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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 12, 2019 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm kasia madera, this is outside source. tears gas and batons on the streets of hong kong's as the protests against a plan to extradite suspects to china turned violent. two men are seriously injured. britain sets out an ambitious target to cut greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero, by the year 2050 it will put us on track to be the first major economy to put this commitment into law. it is an ambitious target, but it is one that is crucial that we achieve. also in britain — the front runner to be the next prime minister launches his campaign saying brexit must happen this time, or else. delay means defeat. delay means corbyn. kick the can again
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and we kick the bucket. and, the outbreak of ebola in central africa has spread into a second country, uganda. we'll bring you up to speed. thousands of protesters have paralysed the streets of hong kong to pressure the government into scrapping plans to allow extraditions to china. there've been chaotic scenes on the streets today. right now it's 4am and things are calmer. those pictures have been coming in, in the past couple of hours, pro—democracy activists are still camped out behind makeshift barriers. there's security there too. these numbers are likely to swell again as dawn breaks in the coming hours.
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critics fear the extradition bill will give china more influence over hong kong. so far protests have been unprecedented in scale, but largely peaceful. today that changed. rows of riot police confront pro—democracy activists. the number orf security forces quickly outnumbered the protesters. the number of security forces quickly outnumbered the protesters. it's been chaos. police fire tear gas and rubber bullets. demonstrators have reponded by throwing bricks. many of them tried to storm government buildings. here they're ripping down barricades. 22 people were injured in the violence. police are calling this a riot. protesters have ta ken aim at hong kong's parliament, called the legislative council or legco.
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and they tried to break in as lawmakers were due to hold a second reading of the bill. this picture by the afp bureau chief gives you a better sense of what was happening outside. the streets are choked with people. moments later the police fired tear gas. it was effective. some of the streets are empty. then we got this announcement, web legco saying the bill would be delayed. gabriel gatehouse was inside the building at the time. the police have effectively barricaded themselves inside the legislative council building here.
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it is complete chaos! they have lucked off the doors, one officer looked like he had been hit in the head and was carried off by his comrades, we saw some policeman arrest one of the protesters. they took him into a little office in there, which incurred the wrath of there, which incurred the wrath of the opposition who started shouting at the police, how dare you occupy oui’ at the police, how dare you occupy our parliament building! the police are using their parliament as a police base from which to attack the protesters and they said to me, that this is worse than beijing! they say that at least one police officer appears to be injured and as i say, they have barricaded themselves inside the legislative council building! hong kong's chief executive carrie lam condemned the violence. but so far, hasn't backed down. today she gave a tearful interview on television.
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translation: have i sold out hong kong? how would i? i was born and raised here. i grew up here with all other hong kong citizens. my love for this place means that i have made many personal sacrifices. carrie lam is hong kong's fourth chief executive and elected to the top post in 2017. she says the bill is needed to stop hong kong becoming a ‘haven for fugitives'. ms lam is seen as a tough negotiator, she's even been compared to margaret thatcher. her critics worry she's taking orders from beijing. former hong kong chief executive anson chan is one of them. i share the population's concern because in one fell swoop, the chief executive has put forward proposals that will remove the essential firewall
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between hong kong and the mainland and so far, as our legaljudicial and criminal systems are concerned, there is just no trust in the mainland's judicial system. everybody can see for themselves that people are subject to arbitrary arrest, trumped up charges, false confessions, how can you expect hong kong people to accept a set of proposals that would make everyone unsafe, even if they are in hong kong? and it applies notjust to chinese, but to foreign nationals, anybody who lives in hong kong or even passing through hong kong. the law itself is complicated. it allows hong kong to extradite people to countries it doesn't have agreements with, including mainland china. critics call it evil and believe it will allow beijing to target anyone in hong kong under any pretense.
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the new york times reports christians are among the worried and fear shipping copies of the bibles to mainland could attract punihsment. that's one side. hong kong's commissioner to the us dismissed those accusations in this letter to the new york times and says the amendments won't affect the legal rights and freedoms of individuals. for more on that angle, here's a former senior hong kong official, andrew leung. beijing is backing the hong kong government 100% and there the hong kong government has already made a stand. but this law is necessary. do not forget that there are fugitives, criminal fugitives hiding in hong kong. and if the loophole is that it is allowed to be continued, then it could attract more fugitives, not only from mainland
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but if you look at the recent case involving spain. spain, about a week ago, handed over 95 fugitives back to china under the extradition treaty with beijing. but not everyone agrees with that assessment. britain and canada have all expressed concerns over the potential affect the change in the law could have on their citizens living in hong kong. the eu is also worried — as is the us. house speaker nancy pelosi has sent a message of solidarity. "america stands with the people of hong kong." laura westbook has been across this all week for us. first she explains how these protests started. this was first proposed by the hong kong government back
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in february and it was surrounded this case with this young woman who was murdered by her boyfriend in taiwan. he came back to hong kong and he was suspected of her murder. the police in hong kong said that he confessed. he is actually in jail for money laundering charges, separate charges and the hong kong leader said that she wanted to close a legal loophole and propose this law. but it is worth saying that taiwan is actually against this law. they say that they're worried about their citizens being exposed and if the suspect was going to be sent back, if this law was going to be passed, they would not take them. so that gives you a sense of how people are worried, notjust in hong kong but in other countries as well. that is a really interesting point. when it comes to people in hong kong, receiving the protests, people are desperately worried. but we have seen protests like this before back in 2014, we had the umbrella movement and nothing really changed back then. what difference do you think this
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time around will see? they already got a victory, they are calling. they said that the bill has been delayed and another key difference this time is that this bill, this law, there are people much more, much more broad support from all of hong kong society. i have been speaking to people and they have seen people is all ten, all the of the people of about 70 all the way to people of about 70 years old and you have different parts of society. you mentioned churches, lawyers who don't normally come out and support, they are against this bill. so you have seen broad support of this bill from all parts of hong kong society and we look at what is been happening at what's been happening since 2014, a political party has been banned, candidates have been banned from running for office, activists have been jailed. what people are saying is that this is the last time that they can protect the freedoms that hong kong has under one country two systems and they're calling
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at the last battle for freedom. and they're calling it the last battle for freedom. britain has a new plan to tackle climate change. here's the prime minister theresa may. today, we are announcing that we will be ending our contribution to climate change by 2050 and legislating for a net zero admissions target. this will put us on track to be the first major economy to put this commitment into law. it is an ambitious target, but it is crucial that we achieve it and it will take is working across the whole breadth of society to do that. mrs may also said the uk led the world to wealth through fossil fuels in the industrial revolution. so it was appropriate for britain to lead in reducing their use. and the government's advisory committee on climate change says that if other countries did follow suit, there would be a 50—50 chance of staying below the recommended 1.5
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degrees rise in global temperature. that's the critical threshhold for climate change laid out by this un report. the report also says that limiting global warming to 1.5c above pre industrial levels would require: here's david shukman on what this would mean for the uk. what is a net zero target? it means running the economy without adding to levels of greenhouse gases. offshore wind turbines and they'll bea offshore wind turbines and they'll be a lot more of them. and they'll mean big changes in our everyday lives. like in the seco house. triple glazed windows and walls that are incredibly thick and insulated.
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amazingly, this house is no central heating at all, the natural warmth of the room is drawn to these extractors ta ken into of the room is drawn to these extractors taken into this device where it is used to heat up fresh, cooler air from where it is used to heat up fresh, cooler airfrom outside where it is used to heat up fresh, cooler air from outside which where it is used to heat up fresh, cooler airfrom outside which is then warmed up and released through this pipe appear. the result is a temperature of 21 degrees for virtually no power and with technologies that are available right now. what about the cost of all of this? if we are all going to switch to electric cars, who pays for the chargers? they‘ re switch to electric cars, who pays for the chargers? they're worried that the bills will mount up. the british chancellor philip hammond has already warned of a potential cost of £1 trillion by 2050. but campaigners say mr hammond's sums don't take into account the benefits of cleaner air on public health, and jobs generated by the green economy. and crucially, the benefits of a more stable climate. let's take a closer look at that.
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this graph from the un report shows the increase in global temperatures over the decades. it's particularly pronounced in the past few years. this increase is linked to industrial emissions such as co2 which traps heat in the atmosphere. and it's caused by human activity. if the temperature goes up, seawater expands and ice melts — causing sea levels to rise. this is greenland, if the ice shelf there were to melt entirely it would raise sea levels by 6 metres. both the arctic and antarctic ice caps are shrinking. scientists predict that rising seas will cause thousands of low—lying islands from the maldives to hawaii to become uninhabitable because of the effects of flooding. there's also a greater
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risk of wildfires. this is the californian town of paradise that was wiped out last year. and there's also the threat to biodiversity. last month another un report warned that one million animal species faced extinction. if we're just talking costs — it's extremely expensive to repair the damage caused by extreme weather and changes in the climate. and earlier this month, this report by cdp said more than two—hundred of the world's biggest companies said they believed climate change could cost them a combined total of almost one trillion dollars. here's andrew walker. the cost will be widely distributed
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between business and ordinary households and in between governments. government will get involved to focus on that for a moment by virtue of having that extra spending commitments and tax cuts and to take the example of electric cars, subsidies and cash coming from government to make it cheaper from people to coming from government to make it cheaperfrom people to buy coming from government to make it cheaper from people to buy electric ca i’s cheaper from people to buy electric cars and tax tax reductions, and government finances and how government finances and how government response to that. there will be a choice to be made. do they borrow more, do they try to raise additional taxes and some other way? ordo additional taxes and some other way? or do that to make cuts in other areas of spending? for example, that is one possibility. i by no means the only possibility is that it is fairto the only possibility is that it is fair to say that there are other costs that will be bought by others. industries seven to make new investments, housing having to update their heating systems in the
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electric supplies. some businesses have been taking this kind of thing seriously for quite a long time and just the last few weeks, we have had a report from an organisation sponsored by a number of businesses thatis sponsored by a number of businesses that is looking very hard at their kind of, exposure to financial risk asa kind of, exposure to financial risk as a result of climate change. there are things like potential for physical damage for some types of business as a result of extreme weather. it might have been more frequently and also the financial risks associated with having to pay for the investments involved in adapting to low carbon energy, for example. so business is very much aware to some degree of these challenges and also on board. i think it is fair to say that the idea of going to a completely different, zero carbon situation by 2050 is something that day, along with many others, many of the stakeholders are going to find quite
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challenging. not least the aviation industry, how was i going to work with this? that is going to be a ha rd with this? that is going to be a hard one and aviation is going to move to a completely admission free future over this kind of timescale. we're looking at a situation with the uk as a whole in the scenario, would be that carbon zero so some areas like aviation would continue definitions, although they might in the analysis, the government has been looking at, be reduced by using biofuels to some degree, but i would have to be upset by carbon being removed in other areas —— offset. explaining the many challenges on hitting those targets do stay with us an hitting those targets do stay with us an outside source. much more to come. we will be live in the spanish
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capital. acadia owns a raft of brands. acadia owns a raft of brandsm acadia owns a raft of brands. it was all down to the landlords, they had to have big cuts and closures and they tried to get this deal through but the meeting had to be adjourned. there was just not enough support and it's not like it has been on the knife edge, but they got it through, they give us an offer and what this means is that the business lives to fight another day and they can cut costs a nd fight another day and they can cut costs and try to execute the turnaround plan. we already know that that involves 48 store closures in total and hundreds ofjob losses. but there is a question about this
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deal. let's simply be a sticking plaster because landlords reckon that down the line, there will be considerably more store closures and head as the story plays out. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... tears gas and batons on the streets of hong kong's as the protests against a plan to extradite suspects to china turned violent. two men are seriously injured. the state of gujarat in western india is bracing itself for cyclone vayu, which is expected to make landfall early on thursday. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from coastal areas and relief centres opened. the storm is already causing big waves on the coast further south. bbc hindi. this story is popular online. the british four—times winner of the tour de france, chris froome,
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won't be competing in next months‘ event after breaking his leg. froome was airlifted to hospital in france after a bad crash in practise, coming off his bike and hitting a wall while going about sixty kilometres an hour. president trump says he's thinking about sanctions over a russian pipeline which will feed natural gas to europe. it's called nord stream two — it runs more than 12—hundred kilometres under the baltic sea from russia to germany. but it is controversial and has split eu countries. president trump says it would make germany a hostage of russia. i will tell you very strongly that i
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think germany is making a tremendous mistake by relying so heavily on the pipelined and i think it is a tremendous mistake, but again, germany is running their affairs and that they would do just fine. but i was critical, i had been critical of it. such a tremendous amount of that energy will be supplied by that pipeline. let's go to new york and speak to two my colleague michelle fleury this is really an escalation of rhetoric and from past us presidents, he is opposed to the pipeline which is essentially with double the amount of gas that can be transported to germany from russia, just to give you some context, supplies about 40% of the eu's gas supplies about 40% of the eu's gas supplies ahead of norway. and what we are seeing is a reiteration of
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the american view here, with some support from congress last time i could have urged him to introduce sanctions, and it is notjust the americans that take issue with the pipeline. we have also heard from other eu member states that have been concerned about the reliance on russia's gas that is the president right now who is threatening the sanction. why is germany so in favour of it? i think some people suspect that it has to deal with the businesses that have invested heavily in it. he is the one running the project, obviously, you have the country saying national interest in terms of doubling its supply and you have european companies with stakes involved in the uk, you've got dutch shell, a familiar name. a company from france, but the chancellor has
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tried to assure other states that the pipeline would not make germany reliant on russia, or make it a hostage to germany and is trying to expand its network of gas terminals in regards to liquefied gas, but nonetheless, concerns remain uncured in the us with the president but also with some in congress. thank you for bringing us up to date with this, live in new york. thank you for that. uber has unveiled its latest self driving car by volvo. it has factory—installed steering and braking systems which are specifically designed for computer control. samira hussain has the details.
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in orderfor it in order for it to really develop into a profitable company, it really has to be able to capitalise on this d riverless has to be able to capitalise on this driverless technology and this is where they're putting a lot of their efforts. and of course this comes a year after it had a fatal accident and some of the testing it was doing with this driverless technology that happened in arizona. the government there found that they were criminally responsible but they have now decided to take some additional safety steps. not only are they going to have a driver in the car, there are a second driver as they go through some of this testing. soon, we're going to see that these cars will be testing into cities and in san francisco. there also a of competitions, they are also trying to develop their own driverless technology. will also be focusing on
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the ebola outbreak because it has spread into a second country, the world health organisation has called this an emergency meeting and will have much more on that coming up shortly. hello. the weather for the weekend is coming for half an hour but at this time of evening, we go beyond oui’ this time of evening, we go beyond our own shores and take a look at some of the main weather stories happening around the world and we start off at the end to the arabian sea, this area of sea with a cyclone thatis sea, this area of sea with a cyclone that is strengthening like a hurricane, just like a typhoon, type of weather system that is fuelled by very warm ocean water of weather system that is fuelled by very warm ocean water and of weather system that is fuelled by very warm ocean water and is classified as a very swift storm in this part of the world and is moving northwards towards the dangerous weather during thursday, how far will go, mightjust go parallel to the coastline and moved further in the coastline and moved further in the coming days, dissipating but just like any hurricane, just like
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any typhoon, the cyclone has some very nasty weather associated with that. strong damaging winds close to the centre as it approaches the coastline and could be up to around 70 kph. it storm surge with the amount of normal type levels to two metres and of course coastal flooding out of that and then flooding out of that and then flooding from the rain is expected in excess of 200 mm as it slows down and just runs close to that here. the west of the usa, western canada as well, increasing fire danger and perhaps turned a little bit cooler for some of us compared to what it was earlier in the week but the heat is not going anywhere the week and in the east, some of us are on the cool side in the west of the usa and some wet weather to move on through, some wet weather to move on through, so the heavy downpours put some towards the south with the exception
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of florida are now turning a bit drier the way ascension coming through. but the flavour of the dry and sunny weather across western areas with the temperature going back up again in san francisco and with that heat across the west. in austria, it is suitably unsettled for the time of year here in the winter months, the weather system ru ns a cross winter months, the weather system runs across cold fronts and temperatures through brisk winds and showers at times, it is looking reasonably unsettled in those systems a re reasonably unsettled in those systems are moving through new zealand occasionally through the weather. but video from monday, taken from a boat with extremely large hailfalling down in a large hail has been a feature of the storms and eastern parts of europe over the past few days, these clusters of storm and thursday, it has been so very hot and temperatures in the mid—30s, we know it has not been very hard, it's been
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quite cold and very wet. is anything drier in the forecast, our weather isn't half hour. —— is in half an hour.
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hello, i'm kasia madera, this is outside source. tears gas and batons on the streets of hong kong's as the protests against a plan to extradite suspects to china turned violent. two men are seriously injured. britain sets out an ambitious target to cut greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero, by the year 2050. this will put us on track to be the first major economy to put this permit —— commitment interlock, it's one that's crucial that we achieve. also in britain — the front runner to be the next prime minister has launched his campaign saying brexit must happen this time, or else.
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the laying means defeat, delay means corbyn. kick the can again and we kicked the bucket. and, the un has called an emergency meeting to tackle the latest outbreak of ebola in central africa. returning to hong kong — where police have fired rubber bullets and tear gas at people protesting against a new extradition. it's the worst political unrest in the territory in years. rupert wingfield—hayes has more. this was the centre of hong kong this afternoon. scenes of mass violence, the like of which have not been seen here since the 1960s. the day had been tense from the start —
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huge crowds surrounded hong kong's legislature — determined to stop any discussion of the hated extradition bill. the object of their anger, this woman — hong kong's chief executive carrie lam. last weekend, hundreds of thousands of people had taken to the streets here demanding she scrap a bill that would allow hong kong people to be extradited to china but she is refusing to budge. why is she quite so adamant, quite so determined? you would call it arrogance on her part, stubbornness. no, she isjust doing all this at beijing's order. she is just some little puppet of the beijing regime. today's protesters were almost exclusively young, aggressive and boiling with rage that their government is giving away their freedoms. it seemed only a matter of time before things turned violent and so they did.
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few here have ever experienced the searing pain of being tear gassed. you could see the shock and confusion. i think there are lines that we can have the freedom from fear, that we are every day facing right now, so i guess we feel angry and we do not get respected by our own government. by early evening, police had begun to gain the upper hand — launching barrage after barrage, driving protesters away from the government quarter. what we are witnessing here in hong kong tonight, with this operation to clear the streets, is a hong kong government determined not to allow another protest movement to establish itself and occupy the centre of the city like it did back in 2014 and a government that is determined it seems to push ahead with an incredibly controversial extradition law regardless of the consequences. rupert wingfield—hayes,
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bbc news, in hong kong. lets look at how this story in playing in china. there's been limited media coverage on the mainland, and search results are either blank, or toe beijing's line. weibo has imposed restrictions and china's google equivalent swipe baidu has banned the phrase "sending to china". here's the view from the editor of the pro—china global times newspaper which has defended the bill. "this kind of violent demonstration is not supposed to happen in hong kong, a developed society. it looks like color revolution. i don't think westerners that encourage protests in hong kong want the best for the city. they would rather see disturbance there." bbc chinese service vincent ni has more on the view from china.
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in public the chinese government has offered a very limited remark on this extradition bill, partly because hong kong chief executive said this is completely a hong kong initiative, it's nothing to do with beijing, they are simply trying to close the legal loophole that doesn't allow criminals in hong kong to be extradited to mainland china. hong kong process government also said that that beijing was not behind it, and today, beijing foreign ministry said that they are fully supporting the extradition bill, and happily supporting the chief executive, all some protesters on the streets in hong kong are calling for her to step down. when it comes to the amount of pressure
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that china exerts, critics it's too much, how does china respond to that. it's subtle because in public china says one country to systems is working extremely well and they also wa nt to working extremely well and they also want to replicate a into taiwan, however the chief executive is their puppet. however the chief executive is their puppet, meaning that she has to listen to the chinese president or his officials. it's always very difficult to define whether relations are really, and public it's one country to systems, and the official rhetoric is always working very well by suspicion and fear is a lwa ys very well by suspicion and fear is always that beijing is exerting su btle always that beijing is exerting subtle but strong influence and hong kong. we hear a lot about the media crackdown in hong kong, that there is little information getting out, is little information getting out, is this what is happening right now
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and reported back in mainland china? there is limited coverage in china, but i think it's probably not surprising because censorship is very stringent on the mainland, however, some people are still discussing this on another channel that's a semi—close group of friends you can discuss different things let them post things like facebook, a lot of people are actually sending pictures and showing their solidarity as i can see from my chat list of friends, one of the comments really sorted the highlighted sentiment among many groups is that this is a fight among hung congress, but i just hope this is a fight among hung congress, but ijust hope it's not going to be a blood to crack we all hope that. the uk's climate pledge we heard about earlier in the programme is one of theresa may's final moves in office. the prime minister announced
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she's leaving next month, and ten conservative mps are now running for their party's leadership. but one person is currently favourite to become the uk's next prime minister. it's this man borisjohnson. former mayor of london and former foreign secretary but to most people in britain he is simply known as "boris". he's been keeping a low profile since mrs may's resignation — largely avoiding interviews — but today he was back in the spotlight launching his leadership campaign. here's his opening pitch. i know we can unite our country and society because i had seen and used exactly those tools. to help unite our capital, the greatest city on earth. so borisjohnson is staking his claim for number 10 on his record as mayor. so what did he get done?
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he's probably best remembered for supporting this a bicycle hire program that bears his name. a couple of different banks have officially sponsored the scheme, but most people in london just call them "boris bikes". but mrjohnson wants to be remembered for more than just a bike scheme. this is him on his time as mayor. i took the city through riots and strikes and the problems of the olympics, which was actually a picnic as i remember. and with a tea m picnic as i remember. and with a team of staff, we brought this city together. with new infrastructure, with renewed and relentless emphasis on education and technology, we shrink that down, and to sum up my mission in a sentence. what i want
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to do now with your help us to do for the whole country what we did in london. not everyone agrees borisjohnson's time as mayor was a success. last week the times columnist and former conservative mp matthew parris wrote thatjohnson was "a habitual liar, a cheat... a do—nothing mayor of london and the worst foreign secretary in living memory". so definitely not a fan. butjohnson is running on more than just his record. he says he's the man to deliver brexit and unite the country. this was him on the possibility of no—deal. we must do better than the current withdrawal agreement that's being rejected three times by parliament, let me be clear i am not aiming for a no—deal brexit. i do not think we'll and up with any such thing, but it is only only responsible to prepare vigorously and seriously for
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no deal, indeed it's astonishing that anyone can suggest dispensing with that vital tool of negotiation. borisjohnson liking with that vital tool of negotiation. boris johnson liking his with that vital tool of negotiation. borisjohnson liking his campaign. let's bring in our political correspondent ben wright. how convincing was he because when it comes to brexit he wants to leave deal or no deal but is not his intention to do without one, what does he want? he says he can renegotiate something in time for the brexit deadline, which is october 31, get that renegotiated the other president, and then for britain to leave. this is the great argument at the height of the tory leadership contest. what can or cannot be negotiated with the eu over the next four months? and whether or not claims that there could be a no—deal brexit then are possible or not. and that's pitting all these candidates, all ten of them against each other, and to be
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honest, it feels like the contest is happening in a parallel universe when you contrast it with what has been a consistent message from eu leaders, national leaders, people are on the commission, who say which i'll agreement was signed off by the uk government and the eu back in november last year is closed. the withdrawal agreement and shut down, that backstop is there, not being taken out, that backstop is there, not being ta ken out, there that backstop is there, not being taken out, there could be fiddles around the political declaration that the debt of the agreement are not open for discussion and yet, that leadership contest is voting focusing precisely what could or could not be renegotiated so it's all a bit bizarre but i thought it was interesting today that boris johnson was tempering his enthusiasm for a no—deal brexit and straining to say he wants the uk to leave with a bl. that parallel universe phrase i think of something they may hear more often don't go away because he wasn't the only one launching his campaign. here's why mrjohnson is the frontrunner. he currently has the backing of 72 conservative mps —
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the next highest is michael gove with 32. even so there was another tory mp launching his leadership bid today. it's the home secretary sajid javid. he's one of the most senior cabinet members in the running. this was his central pitch. i believe i'm uniquely qualified to lead our party and our country through the challenges that lie ahead. i've got a credible honest plan for delivering brexit so we can lead by the end of october this year. and i got the background in ibs and the positive vision for the future that'll help bring the country together and keep jeremy corbyn farm away —— far away from ten downing st. sajid javid lit launching his bed, brexit in the forefront of what were your thoughts
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on hand? heat interesting and presenting himself as they change candidate because he's a pakistani sun ofa candidate because he's a pakistani sun of a bus driver, who went on to a successful career in banking, and accolades of george osborne and the treasury back when he was chancellor, and you know, you think he's going places and he was as i said presenting himself as the changing face of the tory party, says it has to change if it's going to survive and reach new bits of the electorate and he has interesting backers, ruth davidson who is within the party, and a very popular conservative leader in scotland. i think sajid javid could be confident of reaching round two of the parliamentary ballot, either as it will be worried this evening, that first vote at the tory mps is tomorrow at lunchtime, everybody wa nts to tomorrow at lunchtime, everybody wants to go to the second round needs 17 votes, it's a secret ballot but they need 17 to continue, and
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there are some who only have a handful of probably declared backers so far, they should be worried about continuing electives at the moment a very crowded field. isn't thatjust ten conservative mps candy dating, many thanks, ben. more on that battle ship on our website stay with us battle ship on our website stay with us here on outside sites we have more coming. health checks in uganda continue as an outbreak of ebola spreads across the border, you and calling an emergency meeting. the home appliance company — whirlpool — will be ordered to recall around half a million of its tumble dryers over concerns that they could catch fire. the move is described by the business minister as "unprecedented". the company was first issued
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with a warning four years ago after its hotpoint, creda and indesit dryers were found to have a fault. the government has blamed it for at least 750 fires over an 11—year period. colletta smith reports. this is something lots of us do once a week or more. pull out a wash and stick it in the tumble dryer but no—one expects it to end like this. mark studley‘s whirlpool dryer caught fire last year in somerset, causing £8,000 worth of damage and he says if his family had been asleep it could have been much more serious. it's one of 750 fires in the last 11 years caused by whirlpool brands like hotpoint, creda and indesit. the company had been dealing with their problem dryers for more than four years but the government doesn't think they've done enough, unless whirlpool can convince them over the next 48—hours that they've got a bigger plan then, for the first time ever, the office for product safety and standards will force the company to issue a recall. whirlpool say they're still in discussions with the government
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but that anyone who has a machine that has not been modified shouldn't use it and should get in touch with them immediately. merseyside fire service deal with around 30 tumble dryer fires a year. it can very quickly take hold in the kitchen and it can very quickly engulf a house. people who do think they may have a product that is due for a recall, they should really check up on that. if they're in any doubt, they should unplug the appliance. if half a million tumble dryers are recalled on friday, those customers will be entitled to a replacement or a full refund. colletta smith, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... tears gas and batons on the streets of hong kong's as the protests against a plan to extradite suspects to china turned violent.
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two men are seriously injured. we've been covering a lot about the ebola outbreak, the outbreak and that democratic republic of the congo because it has spilt over into uganda. the ministry of health would like to inform the public of the confirmation of ebola virus disease. that confirmed case is a five—year—old boy who travelled from the democratic republic of congo. with his mother yesterday, the 10th ofjune 2019. i'm sad to say... the minister later said on twitter the boy has died: "we have a total of 3 confirmed
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of which 1 — the 5 year old boy — passed on this morning". the boy's 3—year—old brother and 50—year—old grandmother have also been confirmed as ebola patients. uganda shares a porous border with the democratic republic of the congo map the new cases occured here. the new cases occured here. the drc is facing its second big ebola outbreak in recent years over 2000 confirmed cases — 1300 of which have died. here's the drc‘s health minister. there 25,000 people crossing end from the start of the response time and to go, 65 million people had been checked at the various checkpoints of which there are about 80. we had another development because
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the world health organisation has called an emergency meeting in response to the news that ebola spread into uganda, the gathering on friday in geneva will decide whether it isa friday in geneva will decide whether it is a public health threat of international concerns. they are discounting that meeting now. lastly, the who one that outbreaks of viruses such as ebola will be as they described, that new normal. this is a regional directorfor africa speaking to the bbc a little bit earlier on. the investigation is going not —— going on now to establish number of contacts and other people and instigate appropriate measures both times the bic side and in uganda in the context of the family have had. that plan, the country has put in place after this meeting includes clearly sensitizing that community and population. and how to protect
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themselves from the risk of being infected as well as not to strengthen the border crossing screenings to stop any mass gatherings of people, including events like funerals and weddings u nfortu nately. events like funerals and weddings unfortunately. simply to act to ensure we do not have circumstances where large numbers that people are gathered in unsafe conditions and transmission can occur. very worrying development we will continue to monitor that. the four—month trial of the leaders of catalonia's failed independence bid has ended. these are the 12 defendants, who've been in the dock in madrid's supreme court every week since the case began back in february. nine of the defendants are charged with rebellion. including this man — this is catalonia's former vice—president oriol zhoon—keras. he faces up to 25 years in jail. he's become the focus of the case,
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because catalonia's former president, carles puigdemont, the main player in the drive for independence, left spain before he could be arrested. puigdemont is currently holed up in belgium. the other defendants face a lesser charge of disobedience. they all took to the stand one last time today. let's hear from mrjunqueras. i truly believed that the best for eve ryo ne i truly believed that the best for everyone for catalonia, for spain, for europe, would be to take back to politics to good politics from where it never should have left. we should return the matter to an area of dialogue, negotiation and agreement. in the meantime, ourjob to always be contributing and for the judgement of gelid —— ballot boxes to promote democracy, cohabitation and the common good. my colleague has been monitoring this right now and hejoins has been monitoring this right now and he joins us has been monitoring this right now and hejoins us live. how is
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has been monitoring this right now and he joins us live. how is this child being seen? it's been a very divisive trial, the cata la n been a very divisive trial, the catalan independence movement and the catalan government have cast it asa the catalan government have cast it as a political child that seeks not to deliver justice, but as a political child that seeks not to deliverjustice, but simply as a political child that seeks not to deliver justice, but simply to punish the ideology of catalan nationalism and they say it's basically an unfair trial and it shows spanish democracy is unhealthy. the spanish government and authorities deny that, they say the child has all the necessary transparency and guaranties, it's very divisive when those who want independence in catalonia and those who don't. and it has really dominated spanish politics in the last four months or so. the sentences could potentially depending on how the child and five, they are very serious, 25 years for some. that's correct, you mentioned that you could face that 25 year jail sentence, allow the trial is focused on the issue of violence and
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that's because the prosecutors and it need a rather have had tried to demonstrate the violence that was used by the catalan independence movement, during that failed bid for independence in 2017. that is if they want charges of rebellion to stand up. when the verdict is made later on this year. so the use of violence, whether the independence movement did use it or not, there has been a really key issue throughout this trial. briefly if you could, what about carlos push mike himself, he has left and not arrested he is in belgium at the moment. that's right, he's acting as a running ambassador for the independent cause, travelling around europe and meeting with politicians and other countries and the media and other countries and the media and trying to spread the pro—independence message on the international stage. many thanks for bringing us up to date. we have as a lwa ys bringing us up to date. we have as always lots more on our website, get
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in touch with us the social media and we continue to monitor throughout bbc news the situation in hong kong since stay with us. thanks for watching. hello there, hong kong since stay with us. thanks forwatching. hello there, it's hong kong since stay with us. thanks for watching. hello there, it's been exceptionally wet and the last four or five days but we have needed that rain however ever coming out together its causing some problems and it continues to pot causes flooding issues and transport disruption and amber wining invoice, we will come back to that. the reason we are seeing stagnant weather pattern at the moment is because of the jet stream, it's meandering north and south and we see it moving from west to east our weather pattern is changing. my progress patter but will be defined this is of blood pressure, each is pushing more rain our way and field by the heat to the east of us as weather friends got a lot of energy, i found that heat and providing heavy rain. so, through thursday looks like the heaviest of the rain
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or potentially most disruptive will be across southern and eastern parts of scotland, where we could see 80 mm of rain, but it won'tjust be southeast scotland, in many parts of england and wales had a sizeable amount of rain, 20 had a 40 mm widely, but as much of ad across northeast england. as the day progresses, we had showers developing further south and a west— east split across scotland, by what stays mostly to find and try, but i stiff northern priest making you feel cooler and clearly further is concerns for the flooding and travel conditions i had his as it is. dry weather northern ireland and then wells likely to break up the rain and become like chari, but that could be really intense showers in a torrential downpour as he got to the day. the end of the lease be a little warmer life and times friday, i felt little warmer life and times friday, ifelt on little warmer life and times friday, i felt on friday is low, low pressure meanders northwest of the uk, actually pick up a southwest wind, self northern ireland could see wet weather by that stage, but
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is by no means settled elsewhere, there'll be plenty more happy a slow moving employees, it mightjust feel for most of us a little bit more likejune, for most of us a little bit more like june, temperature is for most of us a little bit more likejune, temperature is higher. the weekend, you have to keep keeping an eye and elements in the east, i will if you find a strawman energy, but again without the pressure centre for much of the weekend, we see continue to see showers moving in slowly, thus, the length east of the rain, we will see temperatures that into the mid and high teens, and that strong ginseng scientist on a beer feeling quite pleasa nt scientist on a beer feeling quite pleasant outside status, but again sunday by no means dry unsettled sian berry picture, as we work our way to the weekend. there will be some faces that escape showers but difficult at this stage to pinpoint exactly where. now as we move into the beginning of the newly can, the high pressure in the south may start to migrate a little bit further north and again it's finally balancing the atmosphere at the moment and if it does, meaning we
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may see fewer showers across the southern half of england and wales, and that area of low pressure will be happy to have a slow moving foundry down price and the north, such as the energy and atmosphere at the time of year, but we could be a high teens late 20s and the south and find time, and that this with isaac for a day are possible two days, getting a warmth but doesn't seem to last, we see blood pressure meandering and later in the week, possibly as high as reestablishing dropout into the end of the wii, but really down the spirit cannot make its mind up what to do next week so that could be dry weather for a to do next week so that could be dry weatherfor a time to do next week so that could be dry weather for a time and warm weather, still overall looking rather u nsettled. still overall looking rather unsettled. warnings are on the website.
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tonight at ten — borisjohnson launches his campaign to become the next prime minister. he promised brexit by october, with or without a deal. delaney's defeat, delay means carbon. kick the can and will kick the bucket. the home secretary sajid javid has also set out his leadership pitch — the last of the 10 candidates to do so. tomorrow they all face the first round of votes. as we face the challenges like we have never faced before, as we face the challenges like we have neverfaced before, this calls for a new kind of leadership from a new leader. all 10 candidates now face the first round of voting by tory mps tomorrow. also tonight...

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