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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 9, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan jones. the headlines at 5pm. michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. 15 fire engines are attending a fire at a block of flats in east london. six floors of the building are alight, no injuries have been reported. chanting a huge protest in hong kong against a new law that would allow suspected criminals to be extradited to china. mainland china uses all sorts of way to exercise their so—called dictatorship in hong kong. to kidnap the people they treat as enemies.
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i will continue to fight in your corner, because you're right. controversy over the labour mp supporting the birmingham protests against same—sex relationship teaching in primary schools. stuttering run up... cheering. england beat switzerland on penalties to finish third in the nations league. and in the women's world cup, england have just kicked off against scotland. good afternoon. the conservative leadership candidate michael gove has admitted he commited a criminal offence when he took cocaine on several occasions. speaking for the first time about his use of the class a drug, he said he had a "profound sense of regret" about it. it happened while he was working as a journalist 20 years ago. here's our political
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correspondent susana mendonca. these weren't the headlines michael gove would have been hoping for this weekend as he embarked on setting out his pitch for the tory leadership. after it emerged that he'd taken cocaine 20 years ago, today an admission of lawbreaking from the formerjustice secretary. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. should you have gone to prison? i was fortunate in that i didn't, but i do think that it was a profound mistake, and i've seen the damage that drugs do. he had wanted to focus on his pro—business agenda, and plans to replace vat with a simpler system. instead he was questioned about whether he'd been honest about his drug use, including when he applied for a visa to enter the united states. i don't believe that i have ever on any occasion failed to tell the truth about this when asked directly. but it would be on the form. i mean, you would have to say yes or no, and if you said yes, you could be banned for life from entering the united states. i think it is the case that
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if i were elected to be prime minister of this country, then of course it would be the case that i would be able to go go to the united states. and i think that it's foolish to suggest otherwise. the environment secretary said he respected the country's most senior police officer, cressida dick, who has said that class a drug users have "blood on their hands". that's a view echoed by the home secretary, who's also in the running to be prime minister. today, he said middle—class people and others who take drugs destroy lives. they have their organic food and boast about buying fair trade and talk about climate change — and at the same time, come friday or saturday night, they're all doing class a drugs and they should be thinking about the impact they're having especially on children. are you going to be the next prime minister? another leading contender has come out of the shadows, promising not to pay the £39 billion divorce bill to the eu, which labour says is a legal obligation. i always thought it was extraordinary that we should agree to write that entire cheque before
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having a final deal. i don't wish to conduct a postmortem of the original negotiations, but it was extraordinary that we agreed to pay the money in advance of a deal on the future partnership. while borisjohnson is promising tory members that if the eu doesn't renegotiate, he'll take the uk out with no deal in october, michael gove has suggested a delay to the brexit date of weeks or days to get a deal done. the real question is whether parliament will let any of this happen. susana mendonca, bbc news. with me now is our political correspondent, chris mason. so chris, let's start with michael gove. not his bat like a best steak with yellow i thought that was excruciating to watch this morning. when you have to get to the pit to make a situation where you are pleading with the viewer to be let in to the us as prime minister, you
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become premise or in a matter of weeks, you know you're having a difficult weekend. now he will hope that this all manages to pass over because there will be other questions that will come of the under candidates, not least boris johnson, who has done very little in terms of public scrutiny so far. will he give loads of interviews? who knows, he's not a front runner and is not obliged to. i think gove will hope that after a tough weekend, he can start focusing on policy. it says something as a leadership candidate when you advocate a radical overhaul of the tax system, suggesting getting rid of vat and replacing it with what he sees as a lower and simpler sales tax — it's barely gotten a mention because of all the focus on his personal conduct, albeit a good number of years ago. similarly other candidates have been doing interviews and have been overshadowed. anything take your eye
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away? it's a crowded field, that's for sure. we've had jeremy hunt on sky news with saja javid also on sky. it won't be a contested field for that much longer, because tomorrow sees the nomination start. by my tomorrow sees the nomination start. by my calculation, about five of the 11 candidates so far don't look like they have the numbers actually get on the starting line. now it may be that the conservative mps who have not publicly declared may get over the line. thursday comes the first round of voting for conservative mps, and those who want to be the next pm need to get 17 minimum mps backing them by thursday. that's an even higher hurdle. by the end of the week, the current list of front loaders dust front runners could easily be lower than that. you'll be busy next week. thank you, cheers.
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hundreds of thousands of people have been marching through the streets of hong kong in protest at a law which would allow people to be extradited to the chinese mainland to face criminal proceedings. 0pposition activists say putting people on trial in chinese courts would threaten hong kong's legal independence, which was guaranteed at the time of the handover in 1997. robin brant reports. estimates on the number of streets of people in hong kong from 250,000 just over a million. whatever the price numbers, they were... almost all of dressed in white. it's overwhelmingly peaceful, a mixture of hong kong's diverse society is here. there worry is that a new law that would allow people to be extradited to the chinese mainland, where the courts are not impartial and people can be in prison for their politics. our people are
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afraid, our people are also angry about this extradition trading. mainland china uses all sorts of ways to exercise their so—called dictatorship in hong kong. to kidnap the people they treat as enemies. say no to the evil bill! say no to the extradition of china! hong kong's new extradition law was controversial from the minute it was proposed. supporters say it will target criminals taking refuge in hong kong. but critics see it as a further erosion of the independence of the former british colony, which has a separatejudicial of the former british colony, which has a separate judicial system from the rest of china. the police say permission for the protest runs out just before midnight local time also after that, they will attempt to move people on. the protests of that scale would never be permitted here in mainland china, certainly not now
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in 2019 anyway. and it is very unlikely that the will of the people marching on the streets of hong kong tonight will prevail on this particular issue. it is the will of china's communist party leaders in beijing that is almost certain to win out. as they move, slowly step—by—step to move to michael reintegrate hong kong to the mainland. robin brant, bbc news. around 100 firefighters are trying to put out a large fire at a block of flats in east london. crews were called to the block, which is on de pass gardens in barking. the fire is currently engulfing six floors of the building. joining me now is our news correspondent, chi chi izundu. what more do we know at this stage was eloping of the london fire brigade were called in this afternoon. they had to call in a number of firefighters and fire engines from neighbouring fire crews in and around barking, dag m, east hand to fight this fire that is
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currently engulfing up to the six floor. they say at this stage they don't have an understanding of what is causing the blaze, and the london metropolitan police are also they are assisting london fire brigade. they say they haven't had any injuries reported to them, as has the london ambulance — they are also on the scene trying to assist people. but there has been an update from the london fire brigade on their twitter account. let's see if we can take a look at that update. it says... confirming what you said there. those pictures look fairly dramatic of the flames. interesting when we first broke this news, it was a smaller number of fire engines and firefighters — that seems to have increased in the last hour? in the last half hour. they started off
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with 75 firefighters on the scene, which has increased to 100 firefighters. pictures from clearly local residents on twitter showing how aggressive this fire is in that area. london's metropolitan police have also advised that they have closed a number of roads in and around the area to help assist the number to micro london fire brigade, as you said. thank you very much for bringing us to speed on the events there. police in sudan have used tear gas on protesters trying to put up roadblocks in the capital khartoum. many of the streets in the city are deserted with people responding to opposition calls for a general strike. it's part of a campaign of civil disobedience aimed at forcing the ruling military council to relinquish power. a labour mp has been reported to the party's chief whip, after he supported campaigners who've been protesting against same sex relationship teaching at a birmingham primary school.
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roger godsiff is the mp for the constituency which includes anderton park school — the focus of recent demonstrations. daniela relph reports. chanting: our children! our choice! their protests have been forced away from the school by a court injunction. but the local mp has defied his own party to support these families. for more than two months, there have been demonstrations outside anderton park school. parents arguing that their children are too young to learn about lg bt relationships. now the local mp has spoken out during a meeting with concerned families. i think you have a just cause. and i regret the fact that it hasn't been reciprocated by the head teacher. i will continue to work to try and bring this dispute to an end, because all of you want your kids back in school. i will continue to fight your corner, because you're right. nothing more, nothing less.
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you're right. strongly critical of the comments, in a tweet, the shadow education secretary angela rayner said... a labour party spokesperson has also said that the mp will be reminded of his responsibilities. there is, though, no sign of the protests stopping. this week the parents will go to court to challenge the injunction that has moved them from the front of the school gates. daniela relph, bbc news. a woman has died after being struck by lightning while walking in the scottish highlands. the 55—year—old was hiking near kinlochleven, when she and another member of the group were hit. police scotland said both were airlifted to hospital in fort william, but one died of her injuries. the other walker is in a stable condition. five teenagers arrested in connection with a homophobic
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attack on two women on a london night bus, have been released on bail. a group of young men began harassing the women after discovering they were a couple, and asked them to kiss while making sexual gestures. the suspects were questioned on suspicion of robbery and aggravated grievous bodily harm. a southampton theatre has been forced to cancel its last performances of a gay and lesbian play after some of the cast reported that they had been victims of a homophobic attack. two women actors say they were verbally abused and one was struck in the face with a flying object, as they made their way to the nuffield theatre, at southampton university, yesterday. the police are now investigating, as roger finn reports. two actors, who are also partners, posing before they leave southampton after what they say was a shocking ordeal. yesterday morning, they were on their way to the nuffield theatre on the university campus
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where they were due to perform in the award—winning comedy rotterdam. they say they were kissing when a car drew up. we kissed once and i saw the car approaching out of my eye and then we kissed again. you know, like, you kiss and you'll laugh and you kiss again. and then they shouted something out of the window and i felt something hit my face, but i was turned this way. i felt it hit my face, it knocked me down and i could hear laughing because the car window was down as they were driving off. it was obviously quite upsetting because i didn't really know what happened. i heard some shouts and then luce was in pain and on the floor and, like, was struggling to breathe properly and i was trying to calm her down. i heard boys' voices, young boys' voices, and then laughing as they were going off. not really sure why they were laughing. it's not really funny to do that. the play they are in is described as a queer love story which explores issues of gender and sexuality.
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we're just people. we're just two people looking for happiness, like everybody else is, so... i don't really understand why we were met with aggression from strangers to strangers. the headlines on bbc news... michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. 15 fire engines are attending a fire at a block of flats in east london — six floors of the building are alight — no injuries have been reported. hundreds of thousands take to the streets of hong kong to protest against a planned law about extradition to china. england and scotland have begun their women's world cup campaigns — they're currently facing eachother in nice in the south of france. it's the first time scotland have played in a world cup finals —
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we can dip in life to the match now. england are one of the favourites to win the tournament. england have taken the lead from the penalty spot, nikita parris with the goal. about 15 minutes played there, and glenn are the favourites to win but it should be a close match. a little earlier, our sports reporterjane dougall spoke to the sports minster mims davies — and she spoke about the significance of the women's world cup. this is really exciting, this is a huge game for scotland and england when it comes to the power of participation — the ability to showcase a huge amount of talent that we've got there. and in fact, i think the women are going to have an incredible chance to really show that this game is really, really equal. and as we head into 2021, we are working with the fa to make sure eve ryo ne are working with the fa to make sure everyone gets a chance to play football. when it comes to playing any kind of sport coming from
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teenage years, there's a gap, and we wa nt to teenage years, there's a gap, and we want to address that. if this tournament is to inspire young girls tournament is to inspire young girls to play football, how can they do that when more than 700 pitches up and sold off by the government? there's nowhere for them to play. this is totally inspirational and it will be a fantastic showcase to show where you can get to. there are a lwa ys where you can get to. there are always challenges around facilities. we work with the football foundation supported through the premier league. and as we go into... we've had financial challenges since 2010, but going into a new spending review, i'm pushing hard for sport. we a bse ntly review, i'm pushing hard for sport. we absently have to make sure that we are using the power and influence that are school to keep people tuning in with interest, to make sure we get money into the grassroots. that means there's a chance to play for everyone. england's men have also been in action today. in just the last half an hour, they finished third in the uefa nations league, after beating switzerland 6—5 on penalties.
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and the hosts of the tournament, portugal, will face the netherlands in the final this evening in porto. 0ur correspondent, mark lowen, is there. what the atmosphere like there? it's been a great atmosphere here today. the fans are out here in central porto, many fans are watching here than in the town of an hour's drive here in porto, where that match was actually played. here in the fans own, it was completely crowded and some consolation for england found that at least they managed to clinch third place if they didn't get through the final tonight. they didn't manage to fulfil that dream of lifting the first international trophy since 1966. the will make these guys have come all the way from london. reaction to the match today, did you enjoy it?m was good fun to be with everyone,
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but it was getting to not when the final. it wasn't a great game. at least we got the penalties. relieved that you clinch the final penalty? roger sterling should be shoved off to the side. and what's been the mood here? it's been a little bit violent since wednesday, there was a crash in the centre of porto, some arrests. did you see any of the trouble? we haven't seen so much of it, but we seen a few groups that don't do english fans. we've apologised quite a few times to other people. we got here on — the river was over there. it's been a bit embarrassing a couple times. we've tried to apologise, but...|j would say the majority of it has been very good. it's always the few that have to ruin it. the football association released this video, of
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guerra southgate telling people not to be that idiot before people came over here. there will always be those idiots. they will always be like that. 20,000 fans coming over, there will always be a few. always if you ruin it. is this your first time in portugal? know, i've been to lisbon before. what's it been like in general in terms of the organisation and mood? so we were furtherup organisation and mood? so we were further up earlier, and we thought we would watch in the main square. then we saw this huge title as they we re then we saw this huge title as they were walking down, and we realised that square was closed. we followed it in there was a great place to watch the green. it was beautiful. police tactics... we had no problems. it was quite pricey to stay here, but it was great. and finally, you didn't get there to the final, but will you see the final in portugal? laughter. we bought these ticket months ago!
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england will be in the final, of course it will happen! we came in third place, typical. thanks guys, enjoy the final. that'll happen for quite a load of the fans here. many of them bought tickets to the finals in hopes that they would make it through, but they haven't. so these quys through, but they haven't. so these guys are through, but they haven't. so these guys are going to go support portugal, and many others will do that. it'll be a pretty exciting game tonight, here on home turf for portugal. i'm sure the portuguese hope they can make this home, with christiano ronaldo, they hope they will win the first inaugural net nations league champion tonight. those fans look like they will have a good time no matter who they support. thanks, mark. one of britain's most wanted men, who's been on the run for 16 years, is set to be extradited to the uk, after being arrested in malta. police want to question christopher guest more junior over the murder of a man at a remote farmhouse in cheshire, in 2003.
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he'll appear in court tomorrow. simonjones reports. in handcuffs, far away from home, christopher guest morejr, described as one of europe's most wanted fugitives, being led to his first court appearance, which is set to see him extradited to the uk. it is believed he fled the uk in 2003, after this man, brian waters, was tortured and beaten to death in front of his two children. he sustained 123 injuries. mr waters had been running a cannabis farm in knutsford, when a group of men stormed the property to demand money. three people are currently serving life sentences for his murder. mr more jr, leaving court with a coat over his head, is wanted in connection with mr waters's death, the attempted murder of a second man, and false imprisonment and assault of other people at the scene. the national crime agency said it had waited a long time for this moment. it insisted it was never going to give up the hunt. mr more jr was apprehended
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on a european arrest warrant following a joint operation with authorities in malta. he has been remanded in custody and will next appear in court tomorrow. simonjones, bbc simon jones, bbc news. thousands of people in the city of venice are calling for large cruise ships to be banned from one of its main canals. the protest comes days after a cruise ship crashed into a tourist boat, injuring four people. rahuljoglekar has more. the msc 0pera lost control and crashed into the pier in venice last week. it injured people and caused damage to property. but in its wake, residents of the lagoon city have been left fuming. they came out onto the streets wanting ships like these to be kicked out from their canals.
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translation: we demand that these liners be immediately banned from venice lagoon. what happened on sunday shows that they are dangerous, out of control in case of failure, and they cannot continue to play russian roulette with our homes, lives and with our city, just to enrich these cruise companies. translation: it is absurd, i believe there is very little to say. if we want to save venice and the lagoon, we shouldn't allow those liners to enter — it is terrifying just to see them. the issue has been bubbling along for a while in venice. the government banned ships weighing more than 96,000 tonnes from the canal in 2013. but then, legislation was overturned. following sunday's accident, the mayor of the city urged immediate action and asked for a different channel to be opened up. translation: even if everything went
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well today, it could have been a tragedy. i thank all of the rescue teams, firefighters and security personnel who are working here. once again, it has shown that big ships cannot go down the canal, they must go through san marco. we have said it already, now the minister must decide quickly. for centuries, venice has been a hub of maritime trade and nicknamed the city of water. now, its residents want to keep large ships out of these waters, while the government claims it is finally close to a definitive solution. a new exhibition is bringing to life the diary of anne frank — the journals of the jewish teenager hiding from the nazis in occupied amsterdam. earlier this week, anne frank's stepsister, 90—year—old auschwitz survivor eva schloss, visited the exhibition and spoke to the bbc'sjohn beattie.
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she was a very lively little girl. very full of stories. was very interested in always looking smart, with nice hairstyles and different clothes. full of stories. a big chatterbox. we've been covering the 75th anniversary of d—day all week and the number of people alive who can tell the stories is getting smaller. how important is it that we talk to people like you and that we remember? yes, well it is, and we are getting very thin on the count. every day i hear about a survivor or a military man who was fighting in that war is dying. so this will be the last generation of kids who will hear a personal story of us. your family were sent to auschwitz. can you even begin to describe to someone like me what that is like?
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well, we knew already that when we were being transported to auschwitz, we knew that people were going to be gassed there. so that is, of course, incomprehensible. healthy, young people, children were going to be taken in a room and within 15 minutes they were killed. this is still something which i can't comprehend how this was possible — since the world knew about it and the world didn't object whatsoever. what happened to you and what was left of your family after the war? well, my mother, luckily she survived as well, with me. and 0tto frank, the father of anne was the only member of the family who survived. and both were lonely. both had problems to cope with the loss. he helped me as well, over my hatred.
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he who had lost his whole family had no hatred. and, you know, he said, "if you hate people, the people you hate they don't suffer, they don't know, but you will become a miserable person". and i was. and slowly, slowly he help me. when you think of your father and your brother what was your last memory? well, my brother, he was very, very scared of dying. i think that we all are. we wanted to have not lived for nothing. we wanted to be remembered. anne has become a symbol now of one and a half million children who have been murdered. and everybody knows about her. so she has become immortal. her diary will be read and read and read for many, many generations. amazing memories there from a remarkable woman. we will get the
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weather in a moment. and now, some pictures of a baby elephant. we don't need any reason why, but here she is, taking herfirst steps ata here she is, taking herfirst steps at a zoo in belgium. she's only a few hours old here, and hasn't been given a name. it wasn't long until the calf was up on herfeet, with help from her mother, and getting used to her new surroundings. asian elephants are critically endangered, with just 38,000 left in the world. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. hello. the summer solstice is less than a fortnight away, but the week ahead will feel like autumn. some late spells of sunshine to end the day for some, but for others heavy and frequent showers, thundery with some hail stones in them, and they will continue to work their way from west to east through this evening and at first tonight, only slowly fading. but as the night goes on,
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things become mainly dry, showers across the southwest and persistent rain into south—east england and east anglia. it would be a cold night across the southern half of the uk, temperature is not much lower than nine or 10 celsius, could see two or three across rural parts of scotland. the main focus of the weather in the week ahead is this slow—moving front already arriving into south—east england and east anglia overnight, and through tomorrow, it slowly works its way north and westwards into the midlands, parts of east wales, for south—west england we will see some heavy, thundery showers, much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, a scattering of showers, but here the best of the dry weather with spells of sunshine. we start to pick up a brisk north—easterly wind, so where we have the persistent rain, it is going to feel quite cool, 13—14 celsius, and even where we have the sunshine, just 15—16 celsius. as we go into tuesday, the frontal system are still with us, going nowhere fast. by this stage, the main focus of the rain will be across the eastern side of england, east yorkshire up towards tyneside,
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and across a large swathe of northern england, wrapping itself around into wales in the south—west. again for much of scotland and northern ireland, mainly dry with one or two showers, could see some sharp showers across the south—east and east anglia, but things turning a little drier, but notice the strength of the wind, and a cool autumnal feel, some could see as much of a month of rain in just a few days from this slow—moving frontal system. by the time we get to wednesday, it starts to push its way into scotland and northern ireland, but still some heavy and persistent rain across parts of northern england and wales for a time, further south some spells of sunshine but once again some heavy, thundery showers. so it is a really unsettled week ahead. certainly quite a cool field on wednesday, just 13—14 celsius, may be getting up to 18—19 where you get the sunshine across east anglia and the south—east. the theme to take away from this forecast in the week ahead, heavy rain at times, windy and also rather cool.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. 15 fire engines are attending a fire at a block of flats in east london. six floors of the building are alight. no injuries have been reported. a huge protest in hong kong against a new law that would allow suspected criminals to be extradited to china. i will continue to fight your corner, because you are right. controversy over the labour mp supporting the birmingham
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and england are 1—0 up against scotland at the women's world cup. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's 0lly foster. england in the elite and it could have been more? —— lead. england and scotland are playing their opening match at the women's world cup in france. they are well into the first half in nice and england have the lead thanks to var, a handball decision going their way. fran kirby's cross hit nicola docherty. nikita parris stepped up to score emphatically from the spot — five changes to this england team which lost 1—0 to new zealand, scotland make two changes to the team which beat jamaica.
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these are live pictures from nice, it's on bbc1 right now. it is still 1—0 and approaching half—time. england have won 22 of the previous 25 meetings between the sides. they have scored 85 goals to scotland's1li. and the lionesses have never failed to reach at least the quarter—finals. do not write of the scot because of theirform do not write of the scot because of their form has been do not write of the scot because of theirform has been very do not write of the scot because of their form has been very good do not write of the scot because of theirform has been very good coming into this tournament. still 1—0 to england. we've had two results in group c, there was a straightforward 3—0 win for brazil against world cup debutants jamaica. brazil's 34—year—old forward cristiane has become the oldest person to score a hat—trick in either the mens or women's world cup. brazil were without marta, the leading scorer in world cup history. she is on the bench and injured.
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amongst those three goals there was also a brazilian penalty saved by jamaican goalkeeper sydney schneider. it's the first treble by a brazilian woman at a world cup in 20 years. brazil face australia next. brazil are winning 3—0. —— brazil 13-0. there was an upset in valenciennes as italy came from behind to beat australia. the matildas took the lead through their captain and star player sam kerr, her penalty was saved but she put away the rebound, that was her first world cup goal. 1—0 at halftime, italy levelled through barbara bonansea after a defensive error and when italy won a corner in injury time, bonansea headed home at the far post for the victory. it's italy's first world cup appearance for 20 years. they face jamaica next. england's men have finished 3rd at the nations league finals. their play—off against switzerland was goaless after extra time and gareth southgate's side were flawless in the penalty shootout.
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our sports correspondent natalie pirks was at the match in guimaraes. it was the last game of the season and the game that no one wanted, but the pressure was still on a per england to deliver for the fans who turned out in their thousands. kane almost gave them something to cheer from the author, but there was a distinct end of school feel to this match. —— from the off. england are trying to give a footballing lesson, but are missing their queues. in the dying moments of the game, england took the lead. the header binding of the bar and the older friend va are back again. putting england back to square back again. putting england back to square one “— back again. putting england back to square one —— var. jordan pickford stepped up to the england's death and it was pickford again that
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finally put the game out of its misery —— at sudden death it was pickford that finally put the game out of its misery. rafael nadal has won 12th french open title after beating dominic thiem. it was a repaet of last years roland garros final and though the austrian took a set off nadal this time, there was no stopping the spaniard who is nowjust 2 grand slams behind roger federers record of 20 austin halewood reports. rafael‘s name etched onto the trophy for the 12th time. unprecedented at any grand slam, even for the king of clay. it is no doubt that his throne is under threat by dominic thiem, the best man to take the... but beating nadal in his own backyard may be the toughest test in tennis and if you are slot of the mac, it
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will not be enough. nadal took the opening set. into the second, the relentless hitting continued and he took it, the percentile has ever taken of the doubt here. angering the spaniard can be a dangerous tactic as an adult begin his authority and quickly took the third set. time and time again, the champion‘s touch just too good. the first was more of the same, a titanic effort for thiem, but he could not keep up. that i was co mforta ble could not keep up. that i was comfortable and the champion for a 12th time. —— nadal was comfortable. australia are chasing 353 to win their cricket world cup match against india at the oval india made 127 from their opening partnership with shikar dhawan going on to make his century. indian captain virat kohli chipped in with 82 of his own, 352—5 is the highest total posted against australia at a world cup. in reply, australia have lost both their opening batsmen,
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aaron finch and david warner and they are now 201—2 after 36 overs. they are now 218—3. steve smith is on the crease at 60. england's women will look to warp up the one day series against west indies today. the second match in worcester has been reduced to 41 overs because of rain. england batted first and reached 233 for 7. tammi beamont hit 61 and anya shrubsole boosted the total with some big hitting late on. and shrubsole has been in great form with the ball too, taking two wickets. the west indies are 32 for 4 after 13 overs. they've just come off for rain again. the world triathlon series is in leeds this weekend with brownlee brothers in action in their home race. jake bert whistle has a one at that
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pace in the last few moments. great britain's georgia taylor brown won the women's event with a commanding finish. it's her first world series victory. jess learmonth was third. great britain secured a vital win againt australia in the hockey pro league after a dramatic penalty shoot out. the game was poised at one all when chris griffiths slotted home from a penalty corner, the aussies then levelled and it went to a shoot out, daniel beale had the chance to take the match to sudden death but he couldn't convert, meaning great britain won 11—3 to pick up a crucial two points. couple of super league games to tell you about in rugby league and a real shock with bottom of the table london broncos inflicting a golden—point defeat on leaders st helens. morgan smith's drop—goal proved the difference — the broncos just edging it 23—22. there was another tight finish in today's other match.. sam powell's late drop—goal gave
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wigan a 19—18 win at hull kr the canadian grand prix get‘s underway in the next hour or so. ferrari's sebastien vettel is on pole just as he was last year in montreal before going onto win the race. championship leader lewis hamilton is also on the front row, he is chasing a record equalling seventh win in this race prix vettel‘s fearri teamate charles le clerc is third. he is good in qualifying, but hard to crack. i am full of adrenaline, to crack. i am full of adrenaline, to be honest. you know what, the feeling in the car when itjust keeps coming and feel the grip and they go for it... that was one of those laps, so really, really nice. i really enjoyed it. very happy. very happy for the team because the last 17 races and over the last weeks have been tough for us.|j last 17 races and over the last weeks have been tough for us. i did everything i could and we did everything i could and we did everything we could and i think the timing was right and our procedures we re timing was right and our procedures were perfect. so thoroughly happy with the job. we knew that they were
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quick. but this is good, this is how racing should be. let's just stay with motor sport and show you, quite posisbly the worst pitstop you'll ever see, it's in the indycar series, the former f1 driver takuma sato was leading in texas and came in for some tyres, and then it all went wrong, he overshot his stall knocked over one of the pit crew, that is chris welch who went flying. he was checked over and was fine. they then had to haul sato's car back in the spot where he was supposed to stop in the first place. and then they got themselves in all sorts of bother. iam not i am not sure he works for this team, the man in yellow. he is holding everybody up. that works now. he changes the tire, hang on, fellas, sato is being very patient.
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go on, get out of here he is saying. he finished 15th in the end, after such a good season. here is that crewmember. i'm just thinking about doing myjob, got hit, i got knocked down and i got right back up to get the car back in the box. that is what you're trying to do it. i am out there doing it. so, it is not the first time i have had it happen here before. that isjust the first time i have had it happen here before. that is just at the danger of thejob. here before. that is just at the danger of the job. these guys here before. that is just at the danger of thejob. these guys put their life on the line and so do we. iam not their life on the line and so do we. i am not sure if he really enjoyed that. that's all the sport for now. england 2—0 up against scotland, ellen white scored the second goal. now it is time per click.
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electric whirring. formula e. the highest class of competition for electrically—powered racing cars. it is still very young, with its inaugural season taking place in 2014. but it's quickly becoming incredibly popular. this is the car the teams race in, it is the generation 2 car, completely battery—powered but still capable of achieving speeds of up to 174 mph. 0—60 in 2.8 seconds. now, we know how popular formula 1 is, but formula e is looking to overtake it in the world of motorsport. big names like bmw, nissan, and mahindra are involved, with races taking place all over the world from mexico,
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to france, to china, to germany. we are here at the xl centre which will be home to next year's london race. what's interesting is that this will be the first track in the world that runs both outside... ..and inside a building. we will have more on formula e later in the show. but first i want to tell you about someone that has been —— something that has been happening in baltimore in the us. because just over a month ago, on 7 may, this city of 3 million people was struck by a massive ransomware attack. almost instantly, get this, the entire city's municipal functions were shut down, and they have been ever since. even now, a month on, no—one seems to know what to do about it. dave lee has been finding out what happens when hackers take down an entire city. baltimore is a vibrant city
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of the us east coast. around 10 million people live here. but right now it is in the grip of a massive cyber attack. this malicious attack, this virus, forced city officials here to shut down some crucial services. well, today is the 10th day of a crippling cybersecurity attack on baltimore city. city leaders say the fbi has opened a criminal investigation. technicians are working to resolve the issue, but until then many files in the city's computer systems are unusable. the city's interim mayor, who's less than a month in the job, faces a crisis. our team is working very hard. i can't give you a timeframe, because you know, when the virus hit, we had to find out where it is throughout the whole system. the hackers are demanding $100,000 worth of bitcoin to set the city's computers free.
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there were early reports that hackers may have used a flaw not discovered in china or russia, but perhaps here, just 20 miles away from baltimore. the new york times reported that the hack may have used an exploit known as eternal blue, developed by america's own national security agency, the nsa. the nsa, however, denies its exploit was used, and even if it was, its advisers argue that baltimore should have protected itself, as a security patch for the vulnerability has been available for more than two years. so focusing on a single exploit, especially one that has a solution through a patch that was issued years ago, is really shortsighted. vulnerabilities will continue to be found, doing the basics is required for responsible network administration. regardless of how exactly the hackers breached baltimore's open defences, security experts say it speaks to a bigger problem. unfortunately, baltimore city's it
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operations are not in great shape. the city is underfunded for its it department. it's a man—made disaster. and it's a disaster that's the result of negligence and of putting things off until tomorrow. so i'm on my way now to city hall, to meet with the woman tasked with leading baltimore's recovery from this attack. now, there's talk that they will apply for federal emergency funds, that is the same thing as if there was a big flood or some other natural disaster. baltimore, like many governments, faced challenges in terms of resources and systems being antiquated, that may make them vulnerable to these types of attacks. what our city has shown is that our employees are willing to work really hard to find ways to keep the operations of city government moving, and to support our citizens and our employees, and that's what we're doing.
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the city has said it won't pay the ransom, but more than a month on now, recovery efforts are still ongoing. the eventual cost will run into the tens of millions of dollars, and unless millions more are spent bringing the network up to scratch, it could happen again at any time. now, formula e is notjust a competition between electric powerhouses. it is also a testbed so the teams can further develop the tech in these racers. the idea is that this tech then filters down into everyday electric road cars, in the same way that other motorsports have influenced petrol and diesel vehicles. but one of the main features of formula e is that all teams have to drive this car, they are not allowed to change anything about it. except for one thing. so what is that?
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kate russell went for a spin in berlin to find out. music plays. woohoo! this year's formula e season has been a beauty pageant for the latest in electric car tech. as second—generation racecars eat up the tarmac with more power than ever before. woo! i was one of a handful ofjournalists who got to drive a generation 2 car for the first time on a track, following the berlin e—prix. with 25% more torque and 25% more power than the gen 1 cars, gen 2 goes 0—60 in a
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blistering 2.8 seconds. the powertrain is what converts the electricity from the battery into power to drive the wheels. and what they learn on track goes directly into the production vehicles. the teams all have the same core hardware, so eking out a winning performance is about tuning the powertrain. there is also more race strategy this season, as battery range has almost doubled — meaning no need for a pitstop, as long as you can manage your power regen over the 45 minute race. coasting, that is something we do during the race. we have to use our energy most efficiently, and then using the regen because you can slow the car down incredibly well byjust using the regen, and not using mechanical brakes.
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and in a move to make the sport more exciting, the fia has added an engine boost feature reminiscent of triggering power—ups in a video game. basically you have to go off the ideal line to trigger this attack mode, where you have more power, 25kw additional power, during eight minutes. and if somebody is right behind you, it means they will likely overtake you. then you will have to overtake him again using more power. so it's like playing chase while driving. with the combined look and sound, it does feel a little like driving into the future.
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wow. and new to formula e this year is the market leader for electric consumer cars. we were able to use a lot of our knowledge in the production side to come racing. of course racing will help us develop future technologies, but we really wanted to demonstrate what was capable today. has someone gone in the wall on the exit...? this season jaguar launched the i—pace e—trophy, racing on the same city circuits, and well, it would be rude not to, really, wouldn't it? this i—pace may have been stripped down for racing but it's the same basic car you can drive out of a showroom. the road car is focused on comfort and driver ability to use it every day, whereas this is a pure race car. and lessons learned on race day
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are vital for future innovation. which is why so many carmakers want in. what we hope is that season one, we focus on development of the race car, and then season two, three, beyond, we can bring what we learn from the race, or the race track, back into the road car. the same engineers who developed the i3 and i8 powertrains have developed our motor on the formula e car, so it is really directly related. like their formula e siblings, these cars are quick and quiet. like you said there is no frills, you can hear the noise of the track going under the car. you are able to hear a lot more of what the tyres are doing and almost what the brakes are doing as well, so it adds an extra dimension to it. and after spending a day on the track here in berlin, i am going to look at electric road cars with a lot more
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respect in future. and, i'm afraid, that's it for the short cut of click at the moment. the full version is on iplayer. if you need us through the week we will be there on instagram, youtube, facebook, and twitter we live at @bbcclick. thanks for watching. and we'll see you soon. hello. the summer solstice is less than a fortnight away, but the week ahead will feel like autumn. more on that any moment. back to the here and now. some late spells of sunshine to end the day for some, but for others heavy and frequent showers, thundery with some
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hail stones in them, and they will continue to work their way from west to east through this evening and at first tonight, only slowly fading. but as the night goes on, things become mainly dry, showers across the southwest and persistent rain into south—east england and east anglia. it won't be a cold night across the southern half of the uk, temperature is not much lower than nine or 10 celsius, could see two or three across rural parts of scotland. the main focus of the weather in the week ahead is this slow—moving front already arriving into south—east england and east anglia overnight, and through tomorrow, it slowly works its way north and westwards into the midlands, parts of east wales, for south—west england we will see some heavy, thundery showers, much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, a scattering of showers, but here the best of the dry weather with spells of sunshine. we start to pick up a brisk north—easterly wind, so where we have the persistent rain, it is going to feel quite cool, 13 or 1a celsius, and even where we have the sunshine, just 15 or 16 celsius. as we go into tuesday, the frontal system are still with us, going nowhere fast. by this stage, the main focus of the rain will be
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across the eastern side of england, east yorkshire up towards tyneside, and across a large swathe of northern england, wrapping itself around into wales in the south—west. again for much of scotland and northern ireland, mainly dry with one or two showers, could see some sharp showers across the south—east and east anglia, but things turning a little drier, but notice the strength of the wind, and a cool autumnal feel, some could see as much of a month of rain in just a few days from this slow—moving frontal system. by the time we get to wednesday, it starts to push its way into scotland and northern ireland, but still some heavy and persistent rain across parts of northern england and wales for a time, further south some spells of sunshine but once again some heavy, thundery showers. so it is a really unsettled week ahead. certainly quite a cool field on wednesday, just 13 or 1a celsius, may be getting up to 18 or 19 where you get the sunshine across east anglia and the south—east. the theme to take away from this forecast in the week ahead, heavy rain at times,
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windy and also rather cool. this is bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan jones. the headlines at 6pm. michael gove acknowledges he committed a crime when he took cocaine while working as a journalist 20 years ago. yes, it was a crime, it was a mistake. i deeply regret it. 15 fire engines are attending a fire at a block of flats in east london. six floors of the building are alight — no injuries have been reported. chanting. there are reports of violence at huge protest in hong kong against a new law that would allow suspected criminals to be extradited to china. police are investigating after two female actors were targeted in an alleged homophobic attack in southampton. we're just two people looking for happiness, like everybody else is.

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