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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 9, 2019 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. the headlines at three: michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. the home secretary, sajid javid, attacks middle—class drug users for "destroying the lives" of those caught up in the supply chain. they have their organic food, they boast about buying fair trade, they talk about climate change, and at the same time, come friday or saturday night, they're all doing class a drugs, and they should be thinking about the impact they're having. meanwhile, boris johnson says he would not pay britain's £39 billion brexit "divorce" bill until better terms are agreed for the uk to leave. a woman dies after being struck by lightning while walking on a mountain near ben nevis
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in the scottish highlands. hundreds of thousands take to the streets of hong kong to protest against a planned law about extradition to china. we are in the stadium in nice where injust under two we are in the stadium in nice where in just under two hours, we are in the stadium in nice where injust under two hours, england will take on scotland in the women's world cup. and coming up on bbc news, a look back at some of this week's stories covered by the victoria derbyshire programme — that's in half an hour. good afternoon. the conservative leadership candidate michael gove has admitted he commited a criminal offence when he took cocaine on several occasions. speaking for the first time
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about his use of the class a drug he said he had a "profound sense of regret" about it. he used cocaine when working as a journalist 20 years ago. here's our political correspondent susana mendonca. these weren't the headlines michael gove would have been hoping for this weekend as he embarked on setting out his pitch for the tory leadership. after it emerged he had taken cocaine 20 years ago, today an admission of lawbreaking from the formerjustice secretary. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. should you have gone to prison? i was fortunate in that i didn't, but i do think that it was a profound mistake and i've seen the damage that drugs do. he had wanted to focus on his pro—business agenda, and plans to replace vat with a simpler system. instead he was answering accusations of hypocrisy about an article he wrote in 1999, criticising middle—class drug users for calling for legalisation. the point that i made in the article is if any of us lapse sometimes, andrew, from standards that we uphold, that is human.
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the thing to do is not necessarily then to say that the standards should be lowered. it should be to reflect on the lapse and to seek to do better in future. the environment secretary said he respected the country's most senior police officer, cressida dick, who has said class a drug users have blood on their hands. that's a view echoed by the home secretary, who's also in the running to be prime minister. today he said middle—class people and others who take drugs, destroy lives. they have their organic food and boast about buying fair trade and talk about climate change and at the same time, come friday or saturday night, they're all doing class a drugs and they should be thinking about the impact they're having especially on children. are you going to be the next prime minister? another leading contender has come out of the shadows, promising not to pay the £39 billion divorce bill to the eu, which labour says is a legal obligation. i always thought it was extraordinary that we should agree to write that entire cheque before
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having a final deal. i don't wish to conduct a postmortem of the original negotiations but it was extraordinary that we agreed to pay the money in advance of a deal on the future partnership. while borisjohnson is promising tory members that if the eu doesn't renegotiate he will take the uk out with no—deal in october, michael gove has suggested a delay to the brexit date of weeks or days to get a deal done. the real question ss whether parliament will let any of this happen. i'm joined by the assistant editor of conservative home, henry hill. a lot of things to unpick, the first of all, michael gove would wish that we weren't sitting here talking about him taking drugs. of course he would. it is always a thorny question for political candidates. i
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think the problem for michael gove is that his position doesn't please anyone, because the people who are against drugs, and that will be disproportionately conservative party members, they won't like the fa ct party members, they won't like the fact that he has taken them, but more liberal people who might not mind that he has taken and will object to the fact that whilst education secretary he instituted lifetime bans for teachers for doing the same thing, and has otherwise pursued quite a hard—line anti—drugs stance, and it is the hypocrisy that is the problem. it is slightly unedifying for the whole leadership race, all candidates now coming out and talking about drug use. this is someone, whoever and talking about drug use. this is someone, whoever wins, who will become prime minister. it is tricky to try to work out where to draw the line when it comes to examining candidates' personal lives. there is and argue that things people did 20 yea rs and argue that things people did 20 years ago maybe aren't relevant, and it will be increasingly difficult in the age of social media when so much of what people have done is recorded, but this does have consequences for what they believe about drugs policy today. if michael gove believes that he can serve as
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education secretary and prime minister having taken drugs 20 years ago, then surely it is right that we are able to ask why he doesn't think the same for people in the education profession. that is a key question that i don't think will go away. let's move on from michael gove a look at the other candidates. from what you have heard today over the weekend, what has stood out? boris johnson is cementing his lead. last time he went on as the favourite, but as is traditional for conservative favourites, it all went wrong, he didn't appear to take his campaign seriously, he was surprised by michael gove. this time he seems to be very much on top of things, he has his nose to the grindstone, more endorsements coming to him from all wings of the party, which suggests he might manage to pull off being the unifying candidate. the other significant endorsement was that ruth davidson, the leader of the scottish conservatives, has come out for sajid javid, and in many senses, he is competing with gove for that kind of liberal space, if you have borisjohnson broadly kind of liberal space, if you have boris johnson broadly representing the pro brexit right, who will be
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the pro brexit right, who will be the other member going to the final two 7 the other member going to the final two? if this drugs question continues to damage michael gove, sajid javid might be able to capitalise on going as the liberal alternative. so is that you're back to yourfinal two? alternative. so is that you're back to your final two? if he were pushed, who would you say where your final two? with so pushed, who would you say where your finaltwo? with so many pushed, who would you say where your final two? with so many early rounds and the mps being as changeable as they are, it is impossible to tell. borisjohnson is a lot for the first position, and for the second position, and for the second position it is probably a competition between sajid javid and michael gove. and for people who are not au fait with the conservative rules and procedures, talk us through briefly the process. conservative mps will vote in ballots until, knocking out one candidate at a time, over a period of weeks until hopefully some of them drop out or we will be here for ever. and then down to the final two, they go to a ballot of the full conservative membership which will be preceded by campaigning on
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hustings. thank you very much for coming in. thank you. hundreds of thousands of people are marching through the streets of hong kong in a final attempt to stop a new law. it would allow people to be extradited to the chinese mainland to face criminal proceedings. 0pposition activists say putting people on trial there would threaten hong kong's legal independence, which was guaranteed when it was handed back to china by britain in 1997. alison freeman reports. hundreds of thousands of people are marching through the streets of hong kong in a final attempt to stop a new law. they believe that the law would allow china to target its political opponents, leading them to be tortured. the former british colony returned to chinese law in 1987, but
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has its liberty is not enjoyed by those on the mainland. those who oppose the bill say that it would erode hong kong's freedoms. mainland china uses all sorts of ways to exercise their so—called dictatorship in hong kong, to kidnap the people they treat as enemy. the controversial bill would allow authorities in mainland china, taiwan and macau to make extradition applications for suspects accused of crimes such as murder and rape. the hong kong government has tried to reassure the public, saying the territory's courts would have the final say on whether to grant requests. and those accused of political and religious crimes would not be extradited. whilst hong kong's leader carrie lam has made amendments to the bill,
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she refuses to withdraw it. many of the protesters today carried banners calling her a traitor, and for her resignation. alison freeman, bbc news. elaine yu is a correspondent for the global news agency afp. shejoins us live from hong kong. elaine, on the numbers here, organisers are claiming 1 million people, police claiming 240,000, thatis people, police claiming 240,000, that is quite a big discrepancy. any chance that you know any of the details on those numbers? i'm afraid we have lost the line to hong kong. we will try to re—establish that and come back to that later. let's stay now with the bbc‘s martin yip, who explained the
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demonstrations. this is one this is a scene that has not been seen in hong kong for quite a while. you judge how big the rally is by how many people occupy how many lanes on the road. this is a busy part of hong kong. all six lanes have been occupied by these people waiting mainly white t—shirts. they are chanting slogans ranging from, down with the leader, too, no extradition to china. this is about opposing the proposed amendments to existing extradition law in hong kong. people are worried that some might be extradited to mainland china for political reason once this bill is passed. the government argues that the court will protect them from such a thing, from these political extraditions. but people do not buy into it. and they are showing up here. a woman has died after being struck
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by lightning while walking on a mountain range in the scottish highlands. the 55—year—old was hiking near kinlochleven when she and another member of the group were hit. police scotland said both were airlifted to hospital in fort william, but one died of her injuries. the other walker is in a stable condition. five teenagers arrested in connection with a homophobic attack on two women on a london night bus have been released on bail. a group of young men began harassing the women after discovering that they were a couple, and asked them to kiss. the suspects were questioned on suspicion of robbery and aggravated grievous bodily harm. the final performances of a play in southampton have been cancelled after an alleged homophobic attack on two of the actors. the nst campus theatre says the women were verbally abused and had stones thrown at them. they were appearing in a play called ‘rotterdam' which tells the story of a young gay woman. the labour mp who was reported to the chief whip for telling campaigners they were right to protest against same—sex relationship teaching
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at a primary school will be "reminded of his responsibilities as an mp" according to the labour party. roger godsiff is the mp for the birmingham constituency which includes anderton park school — the focus of recent demonstrations. daniela relph reports. they are now banned from protesting directly outside anderton park school by a court injunction. but on friday, the parents' demonstration moved just down the road. they've been here for more than two months, arguing that their children are too young to learn about lg bt relationships. now one of their local mps has voiced his support during a meeting with concerned families. i think you have a just cause, and i regret the fact that it hasn't been reciprocated by the head teacher. i will continue to work to try and bring this dispute to an end, because all of you want your kids back in school. i will continue to fight your corner
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because you're right. nothing more, nothing less, you're right. roger godsiff‘s comments have angered several of his fellow labour mps. in a tweet, the shadow education secretary, angela rayner, said: i have reported this to our chief whip. this might be the personal views of mr roger godsiff, but they do not represent the labour party, and are discriminatory and irresponsible. there is no sign of the protests stopping. this week, the parents will go to court to challenge the injunction that has moved them from the front of the school gates. daniela relph, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. the home secretary, sajid javid, criticises middle class drug users for ‘destroying the lives' of those caught up in the supply chain.
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meanwhile, boris johnson says he would not pay britain's £39 billion brexit ‘divorce' bill until better terms are agreed for the uk to leave. and in sport, there has been a shock at the women's world cup in france. italy came from behind against australia to win 2—1. the winner came in injury time. elsewhere, brazil are beating jamaica 1—0. the french open final is under way between rafa nadal and dominic thiem. nadal has taken the first set 6-3. and thiem. nadal has taken the first set 6—3. and australia are chasing 353 to beat india in the cricket world cup. she could one hit hundred and 17 at the oval. the australian replies on the way. one of britain's most wanted men, who's been on the run for 16 years, is set to be extradited to the uk,
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after being arrested in malta. police want to question christopher guest morejr over the murder of a man at a remote farmhouse in cheshire in 2003. he'll appear in court tomorrow. simonjones reports. in handcuffs, far away from home, christopher guest morejr, described as one of europe's most wanted fugitives, being led to his first court appearance, which is set to see him extradited to the uk. it's believed he fled britain in 2003 — that's after this man, brian waters, was tortured and beaten to death in front of his two children. he sustained 123 injuries. mr waters had been running a cannabis farm in knutsford, when a group of men stormed the property to demand money. three people are currently serving life sentences for his murder. mr more jr, leaving court with a coat over his head, is wanted in connection with mr waters' death, the attempted murder of a second man,
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and the false imprisonment and assault of other people at the scene. the national crime agency said it had waited a long, long time for this moment. it insisted it was never going to give up the hunt. mr more jr was apprehended on a european arrest warrant following a joint operation with authorities in malta. he has been remanded in custody and will next appear in court tomorrow. simon jones, bbc news. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder after the death of a woman in essex. police said a woman in her 50s was found at an address in burnham—on—crouch after officers were called by the ambulance service at about 12.30am. the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. two men remain in police custody. the boss of broker hargreaves lansdown has issued an apology following the suspension of a fund it sells. chief executive chris hill said he shares clients' "disappointment and frustration" after the woodford equity income fund, managed by neil woodford, stopped investors cashing out this week.
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mr woodford suspended the fund after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. police in kazakhstan have arrested hundreds of people protesting against today's presidential election. the protestors say today's vote is not free. the country's long standing leader, nursultan nazarbayev resigned in march and his chosen successor is expected to win easily. 0ur correspondent rayhan demytrie has the latest. riot police is moving in to push these protesters. many have already been arrested and moved to police vans. they are creating this noise to scare people. but nevertheless they are still standing because people are saying that they are fed up. for 30 years they have never seen democratic elections in this country
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and this time they are saying they will no longer be quiet about the real situation in their country. translation: they spend billions on building palaces but no money for mothers with children. there are just a handful of protesters left but they are being detained and mishandled by the police and pushed to numerous of those buses. so far we have witnessed dozens of people being detained. the police just warned them through loudspeakers that unsanctioned protests are not allowed. after this announcement they are now going and detaining people one by one. but people are saying here that to get permission for a peaceful protest is almost impossible in kazakhstan, and they are simply exercising their right to peaceful assembly. police in sudan have used tear gas on protesters trying to put up new roadblocks in the capital khartoum. it comes on the first day of a civil
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disobedience campaign aimed at forcing the ruling military council to relinquish power. most offices and businesses are understood to have shut. thousands of people in the city of venice are calling for large cruise ships to be banned from one of its main canals. the protest comes days after a cruise ship crashed into a tourist boat, injuring four people. rahuljoglekar has more. the msc 0pera lost control and crashed into the pier in venice last week. it injured people and caused damage to property. but in its wake, residents of the lagoon city have been left fuming. they came out onto the streets wanting ships like these to be kicked out from their canals. translation: we demand that these
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liners be immediately banned from venice lagoon. what happened on sunday shows that they are dangerous, out of control in case of failure and they cannot continue to play russian roulette with our homes, lives and with our city, just to enrich these cruise companies. translation: it is absurd, i believe there is very little to say. if we want to save venice and the lagoon, we shouldn't allow those liners to enter, it is terrifying just to see them. the issue has been bubbling along for a while in venice. the government banned ships weighing more than 96,000 tonnes from the canal in 2013. but then, legislation was overturned. following sunday's accident, the mayor of the city urged immediate action and asked for a different channel to be opened up. translation: even if everything went well today, it could have been a tragedy.
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i thank all of the rescue teams, firefighters and security personnel who are working here. once again, it has shown that big ships cannot go down the canal, they must go through san marco. we have said it already, now the minister must decide quickly. for centuries, venice has been a hub of maritime trade and nicknamed the city of water. now its residents want to keep large ships out of these waters, while the government claims it is finally close to a definitive solution. let's go back to those protests in hong kong and speak to correspondent for the global news agency, afp. elaine, if you can hear me, give me a sense of the size of these protests.
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elaine, it is lewis here in the studio in london, elaine yu, can you hear me? i'm afraid not, we tried once and we tried again, we will have to leave that there. that is the latest on those protests in hong kong. 0ld rivals will go head—to—head today in the women's world cup in france — when england take on scotland in nice. scotland are making their debut in the tournament — while england are one of the favourites to win the competition. 0ur sports reporterjane dougall has been spending time with both camps this week. hopefully you can hear me over the tannoy system, they have been testing it all afternoon. the countdown is on until england take on scotland. you can see up on the corner of the stadium they are counting down the minutes, look at that. just over an hour and a half
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until these two sides take each other on in what was always going to bea other on in what was always going to be a grudge match. the last time the sides met was two years ago at the euros in the netherlands, and england comprehensively beat scotla nd england comprehensively beat scotland 6—0. however, since then there have been a lot of changes made to both sides in fairness, they both have new coaches, and they both have a lot of new players that have come into the side. emotion always run high for come into the side. emotion always run highfora come into the side. emotion always run high for a home nations match, and it is always difficult to predict the outcome. 0n and it is always difficult to predict the outcome. on paper, england other favourites. they predict the outcome. on paper, england otherfavourites. they are ranked third in the world, under head coach phil neville and the former manchester united player, he took over in early 2018 and has already won some silverware with england's women. just earlier this yearin england's women. just earlier this year in march, they won silverware in america in a competition called the she believes cup and the usa are the she believes cup and the usa are the world number one, so they have done very well. they have brought the team on by making the team perhaps a little bit more tactically
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aware. we can hearfrom him now talking about how nerves might be a factor in this opening tournament match. i'm sorry, we can't hear from phil neville, but i can tell you that he said that perhaps the opening match of the tournament is incredibly nerve—racking because number one you have a huge crowd watching you, a lot of pressure on you, and england is one of the favourites have a lot of pressure, but added to that they are going to be playing scotland, who of course, the old enemy, it is going to be a bit of a grudge match, and emotions will run high. shelley kerr, the head coach of scotland, the last time they played, scotland had a lot of injuries, but she is saying now they are 100% fit, they don't have any injury to their squad, but also under her, she has brought them along a lot more, they are playing better as a team, bonding better as a team, and she has brought in some players that she has played with herself throughout her career, she had 59 caps for scotland. and also,
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under her, scotland beat brazil 1—0 in april, that is the first time that any scottish team has ever beaten brazil, and just before christmas, they narrowly lost to the usai-o. so christmas, they narrowly lost to the usa 1-0. so it christmas, they narrowly lost to the usa 1—0. so it is a far improved scottish side that will meet england, and i don't think we will see a repeat of that 6—0 loss. however it will be in this magnificent stadium, they have finished watering the pitch, we did get a bit soaked earlier, but i can confirm they have stopped watering it and it is very lush and green. more than 36,000 people will be watching in the stands when they kick off in an hour and a half's time. thank you, jane. not long to go now before the action finally starts on the talking stops on the pitch there! thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins the summer solstice is less than a fortnight away, but the week ahead is going to feel more like autumn. some late spells was on to end the
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day for some, but for others, heavy and frequent showers, thundery with hailstones, and they will continue to work their way from west to east through this evening at first tonight. as the night wears on, it will be mainly dry, still showers across the south—west, and persistent rain into the south—west. it won't be a cold night across the southern half of the uk, temperature is not lower than nine or 10 celsius, very low in rural parts of scotland. the main focus of the weather in the week ahead is a slow—moving front arriving into south—east england and east anglia overnight, and three tomorrow it slowly works its way north and west into the midlands, parts of east wales, and for the south—west we will see some heavy, thundery showers, much of northern ireland, scotla nd showers, much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, a scattering of showers, the best of the dry weather with some sunshine. brisk north—easterly winds, and where we have the persistent rain, it is going to be quite cool, just 13 or 14 celsius. even where we have
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the sunshine, just 15 or 16 celsius. this frontal system is still with us, going nowhere fast. by this stage the main focus of the rain will be across the eastern side of england, east yorkshire up towards tyneside, and across a large swathe of northern england, wrapping itself around into wales and south—west england. mainly dry, one or two showers, could see some sharp showers, could see some sharp showers across south—east england and east anglia, but things are starting to turn a little dry, but notice the strength of the wind, a cool autumnal feel, a large notice the strength of the wind, a cool autumnalfeel, a large swathe of northern england, some could see as much of the month of rain injust as much of the month of rain injust a few days from their slow—moving frontal system. by the time we get to wednesday, it starts to push its way into scotland and northern ireland, but still some heavy and persistent rain across parts of northern england and wales for a time, further south some spells of sunshine, but once again, some heavy and thundery showers. so it really u nsettled and thundery showers. so it really unsettled week ahead, and quite a cool feel on wednesday, just 13 or 14 celsius, may be getting up to 18
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or19, 14 celsius, may be getting up to 18 or 19, sunshine across east anglia and south—east england, but the theme to take away from this forecast in the week ahead, some heavy rain at times, windy and also rather cool. this hello. this is bbc news with lewis vaughan jones. the headlines: michael gove has acknowledged he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. the home secretary, sajid javid, attacks middle class drug—users for "destroying the lives" of those caught up in the supply chain. meanwhile, boris johnson has
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said he would not pay britain's £39 billion brexit divorce bill until better terms are agreed for the uk to leave. a woman dies after being struck by lightning while walking on a mountain near ben nevis in the scottish highlands. hundreds of thousands take to the streets of hong kong to protest against a planned law about extradition to china. england and scotland fans have descended on the south of france, as the two teams go head—to—head in the women's world cup. now on bbc news, a look back at some of this week's stories covered by the victoria derbyshire programme. hello and welcome to our programme. for the next half hour we will bring you some of the exclusive and original journalism we've broadcast over the last week. first, it's now two and a half years since this programme revealed the horrific scale of historic child sexual abuse in football. when four ex—players spoke to us one friday morning on national television about what they had endured as boys, it stopped people in their tracks. the specialist police unit, 0peration hydrant, has

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