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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 27, 2019 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: president trump prepares to make a major announcement amid reports that the leader of isis has been killed by us special forces. vigils are held in vietnam by families who fear their loved ones are among the 39 people found dead in a lorry in essex. here dead in a lorry in essex. in yokohama, after englar when here in yokohama, after england's when yesterday, now it is wales‘ turn. can they make it into their first rugby world cup final? manchester city are still hot on the heels of liverpool
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in the premier league. the gap is down to three points after a 3—0 win over aston villa. good morning. we are heading for a sparkling sunday, a much better day than yesterday, right across the country. lots of sunshine to be hard, but it is also going to feel colder. all the details coming up shortly. it‘s sunday, the 27th of october. our top story: the white house says president trump will make a major statement later, following reports of a us special forces operation against the leader of the islamic state group. mr trump himself tweeted that something "very big" had just happened, although he gave no details. us media say mr trump authorised the operation targetting abu bakr al—baghdadi in the syrian province of idlib on saturday. we can speak now to our middle east correspondent tom bateman, who joins us from the turkey—syria border. tom, what‘s the latest? well, i think the fact president has
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made the tweet you talked about there, and also does the white house is saying a major statement will be made later today suggests the target of this reported operation is the islamic state leader. us media is reporting that there was a raid near the town of samada, very close to the town of samada, very close to the turkish border, inside syria in the turkish border, inside syria in the province of italy. some us media are reporting that al—baghdadi has been killed, but that is yet to be confirmed. now, according to those reports, there were us special forces that rated a convoy of militant leaders. the bbc has spoken to one resident in the town of tweet who spoke of hearing helicopter gunship fire and seeing troops on the ground, and major activity in that area. but at this stage, those details are quite sketchy. as i say, they are yet to be confirmed. this would obviously be major news if it we re
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would obviously be major news if it were the leader of islamic state, that was the target of that raid. the islamic state group took a major swathes of territory across northern syria, across northern iraq and syria, across northern iraq and syria in 2014. they have been in retreat since that time and they lost their last holdout of bag bagouz in southern syria earlier this year. —— last holdout of bagouz. thank you, tom. as soon as we get more information on that we will bring it to you right here. church services have been held by families in vietnam who fear their relatives are among the 39 people who were found dead in a lorry container in essex. it‘s thought that the majority of the victims were vietnamese citizens, and police say they‘re working to identify them all. a lorry driver from northern ireland will appear in court tomorrow charged with manslaughter. andy moore reports. a service for hundreds of people in
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this fervently catholic community. there priest said it was catastrophe for the area. the whole district was covered in sorrow. this man said they were praying for the 39 victims who died on their way to seek a better life. he said 25 of them were from his hometown. police in the uk said they were investigating a wider conspiracy, after claims in vietnam there were three flurries in a convoy carrying more than 100 people. —— three lorries. some may have made it to the uk, but others didn‘t. lorries. some may have made it to the uk, but others didn't. when they went abroad, their parents had to sell or pawn their houses to the bank to pay for the trip. young people left the country to earn a decent living, but now they are dead ina decent living, but now they are dead in a strange country far away, after suffering horribly. one of those missing is 19—year—old pham thi tra
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my. she was in contact with a friend by text. how was it going, she was asked. not good, she replied. her family are in morning now, just one of many in this small town. —— mourning. andy is in grays in essex for us. andy, you just told us about the human side of this tragedy. bring us up human side of this tragedy. bring us up to speed with where this investigation is up to? well, it is an ever widening investigation. police and the irish republic yesterday arrested a man in the port of dublin. he is said to be of interest to detectives in their enquiry. three people have been arrested in the uk. they are still being questioned by the police. a 25—year—old man, the lorry driver, maurice robinson from craigavon in northern ireland, he will be appearing in court tomorrow. he has been charged with people trafficking and 39 counts of manslaughter. no
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arrests on the continent yet. meanwhile, the investigation into exactly who these people were is going on in conjunction with the vietnamese community here in the uk. all 39 bodies have been removed from the container and taken to hospital for postmortem examinations, so we do not yet know officially because of death. each of the people who died had a mobile phone, a bag with them. police say they have 500 pieces of evidence inside the container to go through. they say this is the largest investigation of its type but they have ever carried out. andy, thank you. it is just approaching 6:07am. it isjust approaching 6:07am. you are with breakfast on bbc news. wales face south africa in the rugby world cup semi—final this morning, hoping to create an all—british final. if they win, they‘ll face england in the first ever final between two teams from the northern hemisphere. 0ur sports correspondent is in yokohama. andy, this is a huge challenge for warren gatland‘s men? a big challenge indeed.
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a big challenge indeedlj a big challenge indeed. i mean, wales will undoubtedly start as the underdogs against south africa. as you say, they have never reached a world cup final before. they have reached the semifinals twice in the past, but never a final. yeah, they will be second favourites in many people‘s eyes, not least because of the way the two teams performed in their quarter—final matches. south africa were impressive as they defeated hosts japan. wales not so impressive, as theyjust scraped past france. wales have also had injuries. therefore buckley and williams was ruled out this week of the rest of the tournament, after suffering a knee injury during training. —— liam williams. he is replaced by lee halfpenny, very experienced himself, more than 80 caps for wales. even so, the coach warren gatland admitted that was a blow to the team‘s chances. that said, wales are the six nations champions. they won the grand slam.
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they have so many inspirational experiences and our team, the like of alan wynne jones, the experiences and our team, the like of alan wynnejones, the captain, the forward who captained them to that grand slam into six nations back at the start of the year. and also dan bigger, theirfly—half. —— biggar. biggar is the kicker as far as wales are concerned, such a key player for them. wales will look at what england did yesterday. they went into that match against the all blacks is the underdogs. they came out as —— came out with a victory. wales will also be hoping they can spring something of a surprise here today against south africa. yes, absolutely. a big day. we will be back with andy, part of that big buildup, kick—offjust back with andy, part of that big buildup, kick—off just after back with andy, part of that big buildup, kick—offjust after nine o‘clock this morning. we are going to talk about all of that, in just over an hour ‘s time. and we will be speaking to former wales hooker richard hibbard about wales‘ chances. quite a challenge ahead for them. very exciting, a potential home nations final, finally.
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the liberal democrats and the snp have written to the european council president, donald tusk, asking for a further three—month brexit extension. both parties say they want a general election but don‘t support the prime minister‘s deal, or his calls for a poll on december the 12th. it comes ahead of another vote on an election in parliament tomorrow. a search is underway in cambodia for a british backpacker who was last seen four days ago. the family of amelia bambridge, who‘s 21 and from worthing in sussex, have flown out to the resort of koh rong to help find her. her handbag containing her purse, phone and bank cards has been found on a beach nearby. there‘ve been more clashes between police and protesters in barcelona, following the jailing of catalan dissident leaders. some of the 350,000 demonstrators threw bottles and fireworks at police, who responded with tear gas and rubber bullets. nine separatist politicians and activists were jailed earlier this month by spain‘s supreme court.
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celebrations will take place later to commemorate the introduction of a climbing ban on australia‘s ancient monolith, uluru. the site, once known as ayers rock, is considered sacred to its indigenous custodians, the anangu people, who have called for an end to climbing the stone since they took back ownership more than 30 years ago. this weekend has seen huge crowds descend on the area for the final time. it was halloween week on strictly last night, but among the vampires, ghostbusters and zombies you may have noticed a rabbit doing a tango. yes, our very own magic mike and his partner katya jones went for an alice in wonderland theme, with mike dressed in bunny ears and waistcoat as the white rabbit. find out on tonight‘s results show if they made the cut. do you know what i love about mike, one of the many things i love about
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mike, look at his concentration face. they said last night, he may not have been technically perfect, but he works so hard. you could see it in his face, he was going through every step perfectly. and he is loving every minute of it. he is! fingers crossed for mike. we will be checking in with him, of course, on the programme tomorrow. 0ur checking in with him, of course, on the programme tomorrow. our regular checkin the programme tomorrow. our regular check in with mike and katia. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. here‘s the front pages. the archbishop of canterbury has told the sunday times he was "shocked" by the prime minister‘s dismissal of pleas to moderate his language last month and warned mps against using "inflammatory putdowns" at a time when society is "very polarised". the sunday express splashes on mrjohnson‘s claims that mps will be "holding britain hostage" if they do not back his calls for a general election. brexit is also the focus for the the 0bserver‘s front page.
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the paper says the uk faces exclusion from europol‘s dedicated anti—smuggling operation after brexit. and it reports the prime minister saying brexit could be delayed until next year but the "country must move on". and finally, an ex—member ofjohn bercow‘s staff has told the sunday telegraph he will not use new rules which could allow his allegations of bullying by the commons speaker to be investigated, saying "the horse has long bolted." also on the front page, all the highs and lows of yesterday‘s rugby game. we will be talking about this
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again later. wales, of course, the home nations potentially lining up a home nations potentially lining up a home nations potentially lining up a home nations final if there is a victory for wales later today. quite nice to see the sunday front pages having some happy front pictures for once, a set of politicians going at each other. very true, it is a nice change. although there is some of the news on the front page. let's checkin the news on the front page. let's check in with the weather. louise joins us. good morning, how is it looking? just shy of five inches of rain and 121 millimetres. iam pleased just shy of five inches of rain and 121 millimetres. i am pleased to say the culprit, the troublemaker, it is clearing off into the near continent. high pressure is building and it will quieten things done for the next few days. this little weather front is enhancing some showers and as we get into the cold air right across the country, some
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of those are wintry to higher ground. quite frequent actually through the night. some will start to ease a little into the day but generally speaking, it is a dry day, not much in the way of cloud around, some sparkling autumn sunshine but noticeably cold out there that i would take this kind of weather any day. temperatures of 8— 13 celsius. it is almost a case of spot the differences we run through the night. we keep the clear skies, some of those will fade away and the winds falling lighter into scotland and so, but is going to allow those temperatures to drop away really quite sharply. being at the temperature profile, watch blue tones starting to arrive through the night, but is the frost developing, temperatures below freezing in places, so a chilly start to monday morning. we could see quite a widespread frost and maybe the first really of the season. first thing on monday could look someone like this but at least it will be dry. it will be settled. we will have decent sunshine around. that is the theme for much of the week ahead. drier and colder. we do need to keep an eye on this area of low pressure into the south—west, it mayjust
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spill some cloud ahead of it into the southwest in general and eventually, we will get to see some rain potentially through the week. but as we move into monday, a good deal of dry weather again, spot the difference, lots of sunshine coming through, still the wind direction from a northerly and still the risk ofa from a northerly and still the risk of a few showers and honours exposed coast, it will feel chilly, highs of 7- 11 coast, it will feel chilly, highs of 7— 11 celsius. maybe a little more clouded to the south—west year and maybe the threat of some rain but generally speaking, as we move through tuesday into wednesday and then wednesday into thursday, we could see the risk of some rain arriving from the west. this frontal system is likely to push in but there is a lot of uncertainty as to exactly when. later in the week we could go back to something a little bit more unsettled, that means a return to the wet and windy weather so return to the wet and windy weather so make the most of the next four or five days and enjoy that five days and enjoy so make the most of the next four or five days and enjoy that sparkling autumn sunshine! make the most of it. louise, it feels like it has turned quite quickly. i‘ll be back to what is typical for this time of
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year? it suddenly feels wintry all ofa year? it suddenly feels wintry all of a sudden. average. all to do with the wind direction, the northerlies are putting the cold arctic air down and if you get a south—westerly it will turn milder and in actualfact this time yesterday i was telling people it was still 16 or 17 in london but this morning it is 10 degrees colder, so that is yo—yo effect we are getting. it has been utterly relentless the last few days. the trains were out yesterday because of flooding in the midlands so because of flooding in the midlands so good to know it will clear up, even for a small window. thanks, louise. more from louise later and if you are waking up and wondering why the clock says 6:16, it is, because the clocks went back last night. if you are up especially early, you are very welcome. all of you are welcome, in fact! time now for the film review.
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hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week‘s cinema releases is mark kermode. hello, mark. hi. we have a very, very interesting week. we have the last black man in san francisco, which is a sundance film festival hit. we have monos, an extraordinary feature from alejandro landes. and black and blue, a thriller starring naomie harris. there is quite a lot of talk about all of these, actually. there has. so, san francisco features? yeah, so this was a film that was funded initially by crowdfunding. they appealed for crowdfunding with an idea and they did really, really well. it is co—written by and stars jimmie fails, who plays a man who is desperate to retrieve his family home in the upmarket filmore district of san francisco.
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he has a very good friend with whom he tours around the city with and they have been pushed to the outskirts, and visit this house regularly, which is now lived in by a white couple. he believes they don‘t look after the house properly. he turns up and starts painting the windowsills. they‘re going, "go away! it's and he says, "well, you‘re not looking after it properly." he arrives there one day to discover they themselves have been thrown out of the house — there has been an inheritance problem, they‘re not longer living there, so the house is now empty. he decides "we‘re going to move back in" and he goes to see his aunt to get all the furniture and all the furnishings that used to be in the house before they moved out. here‘s a clip. your daddy didn't send you here, right? no. you sure? i swear to god. because i hope he's done dragging you into his schemes. auntie, this is for us. 0k. i'm proud of you. i really am. thank you.
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i miss that city. 0h! ooh! you still look good though, baby! you still look good. mmm. what i love about this — and i think you get a little sense from that — is it has a surreal comic element to it, but it also has a lot of pathos and element of tragedy about it. 0n the one hand, it is about how place changes through gentrification, because the whole thing is his grandfather made the house and they want to get back to it. 0n the other hand, it is about how any place changes, depending on the way you look at it. there is this lovely thing about the two main characters skateboarding through the city and you see the city passing by them but you also see the bond between them, because one of them has to put his hand on the other‘s shoulders in order for them to skateboard together. and it is about how people and places are intertwined. funnily enough, the director described it as a love story between a man and a house.
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it is partly about history, partly about personal relationships. it has the most wonderful score by emile mosseri, who i hadn‘t come across before. this score lends a fairytale aspect to this story. because on the one hand, it is a story about a prince being exiled from his castle. it could be quite an angry film, because gentrification makes some people, you know, quite upset. yes, and it absolutely isn‘t — although there is a thread of anger in the narrative — but what is lovely about it is it‘s actually strangely gentle, strangely serene — almost dreamy. and i spent a long time watching it thinking that the real genius of this — on the one hand, the music is fabulous and it has this look about it which is you get into the rhythm of the piece, that you learn to slightly slow yourself down and attune to the frequency of the film. it is very rich, very rewarding, often very funny, but also it has a real tragicomic dark heart to it.
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it is about a very real thing — about something changing, about memory, about history and about gentrification — but also it is kind of a fairytale. it was made from the ground up for very little money and it was backed by brad pitt‘s plan b. and it‘s really remarkable. interesting. really interesting. i don‘t even know how to begin to describe the second film. yes! thankfully, you‘re here! have you seen monos? i haven‘t seen it yet. i am bemused trying to read about it. monos almost defies description by words because it is a audio—visual experience. so it is directed by alejandro landes, who is a colombian—ecuadorian film—maker. it is a story about teenage guerrilla soldiers in an unnamed location atop of a mountain above the cloud line where they are basically being trained and they‘re looking after an american prisoner. we don‘t have geopolitical details of where they are, even when this is and how this got there. at the beginning, they are being trained by somebody called
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the messenger, who leaves and leaves them to their own devices. there is a motive in the film of a pig‘s head on a stick — which of course immediately makes you think lord of the flies. lord of the flies, yes. there is a lot of lord of the flies. there is a lot of heart of darkness and, by extension, coppola‘s apocalypse now. also, this reminded me of — there‘s a really strange movie about child soldiers called johnny mad dog, which is very hallucinogenic, very moving, very upsetting and horrifying. i also saw echoes of other films. it is a film which is so kaleidoscopic that despite the fact it is about, on the one hand, child soldiers, it is about so much more. it is a coming—of—age story. it has this universal feel because you never know where the story is taking place, or when. it is about the group dynamics between this cast fracture and splinter. the cast is made up of, on the one hand, people who have never done any on—screen work before and on the other hand, at least one cast member was a regular on hannah montana and is the comic lead
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in the kings of summer, which is my favourite coming—of—age movie, and who i did not recognise until halfway through the film. it has a score by mica levi that is quite the most astonishing thing i have heard in years. it is brilliant. it is absolutely brilliant and indescribable. i was about to say defies description. yes. the third choice, naomie harris, i love her. she is great. tell me it‘s great, please. she‘s the best thing in it. it is a very a nuts—and—bolts thriller with a nice set—up. which is that she is a rookie policeman, there is racism in the force. but the film is called black and blue, and she is told she has to decide between being black or blue. now, she is blue, she is a policewoman. very early on, she sees her colleagues committing an appalling act which she accidentally films on her body cam. then they are after her, and she is in an area in which the criminals are after her as well. so she is on the run from everyone. here‘s a clip. hello?
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it's me. the hell is going on? is that blood? i need sugar. look, i don't know what's going on, but you can't be in here. i've been shot. what? what do you mean? can i use your phone? who shot you? can i use your phone? you got to go! i don't want no part to this! the police is riding around here all the time! they'll help you. it was the cops that shot me. so that‘s a great set—up and she is really terrific and she elevates it from being essentially a nuts—and—bolts b—movie thriller into being something more than that. narratively, there‘s a weird echo of — do you remember that film set in belfast called ‘71, about a british squaddie who is suddenly separated and finds himself trapped in this area
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where he doesn‘t understand the situation, doesn‘t understand the landscape and it kind of takes place over one night? this has a similar sort of claustrophobia to it. it is very efficiently put together. so there are some very tense set pieces. as the narrative goes on, it becomes slightly more and more unbelievable, and in the end, it becomes rather ridiculous but all the way through it, you believe in her. and because you believe in her, you believe in the story. and i am a real sucker for a well—executed picture. you know, a well—executed, stripped—down genre picture which is what this is. it may well be more at home on dvd or in streaming. i don‘t think it will be a huge cinema hit, by any means, but i think she is really great and it is done efficiently by someone who understands — i mean, it‘s interesting that the director comes from a horror—thriller background — and you know how i feel about that — and that is a great thing, that‘s a really good training
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ground, and i think she really elevates it to the next level. 0k, best out is probably something we all need to cheer us up in these dark times. 90 minutes of pure goodness — the shaun the sheep movie, farmageddon. which is just what — i am a huge aardman fan anyway. yes,yes, me too. ijust smiled and laughed and giggled all the way through. it is a shaun the sheep movie with a kind of et twist. it doesn‘t matter what age you are, it is just so charming and funny and moving, and made with real care and love, and i am a huge silent movie fan. because there is no dialogue in it. so much of it is just to do with silent movie humour. incidentally, the combine harvester you‘re seeing is a set—up for a gag which i laughed about for about three minutes. honestly, it will make everyone feel the world is a better place. it is so lovely. i think we should have that on prescription then, the whole nation. really should. don‘t feel very well? see farmageddon. you will feel better. quick talk about dvds. very quickly, brightburn did not take a huge amount of money in cinemas. it is a dark take on the superman origins myth.
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i do not know much about it and consequently, i really enjoyed it. i like the idea of taking a story that people know quite well and flipping it. it is not the most original thing in the world — it takes a lot of influences from predecessor writing and also films — but i liked the strength of its convictions and it seemed to take itself seriously enough to work. so it is a dark take on the superman origins myth. i know you have a certain fondness for superhero movies. i‘m certainly married to someone who loves all of that. that will be on our shelf. yeah, exactly. but farmageddon, farmageddon, farmageddon. double bill — farmageddon and monos. your mind will be blown. that‘s my weekend sorted! thank you very much! enjoy your cinema—going, whatever you see. really, really interesting week. thanks for being with us. see you next time. bye— bye.
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hello, this is breakfast
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with nina warhurst and ben thompson. good morning. here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. the white house as president trump will make a statement later today following unconfirmed reports the leader of the so—called islamic state group has been killed in an operation by us forces. american media says the president authorised the operation, targeting abu bakr al—baghdadi, yesterday. it comes after mr trump tweeted "something very big" had just happened, but he gave no further details. church services have been held by families in vietnam who fear their relatives are among the 39 people who were found dead in a lorry container in essex. it‘s thought that the majority of the victims were vietnamese citizens, and police say they‘re working to identify them all. a lorry driver from northern ireland will appear in court tomorrow charged with manslaughter. the liberal democrats and the snp have written to the european council president, donald tusk, asking for a further three month brexit extension.
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both parties say they want a general election but don‘t support the prime minister‘s deal, or his calls for a poll on december the 12th. it comes ahead of another vote on an election in parliament tomorrow. a search is underway in cambodia for a british backpacker who was last seen four days ago. the family of amelia bambridge, who‘s 21 and from worthing in sussex, have flown out to the resort of koh rong to help find her. her handbag containing her purse, phone and bank cards has been found on a beach nearby. there‘ve been more clashes between police and protesters in barcelona, following the jailing of catalan dissident leaders. some of the 350,000 demonstrators threw bottles and fireworks at police, who responded with tear gas and rubber bullets. nine separatist politicians and activists were jailed earlier this month by spain‘s supreme court. celebrations will take place later to commemorate the introduction of a climbing ban on australia‘s
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ancient monolith, uluru. the site, once known as ayers rock, is considered sacred to its indigenous custodians, the anangu people, who have called for an end to climbing the stone since they took back ownership more than 30 years ago. this weekend has seen huge crowds descend on the area for the final time. a cardigan described as "one of the most famous sweaters in music history" has been sold for more than £250,000 at auction. the olive green garment, which belonged to the late nirvana frontman, kurt cobain, features burn holes and stains and was worn in the band‘s famous mtv unplugged concert in 1993. it was bought for more than $334,000, making it the most expensive sweater ever to go under the hammer.
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that is incredible. i do remember that empty video so well. it was one of the first albums i ever brought. -- mtv of the first albums i ever brought. —— mtv video. it is history! never mind the grub. quite a lot of money for a grubby sweater. it was a bit grubby, wasn't it? good morning, 0llie. grubby, wasn't it? good morning, ollie. a grubby, wasn't it? good morning, 0llie. a really big day. grubby, wasn't it? good morning, ollie. a really big day. any welsh blood here? ollie. a really big day. any welsh blood here ? we ollie. a really big day. any welsh blood here? we have all be read out for wales, and i am getting nervous. -- all for wales, and i am getting nervous. —— all the red out. so much is at sta ke, —— all the red out. so much is at stake, knowing that england is waiting in the finals. they really did ajob in waiting in the finals. they really did a job in new zealand. we didn't see that coming at all. in the next few hours, wales face south africa, the welsh have never made it past the semi—finals but beat the springboks and we will have our first world cup final with two teams from the northern hemisphere. and as patrick gearey reports, wales won‘t be short of support, in yokohama or back home.
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just want to wish the boys all the best for the match. if they could, a whole nation would give wales their tea m whole nation would give wales their team talk this morning. millions of versions of one message. good luck to the welsh boys on the weekend! when, and this rugby mad country will play in a world cup final for the first time. the trophy is inside. a golden prize at the end of a golden era. two games to go is the welsh coach, and i really will enjoy those last two games. probably nine 01’ those last two games. probably nine or ten players who will not be involved in another world cup as well, so they have got to relish that. when you want something bad enough and you really, really wanted, it can happen. gatland has reason to believe. less than a year ago, wales comfortably beat their semi—final opponents, south africa, as part of a 14 match winning streak. but the springboks have grown since, while injapan wales have struggled for fluency and suffered from injuries. fullback liam williams and back rowjosh luigi have both been ruled out in the past week, as strength is sapped, they will rely on spirit.
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these are the games that you do all the hard work for, the months of prep. the altitude camps, the heat camps. every other camp we have been on up until now. and i think these are the ones that you would give anything to be a part of. wales now know a familiar flow awaits, should they make the final. and an increasingly ferocious one. in beating new zealand the all conquering all blacks, england sent out some statement. but even after such a momentous win, there were no ecstatic celebrations. after all, the biggest battle is still to come. what a prospect in store — england preparing for their fourth world cup final, but who will they face? let‘s head live to yokohama and speak to our sports correspondent andy swiss. andy, 1987, 2011 - wales have been here before, and it‘s ended in heartbreak. that‘s right, 0llie, yes. it is going to be very, very tough for
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wales. they are the underdogs here, undoubtedly, against south africa. not least because of the way the two teams played in their respective quarter—finals. south africa were very impressive against the hosts, japan, and one ultimately pretty co mforta bly japan, and one ultimately pretty comfortably in that much. wales struggled for large periods against france, only scraping by with one point at the end of their match. because of that, south africa will be the favourite. wales have also had a lot of injury problems, as you mentioned, including a new one that has surfaced this week. fullback liam williams, a key player for them, out for the rest of the tournament with an injury. leigh halfpenny comes into the side, he is immensely experienced, but it is still a big loss for wales. wales have developed this winning mentality in the last decade under warren gatland. we saw that in the france game, even when they were not playing particularly well, they found a way to win. of course, they
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are six nations champions as well, winning the grand slam earlier this year. they do have a good record recently against south africa. they have won their last four matches against the springboks. and maybe what happened last night is a good omen for them as well. england went into their semi—final also the underdogs against the all blacks, and look what happened there. so maybe that will give wales a little bit of extra encouragement, that they can also spring a surprise here today. andy swiss, our sports correspondent, live from yokohama, many thanks indeed. that is wales against the springboks, world cup semi—final, commentary on radio 5 live. liverpool‘s lead at the top of the prmier league is down to three points ahead of their match at home to spurs this afternoon. manchester city have stayed in touch after their 3—0 win over aston villa. all the goals came in the second half, raheem sterling giving city the lead with his seventh goal of the season, that came very early
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after the break. but city then had to wait a bit before doubling the lead, david silva given the goal, just getting a stud on the end of kevin de bruyne‘s cross. minutes later ilkay gundogan confirmed city‘s return to second place in the table. afterwards manager pep guardiola was full of praise for sterling. this is a guy who shows the energy that we need to play football, and he did it. so, raheem was... it doesn‘t matter, indian, with the decisions, but the way that he played, he showed us the way we should do, the way we should go. —— in the end. chelsea are on a roll, they‘re into the top four and just two points behind manchester city, after beating burnley 4—2. christian pulisick scored a hat—trick as they extended their winning run to seven matches in all competitions. brighton came from behind to win late against everton. but it wasn‘t without some var drama.
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everton were 2—1 in front when the video assistant awarded a penalty to brighton — despite the refreree not spotting any infringement. neil maupay scored to make it 2—2, then in the 94th minute an own goal from everton‘s lucas digne gave brighton a dramatic win, piling the pressure on everton manager marco silva. they are up to 12, everton just a couple of points above the relegation zone. it is a clear penalty. the referee cannot see, the referee makes mistakes, my players as well. the referees make mistakes as well. the referees make mistakes as well, because it is a game, a tough game always. but the var is there and if they see that penalty they have to do a 50 metres before they have to do a 50 metres before the penalty. today marks the anniversary of the death of leicester city‘s he was killed last year alongside four others in a helicopter crash former chairman vichai srivaddhanaprabha. he was killed last year alongside four others in a helicopter crash outside leicester‘s king power stadium. the club has paid tribute to the thai businessman
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who was central to their incredible premier league title win in 2016. the wounds are still there, definitely. 0bviously the wounds are still there, definitely. obviously it has been a year, but the boss is constantly on our minds, still. every time we go to the field we think about him. we wa nt to to the field we think about him. we want to do him proud. we know what he wants from the club, and from the players. you know, we want to do him proud and every time we go out there, you know, we try and win. it‘s neck and neck at the top of the scottish premiership. celtic are at aberdeen, rangers at home to motherwell this afternoon. bottom side stjohnstone won their first game of the season. callum hendry scored the winner in a 3—2 victory over hamilton. elsewhere, kilmarnock beat st mirren, while the games between hibernian and ross county, and livingston and hearts ended in draws. so a bad day for hamilton there, but could be a great one for lewis hamilton. his sixth formula one world title could be heading his way in mexico city.
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it‘s where he‘s won the title for the past two years but he needs a few things to go his way. this might help him, his teamate velterri bottas crashed in qualifying and will start from sixth on the grid. hamilton has to finish in the top three this evening and get 14 more points than bottas. max verstappen had been on pole but was bumped down to fourth for failing to slow down for that crash. hamilton starts from third behind the ferraris of charles le clerc and sebastian vettel. i enjoyed it. i enjoyed the challenge and the battle. luckily, i am happy valtteri bottas is ok. we have to see what we will do tomorrow. i don‘t know why we are not particularly good here. boxing, and josh taylor is the new unified ibf and wba super—lightweight champion after beating american regis
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prograis. it was a tightly fought contest for the scot, who remains undefeated in 16 bouts. taylor won on a majority decison and he‘s now the only british boxer to hold two world championship belts. derek chisora is a step closer to a world heavyweight title shot. he came out on top in the all—british bout with david price, with the fight being stopped in the fourth round, after price‘s corner threw the towel in. returning to rugby union closer to home, and one player using the weather to his advantage in the premiership yesterday. this was gloucester‘sjoe simpson scoring against wasps, and despite falling quite far from the tryline, simpson managed to use wet conditions to slide himself over to score! it was one of three tries for the home side, in a 25—9 victory. and finally, back to japan and the rugby world cup, for new zealand the third place play—off on friday will be the end of head coach steve hansen‘s reign. speaking to the press after yesterday‘s defeat he seemed upset with a reporter‘s
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question about his team. spare a thought for this reporter, who suggested that his all blacks didn‘t really show the desire required. that is quite a disrespectful question, to suggest that the all blacks turned up not being hungry. they are desperate to win the game. because i have asked them at halftime to get hungrier doesn‘t mean to say they didn‘t turn up hungry. there is a big difference. and if you want to spend some time outside, i‘ll give you a rugby education on that one. the classic step outside and will continue the conversation. he doesn‘t mince his words. he is due to step down, isn‘t it? doesn‘t mince his words. he is due to step down, isn't it? he is, as is warren gatland, the wales coach. slightly terrifying, stepping outside. more on that i'd be a little bit later. we are going to return now to the story 0llie was just talking about, because it has beena year just talking about, because it has been a year since the devastating helicopter crash at leicester city which killed the club's owner. four others died when the aircraft suffered a catastrophic fault as it left the king power stadium. simon hare looks back
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on the events of that night, and the tributes that continue to be paid. 0ctober october 27, 2018, was the darkest day in the history of leicester city football club. the chairman‘s helicopter crashed outside the king power stadium as it collected him after a game. also on board, two pilots and two of vichai srivaddhanaprabha‘s pilots and two of vichai srivaddha naprabha‘s staff. pilots and two of vichai srivaddhanaprabha's staffm pilots and two of vichai srivaddhanaprabha's staff. it was very surreal to see these flames, you don‘t normally see big fires like that. and people were running around ina like that. and people were running around in a confused state. oh, my god. the helicopter hasjust crashed next to the stadium. ambulances and police and fire were coming, flying past. i was travelling on my way home when it was interrupted on radio leicester but there had been an accident. i neverfor one minute
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could have seen that it would be such a tragedy. me and nick were actually in the back on the way, and we had a discussion between us about what it could be. halfway into the journey, control came on to us over the radio to confirm what it was. we kind of hoped that it wasn't a helicopter, and that nobody had been hurt. but then obviously we started getting more information, and piecing everything together. it was just... the most frightening experience, for everybody. this surely can't be happening. there was literally, you know, members of the public coming across to help. there was a level of services, the staff, you name it. it was reassuring to see that when things do go pear—shaped, which sometimes they do, there are a lot of people out there willing to step forward and help out and put their necks on the line. but despite everyone's efforts, nobody on board could be
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saved. leicester city fc! earlier this month, another fan saved. leicester city fc! earlier this month, anotherfan split saved. leicester city fc! earlier this month, another fan split was walked to the ground was held to mark the anniversary. 0nce walked to the ground was held to mark the anniversary. once again, they turned up in their thousands. we will never, ever forget what that man did for ourclub. we will never, ever forget what that man did for our club. never. we just wa nt man did for our club. never. we just want to commemorate him as best as we can, make sure that we are sharing our support, not only for vichai but for the club. he will always live on and everybody's hudson leicester, anyway. because he has given such a lot to the city. and he gave us a dream we never thought we'd have. you can see more on inside out in the east midlands tomorrow night at 7.30pm. it‘ll also be available on bbc iplayer. here‘s louise with a look at this morning‘s weather. it was a wild, wet and windy day for most places, wasn‘t it, yesterday? hideous! cancelled football matches,
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localised flooding in places and some areas have actually seen half a month‘s worth of rain in a couple of days! iam pleased month‘s worth of rain in a couple of days! i am pleased to say it is cleared away and we can enjoy some autumn sunshine over the next few days because this area of high pressure will build in from the west. we have this little weather front of the moment enhancing some showers and perhaps driving down the northerly flow so the cold air is kicking in right across the country so you are going to notice the difference with the feel of the weather as soon as you get out there this morning. 0ne weather as soon as you get out there this morning. one of those showers as we go through the day across the far north of scotland will start to ease in intensity a little and look at this, hardly a cloud in the sky, at this, hardly a cloud in the sky, a dry, settled story for most of us. top temperatures of 7— 13 degrees, noticeably cooler. and with the clear skies by day leading to clear skies overnight, temperatures likely to really fall away. we will continue to see a few more showers into the far north of scotland and again these will be wintry to the tops of high ground that it will be the feel of the weather. you may
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need to get out the winter duvet if you have not already because the blue tones, watch them start to arrive, this means that is whether temperatures are likely to below freezing but generally, low single figures right across the board with the exception of the far south—west. we could start off on monday morning then with some sparkling skies but some frost around first thing. noticeably chilly. the next few days will be a dry, settled and funny one. if you can read that you are doing well and i will sort that out for the next bulletin. high pressure is starting to stay with us for the next few days. this little fellow here may just introduce next few days. this little fellow here mayjust introduce more in the way of cloud into the south—west but generally speaking, it looks as though it is going to be a fine, settled funny story for many. early morning frost is an issue, lots of sunshine and the temperatures struggling a little. if we get some rain, it will be light and pudgy through the isles of scilly, ten or 11 degrees here, but topped images of around 7— nine celsius for many areas. it stays dry, settled, with
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some sunshine around into wednesday, but more of a risk of seeing some rain into thursday because as we head towards the end of the week, a bit of uncertainty as to how quickly these frontal systems are going to come in but it does look as though we are heading back to a trend of more unsettled weather, more rain to come later on this week. back to come later on this week. back more unsettled weather, more rain to come later on this week. back to you two. 0n cue, louise. too late for the wedding i was supposed to go to yesterday but the train was cancelled because of the rain!|j know, i know. celebrate later. you told me you made up with a couple of glasses of wine. i coped! you survived. headlines at seven o‘clock. it‘s time now for all the latest technology news with click.
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every single day, we upload 4 million hours of video to youtube. we send 682 million tweets. we post over 67 million instagram pictures. 4.4 billion of us use the internet. and collectively, we create 2.5 exa bytes — that is 2.5 million tb or 2.5 quintillion bytes — of data every single day. and a significant proportion of all of that data — searches, news, messaging, social media, video streaming — goes through here. this is telehouse north, one of the most important parts of the internet backbone. it is one of four buildings here in london full of computers, cables, cooling equipment,
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and sheer geekery. the internet was built on many earlier ideas, but the big one happens exactly 50 years ago this week. the work had origins in 1969 when the american defense department — specifically the advanced research projects agency — decided that it needed a network to connect about a dozen university computer systems together in order to promote sharing of information and acceleration of research and artificial intelligence. and so, they promoted the design and development of a packet switch network which they call arpanet. 0n 0ctober29,1969, at 10:30 in the evening, the first message was sent. —— the first message was sent over arpanet. a computer at the university of california in los angeles sent
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a word to stanford research institute in san francisco. the word was "login" — although the system crashed before they got to the g. nevertheless, those two nodes became hundreds and then thousands and then millions of connections. a global network of networks now consists of over 1.2 million kilometres of submarine cables, sometimes laid as deep as mount everest is high. these connect massive server buildings and immeasurably more smaller cables connect those to individual computers. an interconnected network that was named the internet. it‘s important to understand that the internet is not the world wide web. the web is a great invention — it‘s the way that data, webpages and services and documents are arranged, accessed and addressed, but all of that sits on top of the hardware that is the internet.
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which allows many, many networks to talk to each other in a really clever way. so, say you want to watch a cute video of a cat. well, your request to see the video shoots out of your device, along regional networks, and at some point races through telehouse north, and off across the globe to where the video is stored. and this is where is gets really clever. see, sending the whole video in one go down one route will likely mean that it will get stuck in traffic and take ages. so the video is torn apart, broken up, split into little packets, and each one makes its own way back down different routes. and when they start arriving back at your device, they‘re juggled into the right order. and once enough of the start of the video has arrived, there is your cat, as cute
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as you want it. ah! my name is vint cerf. i am vice president and chief internet evangelist at google, but some people know me as one of the co—inventors of the internet. first of all, the good part. as the world wide web emerged, there was this enormous desire in the general population that had access to the internet to share information that they knew. and the world wide web was a tremendous facilitating means by which this could be done. then in the 20005, we started to see the arrival of social networking. but those platforms have been essentially subverted by some people who like to use them as a way of injecting this information
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—— of injecting miinformation and disinformation into the system, for either political or other nefarious purposes. so we have a tough problem ahead of us, which is to try and help people distinguish good quality information from bad quality information. some people hope that this could be done algorithmically. i am not as sanguine about that. algorithmic detection of misinformation and disinformation is not so easy. the expectation that artificial intelligence and machine learning and computer programming will somehow solve all these is an expectation which can‘t be fulfilled. some people will say "well, the country should have rules — enforceable rules — that suppress misinformation and disinformation. just make all that bad stuff go away." that particular practice has
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a very, dark abusive side. it is called "censorship," which is intended to suppress access to information that the general public should have. there are regimes in the world that view any information which is critical of the regime is unacceptable and therefore, should be censored. i actually think that the best tool we have for dealing with misinformation and disinformation is called wetware and it‘s up here. and it‘s exercise in what is called critical thinking, where you ask questions like "where did this information come from? does it have any corroborating references somewhere from legitimate sources?" all of those things should be top of mind, should be part of the digital literacy we need to have as we use these online technologies that are so global in scope. one thing that we know you will see — i‘m sure you will see — is the expansion of the internet off the planet.
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way back in 1998, we began asking ourselves "what would happen if we had a network that was the size of the solar system that could support manned and robotic space exploration?" so we now have a set of protocols that together create an interplanetary backbone network. it‘s in operation between earth, mars and the international space station. so you can anticipate there will be an evolving interplanetary backbone over the next several decades to support man and robotic exploration. this exhibition at london‘s barbican provides an insight into ai data training. huge numbers of pictures like these are needed to create artificially intelligent algorithms.
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from apple to anomaly, it attempts to show visitors how something so simple to categorise — for example, an apple is an apple, we all agree on that, but some concepts are a lot harder to explain. and the algorithms that we create have to deal with these abstract ideas. even as a human, it can be quite tricky to identify what an artist model or a creep may look like or, in fact, many of the concepts set up here. —— in fact, many of the concepts that are up here. yet, people are having to create these categories and then teach what they believe to be the right answers to the machines. a training set is a database that is organised into concepts, and each of those concepts have pictures associated with them. but as you go further through the installation, the concepts get more abstract. we move through apple picker, other things having
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to do with apples, but at the end we arrive at anomaly. the concept of an anomaly seems very abstract and yet, abstract concepts like this are still built into technical system. you have a concept like a bad person, for example, that indicates a certain worldview. the whole point of this is that we may think that al is all about technology, algorithms and statistics, but actually, it has human bias at the heart of it. take the search term 0bama, for instance. 0bama shows up as a figure in many, many different categories. it‘s almost like a where‘s waldo? kind of thing. been labelled by the people that made the training set as good person, a bad person, a greedy person, a leader, a loser. what you find — and i think what the example of 0bama speaks to — is that you have a kind
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of underlining bedrock of sludge and contradictions and absurdities quite often that the ai systems are built on. to make this installation, i pretty much sat down and looked at about 14 million images that were organised into tens of thousands of categories. imagebet, the data base that the installation is drawing from, was made by researchers who went and scraped the internet, so they collected tens of millions of pictures, they put those images together, and then hired online workers on the amazon turk platform to sort those pictures into many, many thousands of categories. all of this just leaves me feeling that there are so many different ways of seeing the same thing and as a person, you add some contextual and cultural judgement to that. but the question is can we train a machine to do the same? and i‘m afraid that‘s it for the shortcut of click this week. the full—length version is up
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on iplayer and is waiting for you right now. this isjust a quick reminder that you have less than one week left to register for tickets for click live. it‘s in dundee in scotland this year. and if you can be there on november 19, we would love to see you. the website you need is bbc. co. uk/showsandtours. that‘s it for now. thanks for watching, and we‘ll see you soon. good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. 0ur headlines today: president trump prepares to make a major announcement amid reports

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