Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 20, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm BST

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11:003m and these are the main stories this morning: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. president trump warns iran it will be destroyed if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. the inquest into the london bridge attacks hears about ignacio echeverria, who died, fighting off the attackers with just a skateboard all this week bbc news is in middlesbrough — once called the worst place for a teenage girl to grow up, we meet the young women turning things around. i never thought that i'd be able to become a doctor, but ruby's has helped me to believe that i can do it if i put my mind to it and keep it going in school. and, after eight seasons,
11:01 am
one of the world's most successful tv series, game of thrones, comes to an end. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. iamjoanna i am joanna gosling. technology giant google says it's stopped the chinese tech firm, huawei from using some of its services. it means new huawei smartphones, which use google‘s android operating system, may not have access to popular apps like gmail, or receive security or technical support. it comes after the us blacklisted the company, over fears that beijing could use the firm's equipment to spy on american networks. huawei insists it poses no security threat and says it has made substantial contributions to the development of android around the world. dave lee has more. like most of the smartphones in the world, huawei's devices are powered by google‘s android operating system.
11:02 am
it means integrated access to hugely popular services like youtube, gmail and maps, as well as google‘s voice assistant and security updates. but last week, the us government added huawei to a list of foreign entities that us companies cannot work with unless they obtain government approval. approval google doesn't yet seem to have. and may not get. "we are complying with the order and reviewing the implications," a google spokesman told the bbc. for consumers it means this — huawei smartphones that are already on the market will still have access to everything they do today, including security updates. but when google launches the next version of android later this year, it may not be available on huawei devices. future huawei devices may not have any google services at all. services consumers have come to expect. the us insists its moves against huawei are about security.
11:03 am
they say the chinese tech giant could be used to spy on americans. but huawei, and china, say this is about undermining a company that threatens apple's dominance in the tech industry. and as the us—china trade dispute remains unresolved, this will likely be seen as an aggressive step by the us to force china's hand. dave lee, bbc news, in san francisco. our china correspondent robin brant is in shanghai and has been monitoring reaction there. we've seen some reaction online in terms of social media. frankly, not surprising, some chinese people talking about a pushback. they want their government to target iconic american tech firms, apple of course has been mentioned. that may be something that happens further down the line in terms of the context of the trade war here. we've had reaction in terms of tariffs from the chinese government, reacting to what the us has done. it wouldn't be surprising to see some non—tariff reaction from the chinese as well. and as the us government moves to really essentially try to strangle huawei's operations
11:04 am
when it comes to its smartphone business, for though, crimes it thinks it may commit in its networking business, it's likely we may see the chinese government try to whip up fervour here, particularly on the consumer side, may be some targeting of american companies operating here in china. that's something we've seen before when we've had trade disputes with other countries, the philippines and south korea in particular. our technology reporter, zoe kleinman is here. anyone with one of the phone is that there is potentially affected will be wondering how it might affect them? it is not good news for huawei owners in the west. they have another bank called, . it doesn't look like things will change
11:05 am
straight if you have an existing huawei or other device, nothing will be revoked. but going forward it may mean when the next version of android comes out, you will not get it. you may not get security updates oi’ it. you may not get security updates or other updates you need. your device is going to become older, if you like. huawei says it will try to maintain its own security updates, but everything is so tied into google on an android powered device, it will be difficult to manage without the power of that tech giant behind it. it is quite bewildering, the interconnectedness of these different companies and what we rely on and there are issues around huawei with future contracts in this country? it is only when you think about how much, if you have an android phone, the weather, maps, gmail, it is ingrained in the fabric of your life. the interesting thing, there has been security issues about
11:06 am
huawei in terms of the five g network, the next generation of internet mobile. this is a big side step for a security fear that is very much focused on a different pa rt very much focused on a different part of the company's business, until this point. what are the potential ramifications for huawei and its future growth strategy? huawei is already massive, it is the second largest phone maker in the world and 50% of its sales in china. google doesn't operate in china, so that side of its business is going to be ok. how it is going to survive in the west? it could be an opportunity, android has been the dominant operating system for a long time and perhaps this is a moment where we will see some innovation. huawei says it has been working on its own operating system. maybe we could introduce another player to the market. but would you want to make thejump to a the market. but would you want to make the jump to a different system
11:07 am
now that is untried, untested and unfamiliar? thank you very much. an increasing number of vulnerable children with learning disabilities and autism, are being held in hospitals when they don't need to be there, according to a new report. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, says children are being restrained, sedated and kept long distances from home. she wants a national strategy to tackle what she calls an "unacceptable situation". here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. scandals such as the exposure by the bbc‘s panorama programme of abuse at the now closed winterbourne view private hospital near bristol have highlighted the vulnerability of learning disabilities and autism. that was eight years ago. but despite promises the system is changing, today's report shows vulnerable children being taken to institutions miles from home and spending months there. the children's commissioner says the number of children held in mental health hospitals has risen from 110 in february of 2015
11:08 am
to 250 this february. concerns are also raised about the overuse of restraint, medication and of seclusion, where some children are kept isolated from other patients. i have heard of children who are in a single room with immovable furniture for months on end. they have been shocking stories of children being fed through hatches. none of that can be right for anyone but for the most vulnerable children it really is something that is absolutely unthinkable. the government says it is determined to reduce the numbers of people with learning difficulties and autism in hospitals and significant investment is being put into providing more high quality support in the community. alison holt, bbc news. meanwhile, the bbc has been told that thousands of teenagers in care are being "dumped" in unregulated homes and "abandoned to organised crime gangs". concerns have been raised by police forces and newsnight has found that the number of looked—after children aged 16 and over living
11:09 am
in unregistered accommodation in england has increased 70% in a decade. the inquests into the deaths of the eight victims killed in the london bridge attack two years ago are continuing today the inquests are hearing about the bravery of ignacio echeverria who died fighting off the attackers with a skateboard. our correspondentjon donnison is at the old bailey. what have you heard so far this morning, john? what have you heard so far this morning, john? the court heard today that ignacio echeverria, who was 39 yea rs that ignacio echeverria, who was 39 years old, spanish national and work at hsbc bank in london. he moved to london to be closer to his sister. that evening he had been with two friends and they had been cycling along borough high street near london bridge after skateboarding on the south bank of the river thames. on seeing the panic beginning to spread on london bridge about iopm
11:10 am
at night, they stopped their bikes. we heard a witness statement from one of those friends and he said, as soon one of those friends and he said, as soon as one of those friends and he said, as soon as ignacio realised people were being attacked, being stabbed, he did not think about it, he reacted immediately. he grabbed his skateboard out of his bag and started hitting the attackers. he said one of the attackers looked like the devil. pretty quickly though, we saw cctv footage today showing ignacio being stabbed, falling to the ground. he then fell back and tried to parry the blows with his skateboard. but within a few moments, he was lying motionless on the floor. he was awarded, last year, posthumus lee, the george medalfor bravery by year, posthumus lee, the george medal for bravery by the queen. thank you very much.
11:11 am
cabinet ministers will begin discussions tomorrow on what should be included in theresa may's amended brexit bill. the prime minister has promised a "bold" package of measures, which she hopes will attract cross—party support when the bill goes to a commons vote in two weeks' time. it will be her fourth attempt trying to get her brexit deal through and already the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has said he won't be backing it. let's have a look at the next steps in the brexit process. because the uk remains a member of the european union, this thursday, the 23rd of may, british voters will take part in elections for the european parliament. the government has promised mps another chance to vote on brexit, by bringing forward the withdrawal agreement bill to the house of commons in the week beginning the 3rd ofjune. if the bill is not passed, the default position is that the uk will leave the eu on 31st october without a deal. our political correspondent iain watsonjoins us now from westminster.
11:12 am
what do you know about how bold this is going to be? certainly the terminology is bold. i am not sure about the substance. i think it is a re—badging of the deal that went down on three separate occasions. there are some new elements in it. i am told, when it comes to work a's rights, to try to win over, if not jeremy corbyn and at least some of his mps, the government is going further towards the labour position staying in step with future legislation on employment rights coming from the european union. there is stuff on environmental standards. elsewhere it is a more tricky because the government have to try and get their own brexiteers on site. theresa may says she is reaching out across the commons. but i'm not sure how far her reach will extend. the northern irish backstop, this controversial measure to try to stop hard border, it will still be
11:13 am
in their but not a fundamental rethink. and when it comes to being bold, a lot of labour mps would say, what would require them to get behind the deal is to put the deal toa behind the deal is to put the deal to a new referendum. and as i understand it, that has been ruled out. but what i think we will be hearing from the prime minister, not just tomorrow when she discusses this with her cabinet but possibly ina big this with her cabinet but possibly in a big speech later this week, is to say to people, this is your last chance to leave the european union with a deal. if you get rid of my legislation there is no other vehicle to prevent no deal, the default position you pointed out would kick in in october. the trouble is this, some of her own mps wouldn't really mind no deal all that much and some people on the labour side are prepared to gamble with the risk of no deal in order to try to exact the promise of a referendum. thank you very much. today we are continuing our series of interviews with meps and leaders from the main parties standing
11:14 am
in the european elections in a special ‘ask this'. at 11:30 it's the turn of the conservatives and we'll be putting your questions to ashley fox, mep for south west & gibraltar. if you have a question, send it in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag bbc ask this, or email ask this at bbc.co.uk. as tensions between iran and the united states run high, president trump has issued a blunt threat against tehran on twitter. he said that if iran wanted to fight, that would be the end of the country. the us has deployed ships to the gulf in recent days, as caroline rigby reports. the us has made a point of increasing its military presence in the persian gulf and has used economic sanctions to put pressure on iran after accusing it of threats to us troops and interests. and although both countries have in recent days said they have no appetite for war, on twitter president trump has now offered this blunt warning to tehran.
11:15 am
"if iran wants to fight, that'll be the official end of iran. never threaten the united states again." president trump is known to tweet his views which don't necessarily reflect official policy. so it's unclear quite how seriously to take his latest comments and what motivated them. it might have been some of the other actions that have been taken in recent days in the region that are blamed on iranian proxies. it could have been some intelligence that the president was privy to this afternoon and reacted to it out of concern to get tehran to back off. or it could be recent news reports that sort of portrayjohn bolton, the national security adviser, as the real hawk in the administration, and trump as more of a dove. tehran has described us moves in recent days as psychological warfare and a political game. though just this weekend the country's foreign minister once
11:16 am
again dismissed the possibility of war erupting in the middle east. translation: there will be no war, because we do not want a war, nor has anyone the idea or illusion it can confront iran in the region. yet tensions between the us and iran are certainly not cooling, and the concern is that a war of words could tip over into full—scale conflict. caroline rigby, bbc news. a 41 year—old comedian has been sworn in as ukraine's new president. volodymyr zelensky, a political novice famous for playing the role of a president in a satirical tv series, won a landslide victory a month ago. in his inauguration speech mr zelensky said that he wanted the government to resign and parliamentary elections to be held. the headlines on bbc news: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow
11:17 am
to the chinese telecoms firm. president trump has warned iran it will be destroyed if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing evidence about ignacio echeverria, who died, fighting off the attackers with a skateboard. in the sport, brooks koepka wins the uspga championship for the second yearin uspga championship for the second year ina uspga championship for the second year in a row, leading from start to finish to take his fourth major title. england live up to the world cup favourite tag completing a 4—0 series win over pakistan at headingley. a stunning final dive wins gold medalfor grace reid and tom daley in london. i will have more on those stories later.
11:18 am
all this week the bbc‘s "we are middlesbrough" series is focusing on untold stories from the northern town. in 2016, middlesbrough was named as the ‘worst place for a girl to grow up in england and wales'. steph mcgovern has been back to where she grew up to find out what is being done to empower young women. this is my home town, middlesbrough, and i know lots you know this because i bang on about it all the time on the telly — i am really proud to be from here. it has given me my accent, a great education and some of my happiest memories. i am independent and resilient because i grew up here. so, a couple of years ago when a report came out saying this was the worst place to grow up as a girl in england and wales, i was absolutely raging. and i wasn't the only one. so were liz and krista. to teach girls to believe in themselves and when they work together that they can accomplish their dreams. brilliant answer. in response, they set up a charity called ruby's to help empower girls. i was really upset and disappointed having grown up in middlesbrough my whole life, ijust thought
11:19 am
it was not a league table i wanted to be associated with really or our girls. so we decided we needed to put a different message out there. before you were doing this, did any of you feel before you were doing this, did any of you feel like you weren't good enough. did you! oh, my god, that makes me really sad. before i started ruby's i used to hate everything about me. i don't know why. i always thought i was ugly... ohh, i want to hug you cause you are not. you are gorgeous and you're brilliant. how do you feel now? i feel like i'm beautiful. you are beautiful and do you know what, you said that really quietly but i am so pleased you feel like that. it's teaching us to not bottle up all the feelings and think that we are good enough. i never thought i would be able to become a doctor but rubies has helped me to believe i can do it if i put my mind to it and keep it going to school. just because this is my home town i am not going to pretend things are perfect. of course, they're not. it has problems just like anywhere but things are improving.
11:20 am
would you all say you are confident women? yes. meeting some of the girls studying at middlesbrough college, there is no shortage of ambition. i am going to uni in september, doing primary education with mathematics. brilliant. what do you want to do? work in a day nursery. i actually already work as an electrical technician. you're doing an apprenticeship? yeah. do you think it's harder being a girl here compared to anywhere else in the country? not at all. i think they're focusing on the negative and not looking at the positives of middlesborough. do you think anything more could be done? more work experience. more focus on mental health. because with having confidence issues, things to help deal with it and conquer it is a big issue, anywhere, not just middlesborough. what these girls also need are role models. as female business owners we are giving back now and we are trying to encourage people. these businesswomen think they are making progress. in the last few years, i think there has been much more collaboration. there's been initiatives like business women awards but much more working in partnership.
11:21 am
there have been some real challenges in the area but there's also amazing regeneration and innovation happening locally. i thinkjust that pride that you cannot measure and it counts for so much. we have this momentum and we must keep it going, we must encourage our young people to challenge themselves, to try something new, to show them what opportunities are out there. are you proud to be from middlesborough? all: yes. do you think you can do just as well as anybody else in the country? yes. good, because you can. yeahhh! steph mcgovern, bbc news, middlesbrough. there'll be lots more from "we are middlesbrough" across bbc news all this week. and if you're in middlesbrough and have a story you want the bbc to cover, there's a pop—up newsroom in the cleveland shopping centre. if you go there this afternoon you might even have the pleasure of meeting our very own simon mccoy. home secretary sajid javid has been speaking this morning
11:22 am
about his updated counter—terrorism strategy, which was published last year. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is at scotland yard where mrjavid was speaking. what has he been saying? he has been setting out the landscape in terms of countering the threat. he said the threat from counter—terrorism was increasing and the tempo was increasing. since march 2017 he said there had been 19 plots foiled, one more than was previously given. 1a we re more than was previously given. 1a were islamist plots and five from the far right. he said he would be single—minded in using all the powers at his disposal. there are new measures coming in it which would enable people travelling to or staying in certain countries designated by the home secretary to be committing an offence. the home
11:23 am
secretary has indicated he is looking at designating parts of syria and possibly parts of west africa as places that british people, who are caught up in those areas, who are not there for humanitarian reasons, could be breaking the law and face a sentence of up to ten years imprisonment. we also heard from the home secretary who believes that there are real gaps in the law around hostile state activities. this is after the salisbury attacks. he believes there are real gaps in the law and the government is looking at introducing an espionage bill. that is something we didn't know before. something thatis we didn't know before. something that is being planned at the moment. it still seems as though it is in its early stages and that will look at updating the laws around treason, the official secrets act and making ita the official secrets act and making it a requirement for foreign agents who are in the uk, to have to register so there will be a deterrent in place if it was suspected they were doing something
11:24 am
that was against the laws of this country. they could face sanctions in the criminal courts. that is not something that happens at the moment, it is a measure that is adopted in the united states and australia. it is something the government is looking at bringing in here. a requirement for foreign agents, in other words, spies, to register. it seems counterintuitive, because the whole reason you're spying as you are doing something people don't know about. but this comes in the context of a possible conservative leadership campaign. we think theresa may will be stepping down soon and a number of people declaring they are interested. sajid javid was asked whether he would be interested in becoming the prime minister. his words were, you will have to wait and see and he refused to a nswer have to wait and see and he refused to answer the question. thank you very much.
11:25 am
on thursday, people in the uk will be voting in the european elections and the latest opinion polls shows that nigel farage's brexit party is likely to gain the most votes, with established parties forecast to lose their majority across the european union. and in scotland there are suggestions that the snp is on track for record results. as you can see, it is the brexit party coming out on top over those various polls and the conservatives down in fourth place on this latest poll. labour in second place. professor sirjohn curtice is a political scientist and joins us now from glasgow. thank you forjoining us. obviously very familiarface thank you forjoining us. obviously very familiar face to election watchers on the bbc. tell us what you read into that, these latest poll of polls we are showing? in truth, not much sign of a great deal of movement in the poll since around easter also. that was the moment
11:26 am
when the brexit party very clearly emerged ahead when the conservatives clearly were in deep, deep trouble. and when it began to become evident that the labour party was losing ground, both amongst its remain supporters and amongst its leave supporters. the brexit party is mopping up most of the leave votes. most of those who voted leave are going to vote for the brexit party because they wish to punish the conservative party for its failure to deliver brexit. in some cases they have lost confidence in the conservative party to deliver brexit. on the other side of the argument, it has become more fragmented. during the course of the campaign, the liberal democrats have been edging up. it is not clear whether they have more remain voters than labour, but labour is seeing its vote being eroded in that direction and the biggest single source of loss of 2017 labour votes,
11:27 am
away from other parties as to the liberal democrats. the result therefore it's probably this campaign, as has been true with much of the wider brexit about, we are seeing the public polarising between the party saying leave without a deal, let's just leave now. the party saying leave without a deal, let'sjust leave now. at least one of the parties say no, we should be trying to have another referendum with a view to reversing the decision. the truth is, i think were both conservative and labour have discovered, being in a compromised position, and the conservatives also being a party that has not been able to deliver on its compromise, is a rather uncomfortable place to be over brexit, because the public is polarised between people wanting to leave and those on the remain side who hope a referendum will produce a different result. how polarised is it when you look at how well the brexit party is doing versus change
11:28 am
uk. they are representing the polar opposites, but change uk is at the bottom of the poll so does it indicate that the british people wa nt to indicate that the british people want to leave without a deal? indicate that the british people want to leave without a deanm doesn't indicate that, the brexit party are in the lead but they want an average of 32%. that is short of what the industry requires to represent a majority. the polls have long shown a third of the public are in favour of leaving without a deal. on the romaine side, there has been a civil war between the liberal democrats and change uk for essentially the same folks, the socially liberal pro—remain vote, but it has been clear for some time the liberal democrats have been winning that civil war. not least tell by the enhancement of their credibility in the wake of their performance in the english local elections. this election has come too early for change uk. the liberal democrats, they are not at the kind of strength they were before they entered the coalition in 2010. but they are in a stronger position
11:29 am
amongst the electorate than they have been anytime since then. we are seeing a bit of a mini liberal democrat revival as far as the electorate is polarised around the brexit options. but the liberal democrats are benefiting from that polarisation. thank you very much, john. we will have more from sir john. we will have more from sir john curtis throughout the week. spoiler alert for all game of thrones fans! after eight seasons, one of the most talked about tv shows, has come to an end. fans have complained about plot lines in the last series, but that's unlikely to stop it from being a ratingsjuggernaut. our los angeles correspondent, sophie long, has been at a watch party where the 80 minute finale aired a few hours ago. this goes beyond loyalty. there's no question that the cultural phenomenon that is game of thrones has been a ratings hit. and resulted in big business for some. as fans prepared for viewing parties, this bakery sold around 30,000 limited edition cupcakes, breaking its previous record set
11:30 am
by last year's royal wedding. this has been our all—time best selling limited edition cupcake in the history of sprinkles. it's our biggest innovation yet. at a viewing party near venice beach, heated debate about how it was all going to end. what about a babyjon snow? that's a possibility. yeah, if she's pregnant, he's not going to kill her. there was an atmosphere of great anticipation. some hoping for relief. others, an end to a disappointing season. i felt the writing was kind of sloppy. it didn't make any sense with the character arcs and all that. just a big release, i guess, from the anxiety that we have today. intense. like, so many emotions, like, anticipation that's fulfilled and never seeing it again. and then it was time. cheering. a whole pub completely absorbed.
11:31 am
the debate over the quality of series eight will continue, but in the united states the credits have rolled. winter is no longer coming. wow! sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. now it's time for a look at the weather. warm spells of sunshine and light showers are the order for the day. the showers will be all and all through the day. showers are starting in northern ireland, too, and then to wales. southern england will be affected by the showers, too. because the winds are this showers will be slow moving. we could see torrential downpours with the risk appeal and ponder. in the sunshine above your pleasant, with
11:32 am
temperatures in the south—east up to 21. the showers will fade into this evening. we will keep the cloud with outbreaks of rain for northern scotland. elsewhere, clear spells could lead to mist and fog. temperatures not dropping away too far, 6—10dc the minimum. for tuesday, high pressure is in charge, so it is a subtle story, really a repeat performance of today. there will be some showers around in the afternoon, not as frequent as today, but they could be heavy. hello this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. president trump has warned iran it will be destroyed if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing evidence about ignacio echeverria, who died fighting off the attackers with a skateboard.
11:33 am
a 41—year—old comedian has been sworn in as ukraine's new president after he won a landslide victory a month ago. also coming up: we continue our series of interviews with meps and leaders from the main parties standing in the european elections, in a special ask this. in the next few minutes, it's the turn of the conservatives. we'll be putting your questions to ashely fox, mep for south—west and gibraltar. sport now. here's reshmin choudhray. good morning. brooks koepka survived a huge scare to win the us pga championship for the second year in a row. he had led by seven shots going into the final round at bethpage black in new york, before his fellow—american dustin johnson closed to within a single shot. but koepka hung on to win his fourth major title in his last eight starts. phenomenal. i think that's a good word. i mean, it's been a hell of a run.
11:34 am
it's been fun and i'm trying not to let it stop. it's super enjoyable and just try to ride that momentum. it's just ten days until the start of the cricket world cup, and england have been living u to their tag as favourites. they completed a 4—0 one—day series win over pakistan at headingley, with eoin morgan removing a roof tile on the way to his half—century. england posted 351 and went on to win by 5a runs. full—back israel folau has decided not to appeal against his sacking by rugby australia for homophobic comments he posted on social medial. he said it didn't mean he accepted the findings of the panel that upheld his dismissal, but that he was considering "all potential avenues". he could still take his case to the high court in australia. victoria azarenka has been talking to the bbc about her return to tennis after the birth of her son. along with other leading players, including venus williams and johanna konta, she's successfully campaigned for the introduction of more ranking protection for new mothers
11:35 am
on the tour. she said she feared her career was over when she found out she was pregnant during the 2016 season. in my mind, my first thought was, oh my god, my career is over, i will never play tennis again and i don't know what to do. i was shocked, i was panicked. but then, it was all about, i knowi was panicked. but then, it was all about, i know i am going to come back, i don't know when i'm going to come back because i felt that it's a blessing for me, you know? it's a blessing, but i still want to have my own dreams, i still want to have my own dreams, i still want to have my own dreams, i still want to have my own career. tom daley has won gold at diving's world series event in london alongside grace reid, in the mixed 3—metre synchro springboard. the pair clinched the title with this superb final dive. it's proving to be a successful partnership. reid and daley had already won a silver and three bronze medals in the series,
11:36 am
but this was their first gold. billy monger said he was "over the moon" after winning a race for the first time since losing both his legs in a crash two years ago. he's competing in the euroformula open series and posted this picture on social media after winning the pau grand prix. he says "can't believe it, i didn't think two years on i'd be winning races!" that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. in just three days' time the uk will go to the polls, to vote in elections to the european parliament. now that of course wasn't supposed to happen due to brexit, but the delay in leaving the european union means we now have to take part and in the run—up to the vote on may 23rd, we're talking to all the main uk parties here on the bbc news channel, putting your questions to them. this morning taking your questions is conservative mep
11:37 am
for south—west england and gibraltar, ashley fox. we have a question, will you publish a manifesto? we have one, which is to honour the referendum result and leave the eu in our positive manner. it isa leave the eu in our positive manner. it is a policy that has been failing. it is a policy of the conservative party and the reason why we haven't been successful yet is because the house of commons has voted for the prime minister's deal, but we haven't offered to leave without a deal. with the referendum result three years ago, the decision to leave was taken. it is up to the house of commons to decide how we leave, either with the deal or without a deal. my preference is to leave with the prime minister is deal, and we need to keep on working
11:38 am
with the house of commons to deliver that result and honour the referendum. on friday, the conservatives launch the european elections campaign at a function room at bristol football stadium. there was just one single camera and one journalist. it's not there was just one single camera and onejournalist. it's not the there was just one single camera and one journalist. it's not the way these things are normally done. that was not the launch of the campaign, it was a campaign event in the south—west. i know because i was there. after the press statement the prime minister gave, she came campaigning with me in north west bristol and we had a good reception on the doorsteps, so i think it was a very successful day. tell us more about the reception on the doorsteps. when you go and say we don't have a manifesto but our policy is to deliver brexit, but we've not been able to do it so far, how does that go down? quite clearly, some conservative
11:39 am
supporters are frustrated we haven't left. when you have the opportunity to explain why we haven't left they are much more receptive. i acknowledge that these elections are going to be difficult for us, but we have to explain our intention is to honour the referendum and leave the eu in an orderly manner. that is what the conservative vote on thursday means. it might look to some like the conservatives are very relu cta nt to some like the conservatives are very reluctant to be taking part in this referendum. obviously we are delighted to have you on the programme this morning, speaking to people from all the parties, all of the other parties have fielded their leaders or somebody very senior. nobody has put an mep forward, are you supposed to be asked? i am the leader of the british conservatives in the european parliament, perhaps iam in the european parliament, perhaps i am better to put our case because not only do the conservatives than for leaving the eu in an orderly
11:40 am
manner, but if we have to stay in the eu for a few more months, we will need meps in brussels to defend our national interest, to work hard and all suitable for the deal when it comes before the european parliament, so voting conservative on thursday delivers conservative meps rather than people like nigel farage who shout from the sidelines but are not very good and actually turning up and doing any work in defending our countryinterests. he is top of the opinion polls. he is tapping into a great groundswell of discontent, and i get that. people wa nt discontent, and i get that. people want the house of commons to deliver brexit. why haven't we? because we don't have a majority in the house of commons. perhaps you should ask labour mps who were elected two yea rs labour mps who were elected two years ago on a manifesto pledge to honour the referendum result why they haven't done so. why is it that of the 262 labour mps elected only
11:41 am
five have voted for brexit, whereas almost all conservative mps have voted for brexit either with the deal or without. that is why we are in this impasse. we are doing labour today also. we have had lots of questions to put to you. mike from wales has e—mailed to say if british meps take their seats and the eu parliament ratified the next eu budget, will britain have a legal responsibility to pay a chair? at the moment, under the withdrawal agreement, we will pay our share up to december 2020 because the eu has a seven year framework budget. we are already contracted to pay probably up to that date. we want to leave before december 2020 and to wish —— do not wish to be part of
11:42 am
another seven year framework. why is it acceptable for the prime minister to ask the mps three times to change their minds but not acceptable to ask the public that they have changed their minds about leaving the eu? changed their minds about leaving the eu ? referring changed their minds about leaving the eu? referring to the fact that the eu? referring to the fact that the withdrawal bill keeps going before the mps and there are many who want another referendum but that is not happening. because the house of commons as the british people to ta ke of commons as the british people to take the decision, do you want to remain in the eu or relief and the people replied that they want to leave. not thejob people replied that they want to leave. not the job of the house of commons is to decide how we leave. that is a job that so far they have not fulfilled. it is perfectly reasonable for the government to keep coming back to the house of commons and saying would you leave with this combination, with that combination? we have had lots of indicative votes. the comments will not leave without a deal. would you leave with the prime minister is deal? they said no. the house of
11:43 am
commons needs to come to a conclusion. it seems to me that there will never be a majority in there will never be a majority in the house of commons to leave without the deal, therefore we are best placed to work with mps to deliver the referendum result and to come up with a deal that commands majority support in the house of commons. that is what the prime minister is working tirelessly to achieve. relevant to that, danny from norfolk has asked legal default for breakfast brexit is that we leave with no deal a deal be sorted, but i have heard that parliament would not a deal can be sorted, but i have heard that parliament would not alloy a deal can be sorted, but i have heard that parliament would not alloy and luteal brexit, so does that mean that parliament can override the law? parliament change the law. almost all labour mps and a handful of conservatives passed into law that required the prime minister to seek an extension of article 50. thus prolonging or membership of the
11:44 am
eu. the prime minister complied with that in the extension was granted to the 31st of october. i regret that our membership has been extended to the end of october, i think we should have left already, but that is what mps have done. it is perfectly possible that mps could vote again to demand the prime minister extend article 50. i don't wa nt minister extend article 50. i don't want that to happen, but i think we have to realise where the numbers are in the house of commons. there are in the house of commons. there are many predicting that the next thing will be that we are potentially heading for a new deal brexit on the 31st of october, but you think that will not happen, there will be another extension?m is clearly a risk. it is in the hands of the house of commons and the european union. my preference is that the government to keep working in the national interest to ensure that we deliver a deal and honour that we deliver a deal and honour that referendum result. if we get to
11:45 am
the 31st of october and there is still no deal, the house of commons will need to take a decision and thatis will need to take a decision and that is do they ask for another extension, or do we leave without a deal? we could ask for an extension and the eu could say no, that is perfectly possible. i suspect that the eu will keep us in for as long as they possibly can. i would appeal to conservative colleagues to knuckle down, negotiate and get a deal through that means that we actually leave. ian says the downside to leave with wto rules, the don. that are being exaggerated. i don't want a second referendum because i want the first one to be honoured. i would agree, there has been a great deal of scaremongering about leaving on wto terms. i think
11:46 am
it would be difficult, it would be uncomfortable for british business andi uncomfortable for british business and i prefer to leave with a deal. if we cant, then we must leave without a deal. we will survive and business will find a way. nick on e—mail, with a customs union lock us into eu tariffs? yes. yes. is that what you would like to see? is that what you would like to see? is that what you would like to see? is that what you would like to see? no, that is not what i want. i want freedom to strike deals with other countries. therefore, if you leave the eu but remain part of the customs union, then you are getting the worst of all worlds, so i definitely don't want to see a customs union. the talks with labour have been something that have been a com plete have been something that have been a complete waste of time and shouldn't have even happened? it seems theresa may was going into those talks amid suggestions that the tory party would agree to a customs union,
11:47 am
perhaps a temporary one, but it was something that was being looked at as something that wouldn't be the end of the world. if it was temporary, for a year or two, it is probably something that i could swallow, but i don't want that to happen. i don't think the negotiations have been a waste of time. both sites have described them as constructive and they understand the prime minister will bring the withdrawal bill before parliament and a couple of weeks and there will be changes, perhaps on employment rights, on environmental rights. let's see what is on the bill. when it comes forward, labour mps have a real decision to take, that is are they going to honour the manifesto promise they made two years ago? are they going to honour the referendum result? because i get the distinct impression that they are looking for any reason to dishonour it.|j question we will be putting to them. for now, ashley fox, thank you very
11:48 am
much for giving the conservative perspective for this edition of bbc ask this. thank you. remember, all last week we interviewed leaders and senior politicians from parties contesting the eu elections. we've spoken to brexit‘s nigel farage, sian berry from the greens, the snp's ian blackford, and chuka umunna from change uk, and this afternoon it's the turn of the liberal democrats with leader vince cable. so if you have a question, send them in via text on 611211, tweet using the hashtag #bbcaskthis, or email ask us at bbc.co.uk. that's happening at 5.30pm today with vince cable. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. president trump has warned iran it will be ‘destroyed' if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing evidence
11:49 am
about ignacio echeverria, who died fighting off the attackers with a skateboard. i'm maryam moshiri in the business news. news that google has barred smartphone maker huawei from some updates to the android operating system has had a positive impact on shares of other telecoms equipment makers. shares in rivals ericsson and nokia are both higher in early trade. as you've been hearing, new designs of huawei smartphones are set to lose access to some google apps. ryanair‘s profits fell by nearly a third last year to £880 million as fuel costs rose and fares fell. europe's biggest discount airline added that profits could be lower this year as fares continue to fall. more in a moment. uk rail passengers lost an estimated 3.9 million hours to delays in 2018, according to consumer group which? the data covers trains which arrived at their destination 30 minutes or more late, and is based on 8.1 million such journeys in the year.
11:50 am
about 80 trains a day fitted this "significa ntly" late definition. it's not been an easy ride for europe's airlines of late, and low—cost carrier ryanair is no exception. shares in the airline fell by as much as 6% today after it reported a fall in profits. ryanair also says earnings could fall further next year as it grapples with overcapacity, brexit and delays in delivery of the boeing 737 max. this tops off a turbulent time for european airlines and tour operators with easyjet, thomas cook and tui all showing deepening losses. a little earlier we spoke to rya nair‘s chief financial officer, neil sorahan, who says pricing has been a big issue for his airline, and the industry as a whole. pricing remains soft across europe due to overcapacity at this point in
11:51 am
time. our customers enjoy an average fa re of time. our customers enjoy an average fare of 37 euros, which was down 6% on last year. at the same time, however, we are continuing to spend money on our axillary products, things like priority boarding, car hire and hotels which helped offset that little bit. costs increased about 5%. fuel bill was up about 440 million. fuel bill was up about 440 million. we are joined now by victoria moores, european editor at air transport world. hearing there from the chief financial officer of ryanair, hearing there from the chief financial officer of rya nair, the problem seems to be that these airlines, ryanair included, are selling as many flights, however each passenger is costing them more money. yeah, that sort of the case, although what is happening this is a very, very demand led industry so it really depends on what the passengers are willing to pay. i would say that today's news from ryanair is would say that today's news from rya nair is moderately would say that today's news from ryanair is moderately good news for passengers. i say moderately,
11:52 am
because the good news is fares are cheaper right now and that makes going on holiday a lot cheaper, but the flip side is that the industry is up against a lot of headwinds. fuel costs a re is up against a lot of headwinds. fuel costs are going up. it means that ultimately the sustainability of some airlines might be compromised. we have seen a lot of airline failure is recently compared with other years. it means the certainty of being able to travel is a little bit compromised. the problem here is that lowerfares, but costs are rising. the cost of oil today has risen by 1.4%. how long do you think airlines like ryanairand long do you think airlines like rya nair and easyjet can long do you think airlines like ryanair and easyjet can maintain these low prices? it is really good question. if you look up the larger airlines, so lufthansa, british airways, easyjet, rya nair. airlines, so lufthansa, british airways, easyjet, ryanair. these are big solid airlines and they are good indicators of what the market is
11:53 am
like for the rest of the industry. you need to look at ryanair‘s results, 1 billion euros of profit isa results, 1 billion euros of profit is a positive result, but the fact they are 30% down and where they have been shows that if it is hard for ryanair, it will be very hard for ryanair, it will be very hard for other airlines in the industry that don't have the size of ryanair with the ability to get through things like higher fuel costs and industry pressures. it doesn't help that ryanair industry pressures. it doesn't help that rya nair isn't industry pressures. it doesn't help that ryanair isn't a popular airline amongst many passengers. they have been working on that. they have been under a real initiative to try and turn around the perception in the market of their product. they are a very good, solidly run airline in terms of unit costs, so the cost apply a passenger. they are incredibly successful. the fact is that passengers like cheap fares and they will fly with an airline that offers that. it is just what is that doing to the overall market, is the
11:54 am
question. aircraft are very full. an average ryanair sells question. aircraft are very full. an average rya nair sells 96% question. aircraft are very full. an average ryanair sells 96% of seats on every flight, which is an achievement that ten years ago people wouldn't have thought was possible. the growth in demand is there, demand is very strong, it's that pressure on profitability as the costs go up that passengers are only willing to pay a minimum to go away. the classic example on that is the fact that 37 euros for an air fare, you pay more for a parking space while you are away. that is a good analogy! thank you very much indeed. shares in thomas cook down again after analysts at a bank said the travel firm's shares were "worthless". metro bank has raised £375m from shareholders to bolster its finances, in a bid to ease fears over its future. crude prices are up.
11:55 am
that's all the business news. the duchess of cambridge received the royal seal of approval from her children when they tested out a garden she helped design for the chelsea flower show. princess charlotte and princes george and louis were filmed together with their parents for the first time as they played and paddled in a stream. the duchess said her aim is to encourage children to spend more time outdoors. our correspondent ashley john ba ptisite is at the chelsea flower show for us this morning. good morning. hi, joanna. good morning. hi,joanna. i good morning. hi, joanna. iam ata pretty special garden here at the chelsea flower show. this design the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings. you can see some pretty
11:56 am
striking imagery here. we have sculptures of veterans made out of washers. over here we have a plan thatis washers. over here we have a plan that is grown on the normandy beaches. we have these plinths with comments from veterans. the designer is with us, and a d—day veteran. john, tell us what you set out to achieve with this design. john, tell us what you set out to achieve with this designlj john, tell us what you set out to achieve with this design. i wanted to work with the veterans to tell the story that they wanted to tell. one of the first things i spoke to me about was how they were so scared of drowning, so we wanted to create the drama to evoke the memories of them, they were only kids most of them, they were only kids most of them, and the fear they must have had as the doors dropped on the landing craft. on the other side we have this more contemplative area, with plinths with comments from vetera ns. with plinths with comments from veterans. the flag at the back of
11:57 am
the garden is very striking. can you tell us about that? a friend of ours, trevor beattie, brought the flag along. he bought that some yea rs flag along. he bought that some years ago to make sure it would stay in the uk. it was the first lad planted on any d—day beach, sword beach 30 minutes after the first landing craft went in. dude, you are a d—day veteran. what do you make of this design? i think it is marvellous. i can remember the belgian gets, to spikes that were sticking up. they destroyed quite a few of our assault craft and the consequences was a lot of our chaps dried because of all of the cat they had. they couldn't swim with it. it was a very had. they couldn't swim with it. it was a very poignant time. as sort of time one doesn't want to remember, really. unfortunately, iwas
11:58 am
time one doesn't want to remember, really. unfortunately, i was heart into it because of the blitz in london. to try and remember it now, brings back bad memories and one doesn't want to think about it, really. when you see all these young lads. thank you. other gardens at the flower show will be updating you on later. now it's time for a look at the weather with mel coles. it is another day of warm spells of sunshine, but thundery downpours. the showers will get going in northern ireland, down toward teeth wheels, the far south of england and stretching all the way up to north—east scotland. the winds are light, so the showers will be slow moving. we could see torrential downpours and the risk and thunder.
11:59 am
a lot of fine, dry weather around, also. lengthy spells of sunshine and feeling one, temperatures ranging from 11 celsius in the far north to 20 in the south—east. into this evening, the showers will fade away. more cloud, outbreaks of patchy rain from northern scotland. clear skies, may some mist and fog around. temperatures between 6—11dc. on tuesday, a few showers around but because high pressure is in charge they won't be as frequent. they could be on the heavy side, but many places will remain dry with warm spells of sunshine, once again.
12:00 pm
you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories at midday: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. the inquest into the london bridge attacks how ignacio echeverria was killed, as he took on the attackers with just a skateboard. president trump warns iran it will be ‘destroyed' if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. iam simon i am simon mccoy live in middlesbrough where we concentrate on the people and the stories that matter to them. join me later. after eight seasons, one of the world's most successful tv series — game of thrones comes to an end. and, by royal appointment —
12:01 pm
the duchess of cambridge puts the finishing touches to the garden she's designed for this year's chelsea flower show. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. technology giant google says it's stopped the chinese tech firm, huawei from using some of its services. it means new huawei smartphones, which use google's android operating system, may not have access to popular apps like gmail, or receive security or technical support. it comes after the us blacklisted the company, over fears that beijing could use the firm's equipment to spy on american networks. huawei insists it poses no security threat and says it has made substantial contributions to the development of android around the world. dave lee has more. like most of the smartphones in the world, huawei's
12:02 pm
devices are powered by google's android operating system. it means integrated access to hugely popular services like youtube, gmail and maps, as well as google's voice assistant and security updates. but last week, the us government added huawei to a list of foreign entities that us companies cannot work with unless they obtain government approval. approval google doesn't yet seem to have. and may not get. "we are complying with the order and reviewing the implications," a google spokesman told the bbc. for consumers it means this — huawei smartphones that are already on the market will still have access to everything they do today, including security updates. but when google launches the next version of android later this year, it may not be available on huawei devices. future huawei devices may not have any google services at all. services consumers have come to expect. the us insists its moves against huawei are about security.
12:03 pm
they say the chinese tech giant could be used to spy on americans. but huawei, and china, say this is about undermining a company that threatens apple's dominance in the tech industry. and as the us—china trade dispute remains unresolved, this will likely be seen as an aggressive step by the us to force china's hand. dave lee, bbc news, in san francisco. our china correspondent robin brant is in shanghai and has been monitoring reaction there. we've seen some reaction online in terms of social media. frankly, not surprising, some chinese people talking about a pushback. they want their government to target iconic american tech firms, apple of course has been mentioned. that may be something that happens further down the line in terms of the context of the trade war here. we've had reaction in terms of tariffs from the chinese government, reacting to what the us has done. it wouldn't be surprising to see some non—tariff reaction from the chinese as well. and as the us government moves
12:04 pm
to really essentially try to strangle huawei's operations when it comes to its smartphone business, for though, crimes it thinks it may commit in its networking business, it's likely we may see the chinese government try to whip up fervour here, particularly on the consumer side, may be some targeting of american companies operating here in china. that's something we've seen before when we've had trade disputes with other countries, the philippines and south korea in particular. the inquest into the london bridge attacks in june 2017 has heard how one of the victims tried to stop the attackers by hitting them with his skateboard. ignacio echeverria a 39 year—old spanish banker working in london died after trying to help others who had been stabbed. jon donnison has been covering the hearings this morning.
12:05 pm
the court heard that ignacio echeverria, 39 years old worked at hsbc bank. he moved to london to be closer to his sister. that evening, he had been with two friends and had been cycling a borough high skeet —— high street. after seeing the panic beginning to spread on london bridge at around beginning to spread on london bridge ataround 10pm, beginning to spread on london bridge at around 10pm, they stopped their bikes. we heard a witness statement from one of those friends, he said as soon as from one of those friends, he said as soon as ignacio realised people we re as soon as ignacio realised people were being attacked, being stabbed, he did not even think about it, he reacted immediately. he grabbed his skateboard out of his bag and started hitting the attackers. the witness said one of the attackers looked like the devil. pretty quickly though, we saw cctv footage
12:06 pm
today showing ignacio echeverria being stabbed, falling to the ground. he then fell back and tried to parry the blows with his skateboard, but within a few moments, he was lying motionless on the floor. he was awarded last year, posthumously, the george medal for bravery by the queen. jon donnison reporting. cabinet ministers will begin discussions tomorrow on what should be included in theresa may's amended brexit bill, and more details of her new offer have emerged. the prime minister appears willing to make further concessions to labour on workers' rights, and there will be more emphasis on trying to avoid the controversial irish backstop, as she tries to win the support of mps in her forth attempt of her brexit deal. let's have a look at the next steps in the brexit process. because the uk remains a member of the european union, this thursday, the 23rd of may, british voters will take part in elections for the european parliament. the government has promised mps another chance to vote
12:07 pm
on brexit by bringing forward the withdrawal agreement bill to the house of commons in the week beginning the 3rd ofjune. if the bill is not passed, the default position is that the uk will leave the eu on 31st october without a deal. our political correspondent iain watsonjoins us now from westminster. so more emerging about what mps will get to vote on? that is right, theresa may will claim this is a new brexit deal, not like these at brexit deal, not like these at brexit deals that failed three times before. she mentions rights for workers, trying to win over labour mps and she will try to win over her home cabinet is —— as well. i think she is planning a big speech this week because this may be the last attempt to avoid a no deal scenario. the fact that her time in downing
12:08 pm
street is limited is underlined by some of the things happening today. the former work and pensions secretary esther mcveigh is trying to win overformer secretary esther mcveigh is trying to win over former labour voters who voted leave in the referendum. tonight we have the one they should caucus. amongst its members, amber rudd. anotherformer work caucus. amongst its members, amber rudd. another former work and pensions secretary, the former first secretary of state, damian green joins me now and is a member of the one nation caucus. people are describing this as people getting together to stop a borisjohnson leadership bid? it is about asserting the one nation values that have been with the conservative party for a long time, modernising them for their new era. at some stage over the next few months we will have a new leader as well. we wa nt will have a new leader as well. we want to make sure that the leader
12:09 pm
ascribes to these values as well. it is about internationalism, at home and concentrating on protecting the consumer. and concentrating on protecting the consumer. notjust and concentrating on protecting the consumer. not just against an over mighty state but over mighty corporations as well. under particular emphasis on the environment, which we see as a massively urgent issue for any prime minister. as i say, we are modernising the moderate conservative values that have always led to, in my opinion, the best governments as well as the most electoral success for the conservative party in a new age. we know there will be an election, we don't know exactly when theresa may is going but likely by the autumn conference. what will the view of your groupie when it comes to some of those candidates who are prepared to leave the eu without a deal? one of the things we agree on is it would be massively better for this country to have a deal. we don't see
12:10 pm
no deal as a good option for this country and we will be holding hustings for all the leadership candidates, if they want to come along and explain their vision for the future, when this contest officially starts. so clearly, we will be questioning them about how they will solve the brexit impasse. i hope it is solved in two weeks, because i will be voting for the deal. i am looking forward to see what this big, new offer is that can get it over the line. you are a close confident for the prime minister. if you are still in cabinet now, what would you be advising her to say to the cabinet, those existing members of the cabinet tomorrow, to try to get a deal that might bring them and some of the opposition over the line? one of the opposition over the line? one of the opposition over the line? one of the areas i think there is still more work to be done on the alternative arrangements. the sticking point for the conservatives and the dup is the irish backstop. i
12:11 pm
sat on the alternative arrangements working group. i think there is a viable solution that that doesn't require new technology. i have heard people say it is impractical. using existing technology you can organise the irish border so you don't have problems or a hard border, but don't need a backstop that might be permanent. something along those lines might enable a deal to get to the house of commons. damian green, a former cabinet minister and now a member of the one nation caucus, formally launching tonight to try and give some influence to the wing of the conservative party in future leadership elections and also brexit visions for the party as well. but theresa may has to try to get agreement in her cabinet tomorrow for one final throw of the dice to get the brexit deal through before she leaves office. thank you very much and to remind you we are continuing our series of interviews with meps who are standing in the
12:12 pm
european elections in asks this. it is so vince cable's turn to answer your questions. a power failure at manchester airport were not resolved until 3am this morning. 87 flights were cancelled while most face delays. a spokesman said most flights would take place today.
12:13 pm
scandals such as the exposure by the bbc‘s panorama programme of abuse at the now closed winterbourne view private hospital near bristol have highlighted the vulnerability of learning disabilities and autism. that was eight years ago. but despite promises the system is changing, today's report shows vulnerable children being taken to institutions miles from home and spending months there. the children's commissioner says the number of children held in mental health hospitals has risen from 110 in february of 2015 to 250 this february. concerns are also raised about the overuse of restraint, medication and of seclusion, where some children are kept isolated from other patients. i have heard of children who are in a single room with immovable furniture for months on end. they have been shocking stories of children being fed through hatches. none of that can be right for anyone but for the most vulnerable children it really is something that is absolutely unthinkable.
12:14 pm
the government says it is determined to reduce the numbers of people with learning difficulties and autism in hospitals and significant investment is being put into providing more high quality support in the community. alison holt, bbc news. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the headlines on bbc news: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing how ignacio echeverria tried to fight off the attackers by hitting them with just his skateboard. president trump has warned iran it will be ‘destroyed' if a conflict breaks out between the two countries.
12:15 pm
now, let's catch up with the sport. brooks koepka said he was emotionally spent after surviving a huge scare to win the us pga championship for a second year in a row. he had led going into the final round before dustinjohnson closed to within a single shot. but he hung on. phenomenal. i think to within a single shot. but he hung on. phenomenal. ithink that to within a single shot. but he hung on. phenomenal. i think that is a good word. it has been one hell of a run. iam good word. it has been one hell of a run. i am trying not to let it stop. it is super enjoyable and just trying to write the momentum. israel folau has decided not to appeal for what he said on social media. he said it doesn't mean he accepts the findings upheld by the panel but he could still take his case to the high court in australia. victoria
12:16 pm
aza renka high court in australia. victoria azarenka has been talking to the bbc about her return to tennis after the birth of her son. along with other leading players including venus williams and johanna konta she has feared it would be the end of her career when she found out she was pregnant during the 2016 season. career when she found out she was pregnant during the 2016 seasonm my mind, the first thought, oh my god, my career is over. i will never play tennis again and i don't know what to do. i was panicking. but then, it was all about i know i am going to come back and i know when i'm going to come back. that is a blessing for me. it is a blessing, but i still want to have my own dreams and my own career. billy mungo said he was over the moon after winning a race for the first time since losing his legs two years
12:17 pm
ago ina time since losing his legs two years ago in a crash. he posted this picture on social media. he said i cannot believe it, i didn't think two years on i'd be winning races. that is all the sport for now, i will be back with plenty more later. as tensions between iran and the united states run high, president trump has issued a blunt threat against tehran on twitter. he said that if iran wanted to fight that would be ‘the end of the country'. the us has deployed ships to the gulf in recent days — as caroline rigby reports. the us has made a point of increasing its military presence in the persian gulf and has used economic sanctions to put pressure on iran after accusing it of threats to us troops and interests. and although both countries have in recent days said they have no appetite for war, on twitter president trump has now offered this blunt warning to tehran. "if iran wants to fight,
12:18 pm
that'll be the official end of iran. never threaten the united states again." president trump is known to tweet his views which don't necessarily reflect official policy. so it's unclear quite how seriously to take his latest comments and what motivated them. it might have been some of the other actions that have been taken in recent days in the region that are blamed on iranian proxies. it could have been some intelligence that the president was privy to this afternoon and reacted to it out of concern to get tehran to back off. or it could be recent news reports that sort of portrayjohn bolton, the national security adviser, as the real hawk in the administration, and trump as more of a dove. tehran has described us moves in recent days as psychological warfare and a political game. though just this weekend the country's foreign minister once again dismissed the possibility of war erupting in the middle east. translation: there will be no war, because we do not want a war,
12:19 pm
nor has anyone the idea or illusion it can confront iran in the region. yet tensions between the us and iran are certainly not cooling, and the concern is that a war of words could tip over into full—scale conflict. caroline rigby, bbc news. gordon brown says an investigation into the brexit party's finances is urgent and essential. the former labour prime minister has written to the electoral commission calling on it to urgently examine whether the brexit party has sufficient safeguards on its website to prevent donations from what he calls "dirty money". the leader of the brexit party, nigel farage, has called the claims a "smear". let's get more on this now from our political reporter, jessica parker. gordon brown, former uk labour prime
12:20 pm
minister has written to the electoral commission and he is worried about the donations made to the brexit party, particularly donations under £500, which under uk law, don't have to be declared or reported to the electoral commission. the suggestion from critics is the brexit party and its paypal account could be opened up to donations from foreign donors which could influence the uk election. gordon brown has been voicing his concerns in a speech today in glasgow. the electoral commission and the european parliament should now investigate the finances of nigel farage and his brexit party. applause. democracy is undermined and he says the election is about democracy. democracy is undermined if we have undeclared, unreported, untraceable payments being made to the brexit
12:21 pm
party. if we have the potential for underhand and under the counter payments being made. the brexit party have said they can see where the cash is coming from and they point out under electoral law the party has 30 days to decide if they wa nt to ta ke party has 30 days to decide if they want to take a donation or not. they said they will look at donations which may have come from a foreign currency. nigel farage has been out campaigning today and he was not impressed by gordon brown's comments. absolutely disgusting smear. comments. absolutely disgusting smear. this from a man who was part of the labour party and through lord leavy was making a lot of payments from the house of lords. how dare he. most of our money has been raised by people giving £25 to become registered supporters. nearly 110,000 of them now have done that and frankly, this smacks ofjealousy because the other party simply can't
12:22 pm
do this. meanwhile, on a different matter, catherine beard, from the liberal democrats has written to the president of the european parliament calling for an investigation into the founder of aaron banks, and the money he gave to nigel farage up to £140,000, funding a car, house and a trip to the us. the question is whether nigel farage has to declare that money. he said he was leaving politics at the time are not doing these things in a political capacity but there have been calls for an investigation into this. we are waiting to hear from the european parliament, as we are waiting to hear from the electoral commission. thank you, jessica. all this week the bbc‘s "we are middlesbrough" series is focusing on untold stories
12:23 pm
from the town. simon mccoy is there this morning. we have a mobile newsroom, pop—up newsroom if you like and you have the chance to take part in some horrible history and the tardis is here. bbc tees are broadcasting from here. bbc tees are broadcasting from here all week and if you are desperate you can have a go at being a news reader. i had a go earlier, it is not for me. but these are the stories people have got to tell from this part of the world, people who we don't hear much from. in 2016, this town was named as the worst place for a girl to grow up in england and wales. steph mcgovern, who grew up in middlesbrough has been back to find out how the time is trying to empower young women here. this is my home town, middlesbrough, and i know lots you know this because i bang on about it all the time on the telly — i am really proud to be from here.
12:24 pm
it has given me my accent, a great education and some of my happiest memories. i am independent and resilient because i grew up here. so, a couple of years ago when a report came out saying this was the worst place to grow up as a girl in england and wales, i was absolutely raging. and i wasn't the only one. so were liz and krista. to teach girls to believe in themselves and when they work together that they can accomplish their dreams. brilliant answer. in response, they set up a charity called ruby's to help empower girls. i was really upset and disappointed having grown up in middlesbrough my whole life, ijust thought it was not a league table i wanted to be associated with really or our girls. so we decided we needed to put a different message out there. before you were doing this, did any of you feel before before you were doing this, did any of you feel
12:25 pm
you were doing this, did any of you feel like you weren't good enough. did you! oh, my god, that makes me really sad. before i started rubies i used to hate everything about me. i don't know why. i always thought i was ugly... ohh, i want to hug you cause you are not. you are gorgeous and you're brilliant. how do you feel now? i feel like i'm beautiful. you are beautiful and do you know what, you said that really quietly but i am so pleased you feel like that. it's teaching us to not bottle up all the feelings and think that we are good enough. i never thought i would be able to become a doctor but rubies has helped me to believe i can do it if i put my mind to it and keep it going to school. just because this is my home town i am not going to pretend things are perfect. of course, they're not. it has problems just like anywhere but things are improving. would you all say you are confident women? yes. meeting some of the girls studying at middlesbrough college, there is no shortage of ambition. i am going to uni in september, doing primary education with mathematics. brilliant. what do you want to do? work in a day nursery. i actually already work as an electrical technician. you're doing an apprenticeship? yeah.
12:26 pm
do you think it's harder being a girl here compared to anywhere else in the country? not at all. i think they're focusing on the negative and not looking at the positives of middlesborough. do you think anything more could be done? more work experience. more focus on mental health. because with having confidence issues, things to help deal with it and conquer it is a big issue, anywhere, not just middlesborough. what these girls also need are role models. as female business owners we are giving back now and we are trying to encourage people. these businesswomen think they are making progress. in the last few years, i think there has been much more collaboration. there's been initiatives like business women awards but much more working in partnership. there have been some real challenges in the area but there's also amazing regeneration and innovation happening locally. i thinkjust that pride that you cannot measure and it counts for so much. we have this momentum and we must keep it going, we must encourage our young people to challenge themselves, to try something new, to show them what opportunities are out there. are you proud to be
12:27 pm
from middlesborough? all: yes. do you think you can do just as well as anybody else in the country? yes. good, because you can. yeahhh! steph mcgovern, bbc news, middlesbrough. middlesbrough is a brexit town and nowhere more so than at the thornhill community help and vicki young is there. we are in the middle of the ward. that was the most brexit ward at the referendum, the most number of people voting to leave and generally in middlesbrough, that is the case. we have seen it across the north—east of england and not surprisingly, there is a lot of frustration from many people who feel the politicians haven't delivered what it was they voted for. so despite the fact it was 48%, 52%, those who voted for brexit say it was a very clear win
12:28 pm
that should have absolutely dictated to the politicians that it was time to the politicians that it was time to leave the eu. earlier i was talking to some voters in middlesbrough and this is what they had to say to me. did you vote to leave ? had to say to me. did you vote to leave? yes. what do you think of the fa ct we leave? yes. what do you think of the fact we haven't left yet?|j leave? yes. what do you think of the fact we haven't left yet? i think it is ridiculous. who do you blame for that? margaret thatcher. the government. do you think the mps have been doing the right thing over brexit? no. what would you like them to do? get their finger out and get something done. is there any political party that should do more? you cannot believe any of them, i don't think. what do you think of nigel farage's brexit party?|j don't think. what do you think of nigel farage's brexit party? i don't like that either. who will you be
12:29 pm
voting for? i won't be voting for anybody. do you want to stay in the eu? i voted to stay. they are shouting at each other like babies. everybody is poor anyway, so it doesn't make any difference. we voted to be out, we should be out. who do you blame for us not being out? well, the government. they should have done it. we voted for it and that's the end of it, as far as lam and that's the end of it, as far as i am concerned. if there was another referendum, what would you do? the same again, it wouldn't change my mind. is there any political party you blame for us not having left? no, because they are as bad as one another. there isn't a good party at all in britain now. no good party. what do you make of nigel farage's new brexit party? i am not a fan of
12:30 pm
him, but he is better than the others are doing, labour and conservative. for the people who voted to leave the eu, three years later there is a distinct scent of anger and the polls are suggesting the brexit party could do pretty well in the european elections and you can hear their what is driving people to potentially support him. they feel he has a clear message, a simple message. the anger from a he has a clear message, a simple message. the angerfrom a lot he has a clear message, a simple message. the anger from a lot of people is that they think they are being ignored and that politicians in westminster think they can get away with ignoring them. that is what is going to be a big driver in these european elections. thank you very much. we will be looking at that through the afternoon, that sense of being ignored, like passing people buy when the real story in
12:31 pm
middlesbrough is very different indeed. we will be hearing from people who are looking up the solutions to historic problems here, young people particularly here, a very diverse community here in middlesbrough, who think they may have the answers to some of the problems this time faces. if you are in the area in middlesbrough, come down and say hello. now it's time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to nick miller. it isa it is a pleasant day today. you will see some sunshine today. there are showers around with more showers breaking out in the next few hours. they could be happy and thundery. you can see them here in the north of scotland, the eastern side of england, northern ireland and the south coast. the light winds, they could hang around for a while if you do capture shower. into tonight, a
12:32 pm
lot of the showers fade away. outbreaks of rain staying with us in northern scotland, a few mist and fog patches out there. temperatures between four and 8 degrees. into tomorrow, the showers you can pick out here in the north of scotland, some developing to eastern england. for most places, it will be dry, just the odd isolated shower. it will feel a little bit warmer if you get to see some of that sunshine. looking quiet for the rest of the week. going into the weekend, it might sound a little bit cooler, breezy, with the chance of some better weather. hello this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese tech firm. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing evidence about ignacio echeverria, who died trying to fight off
12:33 pm
the attackers by hitting them with his skateboard. president trump has warned iran it will be destroyed if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. a 41—year—old comedian has been sworn in as ukraine's new president, after he won a landslide victory a month ago. coming up: after eight seasons, one of the world's most successful tv series, game of thrones, comes to an end. the european parliamentary elections take place this week, with british voters heading to the polls on thursday. they're a key test for the eu, and one of the biggest democratic exercises in the world. let's go to warsaw, poland, where our news correspondent ros atkins has more. we are here in the old town of
12:34 pm
warsaw. you can see warsaw castle just behind us. what is fascinating being here isjust as just behind us. what is fascinating being here is just as the just behind us. what is fascinating being here isjust as the european elections in the uk are being dominated by brexit, so too in poland domestic political issues are vital. there is a big parliamentary election date in the year and eve ryo ne election date in the year and everyone is seeing these elections through that domestic prism. hi people across the eu vote will give us people across the eu vote will give usa people across the eu vote will give us a clue to the future they see for the eu, and you will have heard in the eu, and you will have heard in the uk some brexiteers criticising the uk some brexiteers criticising the eu for not being sufficiently democratic, one of the big test of thatis democratic, one of the big test of that is weather voters in the eu really engage in these elections. we have seen drops and turn out every single time the eu has healthy selections. we are watching closely to see if this will be the first time that turnout goes up. let's reflect on how big an exercise in democracy they say is. we know
12:35 pm
across the european union over 400 million people are eligible to vote. we are watching carefully to see how many of them take up that opportunity. the elections are taking place across 28 member states. that figure of course was supposed to be 27, but breads it hasn't happened to the uk is taking part. there are 751 seats in the european parliament up for grabs. the number of meps each country gets is largely dictated by the size of its population. what is interesting here in poland is that yes, this is an election that is to impart being driven by attitudes towards the eu. there are also big cultural battles here in poland around lb gt issues, around abortion, and around the catholic church. you can see an enormous church here in the old town of warsaw. the influence of the catholic church in warsaw and polish
12:36 pm
culture cannot be overrated. this is a social activist. she recently made the headlines after being detained for putting up pro—lgbt being detained for putting up pro—lg bt posters. they being detained for putting up pro—lgbt posters. they portrayed the black madonna, pullen. most revered religious icon, but with the rainbow halo. offending religious freedom is a crime in poland and she faces two yea rs a crime in poland and she faces two years in prison but she says her actions were necessary. lgbt people in poland are treated as a scapegoat. this cable in the last election was emigrants. it is a total withdrawal of humanity. the powerful leader of the ruling law and justice party has cold the lgbt movement a threat to the polish state. his party is closely
12:37 pm
connected to the polish catholic church, which sees homosexuality as a sin. translation: we don't ask, we don't tell. it -- translation: we don't ask, we don't tell. it —— if translation: we don't ask, we don't tell. it -- if it is translation: we don't ask, we don't tell. it —— if it is obvious you are like that, don't broadcast it, just live with someone. anti-lgbt protesters campaigning openly. some go as faras protesters campaigning openly. some go as far as to suggest a link between homosexuality and paedophilia. this is not the official position of the catholic church, but the campaigners do use religion to justify their claims. guiding this country through its troubled history has always been the catholic church, but its reach into so catholic church, but its reach into so many different aspects of civil society is proving to be extremely divisive and not the church does not verify foundations are being shaken bya verify foundations are being shaken by a new documentary. the film
12:38 pm
u ncove rs by a new documentary. the film uncovers numerous cases of sexual abuse of children by priests and a cover within the catholic church. the church was quick to apologise to the victims. it's been viewed over 20 million times online, but the director was concerned that the debate its investigation has ignited his being hijacked. translation: some are trying to link paedophilia with homosexuality. some politicians are trying to suggest that it politicians are trying to suggest thatitis politicians are trying to suggest that it is homosexuality that leads to the rate of children. this is absurd. the ruling law and justice party has responded by introducing tougher penalties against child six abusers, but the scandal has strengthened calls from opposition parties for a tangible separation between church and states. weather or not this will affect the way people vote in the upcoming elections, though, remains to be
12:39 pm
seen. joanna, as we know, one of the drivers of brexit was a sense that people want to assert the national sovereignty of the uk and it has been fascinating moving around europe seeing how some of them similar issues are in play. i was in milan on saturday, they were talking about the importance of asserting the nation state. in poland, there has been a long running conflict with the eu overjudicial reviews that they want to bring in. what is fascinating is that while brexiteers concluded that leaving the european union was the way to assert the nation state, for all their criticisms of the eu, all of these parties across europe criticise the
12:40 pm
eu, but they don't want to leave it. let's get some more now on the news that google said that it would bar the chinese tach firm huawei from accessing some of its android operating system. google is complying with a white house order to blacklist the firm because of fears it could be used to spy on american networks. huawei says it will continue to provide security updates and services for its smartphones and tablets. let's get more with the technology journalist amd writer charles arthur. thanks forjoining us. this is getting quite complicated, because there are allegations that huawei poses potentially as security threat, enabling china to spy on users of their technology, and the trade war between the us and china. it is difficult to work out weather this one is about the trade war, weather this is another bargaining chip in that, or weather it is about the security concerns raised not
12:41 pm
just by the us but also by intelligence services in the uk, australia and new zealand. i think that the best way to look at it is it is part of the trade war. a year ago, president trump effectively banned a chinese company, then a month later rescinded it and that was all part of that trade war. where would you expect this to go? there have been suggestions that huawei will sue the us government over this. i expect that they will, but also that before that you will see some sort of retaliation by the chinese government. the most likely way that it will retaliate will be some sort of move against that. apple, a us company, all its phones, products pretty much a made in china. china could find ways to decide that they are overstepping some regulation in some way or other and they would get back at them in that way. the fact is, huawei is a
12:42 pm
huge company in terms of its prestige in china, where it sells half of its phones, and in terms of the revenue hit that it would take if smartphones effectively are no use in the future outside china. what is the potential for a real impact on users. obviously, huawei users are facing the prospect of not being able to get all of the google apps on their phones, but could have potentially go beyond that, even? well, people who have attack macro phonein well, people who have attack macro phone in their hands now ok. i understand that they will continue to get updates from google, play store protection and so on. that won't change. it is telephones that they might want to sell in the future. that is where they would face the real problem. they would effectively have a phone that would have new apps, new google maps, new google search, none of the google play store apps. in that sense, it
12:43 pm
would kill it stone dead. that is the same effect that said te feared a year ago. the rescinding of the ban, even though there was a clear smoking gun that their broken sanctions against iran, meant that it could come back. for huawei, the fear is probably the same. there will be a hit on american companies, as well. american technology component suppliers to supply to huawei, they will take a hit. no one really co m es huawei, they will take a hit. no one really comes out of this very well. the concerns over security are almost a sideshow compared to the immediate impacts that we will see. thank you very much. the queen will thank you very much. the queen will get a preview of gardens at the chelsea flower show today, before nearly 170,000 visitors
12:44 pm
will visit across the week. the duchess of cambridge received the royal seal of approval from her children when they tested out a garden she helped design for the show. princess charlotte, and prince's george and louis, were filmed together, with their parents, for the first time, as they played and paddled in a stream. the duchess said her aim is to encourage children to spend more time outdoors. our correspondent ashley john ba ptisite is at the chelsea flower show for us this morning. the duchess was here earlier. people we re the duchess was here earlier. people were extremely excited to see her. one of the key features of this yea r‘s one of the key features of this year's chelsea flower show will be the back to nature garden that she co—designed. that garden is a celebration of woodlands and nature, this idea of going back to your roots and encouraging people from all walks of life to engage with nature. the garden really touches on the impact that nature and the half on mental well—being. a very popular feature of this year's flower show. iam feature of this year's flower show. i am currently at the samples and
12:45 pm
david harbour garden. we have some stunning music in the background and the stunning backdrop, really. this garden is a celebration of woodland and green areas in urban spaces and we have the designer, andrew duff. how is today going, andrew?m we have the designer, andrew duff. how is today going, andrew? it is a great day. a really nice and to our build. talk to us about the vision behind this very stunning garden. the idea is, it is a bit like you're through a woodland and someone suddenly you come through a clearing and you have that shaft of light, and you have that shaft of light, and a relaxed, tranquil atmosphere. it also has a strong environmental message. the trees we have dues and absorb the maximum amount of pollution. we have a water filtration system to filter the grey water. the garden is working really ha rd water. the garden is working really hard as well as looking beautiful. what is the reaction been from the guests? it has been great. people
12:46 pm
are saying it is really calm and tranquil, which is what we wanted. strong message when it comes to the environment. how important is it to have these green spaces in urban areas? there are a lot of pressures on urban areas. people need to maximise their use of the space.|j am intrigued by this water feature. there is a sustainable message behind it. the idea is that this filter is the grey water from the house and then it is stored in a water harvesting system underneath we can use for irrigation. we wanted to create a natural —looking reflective pool that you would find ina reflective pool that you would find in a woodland, so we have use leaves collected from the trees we are surrounded by. we two sleeves to fall to fall to the bottom of the water and that has made that beautiful image. tell us about the plants. the plants we're using here,
12:47 pm
we have water irises and bulrushes. the idea is that the whole changes throughout the year so every season there is something looking amazing. we are celebrating things like winter when the leaves aren't on the trees. you get an amazing reflection of the leaves onto the water, which is important. for gardeners watching, how easy is a tempting plan —— to implement some of these techniques? if you get it right from the start, it is very easy. the irrigation system is really able to do. and you have met some celebrities? joanna lumleyjust came around, which was lovely. there you go. great vibes and the start of what will be a very great day for many people coming to the show. we will visit some of the other gardens. as we've heard, after eight seasons, game of thrones has come to an end. it's been one of the most successful
12:48 pm
tv shows of all time, but some fans have complained about plot lines in the last series. our los angeles correspondent, sophie long, went to a watch party where the 80—minute finale aired a few hours ago. this goes beyond loyalty. there's no question that the cultural phenomenon that is game of thrones has been a ratings hit. and resulted in big business for some. as fans prepared for viewing parties, this bakery sold around 30,000 limited edition cupcakes, breaking its previous record set by last year's royal wedding. this has been our all—time best selling limited edition cupcake in the history of sprinkles. it's our biggest innovation yet. at a viewing party near venice beach, heated debate about how it was all going to end. what about a babyjon snow? that's a possibility. yeah, if she's pregnant, he's not going to kill her. there was an atmosphere of great anticipation. some hoping for relief.
12:49 pm
others, an end to a disappointing season. i felt the writing was kind of sloppy. it didn't make any sense with the character arcs and all that. just a big release, i guess, from the anxiety that we have today. intense. like, so many emotions, like, anticipation that's fulfilled and never seeing it again. and then it was time. cheering. a whole pub completely absorbed. the debate over the quality of series eight will continue, but in the united states the credits have rolled. winter is no longer coming. wow! sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. the european union is threatening legal action against romania, unless the country reverses new measures that the eu considers undermine the independence of the courts.
12:50 pm
romania's president, who opposes the changes, has called a referendum on the new laws on the same day as the european parliament elections, which in romania will be held next sunday. nick thorpe sent this report from bucharest. people who are fed up over criticism from the eu over corruption issues and the rule of law. romania has successfully prosecuted more high—level officials than almost any other country, but that strong record of fighting corruption has got the president, the prosecutors and the security services into trouble. rather than upholding the rule of law, they stand accused of undermining it. the latest letter from the european commission to the
12:51 pm
government hasjust from the european commission to the government has just arrived, threatening infringement proceedings. a misunderstanding according to top government officials. i believe a genuine concern about the rule of law should be normalfor concern about the rule of law should be normal for every member state, but then i also have our rhetorical question, why the commission was totally blind and deaf during so many years, more than ten years, when in romania there were so many abuses in the judiciary? the when in romania there were so many abuses in thejudiciary? the latest controversy centres around the former anti—corruption boss, who is now under investigation herself. she isa now under investigation herself. she is a popularfigure now under investigation herself. she is a popular figure for anti—government protesters and now she is in the running for the new post of european prosecutor. romania may look messy, this government critic told me, but it shows that democracy is alive and kicking. what do you expect when you're fighting the establishment? i think it would
12:52 pm
be fairto the establishment? i think it would be fair to expect that the establishment is going to fight back. the establishment is not only a political establishment, they are the one to have the money, that control the media, they are the ones who make the laws in parliament. of course they are going to try to use the tools that they have at their disposal to try to avoid going to jailand disposal to try to avoid going to jail and losing their money. sometimes romanians feel they are going round and round in circles, but 12 years afterjoining the european union, there is also a sense of progress. politicians know they will be held to account. citizens believe their voices will be heard. in the elections of the coming months, they will deliver their verdict. he's one of the biggest names in showbiz and is recognised around the world for his heartfelt lyrics and flamboyant style. now, sir eltonjohn's life is getting the hollywood treatment, with a new biopic starring taron edgerton and richard madden. they spoke to breakfast‘s graham
12:53 pm
satchell, in their first uk tv interview, ahead of the premier in london tonight. # and i think it's going to be a long, long time.# you have, if i may say so, an amazing voice. i'm very comfortable with you saying that. that's good. very well deserved, he has an outstanding voice. it's beautiful because he knows how to sing and he knows how to act and he knows how to dance. it's going to be a wild ride. so, elton is the executive producer on this film. he is. and i wonder whether you felt it was a help or hindrance. i think i've felt very much that it's a help. there is a world in which i might not have felt that way because it's a very specific iteration of this story and one that doesn't hold back from the darker moments. and i think i would have felt slightly crestfallen, had those moments gone by the wayside but thankfully our
12:54 pm
subject matter is a brave man and a man with integrity. and that's the story he wanted to tell, too. john reid. elton. i know it seems all a bit overwhelming at first but something makes me think you'll get used to it. in fact, i predict you could be the best—selling artist in america if you desire. so you like the songs, then? not quite as much as the singer. i play his first partner. they were together for five years before john reid started managing elton john and the relationship started off from a place of love and passion and then changed and became something really different as the film goes on, as people will see when you watch it. your name, taron, in welsh means ‘thunder‘. is that right? what actually happened, ‘ta ran' is ‘thunder‘, so ‘taranau a mellt‘ is ‘thunder and lightning', and ‘taran' means ‘thunder‘ and my mother, she does not like me telling this story —
12:55 pm
she spelled it wrong on the birth certificate. no! so now it's taron, or taron, if you're going to make it english but no, originally my name was conceived as being something welsh. you sang on stage with elton. it's a great dream, growing up? it's a privilege and an honour and i think he really enjoyed it well which is really exciting and really fun. # hold me closer, tiny dancer. # count the headlights on the highway.# i wish everyone knew elton 10% more so that they could know how good taron is at portraying him and bringing all the best elements taron does throughout the whole film which is a film about love and overcoming so much in your life,
12:56 pm
despite the bad things and still at the end of it having this beautiful positive outlook on life which elton has. and i'm very at peace with where we have arrived and where we have landed and i hope that people are moved and i hope that people are slightly challenged at times and i hope that ultimately it's uplifting. thank you both very much. thank you for your time. thank you very, very much indeed. in a moment, it's time for the one o'clock news with ben brown, but first it's time for a look at the weather with mel coles. we have a fairly quiet week of weather to come with plenty of sunshine, lots of places staying dry. this sun was in evidence this morning in north yorkshire. there are showers to be had for some of us today. the showers will develop more widely through northern and eastern
12:57 pm
parts of scotland comment on the eastern side of england. if you look at the picture for this afternoon, it is here we are going to see them showers developing. some through southern england, a few into wales and northern ireland as well. if you catch a shower, it could be thundery and the winds are very light so they are likely to be slow moving, so you could turn out to be very wet for a period of time when just trying to root it is perfectly dry. the warmth enhanced by the fact that the wind is very light. most of the showers slowly fa d e is very light. most of the showers slowly fade away into tonight. we keep the cloud and outbreaks of rain affecting parts of northern scotland, some north sea coasts could turn misty, some mist and fog patches possible elsewhere and overnight temperatures between 4-8dc. in overnight temperatures between 4—8dc. in tomorrow, showers and northern and eastern parts of scotland. there will be some outbreaks of green for us in the northern isles. elsewhere, very few showers developing, so most of the staying dry with sunshine. in the
12:58 pm
sunshine, it will feel a little bit warmer. to wednesday, whilst many places against a dry, there will be some cloud building. through northern and eastern scotland down into north—east england, some showers. a stronger breeze bringing some rain at shetland. it does feel quite pleasant when you get some of that sunshine in amongst the cloud. for much of this week, when the sun makes an appearance, it will feel quite warm. there is a chance of showers, by no means everybody will see them but if you do that could be happy. it looks like the weather pattern will try more active by the end of the week and into the coming weekend, as the jet stream starts to ta ke weekend, as the jet stream starts to take a track more directly towards us. take a track more directly towards us. what we will find going into the weekend is things cool off a little bit, there will be a stronger breeze and will be a greater chance of seeing some wetter weather at times. goodbye.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
google blocks some of its services from huawei, the world's second—biggest maker of smartphones. it comes after the us government blacklisted the chinese company as a security threat. i think it's absolutely disastrous for huawei in the uk because at the moment it's got something like 7% of the uk market and that's been growing. so this is really going to put the brakes on huawei's growth in the uk and in europe. we'll have the latest from our technology correspondent. also this lunchtime: the man who died trying to fight off the london bridge attackers with his skateboard. donald trump warns iran it will be destroyed if it picks a fight with the united states. audiences watch the very last episode of game of thrones —

41 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on