percent. does that suggest there is a bit of tension out there? that people are more likely to cause harassment or of an two other people? some of that, again, is due to changing definitions and the way police record of these offences. but there may be a real increase which perhaps suggest that the whole atmosphere is maybe a little bit more tense. why? that's a question that trauma knowledges have two answer. i'm sure they're making lots of papers and books about this increase. 0n the positive side, gun crime is down. but certainly good news. there seems to be a reduction in computer misuse offences,
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computer scams, perhaps because we are all becoming a bit more savvy, and the overall trend in terms of crime is brought the stable. —— broadly stable. i know he will bring ours, to reaction to that later in the day, hamas adjust the strategy a new plan to tackle drug resistant superbugs is being unveiled by the government — including proposals to encourage the development of new antibiotics. the health secretary matt hancock said that unless new drugs were found a simple graze could become fatal. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes reports. antimicrobial resistance — in other words, the ability of drugs to stop drugs like antibiotics from working — is a serious threat. experts say, if unchecked, within three decades drug—resistant bugs could kill 10 million people around the world every year. if antibiotics stopped working, even minor infections from just
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a simple cut could prove fatal. unless we get a grip on resistance to antibiotics, people will die from these things, and antibiotics won't be able to save them. so, the uk government is renewing efforts to reduce our current use of antibiotics, which has already fallen, down by 7% since 2014. but the number of drug—resistant infections has increased by more thana third. so now the government wants to cut human use by a further 15% in the next five years, for example, by reducing the number of people picking up infections. drug companies will also be encouraged to produce new antibiotics. they will be paid on the basis of how valuable the drugs are to the nhs, rather than the sheer quantity that are sold. this is a great plan, this is a world first, it's a plan that looks to address antimicrobial resistance not just here in the uk but globally,
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and if we get this quite right, we could save millions of lives worldwide in the future. the threat posed by the use of antibiotics in humans and livestock is very real. dominic hughes, bbc news. president trump has backed down in a row with senior democrats, who have forced him to delay his state of the union address until the government shutdown is over. the speaker of the house of representatives, nancy pelosi, wrote to the president to tell him he would not be allowed to deliver the speech in the chamber next week, unless the government fully reopened. chris buckler is following developments in washington. let's talk now to cbs news correspondent mark liverman. warren, what is the background to all of this? we are 34 days into the shutdown. both sides have stuck to the original arguments, president
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trump wants funding for his wall, democrats say they would find it. last week, the president of it if you reform is to immigration policies to try and entice democrats to his side. no democrat came out in support of it. all this is going on as 800,000 federal employees are not getting paid. they are missing a second paycheque tomorrow. the financial impact of the shutdown - will. $6 financial impact of the shutdown - will. $6 billion. financial impact of the shutdown - will i $6 billion. - shutdown the will costing more than the president will end the first - according to economic source. - that is ‘ another not sustainable for another month? what happens - that's the big what happens next? that's the big question. today, the- builds aégffuw ségffuw two aégffuw two the on two different proposals, the z, :;:, plan on two different proposals, the is’ :;:, plan to on two different proposals, the plan to reopen the president's plan to reopen the comment and find the wall. and
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legislation passed last week by the democrats. that last until february eight, giving them time to try and hash out border security but neither expects the past. a few republicans have said that they will vote for both plans. 0thers have said that they will vote for both plans. others want to go back to the drawing board, they want to show that they are an open top but nothing concrete here but they are putting a plan to fund border security. but with a while. again, it's no steel or concrete suit is unclear president trump would even consider it at all. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. we have got some wintry showers still affecting the south—east of england, those are feeding away fairly quickly. still chilly across many eastern areas. temperatures and
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low single fingers but some sunny spells across much of eastern scotla nd spells across much of eastern scotland and england. the farther west you come, the small cloud, patches of rain around western areas. it is modelled, the temperatures on the rise. around 10 degrees for northern ireland as the south east of england. tonight will be patchy rain for scotland. it is built on model as the net goes on. still chilly across eastern areas. the pitchers into fairly low single figures. for many, those temperatures will continue to rise. a wad of cloud around on friday, some showery outbreaks of rain especially in northern and western parts of the uk. the big noticeable difference is the temperature— ten to 12 degrees. sorry about the technical
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difficulty. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: scotland's former first minister alex salmond has been arrested and charged by police. he's expected in court later today. the family of a woman, who died in a speedboat crash on the thames, say the man convicted of her manslaughter, jack shepherd is not taking responsibility for his actions despite his arrest in georgia. "as big a threat as climate change" — the health secretary announces a five—year plan to tackle antibiotic resistance. latest crime figures show a big increase in violent crime. it rose by by 19% in england and wales in the year to september the chief executive of airbus says it's a "disgrace" that businesses can't plan for brexit, and warns the company may have to make "very harmful" decisions for its uk operations in the event of no deal. and if you're confused by terms like "no deal", we're here to help. shortly we'll be breaking down
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the brexitjargon with our political correspondent chris mason. sport now, and here's 0lly. we've had three semi—finals at the australian open tennis, rafael nadal is into his fifth melbourne final. naomi osaka and petra kvitova will face each other for the title on saturday. andrew castle is here with me. let's start with rafa nadal. he has not played since the us open and he looked brilliant. he had it too easy, probably... he might have expected it much tougher against stefanos tstitsipas, but breezed through in three sets. the young greek with great thing is expected that he was blown away. it was the fault of rafa nadal that this happened and sometimes you must hold your hands up and say you have been outplayed. this guy has made a
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fantastic impression on the world of tennis, notjust by beating roger vedder and then another one but making his first grand slam semifinal. he will be around a long time. having watched every ball of this he played 0k. it wasjust that rafa nadal produced one of the greatest single sporting performances we have seen in tennis in recent years. in terms of the standard of his tennis, it was beyond belief. it wasn't a great match but a great performance. he is unbelievable. whatever sport he had taken up he would have been at the very top, rafa looking to become the first player in the open era to win each grand slam at least twice. ten years after he won his only melbourne title. your tennis researchers beyond belief. the other two include emerson and the reason why nobody, has managed to win at least two of the grand slams is because rafa nadal wins all the french open and
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there is nothing left for anybody to win. here's the of play. novak djokovic v lucas pouille. he is trying to win. 8.30 tomorrow morning. we expect rafa nadal versus novak djokovic in the final? they are far and away the best two players in the game in the semifinal at wimbledon last year, remember they waited for another semifinal and went on late. they were the two best and we expect them to be in the final. the plastic stories in the women's semifinals. —— fantastic stories. after a knife attack... petra kvitova beat the unsseded american danielle collins. this will be her first grand slam final since she was the victim of that knife attack just over two year ago. the second set was harder than the first set. she did not know she would have these highlights again and she has come back and understand this is her second chance and it is
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a great story and i am delighted. you could not wish to meet a nicer person. superb. playing not just person. superb. playing notjust for the title but... facing naomi 0saka notjust for the title but also the number one ranking naomi 0saka beat karolina pliskova in three sets. they will be facing each other for the number one ranking. number one in the world and people say serena williams is the best player in the world when she plays well and that may be the case but with sacco's victory and the last grand slams last year over serena in the final, —— boesak —— the city of 0saka. i think that she will win the match. but there is another potential champion. many thanks indeed. a great women's final to look forward to on saturday. highlights from all three semifinals we had today will be at 5pm on bbc two with andrew and the
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rest of the team. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. all the build—up to the second day of the first test in barbados. four wickets from jimmy anderson. more in the next hour. are you confused by all the brexit jargon bandied around by politicians, and used in the news? all day today, bbc news is breaking down the language that is routinely used, but not always explained. 0ur political correspondent chris mason has travelled to the university of befordshire in luton — where the majority of people voted to leave the eu in the 2016 referendum — to test—drive the bbc‘s online guide to brexitjargon. you called yourself the desk of drivel earlier. an admission of failure on my part and be part of all of us in the game of trying to explain what brexit is about because frankly we know that lots of people find some of the terminology around it incredibly baffling and that is entirely understandable because we are talking about the inner workings of political processes and they are not easy and for plenty people they are boring and dry. we are trying to disentangle this at the university of bedfordshire and let me take you into thejungle of bedfordshire and let me take you into the jungle ofjargon. these are the terms thrown away. the word brexit becomes contentious in terms of how it is defined. now introduce you to georgina from the institute for government. good morning. we talk about in this particular segment one term because trying to
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do more than one term in one go is asking for trouble and that term is here on the desk, the backstop, which sounds like a position in rounders but the jurors which sounds like a position in rounders but thejurors in which sounds like a position in rounders but the jurors in the language of political correspondents every second sentence. now, the backstop, does it mean anything at all? 0k, all? ok, this will be brief and vague but i think it is somewhat of a safety net and something in regards to trading. yes, that's it. the rising intonation of uncertainty... do you understand? definitely a safety net for the uk should things go awry with the trade negotiations. 0therthan should things go awry with the trade negotiations. other than that i don't think the term has been defined at all in the media so far. be honest about the job as guys are doing in the media. have we done enough to explain? actually, just being asked to do that as many think about the different terms we mention, bandied about over the last two years, so many of them and they get so used them that you don't really question them. you think you know what they mean anderson as he started think
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about you you realise actually don't and there is a lot more information needed. a devilish question about the backstop now... i have no idea, no clue, for me... i have no idea. admirable honesty and the perfect moment to bring georgina into the discussion from government. the backstop? what is it? a lot of pressure on me now to define this complex term. basically it isa define this complex term. basically it is a fallback option and at the moment the uk is a member of the european union and what we know is we share a border with another member of the european union. the government has said it wants to pull the uk out of the single market and customs union, a trading arrangement we have with all the eu member states. a product manufactured in the uk will be treated the same way asa the uk will be treated the same way as a product manufactured in france. if you pull us out of that market, suddenly we might have different rules or have to have checks at the borders to make sure that whatever we produce conforms with eu rules
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and regulations. now, obviously, there is a history of conflict around the border, so ireland and the uk were preoccupied about minimising the infrastructure along the border as much as possible. so this backstop is a fallback option and what they have said is it is an insurance policy if by the end of trading negotiations we have found no solution to make that border as soft as possible and minimise infrastructure and minimise the number of checks, we would have this policy coming to place to effectively keep the whole of the uk as part of a customs arrangement with the eu, so minimising checks, and northern ireland would have to conform to more rules and regulations because it has trade across that border. it is more closely aligned with ireland and the rest of the eu, then. a stellar and copper hands of explanation, so thank you. and thank you to you as well. —— comprehensive. now i go on about the big pool we are talking of today, the bbc‘s online guide to all of
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these terms. —— it is a tool. i will protest it now. what could possibly go wrong here? i will look up the term backstop, which i have not spelt correctly. that would help. i clicked on their here is the definition of the backstop because there is no such thing as overkill. he is the definition... that is new year's eve 2020. critics say... they fear the backstop could become
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permanent. it is all incredibly simple, isn't it? 0nce simple, isn't it? once you have explained it, it is. but you must hold our hand every day until march the 29th. thank you from the desk of drivel and the jungle of jargon. more from you later. chris will be back and if that was not enough, you can go online and look at ourjargon enough, you can go online and look at our jargon busting enough, you can go online and look at ourjargon busting guide yourself to check the most used brexit terms and phrases. click on the jargon explained. now we go to the us... president trump has backed down in a row with senior democrats, who have forced him to delay his state of the union address until the government shutdown is over. the speaker of the house of representatives, nancy pelosi, wrote to the president to tell him he would not be allowed
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to deliver the speech in the chamber next week, unless the government fully reopened. let's speak now to scott lucas, professor of us politics at birmingham university who joins us now from birmingham via webcam. let's speak now to scott lucas, professor of us politics at birmingham university who joins us now from birmingham via webcam. thank you for talking to us. thank you for talking to us. thank you. where does this stand in terms of precedent and have we ever had this kind of delay for a state of the union before? no, it was not the case that we had state of the unions before congress until the early 20th century. but after the timer woodrow wilson and world war i, ever since a us president has spoken each january before the house of representatives and senate in joint before the house of representatives and senate injoint session. it is unprecedented to withdraw the invitation but of course what is unprecedented really is the government shutdown. this is a record—setting shutdown and we are on day 34. it appears the white houseis on day 34. it appears the white house is prepared for this to extend not only for a few more days but for a few more months. they have asked all agencies what the effects on programmes would be if this lasted until april... that is a situation
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which the us government and economy and people have never faced. it is barely unthinkable for most people in those countries. how will it end? somehow it has to end. the starting point is this is a trump shutdown. it is due solely to the fact that donald trump is insisting on $5.7 billion for eight 30 foot high mexico border while even though all border security experts say it does not deal with the migration issue. to get around it you must convince trump that the ball is not actually the wall, his 30 foot structure, but actually enhanced borderfencing 30 foot structure, but actually enhanced border fencing and 30 foot structure, but actually enhanced borderfencing and other security measures but he will not buy that. the second option must be a guy named mitch mcconnell, the senate majority leader, a republican. he is blocking consideration of bills to reopen the government. these measures have $1.3 billion in addition to border security but mitch mcconnell says if trump will not sign it he will not
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allowed to be discussed until he gives way we keep on going with this unprecedented situation. what will change the mind of the president? his polling figures go down and it is clear the public really hold him responsible. will that change him? it could check his advisers around him and even his hard—line and tight immigration advisers like stephen miller because they thought this issue with help from get 2020 we election but every week over the last four weeks he has lost one half of 1% in approval rating and it is down below 40%. yesterday and 24 hours across all polls he lost a full percentage point. i don't think that will make trump give up and it is hard to make him retreat but it may make republicans in congress think twice about how far they will go with him if his ship is sinking. yet we have seen the divide between republicans and democrats... so polarised but will this push the republicans back towards the democrats? as polarised as politics is, the
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worst i can't remember it, after decades of division, at the end of the day to paraphrase an adviser to bill clinton, it is the economy, stupid. if millions of americans are unable to pay mortgages and cannot pay rent and if farm subsidies are not paid and if airport security can't be guaranteed, if you cannot provide basic services of national parks and other public facilities, then even trump supporters were say, wait a then even trump supporters were say, waita minute, then even trump supporters were say, wait a minute, how long does this dysfunction going? that i think we'll trump the idea, pardon the pun, of his base, the base of the presidents. thank you. donald trump has given his backing to venezuela's opposition leader juan guaido, who has declared himself interim president. it comes amid mass protests against president nicolas maduro who has overseen years of economic decline. the venezuelan government has responded by cutting political ties with the us. this is a complex situation getting
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more complex. joining me is the editor of bbc mundo, daniel garcia, the bbc‘s spanish language service. thank you for coming in. put this in context. it is not an internal political crisis in venezuela any more. in neighbouring countries some are backing the new interim president and the us, and of course a new crash between russia and the us because of the situation in venezuela. 11 countriesjoining venezuela. 11 countries joining the venezuela. 11 countriesjoining the us, and why have they chosen this particular figure to back? can you fill us in on this opposition leader? it isa on this opposition leader? it is a group of neighbouring countries critical of nicolas maduro and they have been very critical for and they have been very critical for a long time. now there is a strategy led by the opposition, the us and
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these countries, to try to gain momentum and to put pressure on president nicolas maduro. we're looking at these pictures, which are quite alarming, of the public protest. all driven by what isa public protest. all driven by what is a very, very severe economic collapse. the economic situation is in a bad way and all the situation, food shortages and medicine shortages and basic goods, and these are main problems,. more than 3 million people have left the country in the last period of time and that is the magnitude of the situation. we just saw pictures of the military in operation trying to control the situation but the position of the military is crucial at this point. you have 11 neighbours plus the us basically saying this is no longer a legitimate president and the president says he still has military support. does he? a key factor in venezuelan and they
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are backing president nicolas maduro and they backed chavez and now the opposition is trying to encourage the military to support the opposition and try to oust president nicolas maduro, saying that the constitution is with the opposition and not with the president, nicolas maduro. very, very complex and worrying situation. thank you for bringing us up—to—date. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... scotland's former first minister alex salmond has been arrested and charged by police. he's expected in court later today. the family of a woman, who died in a speedboat crash on the thames, say they are outraged after the man convicted for her death appears on tv in georgia "as big a threat as climate change" — the health secretary is to unveil a five—year plan to tackle antibiotic resistance. i'm victoria fritz
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in the business news. give us our people back — poland's prime minister says he wants to see more workers return from the uk to help its domestic economy grow. a disgrace and madness — strong words from the boss of airbus over brexit, as tom enders warns that the company could move wing—building out of the uk in the future if there is a no—deal brexit. and going, going, ghosn — for two decades carlos ghosn stood astride the global auto industry. today the executive has resigned from the french carmarker renault, as he faces allegations of financial misconduct in japan. with businesses worried about when and where the next recession might be coming from, it's striking that consumers here in the uk are spending more than ever before. according to the office for national statistics, household expenditure has risen
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to its highest level since 2005. that's if you adjust for inflation. glenn everett is a statistician at the office for national statistics. is this a function of well are a necessity? both, really. the idea of us collecting this family expenditure information is to find out and understand where families are spending their money. and this rise in spending seems as though it is being supported by rising levels of debt and also people dipping into their savings. how sustainable is that as a pattern of spending? it depends how and where they are getting income from. when interest rates are low, there is an opportunity to go and use credit to actually purchase particular items. some might have a long shelf life for example like a new car.
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0k, striking that the proportion of money being spent by younger households is rising when it comes to things like housing. they appear to things like housing. they appear to be called generation rent for a good reason, up to 60%. the younger households in particular are changing spending patterns. in general they tend to spend more on ta keaway general they tend to spend more on takeaway food and mobile phones, for example. 0k, and one thing that tickled us up in the business unit when we were looking through these figures is how much people are spending on takeaway food. some spend a big proportion on ta keaway food. some spend a big proportion on takeaway is and it is lowest income household spending more on take—out food than they are going to the supermarket and buying groceries. i supermarket and buying groceries. , the proportion to the lowest households but the absolute numbers but the more middle and higher income earners. northern ireland as a proportion spend most on takeaway is that this reflects northern ireland having in general some
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larger households. thank you very much. real madrid has topped the table of the world's 20 richest football clubs, displacing manchester united with record revenues of nearly £675 million. man utd slipped to third with barcelona making it the first spanish one—two since 2014—15, said deloitte. fujistu has told the bbc they have "zero intention" of moving their hq out of london. the japanese tech firm has 14,000 employees across uk and ireland — which it says is more than any other japanese company in the british isles. and chancellor philip hammond has pulled out of a discussion on the future of europe at the world economic forum in davos, according to the financial times. he was meant to appear alongside leaders of ireland, poland and the netherlands. speaking about europe... let's look at the markets. the eurozone economy began 2019 with activity creaking to its slowest pace in more than five years.
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the euro fell after the disappointing numbers were revealed. those concerns about growth and what to do about it will play into the discussion among european central bank policy makers, who meet in frankfurt on thursday. the ecb ended net bond buying last month. while officials already indicated then that they wouldn't start raising interest rates for some time, the deteriorating outlook suggests they may hold off even longer. a deep malaise is setting in. that's all the business news. more after the lunchtime news. see you soon. now, to the world of art... we will talk about the original renaissance man, the toast of europe, leonardo da vinci. leonardo da vinci has found himself at the centre of an international spat. italy has denied a request from france for the loan of a number of his paintings.
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the works of art had been requested for a major exhibition in paris, designed to mark the 500th anniversary later this year of da vinci's death. 0ur italy correspondent james reynolds reports from florence. take as much time as you need in front of each of these early leonardo paintings on display in florence. they will not be going on tour to join the mona lisa at the louvre in paris. you would think there would be enough leonardo works to go around to keep everyone happy, but that is not how this argument is playing out. the artist is now essentially the subject of an international custody dispute. the uffizi gallery says that the works are too fragile to be moved. any travel always puts works of art at risk. i mean, there are very, very sophisticated ways of having paintings travel nowadays. however, nothing is as safe as keeping them where they are. but there is much more to it than simple conservation.
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right now, populist—led italy and liberal—run france do not get along. italy accuses france trying hijack leonardo for itself. translation: leonardo, as such, belongs to the world, of course. but if you ask me where he is from, he is italian. he was an italian genius, and the fact that he was surrounded by all this italian beauty, this environment, allowed him to grow and become what he is now. but france, the custodian of the artist's most famous work, feels no need for history lessons from italy. what a revelation! what a revelation. yes, leonardo is italian. but he has chosen, freely chosen, to come into france and to live in this country during several years, and he has conceived many great projects.
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leonardo is italian, but he was french, he was european... a divided continent now prepares to mark the 500th anniversary of leonardo's death. the renaissance symbol who once dream of flight is now grounded, in a nationalistic debate. what on earth with the great man think? a group of prominent business leaders is calling on theresa may to make sure the hs2 railway project is completed, amid fears the northern leg could never be built. the high—speed line was intended to run from london all the way to leeds and manchester, but so far only phase one, to birmingham, has been given royal assent. the government says it is "completely inaccurate" to suggest phase two is being reconsidered.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. now it's time for a look at the weather. thank you. we have a wintry showers now clearing away from the south—east of england, and this gave us south—east of england, and this gave usa south—east of england, and this gave us a covering of snow in places. there will be sunny spells developing across much of north—east england up in towards eastern scotland. the further west you come, we have more cloud and rain. patchy rain moving through into western scotla nd rain moving through into western scotland and wales and the south—west of england. a change in temperatures here, 89 celsius. staying quite chilly across eastern areas. some rain still across western scotland into wales. —— eight or nine celsius. as it moves eastwards the rain will bring mild conditions conditions and the greens and yellows tip over into blue across eastern part, still chilly across the eastern parts tonight but elsewhere temperatures rising up to
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seven up elsewhere temperatures rising up to seven up to 10 celsius. in milder day compared to the last few days, temperatures ten up to 12 celsius. a lot of cloud around and some spots of rain. but of course much milder. goodbye. you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories. scotland's former first minister alex salmond has been arrested and charged by police. he's expected in court later today. the family of a woman who died in a speedboat crash on the thames say the man convicted of her manslaughter, jack shepherd, is not taking responsibility for his actions — despite his arrest in georgia. as we saw on tv, increasing feelings of anger to be honest with you. to see him just stroll into the police station smiling and waving, it was just unbelievable. his arrogance over everything. latest crime figures show a big increase in violent crime. it rose by by 19% in england
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and wales in the year to september "as big a threat as climate change" — the health secretary announces a five—year plan to tackle antibiotic resistance. the chief executive of airbus says it's a ‘disgrace' that businesses can't plan for brexit, and warns the company may have to make "very harmful" decisions for its uk operations in the event of no—deal. and, if you're confused by terms like "no—deal," we're here to help. throughout the day, bbc news will be breaking down the brexitjargon — on radio, tv and online. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the former scottish first minister, alex salmond, has been arrested
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and charged with an offence. it is not yet known what mr salmond has been charged with. police had been investigating, following a scottish government inquiry into complaints of sexual harassment, which he strongly denies. 0ur correspondent in glasgow is catriona renton. this is sending shock waves around the world of scottish politics and beyond. all we know so far is that police have issued a statement saying that a 64—year—old man has been arrested and charged, we don't not know what those charges are at the moment. it has been confirmed that the man is alex salmond, former first minister of scotland. he is not in custody, it is expected he will appear in court later today. we are yet to know what court that will be given. this follows allegations
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made a year ago lastjanuary by two female members of the scottish comic who made formal complaints about mr salmond's conduct getting back to december 2013 when he was still first minister. a scottish government investigation was launched into that, but i salmond resigned as head of snp. he took his own government to court over hull that had been handled, that it had been unfair, that confidential information had been leaked. the court ruled in his favour. at the same time that investigation was going on, police confirmed they were investigating complaints against alex salmond. he is a huge political figure in scotland. he was scotland's longest serving first minister from 2007—2014. scotland's longest serving first ministerfrom 2007—2014. he scotland's longest serving first minister from 2007—2014. he was the first ever snp first minister. he
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led the yes campaign in the scottish independence referendum in 2014. the result of that meant that he resigned his post when scotland ready to stay in the uk. he has continued to be a huge figure on the scottish political stage. as i said, we don't yet know what these charges are, we expect him to appear in court at some point this afternoon. i must stress, all the way through all these processes, mr salmond has strenuously denied any criminal activity. the family of a woman who died in a speedboat crash on the thames have said justice is close — after the fugitive convicted of her manslaughter handed himself in to police. jack shepherd turned up at a police station in georgia yesterday — six months after he was sentenced over the death of charlotte brown. her family criticised him for showing "unbelievable arrogance" when he appeared on tv shortly before he was arrested. chi chi izundu has this report.
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0n the run for 10 months, now surrounded by lawyers, this is the momentjack shepherd handed himself into police. he'd been hiding in the georgian capital, tbilisi. before being arrested, he gave an interview to a local tv channel. i hope that, you know, justice will be done and that my appeal will succeed and i canjust, everyone can move forward with their lives. lastjuly, he was sentenced in his absence to six years in prison for the manslaughter of 24—year—old charlotte brown. in december 2015, the pair had been on a first date and, after dinner and drinks, shepherd took out what he claimed was his speedboat on the thames. this footage was recovered from charlotte's phone. he let her take control, but they were both thrown into the water after the boat hit branches. he was found clinging to the hull. charlotte was pulled out unresponsive. charlotte's family have been
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appealing for shepherd to return to the uk, but had this reaction at the news. to see him just stroll into the police station, smiling and waving, it was just unbelievable. his arrogance over everything. under current diplomatic agreements between georgia and the uk, shepherd is eligible for extradition. the crown prosecution service said it is drafting a request. for now, he remains in a detention centre awaiting a court hearing for the next step in his legal process. 0ur reporter rayhan demytrie is in the georgian capital of tbilisi for us now. what kind you tell us? and jack shepherd is waiting this court hearing in the building behind me. this is the pre—trial detention
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centre here in tbilisi. her lawyers say that this hearing will take place tomorrow. it is expected that a judge will decide whether to continue to keep mr shepherd in detention while his extradition process is ongoing. under georgian law, the authorities can keep mr shepherd in detention for up to 90 days while the process is ongoing. that extradition process can be repeated several times save the maximum detention is nine months. how speedy new process will be depends on the level of cooperation between the respective authorities. roger has very good relations with the uk. -- roger has very good relations with the uk. —— georgia has very good relations. it is not expected therefore it is here will get in the
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way of british justice. theresa may is meeting union leaders today to talk about the next steps of her brexit plan. the prime minister is hoping to find a compromise with the tuc, unison, unite and the gmb after her deal was overwhelmingly voted down by mps last week. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith outside number ten. norman, tell us what is going on? that doesn't seem to be a great meeting of minds between those union leaders and mrs may so far. the verdict of those new leaders, who spent about 40 minutes each with mrs may, is that she's not in the market to move on the key issues where they what movement. no grand given on the idea of delaying article 50, no grant giving on ruling out no deal.
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also the same for employment rights. why this matters is because the unions want mrs may to give some sort of assurances that once we leave the eu, the uk will continue to abide by future eu regulations. there had been a thought that perhaps the premise that could tip toa perhaps the premise that could tip to a bit in that direction, it seems that she hasn't. what we have heard so far, the union leaders seem to be leaving pretty much empty handed. this was the reaction of france's 0'grady, the head of the tuc. i think the prime minister, frankly, has to stop playing to the bad boys at the back of class and start listening to where listening to where parliament is, which is wanting no—deal off the table and more time for genuine talks to take place. but get onto the priorities that matter to people in britain, working people in britain who have had ten years of austerity, rubbish living standards, and want a change. but we want our rights protected,
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and we want working people to be put first for a change. why is interesting that mrs may has given no grand on workers' rights, it seems, is because part of the surgery is not just it seems, is because part of the surgery is notjust being seen to be reaching out but also to maybe give the unions and labour mps is something that could bite on which might make them more supportive of the prime minister's deal. perhaps, therefore it should be a little give on employment rights. so far, nothing more than what has already been promised by the prime minister. meanwhile, we learn that the votes on mrs may ‘s motion on tuesday, is that labour and tory mps on board for the people's vote campaign have decided to pool their amendment which would have led to another vote
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on the referendum. the thinking is that there is no chance of it being passedif that there is no chance of it being passed ifjeremy corbyn comes on board. there are no time to crank up the pressure on mr corbyn to buy another referendum, with one labour mp issuing this warning to mr corbyn if he did not come round to backing the so—called people's vote. i believe that if labour doesn't back a people's vote, we will haemorrhage support right across the country and we will is suffer at those elections boxes whenever the next general election will come. whenever it will be. that is a responsibility for the party to reflect upon. you think it could split the labour party? the issue is that we want to see a resolution, it's the most critical issue in our country. we're all coming together in the national interest because we think this is the most pressing thing we should be resolving at this time. so hang your heart for tuesday. it's going to be another big day in the commons. the aviation company airbus has
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warned that it could move wing—building out of the uk if there is a no—deal brexit. the firm's chief executive, tom enders, said the firm "will have to make potentially very harmful decisions for the uk" in the event of no deal. he said it was a "disgrace" that businesses could still not plan for brexit. our business correspondent victoria fritzjoins me now. it is strong language. very strong language indeed. what's like this grace and madness. lots of corporate have released it away from, in the run—up to the vote next tuesday, but that the other word from catherine bennett on by the timing was so crucial. diplomacy is needed at certain points but we felt we were getting to a crunch time. there were a lot of false allegations that a
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managed no deal woodwork and we just wanted to be clear that for us it would be catastrophic. we would see chaos at the borders and what's essential parts could potentially get held up. as a uk business person, i don't want to see my country causing trouble for companies like project. the reason it matters is because airbus is one of the biggest employers in britain. it employs about 40,000 people, about 3000 in wales and 6000 elsewhere. it builds helicopters, satellites, planes, all sorts of things. it's also the nucleus for a massive supply chain, thousands of thousands of jobs. it massive supply chain, thousands of thousands ofjobs. it isn't the first time that they have said things like this. last year, the issued a bit assessment but this is far stronger language that suggest a new sort of urgency. they give for
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that. it comes at the same time that we are hearing about other companies moving operations, panasonic, sony. we will have more of that through the course of the day. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel. but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the headlines on bbc news: scotland's former first minister alex salmond has been arrested and charged by police. he's expected in court later today. the family of a woman who died in a speedboat crash on the thames say they are outraged after the man convicted for her death appears on tv in georgia. "as big a threat as climate change" — the health secretary is to unveil a five—year plan to tackle antibiotic resistance. sport now. rafael nadal makes it look very
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easy at australian open as he reaches his fifth melbourne final. she might have expected a tough match against his greek opponent. the dial is looking to become the first player in his error like to win the grand slam twice. the women's final will be between the two accused over and none of satire. better give it has not been ina grand satire. better give it has not been in a grand slam final since november to final of 2014 which she won. as more importantly, she has not been inafinalsince more importantly, she has not been in a final since she was stabbed in ha rd in a final since she was stabbed in hard play behind when in an intruder broke into her apartment in 2016.
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her surgeon said that her chances of playing at the highest level against we re very playing at the highest level against were very low in his opinion but some very clever surgery and painstaking habilitation hassen and an abridged session was using a grand slam final beating dave collins 7—6— zero. the roof was closed as temperatures approached 40 celsius. in the final, miami satire, what a sorry for hard. us open champion and now she has won six matches in a row in melbourne too. the search for the missing cardiff city striker has entered a third day. the light aircraft he was travelling on disappeared on monday night near the channel islands as he returned to's after saying goodbye to his former team—mates. rescuers are focusing their searches on coastal areas. it's no surprise magister city through to the final
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of the week. whitaker 9— fuelled week to britain are being. perhaps it was a surprise that they only scored one goal. next week final will be against either chelsea or totte n ha m. will be against either chelsea or tottenham. , nicol up will be against either chelsea or tottenham. , nicolup to will be against either chelsea or tottenham. , nicol up to second and the scottish premature, one point behind celtic. they jumped the scottish premature, one point behind celtic. theyjumped out of rangers after beating them 2—1. the second day of the first test in barbados starts in the next couple of hours, england had just about got their noses in front afterjimmy anderson took four wickets in the final session. the hosts will resume this afternoon on durability of the 4-8. that this afternoon on durability of the 4—8. that is always bought for now, i'll be back after one o'clock. donald trump has given his support
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to opposition venezuelan leader. this comes after the current president has overseen years of economic decline. the venezuelan government has responded by cutting political ties with the us. earlier, i spoke to the editor of the bbc‘s spanish—language service. he put this into context for others say it's not just this into context for others say it's notjust a new internal crisis in venezuela in a more. delivering neighbouring countries are backing the interim president, the us, of course. there is a new clash between russia and the us because of this situation in israel. so, in 11 countriesjoining the situation in israel. so, in 11 countries joining the us. situation in israel. so, in 11 countriesjoining the us. why have they chosen this particular figure to back? this is a group of neighbouring countries, very critical of the president, they have
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been for a very long time. now there is e strategy led by the w us, and these countries to try the us, and these countries to try and gain the mental and to put pressure on the president. we are looking at these alarming pictures of the public protests, all driven by what is a very severe economic collapse. the economic situation is in the background of these situations. there are shortages of food, medicines, basic goods. and of course, inflation is the main problem for the people. more than 3 million people have left it country in the last year, that gives you a sense of the magnitude of the situation in venezuela. would use pictures of the military trying to control the situation. but the position of the litany is crucial at this point, isn't it? all these
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outside forces saying that they're against the president, the president says that he has military support, dusty? the new shadowj says that he has military support, dusty? the new shadow] of the monterey is to support the opposition and try to ask the president, saying that the constitution is with the opposition and not with the president, nicholas medeiros. (pres) a new plan to tackle drug resistant superbugs is being unveiled by the government — including proposals to encourage the development of new antibiotics. the health secretary matt hancock said that unless new drugs were found a simple graze could become fatal. our health correspondent, dominic hughes reports experts say, if unchecked buffer in
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three decades of drug resistant bugs could kill determined people. u nless we unless we get a grip on resistant to antibiotics, people will die from these things and antibiotics would be able to save them. the uk government is renewing efforts to reduce our current use of antibiotics which has already fallen, my son percent since 2014. the number of drug resistant infections has increased by more than a third so now the government was the god humanist by it further 50% in the next five years. drug companies will also be encouraged to produce new antibiotics, they will be paid on the basis of how valuable the drugs are to the nhs rather than the sheer quantity of it is sold. this is a
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great plan, a world first. it is apparent that the address and to may drug your resistance, modest in the uk but globally. if we get this right, we could save millions of lives worldwide the future. the threat posed by the overuse of antibiotics in humans and livestock is very real. the speaker of the house of the representatives from coopers and don't tell them he would be up able to make progress in the chamber next week u nless progress in the chamber next week unless the government was reopened. before border security is even
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talked about,. before border security is even talked about, . last before border security is even talked about,. last week, the president offered if you reform to try and entice democrats to decide but the result of changes to his plan and no democrats came out in support of it. they are missing a second paycheque tomorrow. the financial impact of the shutdown will be $6 billion. this shutdown is costing more than the president will in the first place, according to one economic source. surely that is not sustainable for another month? what happens next? that's the big question. today, the senate builds on two different proposals, the president's plan to reopen the government and find the wall. and legislation passed last week by the democrats. that reopens government february eight, giving them time to try and
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hash out border security but neither expects the past. a few republicans have said that they will vote for both plans. others want to go back to the drawing board, they want to show that they are not for open borders but nothing concrete here but they are putting a plan to fund border security. but without a wall. again, it's no steel or concrete so is unclear president trump would even consider it at all. the warnings come after the first inspection and to focus on sex
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offenders in line years. all home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. i sat in her own home, 30—year—old lisa was attacked and murdered by a man under supervised probation. her attacker had a history of serious sexual offending. the report found was clear failings in the way he was assessed and monitored. now an investigation has uncovered wider problems. the report found that much of the work to address sexual offending was poor. a third of risk assessment of sex offenders were insufficient. and some children were not been protected properly from convicted paedophiles. this is now a national priority. we are dealing with large numbers of offenders and some very significant risks. i'm sure that the public would prefer that those risk are better managed than they are at the moment. the report is a shortage
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of places where prisoners could be safely monitored on release meant that some offenders were placed in an suitable accommodation, including budget hotels. why are they being sent to these types of places? even though there was no room in a blue premises, what sort of risk assessments are being carried out to make sure these people are not in contact with potentially vulnerable adults and children. the military says that hotels are only used in exceptional circumstances. the department is able to tackle the issues raised in the report. are you confused by all the brexit jargon bandied around by politicians, and used in the news? all day today, bbc news is breaking down the language that is routinely used, but not always explained. 0ur political correspondent chris mason has travelled to the university of befordshire in luton, where the majority
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of people voted to leave the eu in the 2016 referendum, to test drive the bbc‘s online guide to brexitjargon. it sounds very exciting, is it? it's riveting. every single minute about brexit is absolutely riveting. i like the university of bedfordshire in britain. let me bring you the year to a la jungle ofjargon. you can see all the consumer— hard brexit, customs partnership, the kind of things that people like me can get through a sentence without mentioning. we have some guys, university students, also employees and the junior who writes for the institution for government. in a moment, we'll talk about the wto and its rules. in the context of the next few months, potentially. we shall talk to you first michael. the
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wto, at just shall talk to you first michael. the wto, atjust one of those organisations that really hear much about and then suddenly, you could put old people like me talking about it all the time. it's a bit of a mouthful. i would say that the liberty of what countries that trade with each other have to comply by. we'll, i'll bring you in. in terms of the noise of brexit, are you paying much attention?” of the noise of brexit, are you paying much attention? i say i am keeping up—to—date with what's going on with brexit. i voted to stay remained so i'm very proud people's vote so that's where i stand on brexit. i think i might add modric asa brexit. i think i might add modric as a littlejudge. i think i might i
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point you as a judge. these are rules that are set by this organisation called the world trade organisation. the, the very basics of trade. if a country wants to sell something to another country, these rules will tell you how much you have to pay and how much each country has to pay to receive goods. there are lots of things that these rules don't cover. they don't cover, for example, all the paperwork needed. the cover rules around checks at the borders, they don't really cover standards. those are set by individual or groups of countries. they are very basic which is why a lot of countries try to have traded as arrangements to build and improve on those trade
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arrangements. did that make sense? it did make sense. i think what they do is that they put in place the rules that countries have in order to trade with one another. but they don't cover everything in regards to trading, which is why we need to make reduce ourselves with other countries? it's best to have other arrangements. the more delays, the more friction you have, it'sjust means that it's going to be more costly which is why lots of countries try and shrike trade agreements. they are very accommodated and they sometimes take years to negotiate. thank you very much. good old discussion about the video in a matter of minutes. i'm pretty head over to my desk of travel as we talk up this online guide, which is brilliant, on the bbc website with some pithy definitions about what we are
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talking about. let's give up the very thing that we have been talking about if we can do the wto in five minutes flat, maybe nuclear this afternoon? go on, challenge yourself, chris. i don't think you should talk yourself down. that is enough of the desk of dreadful. it should be something to glorify yourjargon busting.
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yes, i will work on alliteration. i will have a sandwich and we will give it a pr brush up for this afternoon. yes, more from chris throughout the day and as he mentioned the jargon guide is online. you can check the most used brexit terms and phrases on our website. now let's have a look at the weather. hello there and things are turning milder over the next days and seeing milder over the next days and seeing milderair milder over the next days and seeing milder air arriving into western areas and filtering eastwards through this afternoon and this evening. colder conditions for a time across eastern areas with sleet and snow for east anglia and south—east england, outbreaks of rain preceded by snow and ice in northern scotland. as the night moves on, patchy light rain and drizzle and best and health. 10 celsius in the west but causative
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freezing for east anglia and south—east england. tomorrow the mild air rights laws across the uk and a lot of cloud. a noticeable and windy breeze for the western parts of scotland, rain and drizzle, brea ks of scotland, rain and drizzle, breaks inclined to the east of high ground. an idea of wind strength, tomorrow afternoon, strong gusts for north and west scotland. mild at nine up to 12 celsius the top temperature tomorrow. many feeling milderairon temperature tomorrow. many feeling milder air on saturday but cloudy and windy with our of rain at times and windy with our of rain at times and clearing through. colder out by sunday with a brisk north or north—westerly wind making it feel even cooler. hello this is bbc newsroom live. we go straight over to downing street with a guest. thank you and len mccluskey has come out of a 40 minute meeting with theresa may. theresa may. the invite was to come and listen to the prime minister and i was able to
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reiterate what a number of people have said to me before that a no deal would be disastrous. i speak virtually for the whole manufacturing sector and all of the major companies in it. i suppose i was concerned that it was a proper meeting, and she is serious about negotiating and reaching out, or was it just. .. is she serious? was it just a is she serious? was itjust a pr stunt? we will see. it is action that is currently needed and we are in a difficult situation. it is up to the prime minister to take initiative. did you see any movement at all from the prime minister on any areas, customs union, delaying article 50, any movement? asi any movement? as i say, it is about action, not words. obviously it was a long meeting and we ranged over a number of different subjects. i indicated to her if indeed she is concerned
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and interested and serious about getting the deal through, then in my opinion article 50 would need to be extended, probably by three months. not nine months, just three months? i understand yvette cooper's amendment seeks a nine—month extension, probably too long. the prime minister could indicate that seeking an extension of three months would indicate that she was serious about sitting down with people and talking. you could take a look at trade unions, and this week i have had today is two and a half years too late. if we were talking when the result of the referendum first came out then we may have been able to point out a number of different issues. you have gone in to meet mrs may and jeremy corbyn has refused to do so. do you think he is correct to continue to refuse to do so? i think it was absolutely correct and he has been vindicated. the snp and he has been vindicated. the snp and liberal democrats were made to
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look foolish. jeremy was spot on and i think the manner in which he has handled the situation, a difficult situation in the labour party, has been brilliant and statesman—like and it looks to me like a prime minister in waiting. obviously he is seeking an indication from the prime minister that it isn'tjust another pr stunt, which of course is exactly what the liberal democrats and the snp said. what do you say to those who say, at a time of national crisis, everybody must be prepared to optimise and eve ryo ne must be prepared to optimise and everyone must be prepared to talk, getjeremy corbyn is standing on the sidelines refusing to join getjeremy corbyn is standing on the sidelines refusing tojoin in? quite the opposite. labour laid down an amendment covering a number of different issues and jeremy corbyn has said on a number of occasions publicly, and said in his conference speech in liverpool last year, and said it since, that if mrs may is serious about wanting to reach out, then he is happy to do that. but there must be a clear indication that the prime minister is prepared
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to move. her red lines unfortunately are causing a problem and she has had to do it because of her hard brexiteers and she is struggling which way to go. but it is in the power of the prime minister to do that, notjeremy corbyn. did you hear anything today which you think might give some labour mps a reason to vote for mrs may's deal, whether it is something unemployment rate or anything like that? i think it is all about action. warm words... if i keep saying it, i don't apologise. warm words actually mean nothing and there must be a concrete indication of action that the prim minister will take, and then we will see whether there is then we will see whether there is the prospect of proper meaningful negotiations and an extension of article 50 would demonstrate a belief that she needs more time to thrash out a deal. an indication that she will not pursue a no deal
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would relieve thousands and thousands, tens of thousands of my members' concerns at the moment. that's what she should do, be brave enough to that and then negotiations and discussions can take place to see if we can resolve this. you are a close friend and ally of jeremy corbyn and he is now coming under intense pressure from some labour mps to move towards backing a so—called people's vote. two things — one, do you think he will and number two, do you think he should? labour laid down an amendment embracing a people's vote, and the amendment they laid down is fairly compressor. there is a sequence and clearly there is many of us including meat still desperate for a people's vote. —— it is fairly comprehensive. a people's vote is called a general election, the only one i think is meaningful. i would not dismiss the prospect of a general election at this juncture. jeremy, i think, general election at this juncture. jeremy, ithink, has been general election at this juncture. jeremy, i think, has been actually brilliant at handling this and in a
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sequenced way. we don't know what will happen in the next eight weeks or what will happen tomorrow. it changes almost on the hour and i think what labour and corbyn have done is give a path certainly to get out of this current mess, but also a sequence that they will move to. how likely do you think is a general election? etiquette is still a possibility. it is never a great possibility and i am not suggesting for one minute it isa am not suggesting for one minute it is a great possibility at the moment but it is certainly a possibility. truthfully. .. anyone but it is certainly a possibility. truthfully... anyone who says, this is going to happen or that is, frankly are deluding themselves as well as anybody else. nobody quite understands what is going to happen, and from my belief, we should have a general election and that people could general genuinely decide which way to take this foreword. if that does not really materialise then we will have to see a whole plethora of amendments which will come down.
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people talking about a norway option, common market number two, the swiss option, the turkish option, what do we mean by customs union? there is a lot still u nfortu nately to union? there is a lot still unfortunately to be resolved. we know there will be a lot of votes on tuesday to mrs may's bracket statement, pressure to delay or push of article 50. are you convinced people behind those motions are genuine or is the name of the game here actually stopping brexit? i think some are genuine and i think some are less genuine. i am not going to start naming names but the reality is that people have their own agenda, understandably so. there isa own agenda, understandably so. there is a vacuum at the moment and whenever there is a vacuum people try to fill that vacuum. labour has a policy determined at its conference. jeremy corbyn is following that. he has laid down an amendment that discharges in a sense
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his duty to the conference policy. so those that are playing games around the edges and have their own agendas, well, to me, they will continue to play those games but they're not particularly relevant to resolving what is a concerning situation. thank you, len mccluskey, for your time. the union meetings are carrying on in the afternoon and mrs may is meeting tim roach of the gnb. so far it has been a meeting of minds. a european court has ruled that the uk violated the human rights convention by holding police database information about a 94—year—old man's political views. this case has major implications for the right to privacy and to data storage by the security services. let's get the details from our legal correspondent clive coleman. the implications?
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this is the most incredible story and one day someone will make a film about it. tell us story. john is 94 years old, a lifelong peace activist, and there has never been any suggestion he in any way is violent or a troublemaker but in 2005 he started attending the ministrations organised by a group known to be violent in breaking, demonstrating against an american arms company. —— this was in brighton. in 2010 he sat there sketching or painting pictures of what was going on. he made a request to the police under the data protection act to find out what information was being held on him and he found that 66 entries were there on him, his age, his date of birth, his address, his physical appearance, what he was doing at the demonstrations. they were mainly about the ones in the city of brighton but others as well. that was held on a database that was
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really retaining information about domestic extremism. we may come back to this because there has never been a proper definition of what domestic extremism is. john then sought a judicial review to get the in formation. he asked the police to expunge it and sought a judicial review. he fought it through the domestic court and lost in the high court, one in the court of appeal, lost in supreme court and into his 90s took his case to the european court of human rights and today he has won a unanimous victory in his favour, that his article eight rights, the right privacy... by retaining it... the police had a right to collective but not retaining it. you cannot pretend daytime summer just because retaining it. you cannot pretend daytime summerjust because of political opinions. —— you cannot retain data because of political opinions. police get their knuckles rapped on this because when they went to the supreme court they did
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not provide the supreme court with all the information and data they held onjohn all the information and data they held on john and all the information and data they held onjohn and more data came to light and they had not put that in front of the court. it is pretty embarrassing day for the police. will they have to go back and have a bonfire of data bases? the core of this is that there were no real safeguards in place and no time limits and it was a rule that after six years they must review the information so they must look at whether they are holding information on people purely because of their peaceful demonstrations, political activities... on the other hand, time limits they must look at and also assess who is a threat. and the 94—year—old man doing sketches and drawings, john catt, does not come into the category. where is the navy for your old man? will he starred in his own movie? element he is 94 and in the city of brighton. he is delighted but tired. we would like to talk tojohn catt.
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the number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales went up by almost a fifth, in the twelve months to september, compared with the year before according to latest figures from the office for national statistics. homicides have increased by 14% in a year, with the total number up from 649 to 739. offences involving a knife are up by 8% and overall there has been a 7% rise in police—recorded crime, with a total of 5,723,182 offences in the year to september 2018. west midlands police and crime commissioner david jamieson joins us now to discuss these latest crime stats. thank you for talking to us. what is your reaction to the overall numbers for a rise in violent crime? very disturbing that there has been a rise in many areas of crime, particularly violent crime. i have seen this in my area and most urban
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areas of the country. we have got to relate this to the ability of the police now to do preventative work, which has been seriously impaired by the level of cuts we have had over the level of cuts we have had over the last six or seven years. we have lost 2000 uniformed officers in my area. ithink lost 2000 uniformed officers in my area. i think the other thing disturbing about this, if you look at the trend of where violence is happening and crime is happening, there is now a break between how the police are funded and where the real crime is happening. those areas of high criminality and high need for policing are now being cut more than those with the lesser need. what is puzzling is that the government to day has come out and said, in the shape of the minister for policing, he is saying, we have proposed the biggest increase in police funding since 2010, confident that the new settlement delivering up that the new settlement delivering up to £970 million of additional
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public investment into policing in 2018 and 2020 will help to recruit more officers. he was here in the west midlands and iam he was here in the west midlands and i am pleased to receive him here in the west midlands. with the chief co nsta ble, the west midlands. with the chief constable, we told him what we had had from the government actually was still a further cut to our funding. it is only by putting the council tax up that a substantial amount could get a level playing field in terms of funding. this coming year we have no increase, despite the money being put in, partly because the government have put a massive burden of extra pension costs on the police forces. of course, inflation is going up as well and police pay is going up as well and police pay is going up and we must pay them. there is no extra funding in fact. what it does not account for is the massive reduction in funding which has taken place over the last six or seven yea rs. will come back and ask the government about those figures but another point the government is making on this is that it has a
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serious violence strategy which emphasises intervening early and working to prevent young people from being drawn into a life of crime. does this strategy give you reassurance? it doesn't have been part of the strategy and we have had some funding, £1.8 million here in the west midlands to help with that. we have been sailors for a long time. you cannot just arrest yourself out of these problems and what we must do is put things towards the causing crime. i said to the minister, we must look at drugs policy and how drugs contribute to violent crime, the main cause of violence. the other things i asked them to look at is school exclusions and the number of young people, 13, 14, 15, mainly boys excluded from school with no proper alternative arrangements made for them. those boys then very often find themselves in criminality and violence and working with gangs. cou nty violence and working with gangs. county lines taking drugs from
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centres like west midlands out to other areas... those are issues we must address. i am pleased we are doing that. the amount of money being put in, i have to say, is not large. nevertheless, we welcome this andi large. nevertheless, we welcome this and i am working very positively to assist the government in this programme. thank you forjoining us. the family of a woman who died in a speedboat crash on the thames have said justice is close, after the fugitive convicted of her manslaughter handed himself in to police. jack shepherd turned up at a police station in georgia yesterday, six months after he was sentenced over the death of charlotte brown. earlier, i spoke to barrister katherine taylor who helped to make sense of what happens next. she explained the legal dimension. extradition is the process by which states can request the return of people to serve a sentence stands trial and jack has handed himself in to the police in this case and will be appearing before court on an
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extradition request. that court appearance will be friday morning and it was just said it could take weeks and the maximum time is nine months. does this make sense to you? difficult to predict how much time this could take. it depends on the issues the requested person will be raising. it will be open to jack in this case to raise human rights issues, which might prevent his return to the uk depending on the validity of the issues he raises. what would be counted as a valid issue, given that we normally regard ourselves as a human rights respecting country? issues raised regularly in extradition cases, particularly in cases where people are being sought from the uk, but would apply in georgian cases as well, our prison conditions article three and article six forfair trial conditions article three and article six for fair trial rights. we have heard jack shepherd saying in the interview that caused offence to the family yesterday that he wa nted to the family yesterday that he wanted to prove his innocence, but i
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suppose that in and of itself is rather puzzling since his trial has already happened. yes. i assume what he is thinking is that he wants to come back and make effo rts that he wants to come back and make efforts here to clear his name. which would involve an appeal? yes. that has been lodged already. on the face of it, it seems puzzling that he did notjust get on a plane and come back to the uk and say, ok, now i want to do all this straightforwardly. yes and that is how it might appear to the public. there are benefits that the requested person gets an certain protections they get if they return to the requesting state before the extradition process... one thing is specialty, illegal term. that puts certain restrictions on the offence is the uk government can deal with him for that might have taken place before his extradition.
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issues like skipping on bail? llangefni exactly. —— issues like skipping on bail? llangefni exactly. -- yes, exactly. the likelihood is that given we do have sensible presence and we do have sensible presence and we do have a sensible justice system. the likelihood is this extradition will go ahead presumably. i would not like to say and it will depend very much on the substantive request, so whether that is in order. and any other issues that jack will raise in his extradition process. it is something to watch and the thing is that even if georgia refused extradition, i have no doubt there will continue to be a valid extradition request in the offing should jack decided to move to another country and the uk authorities would be alerted to his presence there are most likely and another extradition request would be forthcoming. all day, bbc news is breaking down the brexitjargon routinely used by politicians and by the media, but which is rarely explained.
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one of those terms is free trade. here's our reality check correspondent chris morris to make sense of it. everyone in the brexit debate is promising to give you free trade, and who doesn't like free stuff? so what is a free—trade agreement and how might it be different to what we have with the eu now? well, free—trade deals in to get rid of tariffs or border taxes on goods. all the stuff we make. meaning there are no charges for bringing those products across the border. they also try to get rid of quotas so there is no limit on how much trade you can do. the idea is to make trade between different countries as easy as possible. but free—trade deals don't get rid of border tracks entirely. —— but free—trade deals don't get rid of border checks entirely. it's not frictionless trade. countries still make their own rules on things like safety regulations or product standards, for which traded goods need to be checked. that doesn't happen when you are part of the eu because in the eu's economic zone, the single market and the customs
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union, there is one set of rules that all countries follow. the eu also guarantees the free movement of services, capital and people. free—trade agreements simply do not cover as much. so when people talk about super canada trade agreements between the uk and the eu after brexit, they are still talking about a much looser relationship than being part of the eu. however ambitious it might be, it wouldn't produce trade with no border checks or delays at all and it wouldn't solve one of brexit‘s biggest dilemmas — how to avoid a hard border in ireland. you may think that a price worth paying for the ability to set your own rules, make your own way and pay far less money to the eu budget, but in the end free trade isn't entirely free. throughout the day — we'll be speaking to our political correspondent chris mason later
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in the programme and you can also use our jargon—busting guide online to check the most used terms and phrases. go to bbc.co.uk/brexit and click on brexit jargon explained. do it now. in a moment it's time for the 1.00 news. but first it's time for a look at the weather. hello and for many it was another cold start of the day but briefly things will turn less coal. a warm front here and behind it milder are starting to make its presence felt across northern ireland and west in south—west england. it brings more cloud and cloud and mist and hill fog and patchy light rain and drizzle. further east in the cold are these blue colours, wintry showers in east anglia and south—east england. they will fade and to receiving an overnight some rain working eastwards across scotland, snow initially for northern scotland for a time but
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slowly things turn milder. increasingly cloudy with mist and fog around. temperatures by dawn tomorrow nine or 10 celsius for the western fringe, but still on the cold side for east anglia and south—east england. those mild conditions work across the uk tomorrow bringing cloud and strengthening winds and outbreaks of rain, particularly across scotland. northern england and northern ireland as well. some breaks of cloud in the eastern high ground but a breezy if not windy day with strongest winds across northern scotla nd strongest winds across northern scotland with gusts of 40 up to 50 mph. look at the temperatures at nine up to 11 celsius tomorrow afternoon, feeling much milder. going into the weekend, you could see another frontal system approaching from the atlantic, a deep area of low pressure strengthening the wind into sunday, and behind it will be cold at once again. the milder conditions were brief. on saturday fred across northern ireland working towards the western fringes of wales, south—west england and western parts of
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scotland, which might see further snow across northern scotland. he called are digging in but further south again nine or 10 celsius. —— caldaire digging in. it works its way eastwards into sunday, with deep low pressure. the wind strengthening all the while and behind it we're backin all the while and behind it we're back in the colder are. on sunday it isa back in the colder are. on sunday it is a cold and often cloudy day with bright and sunny spells with showers and longer spells of rain that also snow returning to scotland and parts of northern england. a strong northerly wind making it feel much colder. an idea of average people with gusts touching 50 up to 60 mph in northern and western coasts. with the strength of the wind highs are just 67 celsius feeling colder. —— six or seven celsius. in. alex salmond, the former first minister of scotland, is arrested and charged by police. it follows claims against him
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of sexual harrassment, which he strenously denies. mr salmond is due to appear in court in edinburgh this afternoon. we'll have the latest from there. also this lunchtime... jack shepherd — the man convicted of killing a woman in a speedboat crash — protests his innocence after handing himself in. her family accuse him of "unbelievable arrogance". he's been found guilty and convicted of manslaughter. how can someone continue now to still be in denial about their reckless actions? a steep rise in the number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales. a warning that, unless we cut down our use of antibiotics, a simple graze could be enough to kill.
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