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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 9, 2019 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. the headlines at two. michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. the home secretary, sajid javid, attacks middle—class drug users for "destroying the lives" of those caught up in the supply chain. they have their organic food, they boast about buying fair trade, they talk about climate change, and at the same time, come friday or saturday night, they're all doing class a drugs, and they should be thinking about the impact they're having. meanwhile, boris johnson says he would not pay britain's £39 billion brexit divorce bill until better terms are agreed for the uk to leave. a woman dies after being struck by lightning while walking
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on a mountain near ben nevis in the scottish highlands. hundreds of thousands take to the streets of hong kong to protest against a planned law about extradition to china. and i'm here in nice where injust a few hours‘ time, and i‘m here in nice where injust a few hours‘ time, england will take on scotland in their first women‘s world cup match. and coming up on bbc news, alicia mccarthy looks back at recent events in westminster, in the week in parliament. that‘s at half—past two. good afternoon. the conservative leadership candidate michael gove has admitted he commited a criminal offence when he took cocaine on several occasions. speaking for the first time
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about his use of the class a drug, he said he had a "profound sense of regret" about it. he used cocaine when working as a journalist 20 years ago. here‘s our political correspondent susana mendonca. these aren‘t the headlines that michael gove would have been hoping for this weekend as he embarked on his campaign for the leadership. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake, andi yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake, and i deeply regret it. should you have gone to prison?” was fortu nate should you have gone to prison?” was fortunate that i didn‘t, but it was fortunate that i didn‘t, but it was a huge mistake and i have seen the damage drugs do. he had wanted to focus on his pro—business agenda and plans to replace vat with a simpler system. and plans to replace vat with a simplersystem. instead, and plans to replace vat with a simpler system. instead, he and plans to replace vat with a simplersystem. instead, he was answering accusations of hypocrisy about an article he wrote in 1999 criticising middle—class drug users in calling for legalisation. the point that i made in the article is that if any of us laps sometimes,
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andrew, from standards that we uphold, that is human. the thing to do is not necessarily them to say that the standard should be lowered, it should be to reflect on the laps and seek to do better in future. the environment secretary said he respected the country‘s most senior police officer, cressida dick, who has said that class a drug users have blood on their hands. that is a view echoed by the home secretary, who is also in the running for the leadership. he says middle—class drug users destroy lives. they have their organic food, they boast about buying fair trade, they talk about climate change, but at the same time, come friday or saturday night, they are all doing class a drugs, and they should be think about the effect they are you going to be prime minister? another contender has come out of the shadows saying he won‘t pay the £39 million divorce bill to the eu. i always thought it
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was extraordinary that we should agree to the right that entire check before having a final deal. i don‘t wish to conduct a postmortem of the original negotiations, but it was extraordinary that we agreed to pay the money in advance of a deal on the money in advance of a deal on the future partnership. while boris johnson is promising to remember is that if the eu doesn‘t renegotiate, he will take the uk out with no deal in october, michael gove has suggested a delay to the brexit date of weeks or days to get a deal done. the real question is whether parliament will let any of this happen. and susana is here. he is on the front page of every paper, talking about taking drugs, how is his day going? pretty excruciating, i would say. he was doing that interview with andrew
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marr today, that was on the schedule for some time, and unfortunately for him it comes a day after people find out that he had taken cocaine 20 yea rs out that he had taken cocaine 20 years ago. but i suppose for him it was basically an opportunity to explain his actions, and he was making the point that it is about human frailty and that people should be forgiven, i suppose, for things that they have done in the past, that they have done in the past, that they have seen the error of their ways, and trying to get that message across. but essentially for him it‘s not great because he wanted to be talking about his plans if he became prime minister, talking about his plans for vat, talking about brexit, and he did talk about things, but the focus is on something that he didn‘t want the focus to be on, in this case. important to note he is not the only conservative leadership candidate who has admitted to taking drugs. we had a whole list of them, andrea leadsom and dominic rab have said that they have had cannabis, rory stewart talking about having smoked opium, jeremy hunt saying he thinks
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he might have consume some kind of cannabis —based drink whilst backpacking in india, borisjohnson who was on have i got news for you, saying he was given cocaine but didn‘t actually consume it, so michael gove is by no means the only person who discussions are being had about drugs, but the conservative party are supposed to be this party of crime and order, and that is very much where they focus themselves, andi much where they focus themselves, and i suppose it gives across this image, certainly critics today have been saying, you know, it seems to been saying, you know, it seems to be okfor been saying, you know, it seems to be ok for people in privileged positions to do this kind of crime, but not for your average person, and it‘s whether or not that damages the conservative brand. youjust it‘s whether or not that damages the conservative brand. you just listed the rest of the candidates and their misdemeanours, it is notjust about michael gove today what are the other candidates saying? essentially, although people are talking about drugs, when it comes down to it, the conservative mps who are going to decide which two candidates end up being put to the
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conservative membership, they are really focusing on who they think can actually deliver where they feel that theresa may could not, and that is essentially about brexit. so we mentioned there what borisjohnson was talking about in terms of not paying the £39 billion, but we are also getting details from other candidates today as well, jeremy hunt for example, the foreign secretary, talking about how he thinks that he would be a good negotiator, that it shouldn‘t be about the kind of aggressive negotiation, that you need to work with the european union in order to get a deal. you‘ve got sajid javid as well, who we saw in the peace they are, in terms of what he is talking about, he‘s talking about the backstop and this idea that the government if he was prime minister would pay for there to be this technological innovation that would enable us to have an invisible border. so all of them really giving their perspectives on what they see
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as being the reason to vote for them. of course, at the moment what they are hoping for is that they will be able to get enough tory mps on side that they don‘t get dropped out at the early hurdles. lots to think about, so thank you very much, susana mendonca. tens of thousands of people are marching through the streets of hong kong in a final attempt to stop a new law. it would allow people to be extradited to the chinese mainland to face criminal proceedings. opposition activists say putting people on trial there would threaten hong kong‘s legal independence, which was guaranteed when it was handed back to china by britain in 1997. alison freeman reports. the streets of hong kong packed with protesters. dressed in white, marching in the sweltering heat. tens of thousands of people opposed to a plan for a new extradition law which they believe could allow china to target its political opponents, leaving them open to unfair trials and torture. the former british colony returned to chinese rule in 1997,
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but has its own laws and civil liberties not enjoyed by those on the mainland. those who oppose the new bill say it will further erode hong kong‘s judicial independence. mainland china uses all sorts of ways to exercise their so—called dictatorship in hong kong, to kidnap the people they treat as enemy. the controversial bill would allow authorities in mainland china, taiwan and macau to make extradition applications for suspects accused of crimes such as murder and rape. the hong kong government has tried to reassure the public, saying the territory‘s courts would have the final say on whether to grant requests. and those accused of political and religious crimes would not be extradited. whilst hong kong‘s leader carrie lam has made amendments to the bill, she refuses to withdraw it.
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many of the protesters today carried banners calling her a traitor, and for her resignation. alison freeman, bbc news. the bbc‘s martin yip is at the protest. he explained the scale of the demonstrations. this is a scene that has not been seen in hong kong for quite a while. you judge how big the rally is by how many people occupy how many lanes on the road. this is a busy part of hong kong. all six lanes have been occupied by these people waiting mainly white t—shirts. they are chanting slogans ranging from, down with the leader, too, no extradition to china. this is about opposing the proposed amendments to existing extradition law in hong kong. people are worried that some might be extradited to mainland china for political reason once this bill is passed.
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the government argues that the court will protect them from such a thing, from these political extraditions. but people do not buy into it. and they are showing up here. a woman has died after being struck by lightning while walking on a mountain range in the scottish highlands. the 55—year—old was hiking near kinlochleven when she and another member of the group were hit. police scotland said both were airlifted to hospital in fort william, but one died of her injuries. the other walker is in a stable condition. five teenagers arrested in connection with a homophobic attack on two women on a london night bus have been released on bail. a group of young men began harassing the women after discovering that they were a couple, and asked them to kiss. the suspects were questioned on suspicion of robbery and aggravated grievous bodily harm. the labour mp who was reported to the chief whip for telling campaigners they were right to protest against same—sex
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relationship teaching at a primary school will be "reminded of his responsibilities as an mp", according to labour. roger godsiff is the mp for the birmingham constituency which includes anderton park school, the focus of recent demonstrations. daniela relph reports. they are now banned from protesting directly outside anderton park school by a court injunction. but on friday, the parents‘ demonstration moved just down the road. they‘ve been here for more than two months, arguing that their children are too young to learn about lg bt relationships. now one of their local mps has voiced his support during a meeting with concerned families. i think you have a just cause, and i regret the fact that it hasn‘t been reciprocated by the head teacher. i will continue to work to try and bring this dispute to an end,
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because all of you want your kids back in school. i will continue to fight your corner because you‘re right. nothing more, nothing less, you‘re right. roger godsiff‘s comments have angered several of his fellow labour mps. in a tweet, the shadow education secretary, angela rayner, said: i have reported this to our chief whip. this might be the personal views of mr roger godsiff, but they do not represent the labour party, and are discriminatory and irresponsible. there is no sign of the protests stopping. this week, the parents will go to court to challenge the injunction that has moved on from the front of the school gates. daniela relph, bbc news. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder after the death of a woman in essex. police said a woman in her 50s was found at an address in burnham—on—crouch after officers were called by the ambulance service at about 12.30am. the victim was pronounced dead at the scene.
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two men remain in police custody. one of britain‘s most wanted men, who‘s been on the run for 16 years, is set to be extradited to the uk after being arrested in malta. police want to question christopher guest morejr over the murder of a man at a remote farmhouse in cheshire, in 2003. he‘ll appear in court tomorrow. simon jones reports. in handcuffs, far away from home, christopher guest morejr, described as one of europe‘s most wanted fugitives, being led to his first court appearance, which is set to see him extradited to the uk. it‘s believed he fled the uk in 2003, after this man, brian waters, was tortured and beaten to death in front of his two children. he sustained 123 injuries. mr waters had been running a cannabis farm in knutsford, when a group of men stormed the property to demand money. three people are currently serving
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life sentences for his murder. mr more jr, leaving court with a coat over his head, is wanted in connection with mr waters‘s death, the attempted murder of a second man, and false imprisonment and assault of other people at the scene. the national crime agency said it had waited a long time for this moment. it insisted it was never going to give up the hunt. mr more jr was apprehended on a european arrest warrant following a joint operation with authorities in malta. he has been remanded in custody and will next appear in court tomorrow. the boss of broker hargreaves lansdown has issued an apology following the suspension of a fund it sells. chief executive chris hill said he shares clients‘ disappointment and frustration after the woodford equity income fund, managed by neil woodford, stopped investors cashing out this week. mr woodford suspended the fund after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. the home secretary, sajid javid, criticises middle—class drug users for destroying the lives of those caught up in the supply chain. meanwhile, boris johnson says he would not pay britain‘s £39 billion brexit divorce bill until better terms are agreed for the uk to leave. old rivals will go head—to—head today in the women‘s world cup in france — when england take on scotland in nice. scotland are making their debut in the tournament — while england are one of the favourites to win the competition. our sports reporter jane dougall has been spending time with both camps this week. it‘s a "derby match" with so much significance.
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how do you see this one going? well, emotions always run high home nations match, so the short answer to your question is it could go either way. but as you mentioned, england are one of the favourites for the tournament, and certainly the favourite for tonight‘s match. they are ranked third in the world in the fifa rankings, and theyjust w011 in the fifa rankings, and theyjust won silverware in march, the she believes cup in america. and phil neville who took over as england manager earlier last year, that is his first piece of silverware, but he took thejob his first piece of silverware, but he took the job saying his intention was to win the world cup, so he has also been credited with making the tea m also been credited with making the team or professional, tactically aware, and also bringing in new young talent like georgia stanway and arsenal‘s leah williamson. we can hearfrom and arsenal‘s leah williamson. we can hear from him and arsenal‘s leah williamson. we can hearfrom him now where he talked about how difficult it can sometimes be to have a first match
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in sucha sometimes be to have a first match in such a large tournament like the world cup. we've probably got the most difficult first game out of all the teams in the competition because it's our nearest rivals, against a team that we've got a lot of respect for, players that know each other — both sets of teams have players that know each other. so it's a really difficult game for us, and we're just looking to get off to a good start, to keep building the confidence that we've got and the belief, and to grow into the competition. now, the last time these two sides met was in 2017 in the euros, and at that time, scotland had a number of injured players, and it was a comprehensive 6—0 winter england. i don‘t think it is going to be that type of scoreline tonight, because since then, shelley kerr has said that 100% of her squad are fully fit, but also scotland have developed in great spades since then. just earlier this year in april, they beat brazil 1—0, that is the first time that any scotland side has ever beaten brazil. and
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then before christmas, they narrowly lost 1—0 to the world number ones, the usa. so i think the scottish tea m the usa. so i think the scottish team has developed massively, and as you know, emotions run high, this is a grudge match, as you can imagine, soi a grudge match, as you can imagine, so i don‘t think we can predict the outcome of it. shelley kerr spoke to me yesterday and told me that 100% of her squad were fully fit. there is no doubt that there is certainly more pressure on england than there is on scotland. however, the pressure that we have will be the pressure that the players put themselves under. in terms of end results, of course we are hoping to win the game. i think any footballer and any coach, you go into every game hoping to win it, and it's going to be a tough, tough match for us. so, jane, what has the atmosphere been like in the build—up to this huge match? in the centre of nice there has been something of an influx of british
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tourists. we have seen many of the england lioness is kits, and the scotla nd england lioness is kits, and the scotland national kits, too. a few kilts as well, i can confirm we have seen. and there is banter between the fans, not much animosity, a bit of ribbing, so the atmosphere has been lovely. lots of families come m, been lovely. lots of families come in, people bringing their daughters and sons to come and watch the women‘s game. and also, the capacity to night, we are told it is going to bea to night, we are told it is going to be a sell out in the stand in nice. we have turned the camera around away from the sprinklers are on a we got a little wet, but it is looking lush. there will be more than 36,000 people in this stadium watching on tonight in this massively hyped match, but hyped for a reason. and i think also this women‘s world cup is going to be one of the most successful ever, because already almost a million tickets have been sold, and i would expect that after this summer, there will be many of these footballer s‘ names that will
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become household names. stay out of the way of those sprinklers! thank you very much. next. thousands of people in the city of venice are calling for large cruise ships to be banned from one of its main canals. the protest comes days after a cruise ship crashed into a tourist boat, injuring four people. rahuljoglekar has more. the msc opera lost control and crashed into the pier in venice last week. it injured people and caused damage to property. but in its wake, residents of the lagoon city have been left fuming. they came out onto the streets wanting ships like these to be kicked out from their canals. translation: we demand that these liners be immediately banned from venice lagoon. what happened on sunday shows that they are dangerous,
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out of control in case of failure and they cannot continue to play russian roulette with our homes, lives and with our city, just to enrich these cruise companies. translation: it is absurd, i believe there is very little to say. if we want to save venice and the lagoon, we shouldn't allow those liners to enter, it is terrifying just to see them. the issue has been bubbling along for a while in venice. the government banned ships weighing more than 96,000 tonnes from the canal in 2013. but then, legislation was overturned. following sunday‘s accident, the mayor of the city urged immediate action and asked for a different channel to be opened up. translation: even if everything went well today, it could have been a tragedy. i thank all of the rescue teams, firefighters and security personnel who are working here. once again, it has shown that big
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ships cannot go down the canal, they must go through san marco. we have said it already, now the minister must decide quickly. for centuries, venice has been a hub of maritime trade and nicknamed the city of water. now its residents want to keep large ships out of these waters, while the government claims it is finally close to a definitive solution. police in sudan have used tear gas on protesters trying to put up new roadblocks in the capital khartoum. it comes on the first day of a civil disobedience campaign aimed at forcing the ruling military council to relinquish power. most offices and businesses are understood to have shut. a new exhibition is bringing to life the diary of anne frank — the journals of the jewish teenager hiding from the nazis in occupied amsterdam.
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earlier this week, anne frank‘s stepsister, 90—year—old auschwitz survivor eva schloss, visited the exhibition and spoke to the bbc‘sjohn beattie. she was a very lively little girl. very full of stories. was very interested in always looking smart, with nice hairstyles and different clothes. full of stories. a big chatterbox. we‘ve been covering the 75th anniversary of d—day all week and the number of people alive who can tell the stories is getting smaller. how important is it that we talk to people like you and that we remember? yes, well it is, and we are getting very thin on the ground. every day, i hear about a survivor or a military man who was fighting in that war is dying. so this will be the last generation of kids who will hear a personal story of us.
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your family were sent to auschwitz. can you even begin to describe to someone like me what that is like? well, we knew already that when we were being transported to auschwitz, we knew that people were going to be gassed there. so that is, of course, incomprehensible. healthy, young people, children were going to be taken in a room and within 15 minutes they were killed. this is still something which i can‘t comprehend how this was possible — since the world knew about it and the world didn‘t object whatsoever. what happened to you and what was left of your family after the war? well, my mother, luckily she survived as well, with me. and otto frank, the father of anne was the only member of the family who survived.
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and both were lonely. both had problems to cope with the loss. he helped me as well, over my hatred. he who had lost his whole family had no hatred. and, you know, he said, if you hate people, the people you hate, they don‘t suffer, they don‘t know, but you will become a miserable person. and i was. so slowly, slowly he helped me. when you think of your father and your brother what was your last memory? well, my brother, he was very, very scared of dying. i think that we all are. we wanted to not have lived for nothing. we wanted to be remembered. anne has become a symbol now of one and a half million children who have been murdered. and everybody knows about her. so she has become immortal. her diary will be read and read and read for many, many generations.
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remarkable memories there from either now it‘s time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to alina jenkins. hello there, we have some sunshine spells around, but also some frequent showers, there has been a rash of them across scotland and northern ireland, wales and the south—west. the further east you are, the better chance of staying dry. through the evening we keep the showers, eventually they will fade away, a few lingering across the south—west, persistent rain moving into east anglia and south—east england. for most, temperatures typically between seven and 11 celsius, rural parts of scotland getting down to two or three. for much of scotland and northern ireland aside from a scattering of showers, it is a dry day tomorrow, but this chunk of weather slowly sta rts but this chunk of weather slowly
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starts to pivot and move its way into the west midlands and east wales. and a cool north—easterly wind, so where we have the rain, temperatures not much higher than 13 01’ temperatures not much higher than 13 or 1a celsius.
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hello, this is bbc news. i‘m lewis vaughan jones. the headlines: michael gove has acknowledged he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. the home secretary, sajid javid, attacks middle class drug users for "destroying the lives" of those caught up in the supply chain. meanwhile, borisjohnson has said he would not pay britain‘s £39 billion brexit divorce bill until better terms are agreed for the uk to leave. a woman dies after being struck by lightning while walking on a mountain near ben nevis in the scottish highlands. hundreds of thousands take to the streets of hong kong
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to protest against a planned law about extradition to china. england and scotland fans have descended on the south of france, as the two teams go head—to—head in the women‘s world cup. now on bbc news, it‘s time for the week in westminster. hello and welcome to the week in parliament, where donald trump takes centre stage on his state visit to the uk, and theresa may stands down as leader of her party and prepares to exit number ten. on this programme we‘ll be asking, what did this prime minister get done in parliament? many of these small bills, i mean, it‘s easy to write them off

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