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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  September 5, 2019 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. borisjohnson has no majority, his party's in turmoil — but on the prospect of asking for a brexit extension he had this to say i'd rather be dead in a ditch. it cost a billion pounds a month, it achieves absolutely nothing. what on earth is the point of further delay? but the prime minister's brother isn't convinced. jojohnson is stepping down as a minister and an mp — saying he's torn between family loyalty and the national interest. it's been another extraordinary day in the uk — we'll take you through it all. meanwhile ireland's prime minister says there will be border checks with northern ireland in the event of a no deal — something that hasn't happened since the good friday agreement of the 1990s.
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we'll be live on the us east coast as hurricane dorian brings flooding. meanwhile in the bahamas, the situation is desperate. record—breaking winds and massive storm surges flipped cars and even shipping containers far onto the land. but all around here is an area that is been totally leveled. that's been totally leveled. and facebook launches a dating service in the us — we'll be live in new york to hear all about it. if you're confused by brexit, if you're struggling to keep up with all the developments, don't worry, we're all feeling like that. but don't worry, we're going to take you through another mind—bending day in british politics — and why it matters so much. before we get into today —
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a reminder that already this week, borisjohnson has lost his parliamentary majority, kicked out 21 mps from his own party — some of them giants of the conservative party, lost an mp to the liberal democrats, lost an effort to call an election, been defeated in 4 parliamentary votes — that's every one he's faced as leader — and seen the house of commons pass measures to stop a no—deal brexit. now to today. boris johnson's younger brotherjojohnson who was a government minister has resigned. the prime minister's brother effectively saying borisjohnson is not acting in the national interest. here's jo johnson leaving
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home this morning. van you tell us when you're playing to resign? i haven't gotten any further comment to say other than it's been an honour to be mp for the prime minister and three governments but it is time to move on and have to get to work. i'm sorry, i beg your pardon. are you completely at odds with your brother, mrjohnson? inevitably, when taking questions from the press earlier, this came up again and again. jo doesn't agree with me about the european union because it is an issue that obviously divides families and divides everybody. but i think whatjo would agree is that we need to get on and sort this thing out. just a few hours ago, anothermp, nick hurd, another one has said they will follow suit. just a few hours ago, anothermp, nick hurd,
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said he won't stand again in the next election. earlier this week these 21 conservative mps rebelled against the government and were told they can't represent the party any more. they including 2 former chancellors, former ministers and winston churchill's grandson. well now more than 100 conservative mps have signed a letter asking for the 21 to be reinstated. no sign of that happening. here's ken clarke — the longest serving mp and one of the rebels, talking about jo johnson's resignation. it must‘ve been an agonising decision but i have every sympathy forjo who has finally put his conscience, national interest first and there are lots and lots of conservative mps like him, quite a lot of ministers in the present cabinet who are completely torn. but if allowed a free vote on the arrangement, most of the conservative party would have voted
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with the 21 were thrown out. with the 21 who were thrown out. the pm spoke earlier and used his location at a police academy in the north of england to explain why he expelled the mp5. discipline is always tough but, here we are amongst a body of men and women who know that sometimes you have to administer discipline and you have to be very clear about your message and that is what we are being. now to the issue of when or if there will be an election. remember yesterday, boris johnson called a vote on this — but he failed to get the two thirds of parliament that he needed. the opposition labour party didn't support the idea. now the prime minister is looking to ask the question again. it's getting urgent — because this is the current dealine for brexit — october 31. that's 56 days away.
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borisjohnson says he'll never ask for more time, but parliament has taken away the option of leaving without a deal. so the pm says his hands are tied — and an election is needed to break the deadlock. listen to how adamant he is, that he won't ask for more time. can you make a promise today to the british public that you will not go back to brussels and ask for another delay to brexit? yes, ican. i would rather be dead in a ditch. we've had this development from reuters in the past hour
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we'll be speaking to an irishjournalist, pat leahy from the irish times about that, later in the programme the irish prime minister leo varadkar has been giving a speech outlining the possible impact of a no—deal brexit on irish citizens. have a listen. flights, trains and buses will operate normally for a period. but in the agreement will be needed for this to continue. eu vessels will no longer be allowed to fish in uk waters and vice versa. so the commission has proposed a short extension to the status quo if the uk agrees to the two. tariffs will apply the goods imported from the united kingdom and vice versa in the
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tariff schedules are known and republished many months ago. you need to be registered as an import 01’ need to be registered as an import or export and you have to make customs preparations. this will be expensive and bureaucratic for business. there will be checks on goods and on live animals and this was possible, these will take place in the ports, airports and a business level. but some may need to ta ke business level. but some may need to take place near the border. we are working out the details of the european commission and will inform the public in business as soon as we know what the outcome will be. that's the thinking of the government. let's understand the position of labour — the biggest opposition party. it's been calling for
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an election more or less since the last one in 2017. but it's not saying yes yet. here's one of labour's most seniorfigures, john mcdonell explaining why. we are up for a general election and i want to get rid of this government as soon as possible because i'm worried about what they are doing to the future of our economy and the future of our country. but it is about timing. and there are prime objectives, and we put in the last manifesto, we want to prevent a no—deal brexit. in his speech earlier, borisjohnson again attacked labour for not saying yes. he also said he didn't want an election. and then promised it would be on october 15. mixed messages. here'sjessica parker in westminster. playing in westminster. on monday, we learned today confirmation playing on monday, we learned today confirmation from the government that they will attempt again early next week to try and get mps to back
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the idea of a snap general election. under the fixed term act as it is known, you need two thirds of mps to get behind an election and the government argument is going to be that by monday, this legislation that's going to going passive comments of the house of lords, designed to block you know to brexit, that looks like you'll get royal assent by monday. so the government will say that you've got your bill through, your insurance policy can say no—deal brexit now give us our general election. not clear what the opposition parties will do, because some fear that this was designed to prevent a no—deal brexit from becoming law, but say he wins, a vast majority, he could repeal that legislation and still t repeal that legislation and still opt for no—deal brexit if he has not managed to broker an agreement. so we will have to wait and see what happens on monday. i want to show you what
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happened near the end of the pm's speech that's right, i am so sorry. that is a signalfor that's right, i am so sorry. that is a signal for me to wind that's right, i am so sorry. that is a signalfor me to wind up. but he didn't wind up. he kept speaking for 70 seconds, then walked off stage. a lot of people reacted to that. a lot of comments like that on twitter.
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jess parker gave us her analysis. we for hearing that this was the first day of the general election campaign even though an election was not under way yet, talking about his domestic priorities, attacked jeremy corbyn for running scared of an election. but we got was a hesitant speech. he appeared to ramble at times and lose the trail, and not going off of any kind of written speech and there was this bizarre incident where during the q and a, a police officer trainee behind him appeared to feel faint and he just appeared to feel faint and he just appeared quite distracted, but that
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might have something to do with his brother, jojohnson who dropped a political bombshell saying that he was resigning as a minister and as an mp. i've updated you on the conservative party, and on the row over when an election might happen. next to the legislation at the heart of this week's turmoil — it's aimed at stopping a no—deal brexit in any circumstances. yesterday it passed in the house of commons. that's what prompted borisjohnson to call for an election. now it moves to the upper house of parliament — the unelected house of lords. here we are earlier today. yesterday it appeared pro—brexit members would try and filibuster the bill. but as one on thursday morning, that plan was dropped. all stages of the bill passing through the lords will be done by 5pm on friday. stay with us on outside source — still to come.
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south africa and nigeria are falling out — after xenophobic attacks in johannesburg, and revenge attacks in lagos. boris johnson warned cabinet on the 28th august that there was a "high chance" that he would fail to get a new deal with the european union over brexit. the comments are contained in documents disclosed in a court case against the suspension of parliament. our legal correspondent, clive coleman has been at the high court. we have read out in the scottish case where mrjohnson‘s said in response to advice that he had been given from his senior legal adviser that there's a section for him to give notes. he talks about the september sitting of parliament and
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it as september sitting of parliament and itasa september sitting of parliament and it as a rigmarole, something to convince them that they are earning their trust. because perot game was over the conference season, the seats lost are actually very few. an indication perhaps that the prime minister did not see this suspending isa minister did not see this suspending is a bigger deal. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? pressure continues to mount on boris johnson as he insists he will not delay brexit. the prime minister says there's now only one option, an early election. but his opponents say not before a no—deal brexit is ruled out. there's been a series of riots in nigeria with many south african businesses targeted. today they delivered a diplomatic incident.
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south africa has closed its embassy in nigeria. and nigeria has recalled its ambassador in south africa. the attacks in nigeria appear to be a response to 10 people being map the attacks in nigeria appear to be a response to 10 people being killed in xenophobic attacks in johannesburg. let's hear from the bbc‘s correspondent in lagos, mayenijones. following the looting and burning of the shop such as happened since sunday, a lot of rumour started circulating on social media with many people claiming that hundreds of nigerians have been cured and the violence people were sharing videos in terms of the some of those videos are from other countries or previous xenophobic attacks on foreigners in south africa and they're claiming there claiming those from this recent attack and that led to many nigerians on tuesday calling for the boycott of south african businesses. so by tuesday evening, all of those
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protests which started as peaceful in cities like legos, descended into violence. there's a connection between two incidents. other lot of south africans live in nigeria? we do not know exactly how many but nigeria as you know, it's one of the biggest oil exporters and where the biggest oil exporters and where the biggest companies are based in nigeria as as security companies, and some african cities to work for them. but speaking to eyewitnesses who were there during the violence on tuesday and wednesday, they said that the protesters did not seem to ca re that the protesters did not seem to care and the people they were attacking were south african or not. the businesses they targeted were definitely south african, but we got reports a few from other nationalities, including chinese nationals being attacked us because they are foreign. the government in south africa has largely blamed the attacks in johannesburg on criminals. but the foreign minister has acknowledged some of it is driven
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by what he called "afrophobia" — resentment of other africans, living and working in the south africa. here's the country's president. no amount of anger and frustration canjustify such no amount of anger and frustration can justify such acts of wanton destruction and criminality. there can be no excuse for the attacks on the homes and businesses of fallen nationals. just as they can be no excuse whatsoever nationals. just as they can be no excuse whatsoever for xenophobia or any form of internal —— intolerance. there is no justification for looting and discussion of businesses that are owned by south africans. —— destruction. other countries are becoming involved. tanzania has cancelled all flights to south africa citing concerns about the safety of foreigners in the country. and this is all going on in a week
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that has south africa is hosting a regional summit — which nigeria had threatened to pull out of. here's mayeni jones again. there's always been a rivalry between nigeria and south africa, particularly in terms of their economic performance, both countries are the continent's biggest economic superpowers and often exchange places as to which one is the continent's biggest economy. so, that rivalry exists and there is a cultural rivalry, both countries have great musical output, you often see this kind of fight for cultural economic and political power between the two countries. but i think is also behind this is the escalation of social media. all the misinformation spread out there led to outrage, many nigerians putting pressure on the government to do something to protect their nationals abroad and the nigerian government has been seen by many people here is quite ineffective. so in this instance, this is something that could deal with rather rapidly and effectively and that is where your seeing such a strong
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response on the part. and speaking to your contacts about the decision to close the south african embassy, we know that there has been diplomatic moves nigeria but in reality, these countries have to keep to keep talking to each other, don't they? despite these high—profile acts? yeah, definitely, the nigerian government has pulled their ambassador from south africa, so the tension continues to be there, but just this evening we're getting reports that some nigerians politicians, including a prominent governor in the north of the country attending the world economic forum, which is currently taking place in cape town nigeria, some of the viewers might know they're going to sit there going to boycott that forum due to the attacks on the nationals in south africa. so, despite the heavy—handed rhetoric, these are two countries which as i say, some of the continent's biggest economic performers and have to continue to work together and collaborate. facebook has launced a dating service in the us.
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it was already available in some other countries — but europe though. that comes next year. vivienne nunis in new york. how does it work place we've travelled, it will use that information to match us up with friends of friends, is not people we are immediately connected with on facebook but friends of ourfriends. facebook of our friends. facebook also said it will not import any of that information if you opt in to miss pa rt information if you opt in to miss part of facebook on your news feed, it will be kept private. what they say hold on, you might want to find out about the strangers?m say hold on, you might want to find out about the strangers? if you opt m, out about the strangers? if you opt in, you just make your own separate dating profile for facebook. so different from your original
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facebook profile and it will connect you to people in your area. i spoke to one user in canada who said he found it quite useful, being trialed there for about a year and he said is matching him with people that is similar education level, so he thought the algorithm was working quite well. thank you very much indeed. as the politrical wrangling over brexit continues — there are fears the uk could be slipping into a recession, for the first time since the financial crisis. a survey by uk manufacturers is warning their industry is in a nosedive — with exports falling despite the weaker value of the pound — and hiring and domestic orders have also taken a hit. britain's vital services sector — by far the biggest part of the economy — is also in trouble — and meanwhile retail sales were down last month compared with the same time last year. the uk's economy shrank
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in the three months tojune — contracting by 0.2%. ann francke — chief executive — chartered management institute — gave us the business perspective on the economy. the markets are starting to factor in all eventualities, including an election and they are making waves for the possibility that you may have a change of leadership. yet again. this is not keep calm and carry on and this is not a britain that the business community in the global community recognise. so we do need to get a grip. businesses are worried and they said they have got to stop this, because it is hurting us. to stop this, because it is hurting us. most businesses want the extension and there are really two reasons for that. firstly, extension and there are really two reasons forthat. firstly, business really does not want no deal in the bank of england is saying only one in five are really prepared for that
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and secondly, if you go to january, it is after christmas and really in the run—up to christmas is the absolute worst time. supply chains and the ability to move goods and staff up, that would be horrendous. so from that perspective too it makes sense. istanbul's new airport opened in april. right now it can handle 90 million passengers — but the airport has plans to become the world's biggest — able to handle 200 million passengers a year. here's the boss of the airport. the sector has the very secular growth in the past a0 years. look at the graph, it is going always up. some hick up once in ten years, like september 11, final
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financial crisis in 2008. but this, you cannot hold these people in the air, you need to let them land that is where the infrastructure is very necessary , is where the infrastructure is very necessary, not just for turkey, is where the infrastructure is very necessary, notjust forturkey, but for many places, you see the investing, he has the investment and eve ryo ne investing, he has the investment and everyone is investing. and demand is going to go all around the world. in the next half hour — we'll be finding out more about the destruction brought to the bahamas by hurricane dorian. the death toll is 20 — and 70,000 people are in urgent need of food, shelter and medical help. flooding as hurricane dorian passes relatively close by. dorian has not made land in the us as of yet. you'll update you on that and have much more in the brexit situation. speak to you in a minute.
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hello there. it is the time of the evening where we take a look at the world whether, which has of course been dominated by hurricane dorian ovei’ been dominated by hurricane dorian over the past few days. we look at these pictures from the bahama, the devastation is clear. floodwater inundating huge areas, enormous amounts of devastation and destruction and a lot of that was down to the fact that the storm they could see on the picture, really stalled across the north end of the bahamas and stayed in at about the same areas, just pummeled relentlessly by winds and rain. of the storm has been on the move since then, teetering on the east coast until then, it was a category three storm earlier today and you can see
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the way in which it is sliding very close to the coastline around virginia, torrential rain damaging, but also a storm surge that can flood low—lying parts of the, at least the hurricane is now moving and will continue to move its way north eastwards becoming what we call post—tropical and losing its tropical and have an impact on the weather is again the next week, we have to keep an eye on that by the atla ntic have to keep an eye on that by the atlantic more generally very active at the moment and bc a tropical storm moving into mexico was still some showers, tropical storm gabrielle is in the middle of the atla ntic gabrielle is in the middle of the atlantic not expected to make baffling time soon, but expected $0011. baffling time soon, but expected soon. more clouds gathering on west africa which could spin out and join next tropical storm. in different parts of the world, these pictures come from him by an indian. and here we see a
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come from him by an indian. and here we see a huge amounts of rain in the first four days of september, mumbai reported nearly 300 mm of rain, that is more than the average amount of rainfor is more than the average amount of rain for the whole of september. all down to the southwest monsoon with westerly winds piling in moisture he went in the air and no real sign of any went in the air and no real sign of a ny letu p over went in the air and no real sign of any letup over the next few days. closer to home in europe, we have weather friend diving south eastwards a ci’oss weather friend diving south eastwards across the british isles during tomorrow and i'll bring some outbreaks of rain and this frontal system across central europe is spinning into an area of low p i’essu i’e spinning into an area of low pressure and that means it will be heading to the southwest of france which over the next few days, you can expect some pretty intense downpours and thunderstorms and on the back edge of that system, southern france and some very strong and gusty winds as well. close to home as i mentioned tomorrow, some outbreaks of rain moving southwards and it is going to be a rather cool and it is going to be a rather cool and breezy day but for more details
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on the uk weather, stay tuned in half an hour.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. borisjohnson has no majority, his party's in turmoil but on the prospect of asking for a brexit extension, he had this to say. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. it costs £1 billion a month, it achieves nothing, what is the point ofa achieves nothing, what is the point of a further delay? but the prime minister's brother isn't convinced. jojohnson is stepping down as a minister and an mp — saying he's torn between family loyalty and the national interest. we will talk about this in a moment. ireland's prime minister says there will be border checks with northern ireland in the event of a no—deal, something that hasn't happened since the good friday agreement
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of the 1990s. we'll be live on the us east coast as hurricane dorian brings flooding. meanwhile in the bahamas, the situation is desperate. record—breaking winds and massive storm surges flipped cars and even shipping containers far onto the land all around here is an area that's been totally levelled. we've had a brexit development from ireland in the past hour. the prime minister's brother resigned earlier. the prime minister leo varadkar has said there will need to be checks near the irish border in the events of a no—deal brexit. have a listen. flights, trains and buses will
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operate normally for a period, but it will be great lakes for this to continue. eu vessels will no longer be allowed to fish in uk waters and vice versa. the commission has proposed a short extension to the status quo if the uk reaches that too. tariffs will apply to goods imported into ireland from the united kingdom and vice versa. the tour schedules are known and were published many months ago. you will need to be registered as an importer 01’ need to be registered as an importer or exporter if you are not already and you will need to make separations. this will be expensive and bureaucratic for business. there will be checks on goods and on life animals and as far as possible these ta ke animals and as far as possible these take place in the ports, airports, and the business level. but some may need to take place near the border. we are working out the deals of this with the european commission and we will inform the public and business
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as soon as will inform the public and business as soon as we know will inform the public and business as soon as we know what the outcome will be. pat leahy, irish times. he was at that speech and he joins us he was at that speech and he joins us live. thanks for your time. how much more explicit was this than previous detail we've had on a no—deal brexit? previous detail we've had on a no-deal brexit? i think the government is edging its way towards giving a full picture of what a no—deal brexit will mean in practical terms especially with regard to the border. this was the most comprehensive description i think that the prime minister has given about the consequences of no deal. he did also list the things that would not change between ireland and the uk in the event of a no—deal because of the common travel area which stands separate to the eu agreements. but he also said for the first time from him that there would be checks needed on some goods close
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to the border. interestingly his pre—supplied script supplied by government building said there would be some checks close to the border where as well delivering and softening that wind and said that there may be some checks. this is a direction the government has been moving in recent weeks. i think we will see more of it in the coming weeks because while the government has steadfastly insisted that it wa nts to has steadfastly insisted that it wants to see the withdrawal agreement pass and it sticks to the backs up on the withdrawal agreement, it is now becoming very obvious that the withdrawal agreement as it is currently constituted is unlikely to be agreed. so there is either a change to the withdrawal agreement or there is no deal and is everybody over there and over here can see as well that the mostly the outcome it seems at this stage is a no—deal. that the mostly the outcome it seems at this stage is a no-deal. if it we i’e at this stage is a no-deal. if it were to happen that there were checks close to the border between
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northern ireland and the republic of ireland, how politically impactful would that be and how unacceptable would that be and how unacceptable would it be to republicans? this i suppose is the great unknown in a way. the irish government has always insisted that it could not have any border infrastructure. it previously said it could not have any border infrastructure anywhere on the island but clearly if there is to be checks on goods coming from northern ireland in the event of a no—deal, that will require some infrastructure as the taoiseach said tonight near the border. there are obvious security implications of that and in our paper tomorrow, there is a minister ofjustice warning about the possibility of a no—deal brexit. how it was treated on the ground will be a difficult question until we see the exact
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nature of the checks. are they to be in specific places? will they be mobile? none of that sort of detail has been supplied yet and it is currently being discussed with the european commission. i think that politically, i am european commission. i think that politically, iam not european commission. i think that politically, i am not sure mr veranda kerr or his government will be blamed by people. i think people will be more likely to blame the british government for it. but the fa ct british government for it. but the fact for the inconvenience of a potential security implications of having these border checks somewhere near the border is something that is on everyone's minds. stay there pat — the us vice president mike pence has been speaking about brexit as well this evening, he gave a speech in london making it clear that if it came to picking sides in the brexit argument with europe, the trump administration was backing the uk. the trump administration the truth is a people who built the greatest empire in history, who alone held off the nazi menace for more than a year, a people who have contributed more
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to the progress and civilisation of mankind than almost any other need no lectures from anyone on how to conduct themselves in this critical hour of your history. applause those comments invoking the second world war in the context of brexit could well raise eyebrows in paris and berlin. mr pence caused a bit of stir in dublin too. he visited ireland before coming to the uk, and had this to say. i encouraged taoiseach varadkar to carry the message of ireland's unique challenges to other allies and partners in the european union and encourage them to come to the table, negotiate in good faith, and make it possible for all parties to achieve a brexit that honours the sovereignty of the united kingdom. the implication is mr pentz wants
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the eu to act in good faith but now suggest that the eu has not been doing this on to this point. this is what the irish press made of it. leo varadkardid what the irish press made of it. leo varadkar did not, on the but irish journalist certainly did. you had the town irish examiner saying... irish central how did you read those comments? there was some surprising government circles in dublin. but not so much in the comments from a senior member of the trump administration and no surprise to anyone that the trump administration are supporters of brexit. what was surprising i think the people was he should seek to make those comments in ireland to an irish audience. particularly when he suggested or seemed to suggest that the eu and therefore ireland have
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been negotiating with the eu in bad faith, the feeling is that the feeling in brussels and to some extent doubling that the uk is walking away from the commitments made, the government of boris johnson is walk away from its commitment made by its predecessor theresa may's government in relation to the backs up that was some evidence of bad faith. i do think people pick too much attention to what mike pence has to say. i think the view in brussels and certainly more so the view in brussels and certainly more so in dublin is that there are important allies in the united states congress where people like nancy pelosi and other individuals have said that they will not ratify any trade deal between the uk and the us after brexit if there are any threats to the border and to the good friday agreement. i think that is probably considered more
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important in dublin than any comments that mr pence has made. pat we comments that mr pence has made. pat we appreciate you joining us on a busy evening. and you can read his extensive reporting on what a no—deal brexit may mean for ireland on the irish times website. was turned away from brexit and mum and turned away from brexit and mum and turned to hurricane dorian. we are finding out more about the destruction brought to the bahamas by the storm. we know that there 70,000 who are in need of food and medicine and possibly... this is before the hurricane arrived. this is now. this report from abaco. treasure quay was one of the most popular resorts on these islands, torn apart by the brute strength of the storm. tourists who tried to whether it, left shell—shocked. but these were the sturdiest
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buildings in a place that wasn't even the worst hit. elsewhere, the picture is even more desolate. well, this was marsh harbour port, where hurricane dorian made its first landfall, and those record—breaking winds and massive storm surges flipped cars and even shipping containers far onto the land. but all around here is an area that's been totally levelled. thousands had lived in a huge shanty town that had been here, but there are few signs of the structures they lived in, and people are left to pick through what's left of their belongings. it is a desperate situation for those who survived. no house, no food, no water, you know? so... i think, people... no life, you see? for me too. everyone here talks of those they know who are still missing, many sheltered in churches. but in the heat here, there is the unmistakable smell of death. aleem maqbool, bbc news,
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on the abaco islands of the bahamas. let's get you up an update on hurricane dorian. these are pictures from charleston in south carolina on the us east coast. there's flooding there even though dorian hasn't made landfall. it is close enough that it is causing problems. gary o'donoghue is there now. i guess places like charleston are for like this. they are well use to they had flooding of various degrees in the last five years here including a couple of other hurricanes as well. they are used to it. having said all that their warnings have been dire this time around. 300,000 people have left the coastal area on those mandatory effectuation orders. watts staying as well, businesses closing up, very few state open. we have had two high
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tides since dorian was in this vicinity. one in the middle of the night and this afternoon. it has not brought that inundation that eve ryo ne brought that inundation that everyone was fearful of. there has been some flooding downtown but not the kind of swamping that the whole town underwater many feared for. gary, that is better news. does that mean other places further up the coast ca n mean other places further up the coast can also put their concerns on hold to some degree?” coast can also put their concerns on hold to some degree? i don't think so. hold to some degree? i don't think so. that's not what the authorities will say because their view is that the storm can change at any time and we the storm can change at any time and we have seen it ticked up and take down in ferocity, we have seen it change course. there is some still concern as it heads north and peers northeast that it will make some kind of landfall on north carolina estate that is above where i am here and if that happens, thejunction estate that is above where i am here and if that happens, the junction of the core and the most of your real and part of the storm, that will be
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and part of the storm, that will be a whole different ball game altogether. people are hoping that won't happen but they are ready for it up in places like wilmington in particular because that could happen overnight into tomorrow. it is still dumping vast quantities of rain onto this low—lying area. you have to bear that in this low—lying area. you have to bearthat in mind. this low—lying area. you have to bear that in mind. the rivers will swell and there will be potential for local flash flooding in swell and there will be potential for localflash flooding in many ways, we for localflash flooding in many ways, we are for localflash flooding in many ways, we are not getting many reports so far, fingers crossed, of any injuries or for talent he reports so far, fingers crossed, of any injuries orfor talent he is and that will be a welcome relief to people here. gary, thank you very much. gary with some better news from charleston on hurricane dorian. we will also be talk about hong kong and brexit because the leader is withdrawing that controversial bill which was the prompt for the huge protests in recent months. we will update you on that. britain's leading children's hospital has been strongly
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criticised over the death of a teenage girl. 1a—year—old amy allan was transferred to great ormond street hospital last year — but died from complications following an operation. michael buchanan reports. she just had an attitude to life we all envied. you know, she always had a smile on herface, she did not let anything get her down. amy allan was born with a genetic condition called noonan syndrome, which left her with lifelong heart problems. as she aged, she developed a curve in her spine that left her in constant pain. the 1a—year—old from ayrshire was sent to great ormond street hospital, as they were the only centre that could do both the spinal surgery and had a life—saving system called ecmo on site, should amy suffer any complications. but while the operation was a success, amy's condition deteriorated in the intensive care unit when a doctor removed her ventilation tube. we watched it all. we sat viewing at the bedside
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from when they took the tube out all through the night watching them pretty much panic in front of our eyes. i have been doing first aiding for about a year and a half now... what amy herself had learned, first aid when she needed urgent care, was not there. the ecmo life support team had not been told amy was in the hospital and took hours to assemble. the teenager struggled on for 2a more days before dying of multiple organ failure. the family came to court today to hear the coroner find that great ormond street had failed to properly plan on amy's postoperative care and that they should have had an ecmo system at hand. but he found that problems hadn't caused her death. we know they never went out of their way to deliberately try to kill amy, at all, but they tried to hide it. in a statement tonight great ormond street say they were sorry that amy's care had fallen short of the high standards they should be meeting. michael buchanan, bbc news.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... pressure continues to mount on borisjohnson as he insists he will not delay brexit. before turning back to brexit, let's talk about hong kong leader carry lam says the government in beijing supported her decision to withdraw the controversial extradition bill that sparked these huge protests we've seen. here she is earlier. they understood why we have to do it. they respected my view and they supported me all the way. so, whether it is in the earlier stages of processing the bill, and then suspension of the bill, and then withdrawing the bill yesterday, it's the same position.
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we we talked about this bill a lot. the bill would have allowed criminal suspects to be extradited from hong kong to mainland china. critics say it was evidence of china tightening its control over the territory. and they took to the streets. the protests turned violent — and they have also morphed into a broader anti—government movement which wants greater democracy in hong kong. because of that withdrawal of the bill is definitely shutting the door after the horse has bolted. lead voice among the protestors isjoshua wong... here's laura westbrook. when i was in hong kong injune, carrie lam announced that she was suspending the bill, three months on, violence has been
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a regular part of the protests that have been almost weekly. tear gas, firebombs have been a regular feature of these protests. in fact, more than 2000 rounds of tear gas have been fired in the past three months. carrie lam has finally agreed to the key demand of these protesters which is the official withdrawal of this controversial extradition bill, which started this whole political crisis three months ago. but, for many of the protesters, this is too little too late because in the last three months, the demands have also grown and they now include an independent inquiry into allegations of police brutality as well as more broad universal suffrage and for a lot of the protesters, yes, she has finally withdrawn the bill. but for them, their demands have grown and they are going to continue to protest.
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there was time back in march and april where the extraordinary brexit moments came night after night. this week has matched all of them. borisjohnson has lost his parliamentary majority, kicked out 21 mps from his own party some of them giants of the conservative party, lost an mp to the liberal democrats, lost an effort to call an election, been defeated in four parliamentary votes. that's every one he's faced as leader, and seen the house of commons pass measures to stop a no—deal brexit. something he wants to have still on the negotiating table as he deals with the eu. the greatest burn came this morning. boris johnson's younger brotherjo johnson who was a government minister has resigned. the pm seemed visibly shocked at a speech he gave in the north of england. theo usherwood, political editor at lbc. .. here's some of it.
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reporter: aren't people entitled to ask if your own brother can't back you, why should anyone else? my own brother, as you've seen from what he said, i want to pay tribute. this is about my brother, jo. it was a fantastic guy and brilliant minister for the science and universities and did a fantastic amount of good work for us in those areas. jo does not agree with me about the european union because it is an issue that obviously divides families and divides everybody. but i thinkjo would agree that we need to get on and sort this thing out. if your own brother has lost faith in your plan, surely you will have to be the next member of the family to resign. my intention as i said just now and i am absolutely determined to do this is to deliver on the mandate
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of the people. we have a democracy in this country and the way we work is, when the people of britain take a decision, parliamentarians are sworn to uphold that. can you make a promise today to the british public that you will not go back to brussels and ask for another delay to brexit? yes, ican. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. jeremy corbyn since he can't trust you to hold an election before the brexit day before the eu cancelled. can you today give a commitment? yes! is that his line today? right! this is a new one. if i understood it correctly, you just said the leader of the opposition says he cannot trust us, trust me to hold an election before brexit day. i've said above five
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times in parliament, we want an election on october the 15th and indeed, you know, earlier if he wants. jeremy corbyn, don't worry i will end very soon. i am so sorry. i think that is a signal for me to actively wind—up. about a minute later the prime minister did. pippa crerar, daily mirror political editor rob watson gave us his analysis straight afterwards. i thought the performance was utterly bizarre. it didn't feel like the prime minister of the united kingdom. he was over an hour late for that as well.
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it was very odd and i picked out two things. number one, that he seems sort of shell—shocked and everyone thinks it's clearly connected to the resignation of your brother. i mean, no public relations man can make that look good, right. if your own brother doesn't trust you, as the line goes, why on the earth should the country? and he seemed amazingly sort of halfhearted in his explanation of what that could be. he looked as a beaten man, notjust some it is about to launch an election. —— notjust —— not just someone —— notjust someone who is about —— not just someone who is about to launch an election. you could see the message discipline that is put into them and you know the message, it says i hate banging on about brexit. but some people might say it's pretty rich seeing as we only got brexit because of him. we just got to get on with it. you have to get on with it with me, if you vote with me, will have an election by the end of october and of course, profoundly disingenuous in that we are going to be talking about britain's possible relationship with the european union for years to come.
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that is where we are after four days of this week. we will see what friday brings. thanks for watching. hello, the remnants of the two tropical systems out in the atlantic could be heading towards the uk later next week. that includes dorian. long before then, we still have this era of high—pressure sitting to the south west of the uk. it is getting squeezed by this weather front here. a it is getting squeezed by this weatherfront here. a more it is getting squeezed by this weather front here. a more active of rain. broader rain band, thick cloud coming down across england and wales moving at southern parts of england. further north we will see sunshine developing and showers. heavy in northern parts of scotland. those temperatures of 16—18 agrees. —— 16-18 temperatures of 16—18 agrees. —— 16—18 degrees. gusty winds are quite
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likely. the wind direction changing from a south—westerly to a northwesterly across northern areas and that will draw out cooler air from the north just in time for the weekend but it is coming around the area of high pressure building more towards the uk. these weather fronts not arriving in the northwest until much later in the weekend. sunny spells on saturday and most places will be dry. we could be picking up one or two broke showers and eastern areas. down the east coast in scotla nd areas. down the east coast in scotland with the breeze blowing, it will feel chilly. 19 or 20 degrees in the south. clearing tonight and with the wind dropping, it will turn cold and it will be the coldest probably from saturday night into sunday morning. chilly start, away from the northwest, we are already seeing some cloud coming into western scotland. the main rain band holding off until later in the day. a lot of dry weather again, spells of sunshine. those temperatures of
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16-18 of sunshine. those temperatures of 16—18 degrees on sunday. warm in the sunshine but a chilly feel nonetheless in the morning during the evening as well. that weather front in the northwest bringing the rain and then tumbles down towards the uk, it brings showers and longer spells of rain down parts of the country. we don't get a proper clea ra nce country. we don't get a proper clearance in scotland and northern ireland until later on in the day when we break up the cloud and get sunshine. 15, 16 degrees. in that rain, this could come as a shock to the system. it will be chilly i suspect. that weather front wheel weakening, it is getting squeezed by this building rich of high pressure from the atlantic and that's going to bring dry weather to many places on tuesday. few showers left over in east anglia and the south—east, otherwise the recent spell of sunshine with atlantic winds coming in again and we pick up cloud in the far northwest. those temperatures holding steady for northern areas lifting a bit towards the south.
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let's move into the atlantic and pick up on those two tropical systems. hurricane dorian, that is the forecast track along the eastern seaboard. and tropical storm gabriel more out in the mid atlantic. we could pick up briefly —— roughly where they are. the remnants of dorian, and the remnants of gabrielle. windy weather across the week, and we could see a spell of rain on thursday from gabrielle. so that area of high—pressure far away, still sitting to the south west of the uk, and drier on the southern half, wet or in northern areas but still cooler as we head into next weekend.
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a major blow for the prime minister — his own brother quits the government and politics, as the brexit crisis intensifies. jojohnson resigns as a minister and says he won't stand as an mp at the next election — because he has been torn between family loyalty and the national interest. he's been a fantastic minister for science, for the universities, and i think that, you know, we certainly haven't seen eye to eye for a long time about the uk and the european union. you should be in brussels negotiating! on a visit to west yorkshire today, the prime minister repeated his call for an election, and said he'd rather be dead in a ditch than ask for another extension to brexit.

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