Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 25, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. in the race to be prime minister jeremy hunt warns that without trust there'd be no negotiations, no deal, and maybe no brexit. thejudgement is, who is the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and bring back that deal? it's about the personality of our prime minister. no more rows, all quiet. meanwhile boris johnson tries to put questions about his private life behind him, elaborating on his pastimes instead. i make buses. i paint the passengers enjoying themselves on the wonderful bus.
8:01 pm
sourthern water is ordered to pay a record £126 million in fines and customer rebates, over what regulators call "shocking" failings. natasha's law the 15—year—old who died after eating a pret a manger sandwich now businesses will have to list all ingredients from 2021. more than a0 degrees temporary fountains, mist machines and free water europe prepares for a recording breaking heatwave. and england's hopes of making the world cup semi finals hang in the balance after a demoralising defeat by australia at lord's.
8:02 pm
the conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt says party members should choose a candidate they can trust. in an interview with the bbc the foreign secretary said the personality of the prime minister is all important and without trust, there'd be no negotiation, no deal, and possibly a general election and no brexit. his warning came as his rival borisjohnson continued to face questions about his private life today. our political correspondent ben wright is at westminster. we've been hearing a lot more from him about how he can take on boris johnson. the tempo seems to be increasing in this leadership contest now as drilling down into i think the two biggest issues which are character and break that. boris johnson has continued to face questions about his personal life and tried to throw the gauntlet down tojeremy and tried to throw the gauntlet down to jeremy hunt by and tried to throw the gauntlet down tojeremy hunt by asking him to say
8:03 pm
whether or not he would definitely be taking britain out of the eu on october 21. something he would do if he does become prime minister. today my colic has been speaking at some length to jeremy hunt, my colic has been speaking at some length tojeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, and began by asking him what he would do on day one and number ten. to take britain out of the eu and renegotiate the deal. well, we have to approach this differently. it's the biggest constitutional crisis that i can rememberso constitutional crisis that i can remember so what constitutional crisis that i can rememberso whati constitutional crisis that i can remember so what i do differently to what we have had before is i would have the dup in my negotiating team and have the erg who are the brexit purists, i would and have the erg who are the brexit purists, iwould have and have the erg who are the brexit purists, i would have scottish and welsh conservatives because fundamentally i believe there is a deal to be done. what would be different about the deal you hope to achieve? it would be changing the backstop with some guarantees that have a hard border on the island forked by the obvious reasons. it
8:04 pm
will be a technology lead solution. you are putting forward, just as borisjohnson you are putting forward, just as boris johnson told you are putting forward, just as borisjohnson told us yesterday something that the european union has said no to. on multiple occasions. what they say is that is up occasions. what they say is that is up to you the uk to come up with a solution but if you come up with a different solution something that can work that we will look at the whole package. it would be a technology lead solution. everyone thinks that within the next decade we are not going to have big border checks when it comes to goods because we are going to do all of these things online just as the rest of our lives transformed. you will have a deal unless there is a backstop. unless there is a credible idea readily immediately. and you are talking about within a decade. idea readily immediately. and you are talking about within a decadelj think it is ready, but of course the eu have not wanted to accept this kind of solution because their hope is that we might stay in this thing called the customs union where we have to stick to their tariffs. i
8:05 pm
think they know now they want to get through parliament. you're suggesting the eu did not listen to more creative ideas for the backstop because they wanted to keep us closer. this is a negotiation and they're going to negotiate what is, for them, the best outcome. the reality is that we ended up with the night dia that is likely to get through parliament. when i touch people in the eu they understand that and are keen to see if there is a way through this. listening to you talk about your brexit plans is similarto talk about your brexit plans is similar to talking to boris johnson. high on ambition and low on concrete detail. i've been very clear on the detail, we have been talking about the fact that... you're clear about you what you would like to do but it isa you what you would like to do but it is a wish. what is the evidence you could get this done? that's the starting point for any deal. it's different to what theresa may was negotiating. the answer to your question is both boris and i want to
8:06 pm
change that deal and the judgement is who is the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and bring back that deal? it's about the personality of our prime minister. if you choose someone where there is i'io if you choose someone where there is no trust or no negotiation, no deal... you don't trust boris johnson. you don't think he is trustworthy as prime minister?” don't make those comments as a fellow. i would serve borisjohnson to the very best of my abilities. you have just sat there in a race of two people and said this is about who we can trust, someone we can trust like me or someone we cannot trust. you are clearly talking about your opponent in this race. no, i am saying i am trustworthy. do you worry in this contest you might be somehow unfairly squeezed out by someone somehow unfairly squeezed out by someone with a bigger personality than you ? someone with a bigger personality than you? laura, i've been waiting for this moment for 30 years of my
8:07 pm
life. i have been sitting around that cabinet table thinking howl wa nt that cabinet table thinking howl want to transform our country. see you wanted to be a prime minister for 30 years, when did you know?” think if i say that it will put people off. 30 years is a very long time and this is britain. i would love to do this job. he would love to do thejob, ben, but his brexit plan commit we heard laura questioning him about it there, it does still rely on somehow changing the withdrawal agreement which the eu have said they won't do, getting rid of the backstop again, something the eu has ruled out. it's good to be very difficult indeed for him to try to get those sorts of changes and he, like borisjohnson, how has not ruled out a new deal brexit. that is completely true. all of the problems that theresa may is leaving
8:08 pm
behind, the incoming prime minister will inherit. a deal that has been rejected several times by the parliament, primarily because of the backstop, that's of course why dozens backstop, that's of course why d oze ns of backstop, that's of course why dozens of tory mps keep putting this down, but a backstop that the eu insists must be in the withdrawal agreement and theresa may, and the attorney general and others have spent months trying to persuade the eu to concede that there could be some technical solutions that would mean that the backstop was not needed or could be time—limited. every time the argument has been made to the eu has said we don't believe you, we need to have the backstop in the deal and yet, as you say both jeremy hunt backstop in the deal and yet, as you say bothjeremy hunt and boris johnson claiming that in a very short amount of time, we are talking september into october before the deadline of october 31 they can persuade the eu to do something with theresa may that she failed to do which is —— the backstop. and it's very little clarity from either candidate but how they plan to do that. beyond talking about technical solutions which we have been
8:09 pm
discussing for months. as a difference when it comes to that final deadline and jeremy hunt today said october 31 was a fake deadline, he does not want to box himself into it and he argues that if the new prime minister decides deal or no deal they are going on october the sist deal they are going on october the 31st his argument is that parliament would intervene to block that no—deal brexit triggering a general election and jeremy hunt is clearly implying the tories could lose and jeremy corbyn would be in number ten. his emphasis is quite different around october 31 and he said today if he does not feel at some point that he could get a deal by october 31 he will decide early on in his time and start to put in place preparations for a no—deal brexit. the audience here is a tory grassroots and all of the polling suggests that the hundred and 60,000 tory party members many of them have no fear about a no deal at all. i think the majority are enthusiastic about it and that's the audience the
8:10 pm
two men are appealing to. and jeremy hunt there was not going to get into all of those questions about boris johnson public—private life. all of those questions about boris johnson public-private life. but his tea m johnson public-private life. but his team must be privately delighted that since the news emerged of that i’ow that since the news emerged of that row that boris johnson had that since the news emerged of that row that borisjohnson had with his girlfriend which reese recorded, the difference between the two, the gap between the candidates is narrowing. yeah, and the tone in the papers, if it's boris johnson's yeah, and the tone in the papers, if it's borisjohnson's supporting papers has turned a bit in the last couple of days. more sceptical and questions to answer they say. questioning his character once again and the assignments row which was recorded at we have been recording a number of days just rolls along. but jeremy pulled his punches despite the invitation saying you cannot trust boris johnson, the invitation saying you cannot trust borisjohnson, he did raise the trust question very clearly and
8:11 pm
very deliberately. that is where he feels there is good mileage to be made, contrasting his car while i think he would concede to be fairly managerial and not particularly exciting personality which the firework is borisjohnson in that is where he wants to be at the moment. many thanks for the latest from westminster. you can see the full version of laura kuenssberg's interview with jeremy hunt later this hour, here on the news channel. meanwhile his rival, borisjohnson, has been taking part in a series of broadcast interviews and public appearances just a day he was labelled a "coward" for not taking part in a tv debate. mrjohnson has refused to elaborate on why police were called to the home he shares with his girlfriend last week. but he has been giving more details about his favourite pastimes as our chief political correspondent vicki young reports. i don't suppose you're members of the conservative party, are you? back on the campaign trail, back in front of the cameras. are you a member of the conservative party? borisjohnson's been accused
8:12 pm
of hiding away to avoid scrutiny. good luck. thank you very much. thank you. i think i'm going to need it. but after a difficult few days he is doing what his team thinks he does best. working a crowd. mrjohnson, why do you think the eu will do what you want them to? because i think that there's a massive opportunity now to get this thing done, put it to bed and allow the country to move forward. but you need good will from them, don't you? and i think there's going to be good will on both sides. it's been 2a hours of interview, speeches and visits, mrjohnson told the bbc yesterday that the uk would leave the eu at the end of october, with or without a deal, and he'd keep back the £39 billion divorce payment. so that's a state secret? today he was still fending off questions about his private life. he's been accused of staging this photo with his girlfriend after neighbours reported shouting and screaming from their flat and called the police. so when was it taken? it's not a state secret,
8:13 pm
itjust happens to be something i don't want to get into. you won't even tell me when the picture was taken? no, why should i? mrjohnson's convinced that the public don't care about the details of his personal life, although it obviously hasn't passed them by completely. we thought you were the best from the word go. fantastic. we hope so, any how. just don't have any more rows. no more rows, no, no, no, all quiet. thank you. borisjohnson's happy enough out and about in true blue tory surrey, but he is still refusing to do a head—to—head televised debate tonight with his rivaljeremy hunt, and there will be many more difficult questions in the weeks ahead. you do like a certain amount of fat in the sausages. what would his priorities be as prime minister? today brought several spending pledges. more cash for schools, police and roads. not much detail on how to pay for it, though. and some questions have produced unexpected answers. how does mrjohnson relax? i make buses.
8:14 pm
you make models of buses? i make models of buses. you're making cardboard buses. that is what you do to enjoy yourself. no, i paint the passengers enjoying themselves. is he being serious? often it's hard to tell. vicki young, bbc news, surrey. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 and 11:30 this evening in the papers our guests joining me tonight are sebastian payne, the whitehall correspondent for the ft and kate proctor, political reporter for the evening standard. southern water has been ordered to pay £126 million in fines and customer rebates because of spills of waste water from some of its sewage treatment sites. the regulator, ofwat, said the company had shown scant regard for the environment and had also deliberately misreported its performance. emma simpson has more.
8:15 pm
cleaning and treating sewage, it's a vitaljob. this is southern water's new state—of—the—art plant but today's report finds serious problems at a host of other smaller sites. there was a lack of investment and equipment failures but more damning, it deliberately misreported data. examples of waste water were manipulated over seven years to present a false picture of compliance. the regulator said it led to unpermitted and premature spills of waste water into the environment. this is absolutely the biggest penalty, proportion of turnover, that we have ever levied on a company. the fine would have been higher had the company not agreed that what they had done was shocking and needed to be changed. the new boss of southern water said...
8:16 pm
southern water has more than 4 million customers from here on the sussex coast to kent and all the way to the isle of wight, and each of them should now get a £61 rebate on their bills spread over the next five years as part of a record penalty by the regulator. campaigners say customers need answers. southern water have been damaging the environment for seven years and not only that, they have been covering it up and lying about their performance. this isn'tjust a one—off, this is a systemic issue across the company. southern water says it is a different business today but its troubles may not be over yet. the environment agency says it is pursuing a criminal investigation on the impact
8:17 pm
of the waste water spillages. emma simpson, bbc news. and the race to be prime minister jeremy hunt warns that without trust there would be no negotiations, no deal and maybe no brexit. southern water is ordered to pay a record £126 million in fines and customer rebates over what regulators call shocking failings. the parents of a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to sesame seeds in a ba g u ette reaction to sesame seeds in a baguette have welcomed a new labelling law. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre let's join holly. news of disappointment in the big class for england against australia. i am to bring europe bad news. england public holds the region semi finals of the cricket world cup have the balance that was
8:18 pm
following a demoralising defeat to australia and lords earlier. the captain are made 100 after england decided to field first. australia scored 285 and england were soon in trouble. james vince went second bowl and they find themselves 26 for three. there was ben stoke city and who gave them a little bit of hope while england were heading for a damaging loss. though the side was eventually all out for 221 losing by 64 runs. and that result means england might need to win their last two games against the tournament's only two unbeaten teams, both india and new zealand to guarantee qualification. there are currently fourth in the table after that defeat with the top four teams resting of course. they can still be overta ken resting of course. they can still be ove rta ke n by resting of course. they can still be overtaken by bangladesh, sri lanka and pakistan. but better news for australia fans very first team to book a place in the semi finals.
8:19 pm
o nto book a place in the semi finals. onto the women's world cup in italy are the latest team to qualify for the quarter finals after beating china 2—0. valentina had a goal disallowed early on but this one after 14 minutes to accounted up at the italians in front. they doubled their lead with this long—range effort from the second half. based on the first time in 28 years that italy have made it to the last eight. and italy will meet the netherlands against japan. these two sides have met before in the world cup and it is the netherlands here taking the lead. the european champions currently leading 1—0 after 16 minutes approaching 20 minutes into that game. you can watch this game on bbc four on the iplayer and the bbc sport website and on the app. staying with
8:20 pm
football and have been granted permission to speak to lampard about the vacant manager job. permission to speak to lampard about the vacant managerjob. the derby bosses the favourite to replace maurizio who left her to cover you vent us earlier this month. and lampard are only a part of his first foray into management last season leading the ramps to the championship playoff final but they lost to aston villa. his former manchester city team—mate vincent company has backed him to do well at sta mford company has backed him to do well at stamford bridge. do i know what the impact is of him on a team, and i'm trying to have the same impact want to come now as a older player. in terms of his intelligence he is up there with the most intelligent footballers, and the match is natural as well. my completely support him here. to the andy murray has fallen to his first defeat on the nature of international and
8:21 pm
eastbourne. murray and his brazilian partner lost 6—2, 6—4. murray struggled on his serve being broken three times out of four. better news in the women's singles forjoe anaconda. she will pay the tunisian on the next round and there also wins the men's draw from britain's dan evans. now the sport of break dancing has been formally accepted as part of the olympic games. irc members voted unanimously at their annual meeting to include it at the paris games in 2024. a final decision will be taken by the organisation ruling executive board at the end of next year and it's not to be highly unlikely and also skateboarding, surfing and climbing have also been approved although they are already part of the tokyo 2020 games. all the sport for now i
8:22 pm
will more for you and i'll have more for you in sports day. a new law to protect people who have food allergies has been announced by the government. it's called natasha's law and it's named after natasha ednan laperouse, the teenager from london who died from an allergic reaction after eating a sandwich from pret a manger. it means that from 2021 businesses in england, wales and northern ireland will have to list all the ingredients in pre packaged foods to try to ensure that people who have food allergies are fully protected when they buy it. natasha's parents say it's a fitting legacy for their daughter's life. daniela relph reports they are the last images of natasha. on a plane, en route to france, for her summer holiday, but before the flight landed she collapsed with a catastrophic allergic reaction. she died soon after. in theirgrief, mum, dad and her younger brother alex turned campaigners,
8:23 pm
urging the government to change the law around food labelling, and they were heard. there will now be a natasha's law. it was never a given and we never took for granted that this would definitely happen. when it is law and politics you don't know how things are going to pan out but we feel the two words natasha's law does actually mean that we are potentially saving lives. it is a law which has natasha's name but is now about safeguarding the millions of allergy sufferers. our lives are now basically intertwined with all the people who have had allergies in this country, food allergies, and for the rest of our lives we will fight all the right causes, all the big, ambitious causes, to make their lives a better and safer place. the teenager had eating a sandwich she bought from pret—a—manger. the packaging did not say it included sesame seeds, the ingredient which caused her collapse. natasha's law will be introduced this summer and will be mandatory by 2021.
8:24 pm
the big food companies have welcomed the change but there is concern that some smaller businesses will struggle to produce a detailed list of ingredients. natasha's parents have had some high—profile support. by coincidence, sarah duchess of york was on board the flight were natasha's body was repatriated. she has supported the family's fight for a change in the law. we know that natasha is up there saying, yeah, well done, go for it, you know. you got my voice heard. and of course, she would be thrilled with the day because she was very strong and had a great voice on her and natasha's law has been announced today and it is a breakthrough. in addition to natasha's law, there will also now be a charity named after her with the ambitious aim of finding a cure for the most severe allergies. daniela relph, bbc news, west london. the bosses of itv‘sjeremy kyle show
8:25 pm
have been criticised by a committee of mps for putting guests through lie detector tests without knowing how accurate those tests we re calling it "irresponsible" and "astonishing". mps launched an inquiry after the jeremy kyle show was axed in may following the death of one of its guests. our media editor amol rajan reports. the jeremy kyle show was today described by its bosses as conflict resolution. critics say it was all conflict and no resolution. ...is a horrible person. the show is no more. steve diamond was found dead in his flatjust a few days after appearing on an episode which was never broadcast. he had failed a lie detector test, one of the pillars of the show. i was telling the truth. the test says you're a liar. executives responsible for the show admitted today they did not know how accurate the tests were. you can't define what a high level of accuracy is? not 100%, but 50% is not 100%?
8:26 pm
i'm not a lie detector expert, so what we would do is... no, but you are responsible for this programme. we have now cancelled the show as you know and i will say that we will not commission show in the future in this way in this format using lie detectors, for the very reason you have just highlighted, which is the ranges... it depends on who you talk to... i find your answer slightly puzzling, because on the one hand you say they have done nothing wrong, but on the other hand you are saying we are never going to do that again. itv say the jeremy kyle show served a proper duty of care and helped hundreds of people and was loved by many thousands more. but the radical implication of their decision to end the show is that even for a commercial broadcaster mere popularity is never enough. what i would say, if anyone raises an issue or concern or a complaint that is not resolved satisfactorily, they are referred to ofcom. that is not what bob gregory, a former guest, says. he was expecting to meet his son for the first time but says
8:27 pm
he was treated with contempt. countless times i complain to them about the whole show and the aspect... the way i was introduced, there was a banner at the bottom of the show, which was completely wrong, everything, and their after—care was absolutely nil. it did not exist. never once was i told to contact ofcom, never once. it remains unclear how this will affect other shows. love island is a huge hit for itv with a massive following amongst younger viewers. it had over five times as many smartphone users last week as its nearest rival. in a culture where everything is on display all broadcasters are reassessing their duty of care. amol rajan, bbc news. the senior police officer in charge during the hillsborough disaster in 1989 is to face a retrial. david duckenfield who was the match commander is accused of gross
8:28 pm
negligence manslaughter in relation to the deaths of 95 liverpool football fans. he denies the charge. a jury was unable to reach a verdict in april. man has gone on trial at the old bailey accused of murdering a passenger on board a train in january this year. he is accused of repeatedly stabbing lee pomeroy who was travelling with his 14—year—old son on the guilford chilled london service. his girlfriend, chelsea mitchell, who is on bail is accused of assisting an offender which she denies. france's briefing itself or a heat wave with temperatures expected to reach 40 celsius in some places by the end of the week. the government has designated almost 1000 cool spaces around paris and in 2003 around 15,000 people died during
8:29 pm
extreme temperatures in france and many of them isolated elderly citizens. from the capital, here is lucy williamson. amongst the visitors to paris this week, one has come straight from the sahara, a blast of summer heat that has sent temperatures into the 30s and the government scrambling for cover. hundreds of cool spaces including parks, gardens and public buildings have been marked out across the capital, and temporary fountains and mist makers have been set up to help people keep cool. the weather may be coming from the sahara, but it is not quite desert temperatures in france yet. paris is a balmy 33 degrees today but it is expected to rise, and some parts of france further south are predicted to reach 40 degrees tomorrow. it is notjust france that is affected. in the spanish capital madrid temperatures could rise to 40 degrees, and up to 42 in some parts of the country. the warning from one meteorologist
8:30 pm
is that hell is coming. rome is forecast to hit at least 36 degrees, while parts of northern italy are expected to top 40. though rome's famous fountains are still strictly for admiring. further north of the german capital berlin is expected to reach 37 degrees. even the zoo has emergency fountains in place. it is all caused by the jet stream which has got stuck. we are getting hot air from north africa so it is the combination of hot air from africa and light winds which are set to see temperatures surge. in france teenagers had their national exams pushed back this week, after the government said the heat was impossible. too bad commuters on the paris metro cannot plead the same. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. not quite as hot as that here at
8:31 pm
home. we will have all the details. high—pressure building in from the north of the country tonight and into wednesday. which means that things will settle down and we will lose this rain it will begin to fizzle away leaving a legacy of cloud. one or two spots of drizzle around tonight through central areas by clearer, slightly cooler weather moving into the north and single figure values here for the south. fairly muggy to start a wednesday morning and there will still be quite a lot of clout through the morning across england and wales and quite low with the misty and murkiness to. skull in northern ireland and late in northern england and top temperatures around this with north sea coast. increased amount of sunshine in search of taffeta the heat and will be hotter again. marie could be seen to be just reach the low 30s celsius across the south. that is i was
8:32 pm
looking for now.
8:33 pm
hello this is bbc news with carol walker. the headlines. in the race to be prime minister — jeremy hunt warns that without trust there'd be no negotiations, no deal, and maybe no brexit. thejudgement is, who is the person we trust as prime minister, to go to brussels and bring back that deal. it's about the personality of our prime minister. borisjohnson makes a series of media and public appearances and promises that brexit will happen on the october 31 deadline ‘do or die'. sourthern water is ordered to pay a record 126 million pounds in fines and customer rebates, over what regulators call "shocking" failings. the hillsborough match
8:34 pm
commander david duckenfield will face a retrial over the deaths of 95 liverpool fans. the parents of a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to sesame seeds in a baguette, have welcomed a new labelling law that will be introduced. morneau on the conservative leadership candidate, jeremy hunt, who says party member should choose a candidate they can trust, in an interview with the bbc, the foreign secretary said the personality of the prime minister is all important, and without trust, there would be no negotiation, no deal, and possibly a general election, and no brexit. we have to approach this differently. it's the biggest constitutional crisis that i can remember. and the key is to put together and negotiating team for
8:35 pm
brexit, that will demonstrate to that you that we can deliver parliament. so what i do different lead to what we've had before, is i would have the dup in my negotiating team, i would have the erg, the brexit purists, i would have scottish and welsh conservatives, because fundamentally, i believe there is a deal to be done. when i talk to european leaders, this is doable, but we have to take the right approach, and one of the reasons that they stopped talking to us reasons that they stopped talking to us before was because they didn't think that the british government could deliver the british parliament, and that's what we need to change. how would you bring those people together? canada negotiating tea m people together? canada negotiating team function? would you have people who fundamentally disagree with each other and cited ? while this is the big difference between the way i want to handle it, and the way we've handled it before, because yes, i think there is a deal that's can unite all wings of the conservative party, and ourfriends in the dup. but it's got to be different to theresa may's deal, and
8:36 pm
we can't put forward a deal to brussels, unless they absolutely know that it can get through the british parliament. what would be different from the deal you hope to achieve? it would be changing the backstop, but with some guarantees that we are not going to have a hard border on the island of ireland for completely obvious reasons. that approach is not too different to what boris wa nts, not too different to what boris wants, i think it will be a technology lead solution. but we've had a lot of discussion about how. we need to have more discussion about who. who is the person that we trust to send to brussels on behalf of the british people, and come back with a deal? that has to be someone that they trust, that they are prepared to talk to, because in the end, you don't do a deal with someone you don't trust, it has to be someone who isn't going to blink, who is prepared to walk away if we don't get what we need, and i'm prepared to do absolutely bouts, but i don't want us to lose hope. there isa i don't want us to lose hope. there is a deal to be done, we'vejust got to make sure that we send the right person to get it. but it is also
8:37 pm
about how you would do it. you are putting forward, just as boris johnson told us yesterday, something that the european has said no to, and multiple locations. it's what theresa may tried and failed to do many times. well what's theresa may tried to do was a deal involving the backstop, which was something that i was in cabinet at the time, and i supported her loyalty, but i never thought that was the right approach, and what i'm talking about is a deal that does not involve the backstop as it's constituted at the moment. so it would be different, and when i talked to european leaders, what they say is look, it's up to the uk to come up with a solution, but of course if you come up with a different solution, something that can work, then we will look at the whole package. but what would it be? it would be a technology lead solution. i think everyone thinks that within the next decade, we are not going to have big border checks when it comes to goods, because we will do all of these things online, just like the rest of our lives has
8:38 pm
transformed, and the discussion is what you do if there is a disagreement about what technology can do and, so you need some mechanisms that resolve those disputes. what happens before than? because for three years, people have been talking about potential technological solutions to the border, and nobody has come up with anything that is convincing at this moment. and that's why the eu always been crystal—clear, you won't have a deal, unless there is a backstop, u nless deal, unless there is a backstop, unless there is a credible idea ready immediately. and you are not saying it's ready immediately, you are talking about within a decade. i think it is ready. now? yes, ido, but i think it is ready. now? yes, i do, but that you have not wa nted yes, i do, but that you have not wanted to except this kind of solution, because their hope was that we might stay in this thing called the customs union, where we have to stick to their tariffs, but i think they know now that won't get through parliament. so what i'm saying is let's not be negative, let's not be pessimistic. there is a way that we can do this, but what we have to do is send the right prime minister to brussels to have those
8:39 pm
negotiations, have those open discussions, and then i think there isa discussions, and then i think there is a deal to be done. you are saying that you did not want to accept this idea, because they wanted to keep us in the institution, one of the institutions of the european union, that's your contention?” institutions of the european union, that's your contention? i think they've always wanted us to remain as close as possible to the eeo, but it's very clear that what the people voted for in the general election that we had two years ago was for us to leave the customs union, leave the single markets, and any... what you are suggesting foreign secretary, is somehow that you did not listen to more creative ideas for the backstop, because they wa nted for the backstop, because they wanted to keep us closer? this is a negotiation, and they're obviously going to negotiate for what is for them the best outcome, but the reality is that we ended up with a deal that is not quite to get through parliament, and i think that when i talk to people in the eu, they are keen to see if there is a way through this, and i think the choice for us at this very critical moment is, do we send someone that
8:40 pm
can negotiate, and i'm an entrepreneur by background, i've done negotiations all my life, inside government, and outside governments, and i think there is a deal to be done, but i'm not going to pretend that it's easy, and really it's about taking a smart approach. yesterday i was at the board of bristol, and i was asking the managing director there, what is the managing director there, what is the art of negotiation? and he said to me, you've got to understand what the other side really wants, you have got to have a connection with them, but you've also got to be prepared to be very, very tough. that's what i would be. but why would eu leaders want to trust you on this, when one of the first things he did at foreign secretary was offended half of europe by comparing the eu to the soviet union? laura, i am not afraid to speak uncomfortable truths to our partners in the eu. a point i made in that speech was that it was totally inappropriate for an organisation that was set up to defend freedom, to make it impossible for a member to leave. and you know, i will say tough things when i need to say tough
8:41 pm
things, but i will also preserve the relationship, i think i've also shown as foreign secretary that i can have good links with european countries, and that's why i'm the right person to deliver brexit. and how long would you keep trying to get a deal before you decide to walk away? so unlike borisjohnson, you are willing to go beyond the october 31 deadline, but for how long would you keep trying to get a deal, before you say ok, this is impossible, time to go for no deal. well i think that 31st of october come hell or high water dead mind is a fake deadline, because it's more likely to trick us into a general election before we've delivered exits, and that would have the keys of number ten to jeremy exits, and that would have the keys of number ten tojeremy corbyn, and then we would have no brexit at all. but in my case, how would i approach this? i think we will know very soon, well before the 31st of october if there is a deal to be done, along the basis that i've sets, and if there isn't, and if no deal is still on the table, i will have been very clear, i will leave
8:42 pm
the european union without a deal. but i'm not going to do that if there's a prospect of a better deal, and ifi there's a prospect of a better deal, and if i did it, it would be with a heavy heart, because businesses up and down the country would face a lot of disruption. i think it would be bad for the union with scotland, where i was at the weekend, so i would do it though, but as a last resort. but what you're saying though, is you would make a decision before october the 31st on whether to leave without deal? that's correct, and i'm very clear that if we have not got the prospect of a deal that can get through parliament by that date, then that is the option i would choose. into a defined that, you ? option i would choose. into a defined that, you? studying at number ten, you will make a decision? i will make a judgement, but i think everyone will know at that stage, and the question is who is the person that we are going to send to brussels who can bring back that deal that has a chance of getting through parliament, and i really believe i could. what is the evidence so that you could, i mean listening to you talking about your brexit plans is very similar to talking to boris johnson brexit plans is very similar to talking to borisjohnson about his brexit plans, high on ambition, low
8:43 pm
on concrete detail. i've been very clear on the concrete detail, we have just been talking about the fa ct have just been talking about the fact that... you have talked about what you would like to do, but it's a wish. what is the evidence you could get this done? that is the starting point for any deal, you have got to be absolutely clear about what you want, and it's different to what theresa may was negotiating, but the answer to your question is that both boris and i wa nt to question is that both boris and i want to change that deal. into the judgement is, who is the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and have that deal? it's about the personality of our prime minister, if you choose someone, where there is no trust, where there is no negotiation, no deal, and quite possibly a general election, which means we could have no brexit either, if you choose someone that the other side will talk to, who will be very tough, and at least be a negotiation, and i believe there isa a negotiation, and i believe there is a deal to be done. and you don't trust boris johnson? is a deal to be done. and you don't trust borisjohnson? you don't think
8:44 pm
he is trustworthy as prime minister? i would never make those comments about a fellow candidate, i would serve borisjohnson. about a fellow candidate, i would serve boris johnson. no, about a fellow candidate, i would serve borisjohnson. no, no, let me finish. i would serve borisjohnson to the very best of my ability, and make his prime ministers ship a success , make his prime ministers ship a success, and i hope he would do the same to me. you've just sat there in a race of two and said this is about who we can trust, someone we can trust, like me, orsomeone who we can trust, someone we can trust, like me, or someone we can't trust. you are clearly talking about your opponent in this race, and saying he is not trustworthy enough to become our prime minister. no. iam to become our prime minister. no. i am saying i am trustworthy, andi no. i am saying i am trustworthy, and i do believe that i can be trusted to deliver this deal, and i've got a background as an on—chip newer, as a negotiator, as someone who has done very big complex negotiations like getting the extra £20 billion for the nhs, which i did when i was health secretary, but also throughout my life. so i think ican also throughout my life. so i think i can deliver that, but obviously, members of the conservative party need to make their choice as to who is most likely to come back with
8:45 pm
that deal. people are also interested in talking but what else you might do if you are lucky enough to win this race. why would you cut corporation tax as soon as you come into office? we already have one of the lowest business tax rates in the whole of the developed world. is that the right priority? let me tell you the answer to that. i want to cut taxes on ordinary people. so that people can take more money home at the end of the month. i think there are still people who find it incredible difficult to pay the rent. and i want to help them out. but also having health secretary —— being health secretary, i am passionate about changing the social ca re system, passionate about changing the social care system, so we treat every older person with dignity and respect, and i also want to transform the education system, so that we abolish illiteracy. that is a big shopping list, and the only way that you can afford all of those things is to fire up the british economy. i want to help thousands more young people set up their businesses. let me just give you this one example, laura, we are growing at one and a half percent per year at the moment. if
8:46 pm
we we re percent per year at the moment. if we were growing up 3% to year, which is the american growth rate, we would have an extra £20 billion to spend on public services, or tax cuts, and all conservatives want to do, both of those things, and that's why my first focus is to really grow the economy. and if we leave with no deal, there will be a hole in the british economy, there may be no growth at all, you want to make that corporation tax cuts, that will probably be about £13 billion, you wa nt to probably be about £13 billion, you want to spend an extra 15 billion on defence, you probably be about more money on carry to back caring for the elderly, where will you get all that cash from? would you borrow more than philip hammond has as chancellor? no. i will follow a physical rule thatis no. i will follow a physical rule that is that debt will continue will continue to fall as proportionate with gdp over the cycle. and we have costed these commitments very carefully indeed. but let me say this, if you have someone who is an entrepreneur by background, who passionately wants to grow our economy, and i think with our top
8:47 pm
universities, with more text... tech sta rtu ps, universities, with more text... tech startups, as a tech entrepreneur, we could be the world's next silicon valley, and if we did that, we would have the money to put into fantastic public services. but you are talking about and if, while making promises to spend tens of billions of pounds worth of the country's money on public services. now as you say, every politician would want to do that. the commitment i've made is to cut corporation tax, two irish levels, 12 and a half percent. and when they made that move a number of years ago, there gdp per per head was lower than ours, now it's nearly 50% higher than ours, so this is the way that we fire up the economy, we create the jobs, we get money for our precious public services, like the nhs, transform our social care system, and find tax cuts, but there is no magic about this. if you don't create the wealth, you can spend it. while exactly, there's no magic about it. and because of that, that would be why some people, perhaps
8:48 pm
including the chancellor, who is trained to get you in borisjohnson to sign up to a commitments, not to be in profits, but there is no magic, you can't spray around spending promises. what is the evidence for what i'm saying? the evidence is that in 2010, we took some very difficult decisions to put the economy back on its feet. we have created since then a 1000 jobs for every single day that we have been in office, and then towards the end of that period, i was able to get an extra £20 billion for the nhs, the biggest ever increase for the nhs, so if you do this with the sensible conservative way, if you create the wealth, and that's what i want to do, then you can spend money on those vital public services. you talk very proudly by your record in the nhs, but it was not quite as straightforward as you suggest. i mean the three biggest targets that really matter to people on a any mac, hospital payments, those targets under your tenure have not been met since 2015, that matters,
8:49 pm
doesn't it? well laura, when i arrived at the nhs, i met a young dad who lost his son, a week old, because of a mistake made by the nhs. let me finish the story, because it's important. i want to a nswer because it's important. i want to answer your question. and as a result of that, he had to write over 400 letters before the nhs told him what had gone wrong. the nhs doesn't imaginejob, buti what had gone wrong. the nhs doesn't imaginejob, but i said i want to make the nhs saver. and by the end, nearly 3 million more patients were using good or outstanding hospitals. your commitment to the health service while you are there, but under those three big targets, for example, peoples experience of what they were getting got worse. targets we re they were getting got worse. targets were missed, there are now tens of thousands of nursing shortages, for example, there are problems in the creaking health service. that's come from the time that you were in charge. let me address those. every single disease category, whether cancer, stroke, heart attack, any other category, the outcomes were better
8:50 pm
when i left the health service, compared to when i arrived. at the targets you talked about, were because of the pressures of an ageing population. ithink because of the pressures of an ageing population. i think the only way you can deal with that is increasing the capacity of the nhs, and what i did as health secretary was one of the biggest ever increases in doctor and nurse training places, and also that huge increase in funding. which meant that the nhs is getting the capacity to deal with those patients. and of course you know very well the other big part of thatjigsaw is care for the elderly. now you have admitted that government should have done more on social care, but what would you actually do as prime minister, because this government of which you have been parts, has been talking about trying to fix social care for yea rs, about trying to fix social care for years, and nothing has happened, we are still waiting for a green paper, which is only the beginning of something. what would you do?” negotiated a ten year plan for the nhs, and my nextjob, ifi negotiated a ten year plan for the nhs, and my nextjob, if i had stayed as health secretary, was to doa stayed as health secretary, was to do a ten year plan for the social ca re system. do a ten year plan for the social care system. i do think that
8:51 pm
councils need more money, because i think we want to be a country where we know that as people get older, they are going to be properly looked after. so i think there is a bit of public money, but it's also about personal responsibility. i think we should be a country where people save for their social care costs, those particularly those last few months, possibly years of their lives, when things can be very uncomfortable, very painful. just in the same way they save for their pension. i think it should be something that people can opt out of, but it should be an automatic thing. to think there should be a cap on social care costs? people have been worried about this, theresa may came a cropper on that particular policy, but would you put a cap on social care costs, and out at what level? i would do a deal. if you are prepared to save responsibly during your life, then we will cap those costs, because you have done the right thing. we need to be a country which rewards people who do the right thing. and i think if we do that, if you look at where we we re do that, if you look at where we were in the postwar period, where
8:52 pm
many people did not say for their pensions, we created a society where the majority of people to save for their pensions, that's the change we need for social care. you have said that you wouldn't try to change the law to cut the time limit on abortion, but also its the case that mps tend to put forward this legislation. if an mp put forward legislation. if an mp put forward legislation to cut the time on abortion, would you vote to do that? well however ordered before is a matter of public record. as you say, i have been very clear, but a spy master, i would not seek to change the law, i didn't as health secretary either, harbord and any future private members bill would be a matter of conscience, and i would have to see what that bill is before i made my decision. so you might go to quebec time limit on abortion? why have to look at what that bill was, but i think for people watching this programme, what they want to know is, as prime minister, i recognise this is a free vote to matter, and i would not seek to change the law. but do you understand for some people that's quite worrying. there are many conditions, life limits and conditions, life limits and conditions that are not picked up in
8:53 pm
medical testing until much later in pregnancy, for some women, hearing you say that, of course it's a matter of conscience. that is something that feels to them, backwards looking, not progressive, not understanding. people have very strong views on all sides of these issues, and all i would say is that as health secretary, i upheld the will of parliament. i did not seek to change the law, but i was very honest with people about how i voted, that's a matter of public record, and it would be the same as prime minister. enters final question. can you actually imagine yourself standing on the steps of number ten, as prime minister, rather than as a cabinet minister in and out for meetings, and do you worry in this contest, that you might be somehow unfairly squeezed out by someone with a bigger personality than you? laura, i have been waiting for this moment for 30 years. i have been sitting around that cabinet table, thinking how i want to transform our country.
8:54 pm
you know, ithink how i want to transform our country. you know, i think the secret to our amazing country, my dad always said, this is the greatest country on the planet, but the secret to our country is that we are so entrepreneurial, so dynamic, but we are also compassionate people. we wa nt to are also compassionate people. we want to have a great nhs, great social care system, a great education system, and i think this isa education system, and i think this is a great moment when i look at brexit and this and cut up a moment in our history, when we can really unleash our potential, and that's what gets me up in the morning. you wa nt to what gets me up in the morning. you want to be a prime ministerfor 30 yea rs, want to be a prime ministerfor 30 years, when did you know? i won't say that, thing if i say that, that will really put people off. 0h, that, that will really put people off. oh, you must tell us no! element 30 years as a long time, and this, look, iwould element 30 years as a long time, and this, look, i would love to do this job. i thing job. ithingi job. i thing i can make a difference, i think this is a moment where if we send the right person, we can'tjust solve brexit, but we can open a whole new chapter in our history. an exciting chapter. that's what i want to do. jeremy hunt, thank you very
8:55 pm
much indeed. thank you. that was jeremy hunt talking to laura goons berg, the time nowjust talking to laura goons berg, the time now just approaching talking to laura goons berg, the time nowjust approaching five to nine. now, in mexico, she is a heroin. but frida — a search and rescue wonder dog — is hanging up her goggles and retiring from duties with the mexican navy after nine years of service. the labrador became famous for finding earthquake survivors in 2017, and is credited with having found twelve people alive and locating more than forty bodies. will grant has the story there were few greater symbols of hope during the mexico earthquake of 2017 than frida. the labrador retriever, clad in her protective eye mask and safety gear, went from building to building with her handler in the aftermath of the terrible disaster, looking for survivors and often finding them, too. in 53 rescue missions, she's helped locate 12 people alive under the rubble, to be exact. and notjust in mexico. she travelled to haiti in 2010, guatemala in 2012,
8:56 pm
and ecuador in 2016. cheering however, now the time has come for her to hang up the goggles and the flak jacket and gnaw on a bone or two in peace instead. at a ceremony in mexico city, frida's uniform was removed and replaced with a chew toy. for many, frida seemed to represent an indefatigable spirit in the country that kept people going when the news kept getting worse. frida is yet to confirm the plans for her retirement, but it's believed she may move to the countryside. that was will grant reporting. let's catch up on the weather prep delete prospects. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. whether turning dryer after today's rain begins to fizzle out, this weather front clearing away, which brought the rain stay, high—pressure building and from the northwest,
8:57 pm
which is why things will be settling down, but also bringing slightly fresher, less humid air to our shores as we head through the course of wednesday. that's dry, cooler air arriving across the north of scotla nd arriving across the north of scotland tonight, for south, we still hold onto the legacy of cloud, still hold onto the legacy of cloud, still thick enough for a few spots of light rain and drizzle there, quite misty and murky in places too, here it will be still muggy in the mid—teen celsius, single figure values in the north. so for wednesday, we start off on a rather great note for much of england and wales, that cloud will continue to be quite low, hugging eastern coastal areas, probably the best of the side chain across northern ireland, we should see brightness developing across the south, temperatures lower than they have been of late, 22—23d there. around the low 20s as well in the central parts of scotland, cooler along the east coast. on into thursday, high—pressure still with us. but seeing a bit of cloud will continue to be quite low, hugging eastern coastal areas, probably the best of the side chain across northern ireland, we should see brightness developing across the south, temperatures lower than they have been of late, 22—23d there. around the low 20s as well in the central
8:58 pm
parts of scotland, cooler along the east coast. on into thursday, high—pressure still with us. but seeing a bit of squeeze in the isobars across the south, that means we will pick up a strong easterly wind across the channel coasts and in towards the west country. lots of sunshine across the uk, as you can see, little it will be cool in the northerly wind, had further west, a little bit warmer in fact with the more sunshine around, we could see 24-25d, more sunshine around, we could see 24—25d, quite warm in scottish central belt. now across into europe, we've got this blistering heat wave throughout this week, record—breaking temperatures likely across parts of france. for the next couple of days, and it looks like we will be tapping into that heat once again as we end the week, as high—pressure moves to the east, draws up this air from the south, or the southeast, right across the uk, but just the southeast, right across the uk, butjust going to be hot, potentially the hottest day of year so far across southern parts of the uk, as we head on saturday. so that's a breeze coming up from the south, it will start to bring the heat into many areas, mainly across western areas, we have still got cooler air across north sea coasts, but further west, we could get 27-28d, but further west, we could get 27—28d, even mid—20s across central scotland. on into saturday, could see the low 30s across the south
8:59 pm
with high humidity, it will feel unbearable, but it will cool down for all as we head into sunday.
9:00 pm
hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the front runner to be britain's next prime minister says brexit will happen on time "come what may" — borisjohnson's opponent says it's about who can be trusted, to deliver. thejudgement is, who is the person we trust as prime minister to go to brussels and bring back the deal? it's about the personality of that prime minister. tensions between the us and iran deteriorate into name calling — amidst the insults president trump warns any move by tehran will be met with overwhelming force. the head of america's border protection agency is stepping down, that's after a huge outcry over the treatment of children being detained.

52 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on