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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 8, 2019 9:30am-10:01am BST

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hello. this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. it is the combination of the fact there is not enough work going into getting a deal, which is not what the prime minister signed up to do, and secondly the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues, who are good, moderate conservatives. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey. as work and pensions business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace negotiations between the taliban and the united states have been called off. in a tweet president trump blames a deadly attack in the afghan capital, kabul. british airways pilots go on strike for the first time in the airline's history.
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a full paper review coming your way injusta a full paper review coming your way injust a few a full paper review coming your way in just a few minutes but before that, let's get a look at the latest sport with jane. good morning. history was made at the us open but not in the way many expected. serena williams failed in her bid for a record—equalling 24th grand slam title, losing in the final to bianca andreescu, who became the first canadian to win a grand slam. adam wild was watching. it's been 20 years since serena williams first won the us open. back then, bianca andreescu hadn't even been born. yet here they were, together, opponents on the game's biggest stage. andreescu chasing williams, and williams now chasing history. that is what the new york crowd had all gathered to see. what they actually saw was history of a different sort. andreescu still a teenager, but with an icy calmness belying her years. while she was still finding her way, williams, it seems, was losing hers.
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mistakes, frustration. andreescu suddenly on the brink. but having saved a championship point, williams suddenly regained her composure as the us crowd lost theirs. but the fightback as spectacular as it was short—lived. andreescu champion at her very first attempt. williams‘ wait for another grand slam goes on. but the game now has a new superstar. adam wild, bbc news. it's really hard right now to take that moment in and to say, "you did ok," because i don't believe i did, you know? i believe i could have played better. i believe i could have done more. i believe i could have just been a better... been more serena today. honestly i don't think serena showed up and i have to kind of figure out how to get her to show up in grand slam finals. great britain has a champion at the us open.
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jamie murray and bethanie mattek—sands retained their mixed doubles title, beating the top seeds chan hao—ching and michael venus in straight sets. murray is the first man in the open era to win three successive mixed doubles titles at flushing meadows. the men's final between rafael nadal and daniil medvedev is later today. england have a mountain to climb if they're to take the ashes to a final test. they're18—2 in their second innings against australia on the final day of the fourth test against australia, needing to bat the day out to draw. andy swiss reports. searching for another ashes miracle, an army of ben stokeses descended on old trafford, hoping for some headingley—style heroics, but surely not this time. once the real stokes had gone, england's first innings fell away. they trailed by a hefty 196. there seemed no way back, but briefly they dared to dream
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as australia lost four quick wickets. her but then, guess who. the phenomenon that is steve smith once again swatted england's hopes aside. by the time they finally got him for 82, remarkably his lowest score this series, australia were out of sight. 383 was england's supposed target. but realistically it was survival. oh dear. first, rory burns, then captainjoe root. pat cummins with two wickets in the very first over to leave england's chances hanging by the slenderest thread. after headingley, perhaps anything is possible, but unless england can somehow bat all day, the ashes will be staying with australia. andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford. at wembley, england captain harry kane scored a hat—trick as they cruised to a 4—0 win over bulgaria, maintaining their 100% record in euro 2020 qualifying.
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kane was set up by raheem sterling for his first, before adding two penalties. and kane returned the favour, getting sterling's name on the scoresheet too, as the pair showed off their deadly partnership. a record crowd of more than 31,000 were at the etihad to watch the first manchester derby in the professional women's game, as the super league season got under way. city beat united 1—0. the only goal of the game coming early in the second half, when caroline weir picked up a poor clearance and slammed it home. great attendance at the etihad, but later today chelsea women host tottenham at stamford bridge. they're hoping to surpass that crowd. ireland will go into the rugby world cup as the number one ranked side in the world. they moved to the top spot after beating wales by 19 points to 10 in theirfinalwarm—up game in dublin. rob kearney going over early for the first of their three tries.
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and it was a fitting send—off for captain rory best in his last game at the aviva stadium. he'll be retiring after the world cup injapan. ferrari's charles leclerc took pole position for today's italian grand prix, amid farcical scenes at the end of qualifying at monza. only leclerc and carlos sainz of mclaren posted a final lap, with all the other drivers jostling for position and failing to make the start in time. despite that, lewis hamilton managed to get second on the grid, ahead of his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas. coverage of all of that is on the bbc sport website. that is all this sport for now. now on bbc news, the papers. hello and welcome to our sunday morning paper review.
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with me are journalist and author shyama perera and john crowley, the editorial director of first draft, which works with journalists and the public to tackle disinformation. so know this information from him today, we hope! the sunday times has interview which is making all the headlines, with amber rudd on her resignation from the government and the conservative party as well. the mail on sunday has reports of prince andrew having a row with aides. the observer goes with legal advice that suggests the pm would have to resign if he failed to follow the brexit law passed by mps. the sunday express leads with a threat from the prime minister to paralyse the eu to avoid getting a brexit extension. and it's amber rudd's resignation which also dominates
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the front of the telegraph. let's go through that in a little more detail. the sunday times. they call it an exclusive and it was an exclusive even though it broke last night and it was on all the news bulletins. slightly strange, ora different way at least, to resign, by giving it to a newspaper. yes, i can't remember in living memory and exclusive like this in terms of a cabinet minister resigning. a video was done as well which was quite noisy in the background and quite ha rd noisy in the background and quite hard at times to work out what she was saying. that well done to the sunday times forgetting it. —— for getting it. it has capped off a dreadful week for the prime minister. the voting of the bill, stopping brexit, he has lost the first three votes, he has lost his brother, and now the figurehead of the one nation tory party caucus, and she is resigning the whip. and get on top of all of this, on the
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other side of the paper, pointing to the fact thatjohnson has opened up a1li the fact thatjohnson has opened up a 1k point lead over corbyn. if they are looking for a raft to cling onto, they will say there will be sound and fury in westminster from the commentators, the media, but the public at large want brexit to be delivered and they are backing him on that front. in that part of boris johnson's strategy to outdo nigel farage and the brexit party to eliminate the need for some leave voters to vote for them? and so in a way, he will not really care. as long as he has got the poll lead, he is looking good. as i recall, and maybe it was a different poll, he had a 20 point lead four weeks ago to 14 points doesn't seem as large to 14 points doesn't seem as large to me. but to go back to amber rudd for half a second. i thought she was very clever to do it through a newspaper because what she was able
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to do was to lay out her case very clearly, in a way that a single letter then reported with little sound bites would not have done. what she has done very cleverly is highlight a number of other issues within the cabinet, gender issues for example. just the way the language has developed since boris took over. the difference between that and theresa may. and the fact there is this level of machismo that has entered the debate. we have heard it. the big girls blouse, the girly swot. he has done terribly macho things, like even adopting a dog which doesn't appear to be looking after at all because he is travelling the country with his girlfriend in tow. i think it is a very clever way of doing this. as a woman as well, she would just have been dismissed. it would just have been dismissed. it would just have been another resignation. here, she is top tier, and she had done it very cleverly. this interview on
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page three of the sunday times gives ita page three of the sunday times gives it a lot more detail on exactly why. and it is quite interesting. she says her patience snapped when she was ina says her patience snapped when she was in a meeting in a cabinet room on tuesday in downing street. that is when she realised that she had to pretty much leave the government. yes, you read on other papers obviously that number 10 are leaking to other papers their side of the story, and they were trying to get hold of her for story, and they were trying to get hold of herfor six hours story, and they were trying to get hold of her for six hours yesterday. she was doing an interview with the sunday times. and well done to the sunday times. and well done to the sunday times. and well done to the sunday times forgetting it. it is still unusual but i agree with what you are saying. it allows her to do it on her own terms. and she also highlights the backstop, which we have stopped talking about, which is driving people mad in ireland, which we are not noticing because of so much happening here. so where is all this heading? sunday telegraph. amber rudd quits as borisjohnson heads for the supreme court showdown. that is one school of
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thought, that is where are heading. if borisjohnson thought, that is where are heading. if boris johnson does thought, that is where are heading. if borisjohnson does this ablate the new law that has been passed by mps, —— disobeyed the new law that has been passed by mps, it could end up has been passed by mps, it could end up in has been passed by mps, it could end upina has been passed by mps, it could end up in a showdown at the supreme court. one of the pay is calling it a constitutional smash—up, which sounds very disturbing and dramatic. but it is. and the mood music coming out, this law will be signed into assent, they one the government lost during the week, and they will go back to brussels and say we will not doa back to brussels and say we will not do a no—deal, a dog about the militaristic language, in another paper they said they would take a chain saw to it. it is militaristic. is that all dominic cummings? we
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know he studied chinese military strategists. perhaps it is. what i just find it all extraordinary. especially with this law, which hilary benn drew up. they were asked to draw it up, went today, to prove he was not going to make a clean break of it? i know it has been drawn up they are getting ready to challenge it. a former director of prosecutions, lord macdonald, has said borisjohnson will be in co nte m pt if said borisjohnson will be in contempt if he refuses to do this. you have the possibility of a prime minister being sent to jail. that sounds absolutely fantastical, but given events... you think the police officer from given events... you think the police officerfrom outside given events... you think the police officer from outside number 10 given events... you think the police officerfrom outside number 10 would walk in and arrest him? maybe it will be the same one who took samir khan out? maybe we can get the same one to take boris to the clink. that borisjohnson one to take boris to the clink. that boris johnson might just resign rather than asking for an extension. yes, and there is a strategy in that way. he will hand the keys over, he
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will think temporarily, to jeremy corbyn, or whoever is able to get a confidence motion through to back their party. that is one option. i think the way that borisjohnson their party. that is one option. i think the way that boris johnson has conducted himself politically, that feeling of wanting to hold onto power and give it up, i think that will be an absolutely massive thing for him to do. he does seem to be in a stalemate, trapped in a box, whatever metaphor you want. he has done that typical teenage thing of throwing all his toys out of the pram. that is a baby thing. and now he has put himself into that space from which there is no escape. but maybe it is a space that they want to be in. i think they realised there would be this confrontation and he can now say to the public at large outside the westminster village and outside the media, and say i am trying to deliver brexit but i am being thwarted on so many different sides. back me in an
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election. the only problem is he doesn't seem to have the power to call that election at the moment. for the moment. and speaking of an election, the front page of the observer, they have campaigners for a second eu referendum planning what is described as the biggest tactical voting operation ever undertaken in britain. and whenever the election does come, it is probably going to bea does come, it is probably going to be a massive exercise in tactical voting. on both sides. this is the people's vote campaign, they are focusing on 100 seats, regarded as a second referendum battle it says here. they are getting their act together, where they have to choose between labour and lib dems. but they have only about 20 seats so far. if we have an election coming in the next couple of weeks, the next three or four, i am not quite sure how they will update from 20 to 100 confidently. one quote that sums
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up 100 confidently. one quote that sums up this whole newspaper review comes from michael heseltine, the former deputy prime minister. he said brexit is prising lose the political allegiances of millions of people. and to go back to amber rudd off the back of that sunday times speech, she was asked by tim shipman, the reporter, would you considerjoining the liberal democrats? and she said i wouldn't rule it out. i remain committed to the conservative party. that is lukewarm at best. the whole political system has been completely flipped on its head. it is very fluid, which is extraordinary.” think people will come more towards this idea of having a second referendum simply from a brexit point of view to consolidate that vote and from the remain point of view to consolidate. on the league side, we have nigel farage saying i can help boris to a majority of 100 mps. do you anticipate some kind of pa ct mps. do you anticipate some kind of
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pact or deal between the brexit party and the tory party? there is so party and the tory party? there is so much animosity between dominic cummings, boris johnson's to so much animosity between dominic cummings, borisjohnson‘s to fix —— chief adviser, and the brexit party that you would think this would not come to pass but you put enmity aside to get over the line in an election. the brexit party is saying stand aside in northern labour brexit voting constituencies and let us brexit voting constituencies and let us have a run at it. for doing that, we will stand aside in other areas around the country. the conservative vote might be split with nigel farage's party. there is a theory that labour leave voters in labour constituencies are more inclined to vote for the brexit party than the conservative party. they see the conservative party. they see the conservative the old enemy. they wouldn't vote for the conservatives but they would vote for nigel farage. absolutely. and the
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remaining voters would go to the lib dems when they would never have voted for than before. if i was a far right tory, from the erg, i would be upset. the chair of the erg has called for a working relationship with them. and in that piece, the brexit party said they would not put up a candidate against erg candidates. is it happening already? we have mentioned dominic cummingsafew already? we have mentioned dominic cummings a few times. a figure with so cummings a few times. a figure with so much authority and power who appears in number10. so much authority and power who appears in number 10. there is a story in the observer about anger over a westminster security parcel at dominic cummings. demanding to know why boris johnson's aid at dominic cummings. demanding to know why borisjohnson‘s aid has access despite being in contempt of parliament. why do you think that is? what do you think of that? what doi is? what do you think of that? what do i think of it? we are in a tweedle dumb, tweedledee period of politics. as a commentator, i love
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it. my goodness, it sets tongues wagging and it makes us think. as a politician, i hate it because it brings parliament into disrepute. there is no consistency in what we are seeing happening. why isn't he being given leave to enter when he didn't turn up for his committee? and has been found in contempt? nothing is happening as one would expect it to happen at the moment and that is quite fun. it is very disruptive. of course what you said earlier on, sonia khan, sajid javid's special adviser, she had her purse taken away from her and she was frogmarched out of downing street by an armed police officer. —— she had her purse taken away. reportedly after a confrontation with her. and i am not sure if this is true but is not even supposed to bea is true but is not even supposed to be a member of the conservative
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party a nyway. be a member of the conservative party anyway. he is not a member, is he? again he is at the centre of the conversation and what alistair campbell, tony blair's chief spin doctor, say? never become the story. i think we need to look at the pass to see if it had sonia can't's picture on it and maybe he couldn't get in any other way! this labour mp quitting, to take up a full—time role as the government's anti—semitism tsar. according to the sunday times, the labour party plunged into civil war again last night. yes, you think this is a great opportunity for labour. the tories are in a complete state of flux but labour have their own problems themselves which add to the sense of paralysis. there is so much infighting going on. john laing has
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been a campaigner against the scourge been a campaigner against the scourge of anti—semitism. my personal view is it has not been addressed by the labour party said they will have to deal with that this week. let's stay with politics but move away from brexit and anti—semitism. the telegraph have a story about the tory party chairman pushing to abolish fee—paying schools. this old chestnut. could you imaginea schools. this old chestnut. could you imagine a day when private schools are abolished in this country? i can't but i am glad the labour party is getting back on track over schooling. we had lots of jokes at the time of tony blair when all of the front bench worshipping their children out to religious schools or taking them out. i think harriet harman's children went to grammar schools in kent and lots of them believed to be next to camden school for girls, those schools that we re school for girls, those schools that were considered to be top end. while at the same time belonging to a
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party that has always believed in equality across education. i am very glad that the labour chairman is blocking the abolition of private schools, even if i don't personally necessarily agree with that. i think it is very important at this point that people's politics, the policies of parties, are clarified. we are in such a great area at the moment and it is quite clear that people just wa nt it is quite clear that people just want less or no. pro—brexit, anti—brexit. pro private schools, anti—private anti—brexit. pro private schools, anti— private schools. anti—brexit. pro private schools, anti—private schools. it is quite a clever move. can you imagine that becoming labour party policy and being implemented by a labour government? the abolition of private schools? no, but the chairman, he was advocating this, this is a motion that will be debated. and it will be the party conferences in the middle of all of this. it is all about their charitable status and their right to get tax breaks. there
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has been so much intellectual energy sucked out of policy because of brexit that we can't even talk about this. and it is finally here. and it isa this. and it is finally here. and it is a really big subject to talk about. they are nailing their colours to the mast. it is a policy you would expect them to take, and which you would particularly expect the labour party to take. let's see if we can debate any more things apart from brexit in the future. let's debate one more. we have a couple of minutes left. opioid crisis hits the middle—age. britain is in the grip of a growing opioid crisis, says the sunday times. middle—aged women are fuelling a 60% rise in the number of strong painkillers, anxiety medications and antidepressants prescribed in the last decade. well, talking as a big girl's blouse, and a girly swot and a middle—aged woman, i am under
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attack and any opioid would be helpful right now! it says in fact that one in eight adults in this country are taking opioids at the moment. their worry is that half a million have been taking them for over three years. the recommended period of time is a few weeks, three weeks to a couple of months. is this a problem? clearly it is. what it doesn't explain to me is it says it is about pain management, so why are all of those women in such pain festival? secondly, is this link at all, i don't know, to the opioid story in the us? and of course this should be looked at but it willjust drop. it is being doled out by someone, drop. it is being doled out by someone, by doctors, and the figures have gone up from 89 million in 2008 to 141 million now which is a big jump to 141 million now which is a big jump in anyone's language, and it is all happening behind closed doors. and it may all be tory party women
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actually. we don't know. cowed and it may all be tory party women actually. we don't know. (owed by the maquis we were trying to get away from politics at the end but you brought it back! —— cowed by the machismo. that is it for now. you can see this online seven days a week. follow the address. and if you missed a newspaper review you can catch up on bbc iplayer. thank you to shyama perera is anjohn crowley and thank you from all of us. hello. the dry and settled theme to are we continues for most of us through the course of the day. a pleasa nt through the course of the day. a pleasant sunday for most of you. this was the scene earlier in bradford with beautiful blue skies. the cloud will build up through the
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afternoon. —— in bedford. most places looking dry but not everywhere. for people taking part in the great north run, it looks like a decent day. not too hot. 60 degrees the top temperature this afternoon with a light breeze and it should stay dry. we have some weather fronts moving on from the north west and this cold front will bring rain overnight and this one front will bring more cloud through the day across northern ireland and the day across northern ireland and the western half of scotland as well. we could see a few spots of light patchy rain moving in from the north west during the afternoon. for eastern scotland and the bulk of england and wales, a dry picture through the day and cloud tending to build but mostly dry. some showers are possible in the far east of east anglia, perhaps kent and north wales. temperatures out there 14 to 18 degrees through today. it is going to be dry for the cricket at old trafford as well. for the evening and overnight at the cloud moved on from the west ahead of this rain soa moved on from the west ahead of this rain so a soggy night to come for northern ireland and by the second
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half of the night scotland and the western half of england and wales seeing the rain. the clearest skies in the east will mean temperatures for lowest there. it will not be as cool as last night. monday dominated by this weather front moving in from the west. it looks like it stores across the uk. heaviest rain will be in the south—west of finland and wales and into north west england and scotland. the rain will clear through northern ireland on monday. and the far east of england staying dry for and the far east of england staying dryfora and the far east of england staying dry for a good part of the day. underneath the cloud with the rain, not feeling particularly warm and an autumnal feeling. 14 to 16 on monday. i'm looking ahead and through the coming week, this area of low pressure pushing from the north. that will be the remnants of x hurricane dorian, and a trailing weather front bringing wet and windy weather front bringing wet and windy weather to western parts of the uk. it looks like it will turn milder with temperatures on the rise towards the end of the week. that is
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it for now. goodbye.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben bland. the headlines at 10: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. it's the combination of the fact that there isn't enough work going into getting a deal, which i think is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do and secondly the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues who are good and moderate conservatives. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace talks between the taliban and the us are called off —

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