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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  June 25, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond one hundred days. conservative leadership front runner borisjohnson says he is fully committed to leaving the eu on october 31st. it is "do or die" says mrjohnson. the conservatives, he says, are staring down the barrel and must deliver. but his challengerjeremy hunt says the party needs to choose someone it can trust, someone that europe can trust, to deliver a deal. thejudgment is, the judgment is, who was the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and bring back that deal? it is about the personality of our prime minister. the insults fly between iran and the us — president trump warns any attack on anything american will be met with overwhelming force
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— iran blames america. you've proved to be a liar. you are not seeking to negotiate. if you did we would have negotiated. the head of america's border protection agency steps down amid outrage over the treatment of children being detained. also on the programme. tomorrow, in miami, it all begins. the first televised debates. 25 democrats lining up for 2020 and the right to challenge donald trump. the five hottest heat waves in europe since records began have all come in the last 20 years. there is another coming this week. and it is going to be a scorcher. hello, i amjane 0'brien in washington, christian fraser is in london. stung by... stung by criticism from his rival jeremy hunt, that he was trying
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to slink into number 10 via the back door, mrjohnson is suddenly more visible — and he's commited to leaving the eu by the new deadline. "if i become pm, he tweeted, we will leave the eu on 31st 0ctober, deal or no deal. today i have asked jeremy hunt whether he will also commit to this date, no matter what. so far, jeremy hunt has said he is committed to leaving, but if there was no prospect of a deal by oct 31 then he would want to avoid "the disruption of no deal" by perhaps, delaying for a short period. mr hunt pledged today that if he became prime minister he would increase the defence budget by £15 billion over the next five years. the foreign secretary has been sitting down with our political editor laura kuenssberg. jeremy hunt wants to persuade you he ought to be the next prime minister. he knows that means first of all untangling an enormous mess. what would you do on day one in number ten to get us out of the eu at the end of october? we have to approach this differently. it is the biggest constitutional crisis that i can remember, so what i would do differently to what we have had
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before as i would have the dup in my negotiating team, the er g for the brexit purists, i would have scottish and welsh conservatives, because fundamentally i believe there is a deal to be done. what would be different about the deal you hope to achieve? it would be changing the backstop but with some guarantees of no hard porter on the island of ireland for a completely obvious reasons. that approach is not too different from what boris wa nts. not too different from what boris wants. it would be a technology led solution. you are putting forward something that the european union has said no to on multiple occasions. what they see as it is up to the uk to come up with a solution but of course if you come up with a different solution, something that can work, then we will look at that. but what would it be? it would be a technology led solution and i think eve ryo ne technology led solution and i think everyone thinks in the next decade we can do all these things online
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just as the rest of her life is transformed. you won't have a deal u nless transformed. you won't have a deal unless there is a backstop, unless there is a credible idea ready immediately and you're not saying it is ready immediately. you're talking about within a decade! i think it is ready. the eu have not wanted to accept this kind of solution because they hope we stay in the customs union where we have to stick to their tariffs but they know now that won't go through parliament. what you are suggesting is that somehow the eu didn't listen to more creative ideas because they wanted to keep us closer. this is a negotiation and they are obviously going to negotiate for what is for them the best outcome but the reality is we ended up with a deal thatis reality is we ended up with a deal that is not going to get through parliament and when i talk to people in the eu they understand that. they are keen to see if there is a way through this. listening to you talk about your brexit plans are similar to talking to borisjohnson about
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his brexit plans. high on ambition but low on concrete detail. i have been clear about the concrete detail. you are talking about what you would like to do but it is a wish. what is the evidence you could get this done? that is the starting point for any deal, you have to be clear about what you want and it is different to what theresa may was negotiating. the answer to your question is that both boris and i wa nt to question is that both boris and i want to change that deal and the judgment is, who is the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and bring back that deal? it is about the personality of our prime minister. if you choose someone prime minister. if you choose someone where there is no trust, there is going to be no negotiation, no deal. you don't trust boris johnson and don't think he is trustworthy as prime minister?” would never make those comments. i would never make those comments. i would serve boris johnson. .. would never make those comments. i would serve borisjohnson... let me finish. i would serve boris johnson to the very best of my ability. you
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have just sat there in a race of two and said this is about who we can trust, some we could we can trust like me or someone we can't trust. you are clearly talking about your opponent in this race.” you are clearly talking about your opponent in this race. i am saying i am trustworthy. meeting veterans in chelsea no doubt you would use every moment to try to win but how would he fix what he admits is one of the biggest problem is that the government he is part of failed to fix. what would you do as prime minister because your government has been trying to fix social care for yea rs been trying to fix social care for years and nothing has happened.” been trying to fix social care for years and nothing has happened. i do think councils need more money but it is also a bit personal responsibility. i think we should be a country where people save for their social care costs just in the same way they say for their pension. it should be something they can opt out of but it should be an automatic thing. would you put a cap on social care? i would do a deal. if you are prepared to save responsibility
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during your life we will cut those costs because we need to be a country that rewards people who do the right thing. do you worry in this contest you may be unfairly squeezed out by somebody with a bigger personality?” squeezed out by somebody with a bigger personality? i have been waiting for this moment for 30 years of my life. i have been sitting around that cabinet table thinking how i want to transform this country. you have wanted to be prime minister for 30 country. you have wanted to be prime ministerfor 30 years. country. you have wanted to be prime minister for 30 years. when did you know? i think if i say that that will put you off! 30 years is a very long time. i would love to do this job andi long time. i would love to do this job and i think i can make a difference. three decades is already a long time to wait. will tory members keep him hanging on? i have to ask about that photograph that we keep seeing popping up time and
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again of boris johnson keep seeing popping up time and again of borisjohnson and his girlfriend after that row they had. this photograph, this bucolic photograph. looking very lovey—dovey. photograph. looking very lovey-dovey. boris johnson is no longer a shrinking violet and we know because he has been to the royal horticultural society today, he has been everywhere, on talk radio and on lbc and he was asked about that photograph 26 times by nick ferrari and gave the straight bat answer. listen. where did the picture come from? the longer we spend... where did the picture come from? where has the picture come from? where has the picture come from? i am not going to... i think the longer we spend. .. from? i am not going to... i think the longer we spend... that you know the longer we spend... that you know the picture was being put out, mr johnson? there are all sorts of pictures of me. did you know the pictures of me. did you know the picture was out there? of course i
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knew there was a picture in existence. maybe i have been living in the us for so long but i am slightly baffled as to why it merits 26 mentions. does anybody actually ca re 26 mentions. does anybody actually care about boris johnson 26 mentions. does anybody actually care about borisjohnson and his girlfriend and whether they have kissed and made up or whether they are still having a row?” kissed and made up or whether they are still having a row? i suspect the majority of that 160,000 that are going to vote for borisjohnson probably don't care. i am not an expert in crisis management although maybe i should go into crisis management when the bbc shuffled me out of the door because he could have nip this in the bud quite early and said this has been a hell of a week, we are stressed and tired and had a row at home, i am sorry to our neighbours, the police said there was nothing to see, let's put it to bed, and instead he has prevaricated and refused to answer the question and refused to answer the question and itjust and refused to answer the question and it just keeps and refused to answer the question and itjust keeps coming back. kill the story! he has not been well advised. i don't think it works saying i don't want to put my family
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into the public domain. they are in the public domain, he is running to be prime minister. and president trumpjust be prime minister. and president trump just ignores it when be prime minister. and president trumpjust ignores it when it happens to him. president trump warned iran today that an attack "on anything american" would result in an overwhelming military response. his threat was in response to comments from iranian president hassan rouhani, who said the white house was ‘mentally retarded' for imposing new sanctions against the supreme leader ayatollah ali khamenei. in a series of tweets the president trump said "the us. has not forgotten iran's use of ied‘s & bombs which killed 2000 americans. any attack by iran on anything american will be met with great and overwhelming force. in some areas, overwhelming will mean obliteration. no morejohn kerry & 0bama! reffering to the previous administrations appeasement and support for the nuclear deal. the us says it's still open to talks but the latest sanctions were met with fury in tehran.
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it will be, i think, the combination of sanctions and other pressure that does bring iran to the table. at the same time you call for negotiations, you seek to sanction the foreign minister? it is obvious you are lying. if you really wanted to negotiate we would have negotiated. joining us now from our cambridge studio is azadeh moaveni — a middle east specialist with the international crisis group. lovely to see you. there has been a lot of focus today on this latest round of sanctions and who in particular it targets and a lot of focus on the foreign minister because the foreign minister spends a lot of time here in europe lobbying for a run and if you are serious about the diplomatic channel then why would you lockdown someone like that? precisely. that is why you heard the reaction that has been
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coming out of tehran today which underscores the perception they are that the us is not really serious about any kind of engagement, that it is looking for a confrontation, it is looking for a confrontation, it has selected around's top diplomat which means they couldn't even negotiate a way out of this confrontation. iran perceives itself to be on the receiving end of economic war with the us at a time when it is waiting for europe to come in with some measures to give it an incentive to stick by what it promised to abide by and then we are confronted with this. there was another interesting thing that happened today, russia, israeland the united states were meeting today and john bolton's russian counterpart said the us drone that was shot down last week was in an iranian airspace, contradicting what the americans are saying. are you at all worried that there are some
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including john bolton who are trying to create a pretext for war? it seems really clear that there has beena seems really clear that there has been a push from certain circles of washington, certainlyjohn bolton, to push for a confrontation. the whole policy of maximum pressure is designed to push for a confrontation. it has backfired tremendously. you see that iran hasn't changed any kind of posture in the region, it has caused them to a road from within. it has achieved nothing and suddenly we are at the brink of warand nothing and suddenly we are at the brink of war and nothing is working but it seems for some that was the intention to start with. but how much do you think iran is gambling on the possibility that donald trump will avoid war at all costs, especially in the run—up to the 2020 election, or that they can just sit him out because he might not win the election? that is very sensible and
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i presume that is what cooler heads in iran are thinking. to set this out, europe has been encouraging around to abide by the terms of the deal and we are close to the end of the trump term. escalation has momentum and a logic of its own which is why the moment is so dangerous and that is why i ran, though patient and exercising what you might call a policy of maximum patience, hoping to wait it out, really need some concrete economic incentives to stay patient and to stay abiding by the terms of the deal. thank you. for all the fiery rhetoric that we get for donald trump on his twitter feed the president has so far resisted the hawks within his team. last week he called off the air strikes on iran, having learnt that 150 people would probably dies as a result. that restraint has been welcomed but it has sparked a debate in america as to whether the president alone, has the authority, to order strikes withough first going to congress.
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in an interview with the political newspaper and website the hill, the president said that he does have that power. the acting chief of america's border agency resigned. we can head —— alexis simendinger is national political correspondent for the hill and shejoins me now. your publication has a pretty wide—ranging interview with president trump in which he talks about the border crisis saying conditions are better underhand than they were under 0bama. we are talking about children's lives. why has this become such a political football that seems to lack consensus? it has become a political foot ball consensus? it has become a political football for some of the humanitarian reasons that we would normally attach to separated families and children. the president was trying to be defensive and always to compare himself to
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previous presidents but as he notices from members of congress and within his administration there is a vigorous debate about what can be done, when funding will run out and whether the president's pressure is sending the message. he is trying to transmit the message to central american nations, do not come, do not send your children. so part of the argument is, we want this to look tough, we wanted to look as if the united states is very tough on migrant families and children, not to make it a cushy home for them because we don't want them to come. this issue over whether donald trump can order the air on his own, hasn't congress abrogated responsibility before without getting involved? congress abrogated responsibility before without getting involved ?m isa very before without getting involved ?m is a very good point and having cove red is a very good point and having covered previous presidents i know this debate recurs with each president. part of the problem that congress has is that while there are lawmakers who are interested in the
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idea that the 2001 authorisation that backed the use of force in the iraq war needs to be updated, there are very few lawmakers who are willing to debate that and actually put their name to a vote on that before a major election. even though we hear from lawmakers both democrats and republicans that it would not be a bad idea to update this, i saw this debate happen again and again in the 0bama administration. you're remember that the president then paused on his action in syria because he agreed that he should seek congress's approval and then congress backed away. there is a new allegation against the president. a columnist for elle magazine says in her new book that she was sexually assaulted by the president and the fitting room in the 1990s. she hasn't come
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out before now but his response is also odd. she put he said, she is not my type, which is bizarre response when you are accused of sexually abusing somebody. that was his response in the interview yesterday and it is not a new phrase from the president. he has used this to brush aside these 15 women who offered allegations of sexual misconduct against him by saying they are not his type. he also says he believes that she is lying and didn't meet her but then admitted they were photographed together. but he says i was wearing an overcoat and try to describe what is in the photograph. so the president's argument against this is a denial by basically trying to put aside the idea that she has any knowledge of him or had any encounter with him.
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this goes back to 1995, 1996. she doesn't remember the exact year and there are no corroborating witnesses willing to go on the record and she herself talking to cnn has not use the allegation of rape which appears in the article, not attributed to harbert to one of her friends. we are putting you through your paces today. another question on white house appointment stephanie gresham. the first lady's press secretary is moving over to be the white house press secretary. will that change the dynamic, will beget a press briefing thereafter 100 days of not getting a press briefing? my bet is on the wall. stephanie gresham came in to the trump fold as a volunteer and has been with the first lady and president for a long period of time and she is nothing if not loyal to them, and the president and first lady have both anointed her in this position because of her loyalty. she has a reputation of being really
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protective of them, sol has a reputation of being really protective of them, so i imagine that whatever the president once in a job that he has described as dual purpose, press secretary and communications, normally two jobs, purpose, press secretary and communications, normally twojobs, i expect it to be relatively the same. thank you very much indeed. president trump's son—in—law, jared kushner, has said agreeing an economic pathway forward is a necessary precondition for peace between israelis and the palestinians. speaking at the start of a conference in bahrain focusing on the economic aspects the long—awaited us peace plan, mr kushner said president trump and america had not given up on the palestinians. us secretary of state mike pompeo has arrived in india for a two—day state visit. he'll be meeting the country's external affairs minister. they are expected to discuss a series of issues including trade, the telecoms giant huawei, and india's planned purchase of russian weapons.
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think rainbows have been spotted in the south and west of england. the display was captured in areas of dorset, it is a meteorological phenomenon caused by reflection, reflection and dispersion of light and water droplets resulting in a spectrum of light. doesn't quite explain why they are pink. very nice. very pretty. the new home of meghan and harry — the duke and duchess of sussex — cost the public nearly £2.5 million to refurbish — that's more than $3 million. frogmore cottage in windsor used to consist of five separate homes, but was turned into a single property for harry and meghan. the official figures — published by buckingham palace — also showed the queen was given more than £80 million last year to fund her official duties. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell.
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they chose windsor for their wedding and when harry and megan considered where they wanted to live the focus was once again on this town and its long association with royalty. they moved from kensington palace to a secluded residence known as frogmore cottage. what is revealed today as it cost £2.11 million to turn this cottage into a home fit for the duke and duchess of sussex. the officials who control royal spending cost £2.11 million because the cottage was in fa ct million because the cottage was in fact five separate homes which had to be out and reconfigured to become one single residence. and those officials say that whenever they wa nt fixtures officials say that whenever they want fixtures and fittings in their cottage which went beyond the basic level of comfort they paid for them themselves. 0n the broader question
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of royal finance figures show that what is known as the sovereign grant for 2018-19 what is known as the sovereign grant for 2018—19 amounted to £82.2 million. that is the overall cost of the monarch a— things like security. of that, 33 million was spent on refurbishment of buckingham palace, the infrastructure of which are said to be an urgent need of repair. the figures give an insight into royal transport costs. the visit lastjune by the queen and duchess of sussex to cheshire by royal train and charter aircraft cost just under £30,000. and the visit to the caribbean and cuba earlier this year by the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall cost more than £400,000. long haul visits like the one to the caribbean meant a sharp increase in the royal family's carbon emissions caused by air travel. up by 98%.
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emissions by royal residences were down by 22%. overall officials say the year was a busy one for the royalfamily, the the year was a busy one for the royal family, the members the year was a busy one for the royalfamily, the members of which carried out more than 3000 official engagements in the uk and overseas. yesterday we told you about the cat that had to be rescued after getting trapped in a car engine. today, that theme of felines having lucky escapes continues. yes, spare a thought for poor old droptop who spent three days trapped in a world war two bunker. he got stuck after squeezing himself into a reinforced concrete structure in suffolk on friday. dozens of locals tried to get him out — before a team of expert volunteers from the warrior fire and rescue service came to his aid. droptop will be thinking twice before adopting a bunker—mentality in the future, no doubt.
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maybe he will be renamed? dropped in or dropped the ball. i wrote that one. well done to the fire and rescue service. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news. ahead of the 2020 democratic contender debate later this week, we will take a look at abortion rights, fast becoming a key issue in the presidential race for the white house. and it will be hot this week, soaring temperatures set to shatter records across europe. five heatwaves, record five weeks heatwaves, record five weeks heatwaves all come in the last 20 yea rs, heatwaves all come in the last 20 years, that is since records began 500 yea rs years, that is since records began 500 years ago. do get in touch with
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us 500 years ago. do get in touch with us if you are enjoying the heat wave across europe. stay with us. conditions are gradually turning drier across central parts of the country drier across central parts of the cou ntry after drier across central parts of the country after today's rain starts to fizzle out. the weather front clearing away which brought all the rain today. high pressure building from the north—west which is why things are settling down but bringing fresher and less humid air to our shores through the course of wednesday. dry and cool air arriving across the north of scotland. further south we hold on to the legacy of cloud. if you spots of rain and drizzle. misty and murky. the mid teens in the south but single figures in the north. wednesday starts off on a rather grey note. probably the best of the
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sunshine across scotland and northern ireland and later into northern england. some brightness developing across the south and the temperature lower than of late, 2223. low 20s in the central belt but cooler along the east coast. on thursday, high pressure still with us thursday, high pressure still with us but a squeeze on the isobars across the south, a strong easterly wind across the channel coast and then towards the west country but lots of sunshine across the uk as you can see. cloud across eastern coastal areas but can still be quite cool coastal areas but can still be quite cool. heading further west, warmer with more sunshine around, we could see 24 to 25. quite warm in the scotla nd see 24 to 25. quite warm in the scotland central belt. in europe, a blistering heat wave, record—breaking temperatures are likely across parts of france for the next couple of days. looking like we will tap into that heat once again as we end the week as
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high—pressure draws up this area from the south and south—east right across the uk but very hot, potentially hottest day of the year so far across southern parts. the breeze coming up from the south will start to bring the heat into many areas, still some cooler air across the north sea coast, further west we could see 2728. mid 20s across central scotland. into saturday could see the low 30s across the south with high humidity feeling unbearable but then it cools down into sunday.
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it's you're watching beyond one hundred days. a top stories... in the race to be british prime minister they contenderjeremy hunt was that without trust there will be no negotiations, no deal may be no brexit. no more rows, no, no, all quiet. meanwhile, his rival boris johnson tried to pick questions about his private life behind him. insults fly between iran and the united states. president trump was any attack will be met with overwhelming force, iran blames america. also on the programme, temperatures hit 40 degrees as
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europe prepares for a record—breaking heatwave. setting up temporary fountains, mist machines and even free water. is this an alligator or a unicycle? you might know the answer, but algorithms a p pa re ntly know the answer, but algorithms apparently do not. we are still some 71 weeks from the 2020 election. but tomorrow night, it all gets real in miami. 10 of the 25 democratic candidates are about square off in the first of two televised debates. another 10, including jo biden, will appear on thursday. they will be plenty of policy that divides them. but the one area where they will be common ground, is on reproductive rights and a woman's freedom to choose. there are a number of states that have passed restrictive abortion laws in recent months, with some banning the procedure
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at six weeks or even earlier. but there are other states, that are trying to ensure reproductive health care, including abortion, contraception, and maternity care, are a fundamental right in the state. the bbc‘s aleem maqbool has been to illinois. this is not the kind of news we have been hearing of late on one of the most divisive issues in the us. today we proudly proclaim that in this state we trust women. in the face of conservative gains on the issue nationally, illinoisjust passed a bill reinforcing a woman's legal right to have an abortion. this room here is the room where they complete the surgical abortion procedures. it has been of huge relief tothose providing abortion care from women of the state and those coming in from other, now more restrictive states. we are considered a safe state where they
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do not have to worry about those additional boundaries or be charged with any criminal charges. illinois may have passed this bill effectively enshrining a women's right to choose, but it comes with a backdrop of many other states passing laws that severely restrict that right and a sense that america as a whole, it is becoming much more difficult for a woman to have an abortion. but many in illinois wanted to become more difficult here, too. protesting against the new law. i ask you to rise up, oh, god, and judge illinois where the sanction destruction of the innocent unborn. even inside the state house, where a pastor led a surprising prayer during the abortion debate. from conception we are talking about a human being, made in the image of god and we are responsible to nurture them and take care of them and see their development and growth. with abortion the consequence stays with you. millions of dollars are now spent
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in the united states on campaigns to stop women having abortions. with some anti—abortion groups run by women who themselves had pregnancies terminated and now say they regret it. like nancy, she wanted her state to ban all abortions while passing a law protecting the right. the bottom line is it's the killing of a human being. it'(s the killing of a baby. and now with the...enshrined in our law, abortion through the ninth month, cannot accept, i cannot abide by that kind of law. in many parts of the country nancy's way of thinking is starting to prevail. notjust with emotive videos. with an election approaching, the battle lines on this issue have been drawn.
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joining us to discuss this further is professor mary ziegler from the florida state university who has written several books on the history of abortion in the united states. thank you forjoining us. how did we get from bill clinton's description of abortion as safe, legal and rare to its being an issue on which there appears to be absolutely no consensus whatsoever? nobody came on this, can they? no, ithink despite of the broader story of political polarisation in the united states we now very much living about alternative fax, post donald trump. that has a longer history in the us abortion struggle. they have always been competing moral and constitutional views. now increasingly people do not agree with the basic facts. whether that involves a great post abortion with women or whether abortion causes breast cancer. when you cannot agree
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on the basic facts, it is really ha rd to on the basic facts, it is really hard to imagine any kind of common ground emerging. on a banking of hot button election issues, where would you place abortion right now?m button election issues, where would you place abortion right now? it is quite important, i think. there was a recent report suggesting that one in three americans interview the abortion issue is very important. i think su would support that, generally speaking, pro—choice americans are americans who support the rights. there is unquestionably a threat to abortion in america. you would expect as a butchers on both sides of the issue prioritising this to some extent on election day. the million dollar question is when one of these more restrictive bills gets before the supreme court and what the court will make of it? well, i think that the people who pass laws in states like alabama, that banned almost all abortions, has
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miscalculated a little bit in terms of timing the expectation seems to be that's because there is a conservative majority on the supreme court that the justices will immediately eviscerate real versus wade. i think there is very little signal of that. the centre of the court at the moment seems very concerned of the quite's reputation. while i think he is still likely to wa nt to while i think he is still likely to want to overturn sinner or later, later a bit like very different politically than sin. you are saying they're not going to overturn present in 1000 slip, but they may be death by a thousand cuts? that is much more likely, exactly. i think by pressing for so much a sin, anti—abortion legislators actually rescue potentially losing out on the court of returning row altogether. it is certainly not improving the odds. thank you very much indeed.
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in europe it has been an issue that was put to bed long ago, of course is not even in ireland, recently. i know, everywhere else it seems to be moving ahead and becoming more permissive and here there is a definite retrenchment as it were. britain is making clear it's doing all it can to to reduce the risk of conflict in the middle east in the face of growing tension between iran and the united states. the foreign secretary jeremy hunt says the uk is making "serious efforts to de—escalate tension" in the region to avoid what he calls "an accidental war". the conservative leadership contender told the commons that he "can't envisage" britain becoming involved in a military conflict. a short time ago we talked to the chair of the commons foreign affairs select committee tom tugendhat. tom, we are in a precarious
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situation on iran, at the moment. i understand that britain, france and germany sent an official diplomatic warning to iran yesterday that they needed to stop stockpiling uranium. if they didn't, there was be consequences. where do you think we are consequences. where do you think we a re naturally consequences. where do you think we are naturally going with this now? the sinuses of this appears to be the unwinding of the treaty that is kept iran from developing nuclear weapons over recent years. it was problematic treaty to put it politely. i have many holes in it. it was at least preventing iran from developing nuclear weapon. that appears to be coming unpacked, as we speak. tom, are you worried that given the potential for any conflict to include a lot more than just the us and iran, that the uk did not get an advance warning of president trump plus my potential strikes at the weekend? i think you are right,
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jane. i think the chances of any incident including notjust the immediate region, by which i'm in the persian gulf, bahrain, qatar area, but actually the wider reading g re nfell area, but actually the wider reading grenfell region, including as i know yemen, israel and indeed of course terry and iraq, means this is a very important and troubling moment. if there is one thing worse than having partners, not having partners. i would urge the administration to remember that bikers stopjust expand that a little bit. winning proxies would supposedly get involved in that it was a problem for european assets in the region?” mean, it is far to early to spike it was may or may not happen. but it is true that iran has a history of sponsoring terrorist groups and
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militias around the region. if you look at what is going on in syria today or indeed in parts of lebanon, you will see very clearly that iran's leisure activity and yes of violent groups —— militia activity and use of violent groups. offers irana range and use of violent groups. offers iran a range of options which is destabilising for many countries, not just its neighbourhood destabilising for many countries, notjust its neighbourhood was” must ask you about the conservative leadership. like submarine boris johnson has risen to the service in the last 24—hour is. let us just listen to what he said today. we will of course be pushing our plan into action. so, we understand... and getting ready to come out on october the... sist. 31st, correct. come what may? come what may. do ordie? do or die, come what may.
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you did say they were tested for you, have you changed your mind? st germain england has 106,000 people who will make the decision for the leader of the conservative party, i'm a little judgment until leader of the conservative party, i'm a littlejudgment until i have seen i'm a littlejudgment until i have seenjeremy i'm a littlejudgment until i have seen jeremy hunt and i'm a littlejudgment until i have seenjeremy hunt and borisjohnson conducting the debate. i very much hope borisjohnson shows up. i think there is a huge opportunity here for these questions to be fully explored. look, my view on, on the trust issue is pretty simple, i think we need someone in him we can have confidence to prioritise the interest of the whole of the united kingdom, notjust experience it. thank you very much, tom. europe is expecting some seering temperatures this week. the national weather agency in france has placed 53 regions on an orange warning — that this second—highest alert — with temperature of 40 degrees expected. one spanish meteoroligist tweeted — el infierno is coming —
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hell is coming. the french know how dangerous these spikes in temperature can be. in 2003 a europe—wide heatwave killed 20,000 people — 15,000 of them in france. from paris, lucy williamson sent this report. among the visitors to paris this week one has come straight from the sahara. a blast of summer heat that has sent temperatures into the 30s and the government is scrambling for cover. hundreds of cool spaces including parks, gardens and public buildings had been marked out across the capital. temporary fountains and list makers set up to help people keep cool. they weather may be coming from the sahara, but it is not quite desert temperatures in france yet. paris is a balmy 33 degrees today, but it is expected to rise. some parts of france further
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south are predicted to reach 40 degrees tomorrow. it is notjust france that is affected. in the spanish capital madrid, temperatures could rise to 40 degrees. up to 42 in some parts of the country. rome is forecast to hit at least 36 degrees this week, but parts of northern italy are expected to top 40. the roman's famous fountains are still strictly for admiring. further north, the german capital by then it is expected to reach 37 degrees. even the zoo has emergency fountains in place. in france, teenagers had their national exams pushed back this week after the government said the heat was impossible for to bad commuters on the paris metro cannot plead the same. rather worried, i'm going to italy next week. rather worried, i'm
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going to italy next week. our weather presenter chris fawkes has a look now at how abnormal it is for europe to be hitting these high temperatures. as temperatures continue to surge across western europe it is a heatwave that is developing, the forecasters in france has described it as being unprecedented in intensity. no wonder why, temperature records are not only under threat, they are likely to be completely obliterated under the next three days. take nimes for example, the currentjune temperature record stands at 39 degrees. forecast later in the week sees temperatures going as high as 45 degrees. if we hit that 45 degrees mark, it would not only break nimes temperature record, but also a national temperature record for the whole of france. it is notjust france that is heating up. the heat is pretty widespread. temperatures are expected to reach around 44 celsius in spain, plenty hot enough but still some way of the national record here. we will see temperatures into the low 40s in parts of northern italy, not far behind that in germany. forecasters in france have noticed that the number of heatwaves that we are seeing is increasing
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with the expectation that we can see a doubling of the frequency of heatwaves in the year to 2050. such extreme conditions could become a little bit more common. iam i am looking at the temperatures we re i am looking at the temperatures were miami tomorrow, jane. the good news as it is a little bit cooler thanit news as it is a little bit cooler than it is today. tomorrow it is 33 degrees. it is all about the humidity, christian. i know this from bitter experience and stop there is a dry heat and there is a wet heat. florida has a wet heat which means when you sweat you never drive. italy has a dry heat, which is good, because it feels cooler. spare a thought for ted. ted is in the north of england and he has just
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at the stove on. there is no heat wave in the north of england. wrap up wave in the north of england. wrap up warm, ted.jane wave in the north of england. wrap up warm, ted. jane will send you a postcard from miami. this is beyond 100 days. still to come... a new law to protect people who have food allergies has been announced by the government. the legislation — which will require businesses to list all the ingredients in pre—packaged foods — is named after natasha ednan—laperouse, who died from an allergic reaction after eating a sandwich from pret a manger. daniela relph reports they are the last images of natasha. ona plane
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they are the last images of natasha. on a plane en route to france for her summer holiday. before the flight her summer holiday. before the flight landed she collapsed with a catastrophic allergic reaction. she died soon after. in their grief mum, dad and younger brother alex turned campaigners. urging the government to change the law around food labelling and they were heard. there will now be eight natasha's law. labelling and they were heard. there will now be eight natasha's lawm was never a given. we never take for granted that this would definitely happen. when it is law and politics just do not know how things will pan out. we feel, the keywords natasha's law, does mean we are potentially saving lives. it is a lot with natasha's name but is now about saving the millions of allergy sufferers. are lives are not intertwined with the people who have for allergies and for the rest of lies we will fight all the right causes, on the big, ambitious causes to make their lives a better, safer
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place. the teenager had it in a sandwich from pret a manger, the packaging did not say it contain sesame seeds. bigger companies have welcomed the change, there is a concern that smaller businesses will struggle to produce a detailed list of ingredients. in addition to natasha's law, there are also now be a charity named after her, but the ambitious aim of finding a cure for the most severe allergies. one day soon our cars will drive themselves. the technology is already there. intelligent cars that can recognise obstacles in the road and respond accordingly. that same technology is how being used in all manner of other fields, in surveillance and in medicine, where often there is little room for error.
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the trouble is the algorithims that power this technology aren't always right, they are not as good as humans at identifying things, and they can be erratic — computer scientists aren't sure why. and so new scientists have collected 6,000 photographs that artifical intelligence technology routinely gets wrong — to try and understand what is behind the mistakes. to humans it's obvious. but why do machines for instance mistake a squirrel for a sea lion? a window for a school bus? why would you mistake a fly for a pufferfish? or an alligator for a unicycle. doesn't exactly fill you with confidence, does it? let's speak now to the berkeley phd student behind the study — dan hendrycks — who joins us from mountain view, california.
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iam i am slightly alarmed, because we are increasingly reliant on this a! technology for what is going wrong? u nfortu nately technology for what is going wrong? unfortunately it is very unclear what is making them make the strange, erratic predictions. current a! systems are black boxes, so even when they are making correct decisions we do not have an idea of what is going on, why they are failing in the strangeways.” imagine asa failing in the strangeways.” imagine as a layman, that we underestimate the technology that is in our eyeballs and the connections between the eyeball and brain. that is something that right now as i just cannot replicate in artificial technology. such yes, but there is still somewhat competent. they will still somewhat competent. they will still be used in broad domains such as autonomous vehicles, drones and even medical imaging. so by looking at how visual systems are making these mistakes, we are revealing that tonnes of applications of ai have lots of these underlying
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fragility is. they are not paying enough attention to shape and things like that. that is one possible source for by their making is very strange decisions. currently we do not have much of an answer of how to resolve this failure bugs. but dan, isn't part of the thing about al is that it learns so given enough time will it just rectify that it learns so given enough time will itjust rectify itself? we have to guide how it large and right now they are learning the wrong things. the things that they are learning is fairly unpredictable and difficult for us to explain, so that makes it difficult to correct. what about technology? doesn't technology simply advance? are you could effect this, i think is the bottom line? we attempted to in this paper, but u nfortu nately attempted to in this paper, but unfortunately there is still significant room for improvement. we are short on solutions currently. but hopefully, hopefully with some
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greater interest in the failure and by characterising them, will be able to make more solid progress before they are deployed more widely in more safety critical settings. doesn't severely limit where logic can the use? because i am not filled with confidence was not if there is imaging going into my body to find my tonsils and it cannot distinguish an alligatorfrom my tonsils and it cannot distinguish an alligator from a unicycle, my tonsils and it cannot distinguish an alligatorfrom a unicycle, i am a little bit worried. yes, so, fortu nately little bit worried. yes, so, fortunately there are laws restricting some of their application, because they are not ready for prime time yet. so, we will need to make them more robust. but such an eight current a! systems have a long way to go before they are able to warrant art trust. dan, thank you very much. question, does not mean you should be about alexa? you they learn, they never learn. i ask every morning to put the radio on and she gets the wrong station. i
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do not know, there is a long to go. there is always time for an animal story. and tonight we are turning to the rescue dog from mexico who is retiring, after her heroics during the response to the earthquake in mexico in 2017. the golden labrador frida has taken part in 53 rescue operations across mexico, haiti, guatemala and ecuador. she has a particularly sensitive nose. she is credited with saving 12 people's lives. and to thank her the mexican navy canine unit held a ceremony on monday to honour her. there were few greater symbols of hope during a mexico earthquake of 2017 than fidel. clad in her protective eye mask she went from building to building in the aftermath of the terrible disaster
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looking for survivors and often finding them, too. in 53 mission she has helped locate 12 people alive under the rubble to be exact. not just in mexico, she travelled to haiti in 2010, guatemala in 2012 and ecuador in 2016. however, now the time has come for her to hang up the goggles and the flakjacket time has come for her to hang up the goggles and the flak jacket and time has come for her to hang up the goggles and the flakjacket and nor unable or two goggles and the flakjacket and nor unable ortwo in goggles and the flakjacket and nor unable or two in peace, instead. a ceremony in mexican setting her uniform is removed and replaced with a tree toy. for many, she represented an indefatigable spirit in the country that people going when the news kept getting worse. she is yet to confirm the plans for her retirement, but it is believed she may move to the countryside. he could not replace ai. i am not sure any dog every retires its nose? that is that from us. jane willjoin
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us that is that from us. jane willjoin us live from miami tomorrow. see you tomorrow. thank you for watching, by by. conditions are gradually turning drier across parts of the country after the rain starts to fizzle out. we have got building in from the north—west, which is why things of the settling down. it will also be bringing slightly fresher, less humid airto ourshores bringing slightly fresher, less humid air to our shores as we head through the course of wednesday. that trier, cooler air arriving across in from the north—west, which is why things of the settling down. it will also be bringing slightly fresher, less humid air to our shores as we head through the course of wednesday. that trier, cooler air arriving across and with this couege arriving across and with this college night. further south we hold onto the cloud, so misty and murky in places, too. here it'll be quite muddy. england and wales. the best
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of the sunshine across scotland and northern ireland and a lighter into northern england. which is a little to brightness developing across the south, temperatures lower than they have been of late. 22 a may brightness developing across the south, temperatures lower than they have been of late. 22 or maybe 22 degrees, there. cooler along the east coast. on into thursday then, high pressure still with us. but we was a bit of a squeeze on the ice about across the south. that means will pick—up a strong initially went. lots of sunshine across the uk, as you can see the little bit of miller across the eastern because areas where it will still be cool. head further west, a bit warmer with more censure around. we could see 2425 degrees, quite warm in scottish central belt. across into europe and we have this blistering heat wave throughout this week. record—breaking temperatures likely across part of france. it does look like we'll be tapping into that heat once again as we enter the week as high—pressure move to the east,
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draws up this air from the south right across the uk. it is going to be very hot, potentially the hottest day of the year to far across other parts of the uk. that breeze coming from the south. tremendous heat into many areas, millie across western areas. we still hasn't cooler air across north sea coast. further west to be could mate 20. until saturday, we can see the low 30s with high humidity, it will feel unbearable. but then it cools dinosaur head into sunday. —— it cools down
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. in the race to be prime minister jeremy hunt warns that without trust there'd be no negotiations, no deal, and maybe no brexit. thejudgement is, who is the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and bring back that deal? it's about the personality of our prime minister. no more rows, all quiet. meanwhile boris johnson tries to put questions about his private life behind him, elaborating on his pastimes instead. i make buses. i paint the passengers enjoying themselves on the wonderful
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bus.

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