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tv   Election 2019  BBC News  December 13, 2019 6:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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but none of the northern ireland parties back borisjohnson's brexit deal and attention now turns to this place. old differences must be overcome if a devolved government is to return here to stormont after nearly three years. and talks are supposed to restart on monday. but the face of northern ireland is changing. the hardliners now punished by voters for years of paralysis. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. good evening, i'm matthew amroliwala, you join us live in westminster where borisjohnson labour's heartlands is beginning a new term in wales were not safe as prime minister after from the conservatives‘ the conservatives won their biggest sweep to power, where they gained six seats. majority since 1987. the tories took seats that have been red for generations, like the industrial town after leading his party to its of bridgend, and they also biggest majority for 30 years — the prime minister thanked those who helped his dramatic victory by voting conservative from there, our correspondent, for the first time. hywel griffith, reports thank you for the trust you have on the results in wales. placed in us and in me and we will
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welcome to a town of first—time tories. work around the clock to repay your wrexham has never returned a conservative mp before. trust and to deliver on your for most of a century it stuck priorities with a parliament that works for you. with labour through thick and thin. a very different story for labour austerity bit hard here but it has asjeremy corbyn leads his party turned its back on the party to its worst election performance and gone from red to blue. since the 1930s. he says he will stand for liam, it was all down but not yet. about delivering brexit. get it done. the responsible thing to do is not we should be an independent country. we should be moving forward, to walk away from the whole thing looking at different things. andi to walk away from the whole thing and i will not do that. i will stay onwards and upwards, i say! here until there is somebody elected others lacked faith to succeed to me and i will step in labour's leader. down at that point. for pam, he was the elsewhere, a mixed picture reason she voted tory. for the other main parties. i reallyjust didn't an extraordinary night want jeremy corbyn to for the scottish national party be our prime minister. as they take almost all of the seats i don't think there was a great deal in scotland raising to choose from but ijust didn't serious questions about want him in as the prime minister. you would rather borisjohnson? the future of the union well, kind of, yeah! wrexham is at the western edge of the so—called red wall — given what i fear, the tory labour seats targeted by the tories. government now has in store for scotla nd irene lewis was, until a few government now has in store for scotland that right to choose our months ago, vice chair own future has never been more of the local labour party. important and more urgent. the snp's triumph costs
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but this time she lent her the lib dems their leader — vote to borisjohnson — jo swinson loses her seat in east and she would consider doing it again. if the policies of the conservatives dunbartonshire. are more in line with my thinking, then i will vote for them. it may not be a one—off? it may not be a one—off, no. this wasn't a tory takeover. labour remains the largest party in wales. good evening and welcome but it has been humbled. to viewers here in the uk on the bbc news channel — and around the globe losing votes on brexit, not connecting through its leader and, on bbc world news. vitally, failing to persuade voters the conservative party has secured an overwhelming win here on its record after 20 years in the general election.the prime minister borisjohnson now of running public services in wales. in the general election. the prime minister borisjohnson now has a majority of 80 — there was little festive cheer the largest since margaret thatcher for the other parties, either. in 1987. speaking outside downing street lib dems lost their only welsh seat. earlier today he said the country plaid cymru held theirfour. "deserves a permanent break from talking about brexit" but it will be the conservatives who feel that christmas has come early. and that he would deliver hywel griffith, bbc news, wrexham. a parliament that "works for the people". for the labour party it's been bad news — losing many seats in this afternoon the prime minister their traditional heartlands. said the nhs would be jeremy corbyn called the result "disappointing" a priority of his government. and said he would not fight it comes as new figures show a future general election. that the performance of a&e the liberal democrats departments in england fell had a terrible night to another record low last month. as the party leader,
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81.4% of patients were seen within four hours — jo swinson, lost her seat and quit. but the snp did well, coming close to sweeping the board our health editor, in scotland. let's take a look at hugh pym, is here. the result as they stand. the conservatives won given those figures, the prime 365 seats — up a7. minister has his work cut out. the labour took 203 — down 59. figures minister has his work cutout. the figures were the worst ever, and the snp have a8 mps — that ignited the campaign debate about the state of the nhs, whether an increase of 13. that was enough money. we have the the liberal democrats latest figures, postponed from only have 11 — down one. the dup eight. yesterday because the stats watchdog said that no whitehall department should put figures out on polling day orfull and sinn fein — who don't take their seats — seven. should put figures out on polling day or full —— should put figures out on polling day orfull —— on polling day. throughout the next hour, we'll get reaction to the result — and look at what it means for the political parties, 90,000 patients had to wait another the country, and brexit. first let's catch up with the day's events, four hours or more if they were with this report from our political editor laura kuenssberg. going to be admitted. as we approach cheering. the depths of winter and the flu season, it will be a priority in the the power of surprise... the power of victory. intro for the government and the well, we did it, we did it. we pulled it off, didn't we? prime minister. our health editor,
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hugh pym, thank you. throughout the campaign the power of a prime minister the tories worked hard with authority firmly in his hands. on their target labour seats — ones that had voted to leave with this mandate and majority, we will at last be able to do what? in the eu referendum and which had started to turn blue get brexit done! in the 2017 election. but the extent of the conservative victory in the midlands, you paid attention. the north of england like my jubilation here and north east wales they can keep the promise was still remarkable. jon kay has been to three contituencies which swung heavily from labour to the conservatives. like the jubilation here he starts his journey in they can keep the promise to leave the eu next month. blyth valley in north east england — one of the first seats to declare, the will we, won't we fundamental tussle of brexit almost at an end. turning blue for the first time. it starkly illustrates this election means getting brexit done is now the irrefutable, irresistible, unarguable decision the story of this election. of the british people. ian levy, the conservative party but it didn't happen just candidate, 17,000. because of traditional tories but because of labour voters going over. cheering would you believe it? the majority he craved, the start of the change. blyth valley and northumberland county woke up with a conservative we have won votes and trust mp for the first time ever. from people who have never voted so how are you feeling this morning? conservative before. good. walking her dog by the north sea, we meet allison. those people want change. labour born and bred, we cannot, must not, but this time, tory. must not let them down. and i know a lot of people and in delivering change,
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are saying, oh, well i was brought up labour back. we must change too. my dad voted labour, me mum. those days are long gone. let's get brexit done. the labour party then in its day, was great. things have changed now. but what has changed? what's different this time? i think it's all but first, my friends, around brexit, yeah. let's get breakfast done. thank you all, thank people have voted to leave, you all very much for coming. but jeremy corbyn wanted to hold another referendum. thank you all very much. boris, boris! borisjohnson has pulled off what is a genuinely until last night, blyth historic victory, notjust was a brick in labour redwall, a block of supposedly safe seats, because it is the biggest stretching for miles across the country. conservative majority since the 805, but not any more. but because he has had people who have never supported his party to vote for him. we head under the tyne to sedgefield. this was tony blair's house, a mandate has been given tonight. when he was the local mp. in the days of new labour, he had a majority of 20,000 here. the best we can like now, all changed. a christmas present. this constituency went conservative. we were like, omg, never. it is going to happen. i don't believe it. it is amazing and it did. we meet care worker andrea he has won the right to call this at the end of her night shift. she stuck with labour, home for five years now.
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and thought others would in this old mining community. are you going to resign, mr corbyn? how big a shift is this? that sedgefield is now conservative. forjeremy corbyn, the end it's unbelievable. it's just totally 100% mad. of his ambition to move a few short miles to westminster. it's the biggest change i've everseen in my life. he is off by the spring are you going to change if not before. the colour of your car? i did everything i could. no. but derek has changed the way he votes. a retired pit worker, he's been labourfor 70 years. of course, i take responsibility for putting how did you feel voting the manifesto forward. conservative for the first time? the manifesto was universally i didn't feel anything. supported throughout i thought it was the our party and movement. right thing to do. as i said in my own result last and that's why i did it. night, we don't give up on the eternal hopes and do you now consider yourself to be a conservative? of a more decent society. no. no, i don't. our exit poll is suggesting that there will be i voted againstjeremy corbyn, a conservative majority. from the start, it was obvious that's what i voted against. what might be coming. one of the very first results it was a vote against labour, not necessarily for conservatives. of blyth valley in northumberland, no. labour since 1950, turned tory. we heard that a lot today. the new mp almost overwhelmed as we headed west through newly by the scale of that change. blue bishop auckland, and i would like to thank boris.
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former labour voters saying they just hadn't trusted jeremy corbyn on brexit, security, or the economy. our final stop, cumbria. and through the night, labour's routes appeared to shrivel, whether in yorkshire, the midlands... i'm just sorry we have let people down. or the north—east, seat after seat flipped red to blue. where workington man was supposed jeremy corbyn‘s hopes came crashing down. to be the typical vote in a fateful moment, ——voter the parties needed to woo. just as he took to the stage in islington, sedgefield, the seat of tony blair, the conservatives won here as well. held by labour for all time, so what now? broke for borisjohnson too. how much do you trust borisjohnson the foundations of labour‘s victories pass crumbling to deliver what you voted for? boris, boris himself, i don't know. but the party in general, i'd before our eyes, the party falling like to think there is some truth. more heavily where people voted lee. trust is a big thing the lib dems had in politics, isn't it? a crushing night too. because there is many of them that tell a lot of lies, but fingers crossed. from the north sea to the irish sea, labour's red wall reduced to rubble. just a few weeks ago, jo swinson john kay, bbc news. claimed she could be prime minister. i spent the night outside bbc broadcasting house tracking the shift of political power in the middle of the night, though, on our giant map as she even lost her own the results came in. place in parliament. it gave us a really clear idea of the extent she closed the day neither of the seismic changes overnight. an mp nor a party leader.
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all of us who share an alternative vision for society on this map, each constituency have a responsibility to learn from this result has been reduced to and find new answers. exactly the same size. so one hexagon is one mp and it gives you a really clear idea they lost at the hands of the tories of where the balance of power now lies. and the snp too, who cleaned up. in the south of england things haven't changed that dramatically. look at the first minister, i'm walking around the edge unable to hide her glee as the results came through. of london now, with its 73 mps still very much dominated by labour. scotland yellow, england now largely blue. the red tiles. the union uneasy, another demand for but the dramatic changes have taken a vote on independence on the way. place elsewhere and they really i acknowledge that not everyone have been very stark. who voted snp yesterday is ready to support independence. so, seats up here, along the labour red wall, which was so dominant whether or not scotland becomes until last night. an independent country must be you can see how much it has shrunk. a matter for the people who live here. and that is because of seats the map moved in like leigh in greater manchester. northern ireland as well. there was a 9500 labour majority the dup leader at westminster, that was overturned to turn it nigel dodds, lost his seat, blue for the first time. and for the first time, what i couldn't do last night more nationalists than unionists is walk coast—to—coast were chosen by voters, along conservative seats but that is what i can do now. pulling at the union's thread. the brexit party scooped up votes
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because so many of these seats have but didn't cross the bar voted overwhelmingly to leave the eu for any seats of their own. and they have chosen conservative. like wakefield, which had been we are going to leave the european union now in labour hands since 1932. at the end ofjanuary. now it is conservative. and look what's happened in scotland. it is almost all snp yellow. nor did any of those who switched allegiances taking with it casualties in the last few torrid years. like the liberal democrat leader, jo swinson. but our map gives you such a good idea now of what has all these falling pieces happened overnight. created one clear picture — one man securely in charge, and labour's red wall is completely even though his journey gave discomfort to many voters. but with this victory, surrounded now by that sea of blue. borisjohnson has secured at least a major chapter in the kind i'm joined again by our political of history books he likes to write. he won't be a footnote now. editor, laura kuenssberg. his first task, to finish when you see that swathe of yellow what they started. up when you see that swathe of yellow up against this wave of blue, you with an appeal to the a8 and the 52. wonder what it means for the future to those who did not of our union. it isn't uneven vote for us or for me, scatter of jigsaw pieces of our union. it isn't uneven scatter ofjigsaw pieces with little dots of red and blue and yellow will and who wanted and perhaps love the place, more like a dramatic still want to remain in the eu, and i want you to know patchwork, isn't it, with the that we in this one nation
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country clearly in different chunks. we have seen it today, nicola conservative government will never ignore your good and positive sturgeon straight out of the blocks feelings of warmth and sympathy pushing number ten to give her towards the other nations of europe. another vote on independence which she so desires, and i think the then an unlikely claim, perhaps, union is going to be under a lot of a post—election promise of peace and goodwill. pressure in this parliamentary term. the picture in northern ireland is this country deserves a break from wrangling, so the picture in northern ireland is so different. really significant, a breakfrom politics, for the first time more nationalists and a permanent break from talking about brexit. there representing people rather than unionists, so while overall thank you all very much, clearly things are going to be much and happy christmas. thank you. easierfor the clearly things are going to be much easier for the conservatives in parliament than they've been for the last few years, it's going to be yet, this politician has been unafraid to provoke, unafraid to gamble. very tense in those kinds of ways, and weak can hear a few protesters he now swears he will outside the gates of downing street govern for us all. tonight. just because it will be with five years and a convincing easierfor borisjohnson majority, he has time tonight. just because it will be easier for boris johnson in parliament it doesn't mean that what to succeed or to stumble. he wants to do will be easy with the wider public. while he has a very convincing majority, there are for today, though, millions of people probably watching tonight who will feel that they've not been represented by this result, he who dared did win. their voices have not been heard. that said, the scale of the majority
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means that we are entering into a joining me now is laura round, a former special adviser very different period in our to penny mordaunt, who has of course politics. for the last few years, retained her seat in portsmouth north. laura is also a conservatice councillor in kensington to the west almost daily sometimes, it has felt the government might fall if they of us here in london. lose a vote. we have had huge well, an extraordinary result which hijinks on such a regular basis, the argument in parliament really at fever pitch. that will not be the is superb, speaking as a case flow conservative adviser. i think it is fever pitch. that will not be the case now because we have returned to a situation where there will be demonstrated the power of another furious arguments, of course, but a government that is able to carry out incredible slogan shortened to point, getting brexit done. its business, and that may well be controversial in the things they accompanied by a wooden nation wa nt to controversial in the things they want to do, but in that sense, we narrative of how to proceed are entering a period that ought to afterwards after unleashing british be much more stable. laura kuenssberg, thank you. potential and being incredibly time for a look at the weather with louise lear. successful. one for boris johnson to get this incredible mandate for white knight for many of us, a brexit and another for nicholas was better day. breezy with sunny run rampant in scotland and she spells. in cumbria, soggy ground, claims that is a mandate for a snow on the hills, and we saw second referendum. the austrian frequent showers across northern hungarian empire effect. with each
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leader on the other two big leaders, ireland. the showers are pushing north and east overnight. persistent showers in south—west england, gale labour going to civil war. claim for force gusts of wind through the night. sheltered eastern areas will independence and the claim to leave the european union. clearly a good see clearer skies and a chillier field to saturday morning. we start the weekend bright and breezy. cold, night for the snp, but once this yes, with low pressure never far dies down, they wanted two things, away, and these weather fronts circulating around that low with the stop brexit and have a second plenty of isobars on the chart. it referendum on independence and she will be breezy and showery through will fail on both, will she not? the weekend. we may start off with there was a danger of them becoming sunshine but it won't be long before conflicted because until a couple of the westerly winds drive those days ago, they looked like they were showers further inland, some of them heavy, some of them with hail, maybe prospering because this message of independence next week and 2020 was thunder, wintry on high ground. it will be chilly. four or five celsius actually galvanising the unionists, and other nationalist. when the vote came in, it was the other way around. per boris johnson had a in the north, 8—10 in the south. conversation and said there would be shopper showers developing on
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saturday, perhaps snow to the higher no second referendum. that will not ground of wales, northern england and scotland for a time. they push stop them pressing or not. a stance through quickly, but again it will like turning up in these northern bea through quickly, but again it will be a pretty cold start to our sunday morning. particularly in rural labour strongholds that are now spots. and dry with sunshine around. conservative, ao mps and putting in don't be fooled. for the showers are demanding a meeting, she does not expected. and with lighter winds on sunday, some of these could be give with she wants. and the terms slow—moving as they move in from the south—west. again, not particularly of having the majority of 80, being warm, top temperatures of 3—9dc. prime minister in pursuing brexit, enjoy your weekend. no more excuses and he can do what thanks, louise. he wants. that is the proposition that's it from downing street. in a moment, the news where you are. they put to the country and he said but first, let's leave you with some that this was a plan that is ready of the most memorable moments to go and all he needs are mps to from an historic general election. see it through the comments and that is what he's got larger numbers than i think, i was certainly hoping for was expecting and i do not dream of what might our exit poll is this sort of majority and so, this suggesting that there will be a is it. for example, getting a trade conservative majority. at this stage, it looks as though this one deal, everyone that says it is
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nation conservative government has incredibly tight, 11 months, does been given a powerful new mandate. this give them scope to extend that, despite everything that is been said so far? i think this majority gives them scope on quite a number of nation conservative government has been given a powerful new mandatelj will been given a powerful new mandate.” will not lead the party in any things. certainly during my time of future general election campaign. living in this country, i have not corbyn was a disaster on the seen a government with the sort of doorstep. everyone knew that he numbers and that will give him a lot couldn't lead the working class out of room to manoeuvre on it a lot of ofa paper couldn't lead the working class out of a paper bag. for me, it is about things, but i think they have a whether the labour party even has clear plan and they will want to any right to exist. i still believe stick to their word on what they have done i am sure and that is what that we, as a country, can be warm they intend to do. he thanked voters and generous. scottish national for lending him the vote, saying he heard what they had said in terms of party, 17,000... their needs to be change and said we need to change as a party, it is it cheering # i'm dreaming of a blue christmas clear to you what aspects they need to change going forward? but i am #. afternoon, everybody. i say thank hopeful for to change going forward? but i am hopefulfor and to change going forward? but i am hopeful for and what he does embody is to actually bring two wings of you for the trust you have placed in us you for the trust you have placed in us and in me. i urge everyone to
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the party that have been in such contrast and unpleasant nature that find closure and to let the healing you actually will bring them begin. and happy christmas. together. but if they're being cast aside, you've had all manners of mps who are no longer in the party. there are many many sides to bring back together to look at, but there is plenty of one nation candidates who have the seats that will be coming to the commons. in this large majority does give him the ability to pursue a one nation national agenda which people who will say thatis agenda which people who will say that is actually where his values lie. you talked about this earlier, but it's the plan b? the second
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independence referendum. if you says no, what happens then? is their plan b? killing the divisions will be nothing to dealing with the brexit divisions across the uk and structural tensions between the s&p and scotland which he will try to avoid for some time, but he cannot ignore it forever. not even going to ask for staging a referendum she is going to serve on the divorce papers. she is going to present her own legal route and not by the westminster parliament, but this is all fantastic constitutional action that haunted her through the campaign on education, health care, welcome to westminster, with me, and... on the state of the union, as matthew. after the dramatic general election results, borisjohnson has we talk now and where the liberal w011 election results, borisjohnson has won a big majority in the uk general democrats and labour are in election, a majority of 80 in downing street. he talked about scotland. labour in scotland and
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using that majority to unite and england woke up to the problem that level up. it was a desperate night they've had in 2015. it's overrun, though for the labour opposition in the liberal democrats. 0ne leader their soldiers not knowing how to has already gone, the other going. win the territory that they took for let's ta ke has already gone, the other going. let's take a closer look at the granted for years there's no results, first of all, the guarantee that they would do well in conservatives won 365 seats, up a7. england is that in scotland, there is no socialist party now. in greece, the same. labour took 203, down 59. the s&p have a8 mps, an increase of 30. the thank you so much forjoining us here at westminster. let us head liberal democrats have 11. that is down one. well, let's go live to back to downing street. just take me emerging troxel who is in downing street for us. because she's been through what they're expecting in watching all of the developments the coming days. there, and martin, it has been a stunning victory for boris johnson. we know that boris johnson in terms of the landscape, it is we know that borisjohnson went we know that boris johnson went to buckingham palace not expecting him com pletely in terms of the landscape, it is completely changed, hasn't it? com pletely completely changed, hasn't it? completely changed. yes, there are to have a big reshuffle of the parts of britain that haven't seen a ministers in his cabinet. there conservative mp returned in a might bea ministers in his cabinet. there might be a small reshuffle but of general election for 100 years. the course we will wait to hear what is so—called redwall of labour going to be his political agenda,
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which in this country is known as constituencies has been demolished the queen's speech and we are likely by the conservatives, and brexit is to hear that next week before the the reason many have given for that end of next week, we are going to try to get that out before christmas change. it's meant a very difficult and this what they've also got to do day, as you have said, for the is bring back the withdrawal labour party, who were the opposition. they only have 203 seats agreement bill which is the basis on now, giving boris johnson which britain can leave the european opposition. they only have 203 seats union and you're talking about the now, giving borisjohnson the majority of 80. so what is he going to do with that mandate? welcome a speed that is very complicated, they three o'clock local time here, he do not have a lot of time because they need to have that done so came outside this famous black during downing street, and spoke for britain can leave the eu by the end about four minutes. he said he was of january and then forming a people's government, a one britain can leave the eu by the end ofjanuary and then get on with those all—importa nt trade nation conservative governments. he ofjanuary and then get on with those all—important trade talks. he has big mandate and should be able said he wanted to repay the trust of to do that. he has a majority of 80. people who have never voted conservative before. but he also limits the opposition, the labour recognised that there were people party have at their number of seats who still, even now, do not want in the house of commons reduced to britain to leave the european union. 203. however the labour leader he said that they will not be jeremy corbyn says that despite the parties crushing defeat, he was ignored, they will not be left behind, and that he will work proud of his manifesto and defended his record in charge of the party. towards making a new relationship with the european union. after all, he said he would stand down after there is still the withdrawal what he called, a period of agreement to get through, the reflection or the its mps have
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parliament, and then all of the called on him resign immediately. we trade talks, which we can talk about ina trade talks, which we can talk about in a second, which is not going to look now at labour be easy. it will be very complicated, but borisjohnson‘s tone, very different this time, not triumph it when it was when he here comes the leader. became prime minister in the summer and there goes the leader. come out much more consolatory, much after last night, the media was keen to catchjeremy corbyn's more measured, and also talking thoughts in defeat. about britain deserving a break from one cameraman — who took a nasty tumble — especially. the wrangling. a time to unite. a are you going to say sorry? what about all the mps time to level up, a time to let the who lost their seats! a lot keener than he healing begin. which, of course is was to talk to them. much easier to say when you are on it was a car crash, labour's election, and this trip the winning side. welcome exactly on didn't go too well either. that point, martin, let me bring in now, mr corbyn's not rushing some live pictures from central the next leader's election. london. protests, a note to boris what i hope is there will be a period where we can have a good discussion within the party, protest, those are the live pictures and i think that's healthy and that's to be very welcome. on the streets in central london. and i hope those that were inspired you mentioned that phrase that he by my manifesto will actuallyjoin used, let the healing begin, was the party and take part there any sort of pointer as to how in that discussion. it's up to them to set he plans to try to do that? well, a programme for when an election will take place. he's talked about wanting to make it will be in the early sure that those parts of the part of next year. jeremy corbyn didn't put it country, which i felt left behind, like this, but he failed badly.
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town centres, which have become and now he and his team are looking for someone they'd like to carry on, depleted over the years, particularly in the north of what they've always described as the "socialist struggle." england, those traditional labour heartlands, that have not normally there is no clear sign who that person might be. voted conservative, and do feel left so, they want time to plan behind, and one of the reasons that and prepare for the succession. they felt there was a need to leave labour's hurt won't heal quickly. they felt there was a need to leave the european union was to bring back the european union was to bring back the money that would've been spent remainers and leavers blaming each on membership of the european union, other, or the leader for pleasing no one. centrists raged at devoted corbyn back to local issues. he's also, we followers for turning off traditional supporters. know little bit about the young corbyn was a disaster on the doorstep. everyone knew that he couldn't lead the working class ma nifesto, know little bit about the young manifesto, because we've been in the campaigning period for a number of out of a paper bag. weeks, there were 13 key points the party's splitting ahead amongst the issues, besides that of a new year leadership contest. slogan that everybody heard him say, those who embraced politics which was to get brexit done. he's the corbyn way, and blame brexit for defeat, and those who say also promising to make sure that there are more nurses in the health labour and its leader got it wrong. service, that there will be a i feel sorry for all those points—based immigration system. so that low level, low skilled migrants constituents up and down the country in all four corners of this country. will not be able to come to this they need a labour government, and they've been badly let down country, which is how some people feel that that's why they can't get by the labour party, and we've delivered a hard right conservative the employment that they want. government with the most conservative prime minister there's all sorts of talk of in history, and i think we should boosting infrastructure as well,
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all reflect on that. unfortunately, our labour heartlands, working—class heart extra investment for schools, and lands in the north and the midlands, they voted leave. making sure that streets are safer. they, undoubtedly, felt that very much wants to make sure that he can try to unite the country through labour had let them down. those policies. some pond and said so who could join the they haven't been properly costed. race to lead labour? there is rebecca long—bailey, of course, the prime minister was but does she want the job? accused of evasion, that he wouldn't angela rayner‘s been mentioned, perhaps as deputy leader though, ta ke kier starmer‘a a heavyweight, accused of evasion, that he wouldn't take part in interviews at times, a center ground pro—european, and during the campaign. so we will which could put some off. have to wait to get that detail. all emily thornberry is a strong right. martin troxel come alive for performer, and looks ambitious. us right. martin troxel come alive for us there at downing street. thank you very much. so, how will boris then lisa nandi, young, left—leaning, looks like another contender, and jess phillips, johnson govern? what does it mean outspoken, combative, for the johnson govern? what does it mean forthe uk, johnson govern? what does it mean for the uk, for brexit, for our country that is so divided? 0ne maybe the wild card of the contest. for the uk, for brexit, for our country that is so divided? one of britain's best—known political jeremy corbyn's heading profilers is with me. a few years for a quieter life, to his admirers, a heroic loser, to critics, ago, you will remember he talked to borisjohnson, made a film about the man who consigned labour to a fourth term out of office. him, and, of course, borisjohnson they will all be fighting over labour's future before talked about the possibility of jeremy corbyn's even out of sight. becoming per minister. have a look. would you like to be per minister? it's a very tough job being would you like to be per minister? it's a very toughjob being prime minister, very tough job. it's a very toughjob being prime minister, very toughjob. obviously, if the ball came loose from the back ofa
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if the ball came loose from the back of a scrum, which it won't, of course, it would be a great thing to have a crack out. but it's not going to happen. well, michaeljoins me thank you forjoining us this here in the studio, michael, of evening. what went wrong for the course, that such a famous clip, but labour party? everything, to be on in terms of listening to boris johnson today, what did you make of it, and indeed, the result itself? the well, the result itself is quite extraordinary. i mean come if you ma nifesto manifesto it was a giveaway think about it, borisjohnson is the manifesto which people were not sure that i should be paid for. they had first tory prime minister since mrs a leader who was the most unpopular thatcher in 1987. —— to get a proper opposition leader since polling on majority. he has managed to capture that began in the 19705. seen as seats which, for 100 years, have unpatriotic, seen as weak on terrorism and on crime, he was seen been labour. it's come of the world as has turned on its head. the event i terrorism and on crime, he was seen a5 indecisive and quite frankly, he was not seen as likeable and the way was last night, there was a the bori5 was not seen as likeable and the way the borisjohnson wa5. was not seen as likeable and the way the borisjohnson was. so if you put the borisjohnson was. so if you put the leadership and the offer together, that is a part of labour‘s sweepsta ke as to was last night, there was a sweepstake as to what the size of his majority would be, and some problem. boris johnson have that people thought it would be a hung parliament, possibly even with
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5logan, get brexit done that he said jeremy corbyn being the largest that any available opportunity. how much of an issue was brexit for the party, and the opinion polls got it labour party. clearly, i do not wrong very significantly. are you think it was either or, it is not able to pinpoint why he was able to jeremy corbyn or brexit, it is a do that in some of those labour combination of the two. and they did heartlands that have never voted i make combination of the two. and they did imake up combination of the two. and they did i make up their mind early enough conservative? it has to be the with what they wanted to do for brexit factor. it's a mix. you see, somebody wa5 with what they wanted to do for somebody was fairly clear from early on that labour, given its membership brexit factor. it's a mix. you see, in the views of most of its mp5, wa5 brexit is not just going to be directed towards a brexit factor. it's a mix. you see, brexit is notjust about europe. it's about feeling the liberal second referendum po5ition. going to be directed towards a second referendum position. it would've been much better had they made up their mind to do that early on and defend that position rather metropolitan elite have left them than simply sit on the fence. i behind. it's often former industrial think it is a combination of brexit in the leadership. what is the towns, cities, coal mining places, and the big industry has gone. you know, there are amazon warehouses likely immediate future for the instead of coal mines. lots of labour party? go up to get their act together fairly quickly because we unemployment, lots of poverty made have some great negotiations going through once we have left and we worse by austerity. in boris need not position to hold the
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johnson, one of his great gifts, is government to account because it to spread a little happiness. he's a will make a very big difference to can—do chap. he's an optimist. britain's economic future. the to spread a little happiness. he's a can-do chap. he's an optimist. on that point, let me just playing of a problem for political parties is when they lose the spratly, they clip from that documentary, where he talked to you about all of that. let often conduct a leadership contest before they conducted any type of me play that now. postmortem to find out why they have well, i certainly think that as a general tactic in life, if that's lo5t. postmortem to find out why they have lost. in those questions get bound what you are driving at, it is often up lost. in those questions get bound up with the individual standing and therefore, they are not always a nswered therefore, they are not always answered this clearly as they might useful to give the slight impression that you are deliberately pretending be as clearly as they might be. and not to know what is going on. because the reality may be that you don't know what is going on, but much more socially liberal than the people won't be able to tell the average voter. so getting them to difference. we saw that again, in pick someone who appeals to the average voter could be quite a terms of what he said in downing street today, about united about stretch. during the 80s and 90s, up healing, what did you make of the words you heard from him? well, i to 97, they seem to have lost their think there the words that are absolutely needed. at the start of way during margaret thatcher's yea rs, way during margaret thatcher's years, how likely is it that they're going to take that long to recover this election, i think this country this time? it would be incredible of was as brutally divided as it has
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labour to be able to pull off a been at any time since cromwell, in victory in 202a over the next some ways. bitterly divided. it was election will take place, given the borisjohnson will a nasty, often vicious campaign. election will take place, given the boris johnson will probably election will take place, given the borisjohnson will probably repealed the fixed term policy act. labour, both in the open and on social when he picks a leader is either going to have to go for someone it media. threats and death threats. thinks is good for the long—term, or end is the size of the majority mean someone go for an interim who will that it gives him the power to study the ship and now labour will perhaps even faced on elements within his own party, the power that ta ke study the ship and now labour will take back a few of those seats that theresa may, when she won in 2017, they lost this time around and make hoped to get, but didn't. yes. he a more serious attempt on power in won't have the same problem with the 2028, 2029. how likely is it that we erg that she had, it was a party within a party. he's at his moment will see some form of new labour which is how tony blair managed to win those three elections? his party of greatest power now when you win a seems a long way from that type of huge majority. it's very much all body stability it certainly does. i don't think emma can precisely down to you because it's such a recreate the conditions of the past personal battle we shall see what he does with that power he was talking —— anyone can. himself about that at downing
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street. plenty more to come from recreate the conditions of the past -- anyone can. and it could have a westminster in the next few minutes. westminster in the next few minutes. radical agenda but it certainly has we will take a short break, but i'm to find someone who has credibility backin we will take a short break, but i'm back ina we will take a short break, but i'm back in a bit. join me then. and authority with voters, as well as with its very dedicated hello there. supporters and sometimes there's a trade—off between those two things. between purity, which satisfies the members and pragmatism which is where the voters are looking for. there's been showers, and dry with some sunshine. but through the isle of man, for example, we have had shower after a shower already earlier on today. those showers will tend to move their way northwards up apart from the conservatives, the other big winner of the night was the snp. in to southern scotland to bring they took a8 of scotland's 59 seats some snow over the hills. it will turn dryer in the northeast of — and the party's leader nicola sturgeon says borisjohnson mainland scotland, but we will see now has no right to stand lots of showers packing and across in the way of another scottish independence referendum. northern ireland, england, and our scotland editor sarah smith's whales. most fairly strong wind as been looking at what the snp's victory means for scotland well, on the whole, keeping temperatures up, but it's touch and and the united kingdom. posing with some school kids this go as you had for the north, and may morning, nicola sturgeon bea go as you had for the north, and may be a touch of frost here and there. has one clear demand — as we head into the weekend, it that their political future be decided by scottish voters. remains quite chilly. it will probably be cold enough for a bit more snow on the hills as far south she believes that winning 80% as made wells. more showers driven of the seats in scotland means
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on by some very strong winds for she must now be allowed to hold england and wales. some sunshine another independence referendum around as well. those showers will but legally she needs borisjohnson to agree. push their way eastwards across england and wales on saturday so, to the prime minister, morning, leaving some dryer in sunny let me be very clear. this is not simply a demand that the afternoon. those showers may ease off in northern ireland, i or the snp are making, continuance, and, especially in the west with some more sleet and snow it is the right of the people of scotland, and you, as the leader in the hills. quite a cold day here, of a defeated party in scotland, temperatures a—5d. had towards the south west of englund, temperatures have no right to stand in the way. make it into double figures, but it will turn weather here in the evening, it's that wet weather that the prospect of another independence comes into england and wales on referendum is not imminent. saturday night into the cold air, borisjohnson will refuse permission. but that will put his government some hills know, mainly across wales and northern england. a couple of centimetres by the morning. you can on a constitutional collision course see that wet weather moving in here. it doesn't last too long before he pushes away. wintry showers continue with the party that dominates scotland. and that risks further overnight into scotland and northern increase in support ireland as well. of the northern for scottish independence. the conservative campaign half of uk in particular, a touch of focused almost entirely on rejecting another referendum. frost, given those showers, covering but it's the tories snow over the hills of northern who were rejected in over half england in particular, may well be of their scottish seats. some icy patches as well. sunday sees more showers, more widely for the people who gave us that vote, england and wales. some of them have who voted for us last night, did become a gaels picking up, perhaps
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so on the basis that we would stand towards the southwest of england. not so windy for scotland and up for scotland's place northern ireland, seven scotland, northern ireland, seven scotland, northern ireland, seven scotland, northern ireland, probably turning weather later in the day, but the in the united kingdom. rest of scotland, it should be a dry day, but still on the cold side. as and i'm simply not prepared to betray the votes of those we move into the beginning of next week, we see the winds easing down. people for us last night. the lib dem leader, jo swinson, was defeated by the snp landslide. this area of the pressure will bring have you lost your seat, ms swinson? showers into the northwest, this will you resign from the party? weather from perhaps bringing showers into the northwest, this weatherfrom perhaps bringing some rain later towards the south east of but scottish labour suffered the greatest humiliation. the uk. but still in cold airfor they were even beaten by a candidate who'd been suspended from the snp. the uk. but still in cold airfor the first couple of next week. and have only one milderair the first couple of next week. milder air waiting the first couple of next week. milderairwaiting in the surviving scottish mp. the first couple of next week. milder air waiting in the wings, that will be accompanied by some 00:28:31,536 --> 2147483051:51:01,223 weather windy or whether on thursday 2147483051:51:01,223 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 onwards. i'm sick at standing at lecterns during general election campaigns and saying, it's been a difficult night for the labour party. this party must listen, and this party must respond. or this party will die. the entire city of glasgow is now represented by the snp. and ready for another referendum. i definitely think we should be allowed to have an independence referendum, and i think that steps
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should be taken if possible to force them to make this happen, to let this happen. ijust think that... england's going one way, scotland's going another, so we should be able to decide for ourselves. if they are there, obviously, we get the go—ahead from westminster, it will happen again, obviously, we have to make our choice again. i'll be voting no again. a whole new crop of mp5 is a victory for the snp. but it may not be enough to seize the price they desire, the chance to vote again on independence. the main story of the election was labour losing seats across northern england and the midlands to the conservatives. for example, they lost two of the three wolverhampton seats in the west midlands. phil mackie has been speaking to voters there. well, they very nearly won all three in the end, the conservatives were probably stopped from winning that third seeds, which was held by the labour mp, pat's to make feather,
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simply because there were two and half thousand people who voted for the brexit party candidate, the majority in that particular constituency was just 1000. but, yes, the other two seats, the labour mp5 eleanor smith, and emma reynolds, lost their seats last night as part of this blue wave across the west midlands. they've won stoke—on—trent, they won at west bromwich, dudley, and two out of the three seats in wolverhampton, some seeds that they have never really one from labour, certainly not for generations. so, the big question is, firstly, are those people there for good, and why come if you are labour better, did you either switch this time, or what do you think went wrong? they've got five years now to get things done, and we can get brexit done on time, end ofjanuary come and get this country moving. and thank goodness we've managed to remove that stranglehold of a hung parliament. iabstain. i thought they were both come i thought boris johnson, i don't trust them, and the others come i think i've got more sense than them. what about labour now, how were they when your trust back? if they got someone, a better leader, and better people
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who you think would be good in the cabinet. i'm not a carbon supporter, but i prefer the policies i'm not a corbyn supporter, but i prefer the policies over at labour over what the conservatives have. even though you are not a corbyn supporter, you still voted labour? yeah. and so, what you think labour should do now to try to win the country back? get rid ofjeremy corbyn i guess. so wolverhampton southwest, where i am now, this used to be enoch powell's seats, nick after that, it has flipped between conservative and labour over the years. wolverhampton northeast, well, that's really one of those seats that's always been regarded as a safe labour seat. so, really, in wolverhampton, a change, just like other parts of the west in the east midlands, this is where borisjohnson has won his majority. but people today probably thinking of wolverhampton just as much about their little win in the europa league last night, and the fact that the wolves will still be playing european football next year, as much as they are about the results of the election.
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different priorities. that was fill reporting from wolverhampton in the west midlands. so, the uk political map, matthew, looking very different from how it did just 2a hours ago. it really does come thank you very much, we will have more from downing street a little while later. let's ta ke street a little while later. let's take a closer look at the story of this election, which saw the conservatives when that huge majority. about a5% of the vote, they did lose votes in the south of england, and also in scotland, but those were balanced by gains in the rest of england and wales. labour, meanwhile, lost ground in every nation and region right across britain. read a chakra party has been looking at some of the key results that we saw. i want to show you the final scoreboard time of the state of uk parties, and as you can see, the conservatives having a very good night gaining a7 seats. labour losing 59 seats, a bad night for them, and the snp also putting in a
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strong performance, getting third 13 seats. i want to show you look at how the vote share change compared to the 2017 election. what's so interesting here is that the conservatives actually only put on one point in terms of votes shared. the labour vote share dropped sharply by eight points, and it's the difference between the two that's allowed the conservatives to surge forward and gain all of those seats. i want to show you some more detail about conservative gains from labour. here are some really old traditional labour strongholds that have just tumbled to the conservatives. seats like such field, tony blair's old seat. a seat where he wants data 25,000 majority, that's now gone conservative. great grimsby, labour since the war, now conservative. bassett law in nottinghamshire, now a conservative seat. let me show you what happened to the labour vote, down by 25 points. labour load completely collapsing in bassett law, and that represents a suing from labour to
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conservative of 18%, that's the biggest swing of the night that we saw. i will show you one more thing, which is the different way in which the country voted, depending on whether people were in strong leaves seats are strongly remained seats, as you can see, the conservatives are doing well in those leaves seats. labour vote dropping sharply, but both main parties losing share of the vote in a strongly remain seats. but, again, it's the difference of the two performances that's important here, the conservatives performed less badly than labour, and therefore, were able to up seats. you can find much more detail on all of this, including your own results in your own constituency, all on the bbc news website. that was rita chakra party a little earlier today. —— earlier today, the prime minister appeared in front of the cameras at downing st and said he'd lead a people's government that would take the uk out of the european union by the end of january. let's take a listen to all of what he had to say.
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good morning, good afternoon, good afternoon. afternoon, everybody. good afternoon. this morning, i went to buckingham palace and i am forming a new government, and on monday, and peace —— mp's will arrive at westminster to form a new parliament. and i'm proud to say that members of our new one nation government, a people's government, will set out from constituencies that have never returned a conservative mp for 100 years. and, yes, they will have an overwhelming mandate from this election to get brexit done, and we will honour that mandate by january the 31st. and, so, in this moment of national resolution, i want to speak directly to those who made it possible. and to all of those who voted for us for the first time, and those whose pencils may have wavered over the ballot, and who heard the voices of their parents and their grandparents whispering anxiously in their ears. i say, thank you for the trust you have placed in us and in me.
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and we will work round to repay your trust and to deliver on your priorities with a parliament that works for you. and then i want to speak also to those who did not vote for us or for me. and who wanted, and perhaps still want to remain in the eu. i want you to know that we in this one nation conservative government will never ignore your good and positive feelings of warmth and sympathy towards the other nations of europe. because now it's the moment, precisely as we leave the eu, to let those natural feelings find renewed expression in building a new partnership, which is one of the great projects for next year. and as we work together with the eu, as friends and sovereign equals in tackling climate change
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and terrorism, in building academic and scientific cooperation, redoubling our trading relationship, i frankly urge everyone on either side of what are, after three and a half years, after all, and increasingly aerated argument. ——increasingly arrid argument. i urge everyone to find closure and to let the healing begin. because i believe, in fact, i know, because i've heard it loud and clear from every corner of the country, that the overwhelming priority of the british people now is that we should focus, above all, on the nhs. that simple and beautiful idea that represents the best of our country. with the biggest ever cash boost from more nurses, a0 new hospitals, as well as providing better schools, safer streets, and in the next few weeks and months,
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we will be bringing forward proposals to transform this country with better infrastructure, better education, better technology, and if you ask yourselves what is this new government going to do? what is he going to do with his extorting majority? i will tell you, that is what we are going to do. we are going to unite and level up. unite and level up. bringing together the whole of this incredible united kingdom, england, scotland, wales, northern ireland, together. taking us forward, unleashing the potential of the whole country. delivering opportunity across the entire nation. and since i know that after five weeks, frankly, of electioneering, this country deserves a break from wrangling. a breakfrom politics and a permanent break from talking about brexit. i want everyone to go about their christmas preparations happy and secure in the knowledge that here in this people's government, the work is now being stepped up to make 2020 a year
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of prosperity and growth and hope, and to deliver a parliament that works for the people. thank you all very much, and happy christmas. thank you. applause joining me now is torcuil parker, westminster editor for the scottish newspaper the daily record. and also george parker, political editor for the ft. vindication, what we have seen with these results from the strategy of borisjohnson these results from the strategy of boris johnson and dominic these results from the strategy of borisjohnson and dominic cummings from day one, really. that's right. right from the moment borisjohnson that's right. right from the moment boris johnson became prime that's right. right from the moment borisjohnson became prime minister backin borisjohnson became prime minister back injuly, borisjohnson became prime minister back in july, it borisjohnson became prime minister back injuly, it was always part of dominic's strategy that boris johnson would push for his brexit deal, but always the understanding that at some point, parliament would block his deal, and they would be forced to go for a snap election. at that point, they present parliament is obstructive come up labour is
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being obstructive come and use that as an issue to drive the party into the northern heartlands. which we saw. of the run up to that, tony blair morning again and again for the opposition not to fall into the obvious elephant trap, and that is where they have ended up. s. tony blair was saying, look, type borisjohnson down s. tony blair was saying, look, type boris johnson down in s. tony blair was saying, look, type borisjohnson down in parliament, fights a long winter war with boris johnson, war of attrition, inflict nightly defeats on him, sapped his strength in parliament, instead, the liberal democrats on the snp went first, and labour back them and went for the election. it's difficult for opposition parties to refuse the opportunity to go to the polls, but it was a trap. in terms of the absolute basics, the fundamentals, what do you think a result like this does for that basic issue of brexit in the type of brexit that we might get? well, people have suggested that boris johnson get? well, people have suggested that borisjohnson would use this 80 seat majority to somehow marginalise the right wind you're a sceptic european research group, and push for a softer brexit. now, i spoke to a few ministers today to speculate that that is exactly what he will
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do, that he want to have to co nsta ntly do, that he want to have to constantly negotiate one deal in brussels and another deal with his hero sceptic backbenchers back here. soi hero sceptic backbenchers back here. so i think we see a softer tone on brexit and more emily intoned, and we saw some of that today and possibly a slightly longer timetable for getting that deal done. in a sense, when theresa may said she needed a bigger majority to have a stronger hand with brussels, i had a lwa ys stronger hand with brussels, i had always thought that she meant she needed a stronger land with dealing with sections of her own party, but what boris johnson with sections of her own party, but what borisjohnson has got that majority, he can face down from if they are uncomfortable moments with sections. he can to come at the moment he said he's not going to do like he will connect as she will stick to his timetable. i was speaking to a minister today who said, look, events minister today who said, look, eve nts ca n minister today who said, look, events can intervene to make having a very strong suggestion, of course, it may not be practical to do it that quickly, but i can expect a longer timetable for the straight deal that we negotiated, in the end, britain and that you have a slightly closer relationship than we might have thought a few weeks ago. for jeremy corbyn, he has decided not to stand down and immediately, how much
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do you think that is in parts of trying to, in a sense, preserve and save the corbyn project?” trying to, in a sense, preserve and save the corbyn project? i think that's entirely what it's about. so he wants to be in charge of this postmortem into what went wrong, and you can be sure that postmortem will conclude it wasn't his fault, it wasn't the fault of the party's policies, it was that black swan events, brexit. so i think that's pa rt events, brexit. so i think that's part of the strategy, of course, the longer he waits them or they have time to try to bring forward... how bloodied the fight in the labour party in terms of direction?” bloodied the fight in the labour party in terms of direction? i think it will be bloodied, i think it's the left that has such a tight grip on its party, you must feel the fight has gone out of some of the moderates who have tried before, on numerous occasions, to get rid of jeremy corbyn and failed.“ numerous occasions, to get rid of jeremy corbyn and failed. if the fight has gone out of that, it has certainly not gone out of the potential collision with the snp. i mean, how tense do you think that is going to be in the coming months?” think it's going to be really tense. the trouble with borisjohnson now is he's got this big majority, he's got two big things out of his
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control, the negotiations in brussels and as you mentioned scotland. the idea that the snp, a8 out of 59 seats will be pushing very ha rd out of 59 seats will be pushing very hard foran out of 59 seats will be pushing very hard for an independence referendum. borisjohnson is say no at the moment. i think if snp win a majority in in the scottish elections, i think they will be underan elections, i think they will be under an immense amount of pressure to see that referendum with the risk of obvious otherwise a grievance festering north of the border. your final thoughts, if you would, how does borisjohnson final thoughts, if you would, how does boris johnson manage final thoughts, if you would, how does borisjohnson manage a really diverse set of seats now, in terms of places, thrusts, emphasis. welcome he says he wants to govern isa welcome he says he wants to govern is a one nation tory, and frankly, he's got no choice now. it's coalition in stoke—on—trent, who have to govern for the whole country, that means putting the interests of poor people, working class people, sometimes ahead of his co re class people, sometimes ahead of his core vote. george, thank you very much indeed for being here with me. and for your analysis. let's go back down to downing street, and back to martin, of course, a lot of talk about the shuffle we are expecting,
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big reshuffle come january, about the shuffle we are expecting, big reshuffle comejanuary, how —— how quickly might that come? we are expecting it to be early part of next week before we get to hear what's in the queen's speech, which is where borisjohnson will set out his agenda for this parliament. much quieter this evening here in downing street, only a few of us diehards left. outside, there were quite a few protesters who are unhappy that borisjohnson is few protesters who are unhappy that boris johnson is now few protesters who are unhappy that borisjohnson is now taking up residence at number ten again. they are much quieter, only a few dozen of them left. but, of course, it's not just the conservatives who of them left. but, of course, it's notjust the conservatives who have had a momentous night. lieber did for all the wrong reasons as well, the opposition party. labour suffered it's worth election defeat since 1935, not only that, but lost seats in its traditional law heart lands, as we have been saying. places that have never voted conservative before. our political correspondent reports from stoke—on—trent central, which voted to leave the eu and has now gone
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blue for the first time in its history. stoke—on—trent‘s industrial past is still printed on the skyline. with roots in coal, steel, and famously, ceramics. this was a labour stronghold for decades. not any more. stoke—on—trent central now has a conservative mp, the first since the seat‘s creation in 1950. jo gideon, businesswoman and until now a councillor in kent, thinks she knows why she won here. it's a city that feels it's been neglected and ignored for a long time, and so, in a sense, the fact that they voted 70% for brexit and it didn't happen was just another example of how nobody is listening to them. and so it was a call to be listened to, really. more people here voted to leave than any other city in the uk. the tories tapped into brexit frustration in labour's heartlands. john is a former miner. i've always voted labour, all my life. until this time. who did you vote for? conservatives.
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why is that? to get something done on this brexit business. so you switch from labour to conservatives. yes, i don't like jeremy corbyn, for one. he is trying to put the country back years. some in labour claim their policy offer was crowded out by brexit, which was the tories' relentless focus. the conservatives deliberately put brexit front and centre of their campaign, hoping it would transcend traditional party loyalties, and so targeting areas that voted to leave in the midlands and the north, and that's where they gained support. while labour wrestles with the reasons behind this result, the former mp here called it a catastrophe. last night, laying blame on the party's leaders. in stoke—on—trent, we are going to have another five years of tory government. probably with three conservative mps, and the damage and the untold horrors they will unleash in stoke—on—trent, i believe, lays firmly at the door of those running the national parties campaign, and the decisions that they have made about where
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to target and these sort of brexit response that they should have made. in this city, some loyal to labour are surprised at the extent of their losses. i'll never be a tory voter. i was born in 1985, my mum was a single mother, we were at the tail end of the thatcher decade, and we were really struggling. and to see such a working—class, and hard—working and friendly city like stoke—on—trent be turned is just so sad to see. the country's political map does look very different today, with some who've never voted tory now making that choice. i've got to go with boris, i'm afraid. so, yeah, times are changing. they most certainly are. alex forsyth, bbc news, stoke—on—trent. labour's lisa nandy managed to hold on to her wigan seat, but she has been critical of the party's position on brexit, she spoke to our correspondent judith moritz and told her about the sadness many of her constituents felt
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at abandoning labour. it's been the worst campaigning experience that i can ever imagine, and i started delivering leaflets in the rain when i was about seven years old. this has definitely been the worst. people in towns like mine, they've got really good manners. they are really decent, but what was absolutely chattering ——they are really decent, but what was absolutely shattering about it was that as we went out, and we knocked on doors, we met people who have voted labour all their lives, who still share labour values, who just felt that they couldn't vote for us. there was some anger, but a lot of it was just deep, deep sadness. that they just didn't feel that they could come out and vote for us this time. many of them stayed at home. many of them, very, very clear that they don't feel any kind of affection for any other political party or any other agenda that's being pushed forward. i've got a very strong sense that people are looking for something positive to vote for, but they just didn't feel it was there. well, in many ways,
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you are lucky to have held on. looking at seats around you, the seismic shift there in lee, never been in tory hands before. this is a massive change. it is. it's heartbreaking, and i think it's very early to say, but i think what we have seen around the country is that there are a lot of communities who feel completely shut out of power. they feel that they don't have much of a voice from a nationally. ——they feel that they don't have much of a voice, nationally. they don't feel that they get their fair share of resources. they don't feel that they are respected, or understood. and the further that you go from those centres of power in london or in manchester, the more that that is felt. so, wigan is a town where people feel very strongly that we don't get our fair share of resources from manchester, orfrom london. but lee, again, is a town that doesn't feel, frankly, that it gets its fair share of attention or of attention or resources from wigan. and there is truth to that. you only have to walk down the high street to see what ten years of tory government has done. the loss ofjobs, a0 years ago in towns like these, it still felt, because they've never been replaced
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byjobs that pay a decent wage, that enable young people to stay. all of these things are things that i and many of my colleagues in these areas have been saying for a long time. and i think now is really the moment when the labour party has to sit up and take note of that. and has to think seriously about how we start to rebuild. and how does that happen? first of all, jeremy corbyn is saying he will hang on whilst he's rethinking, do you thank you should go immediately? ——on whilst he's rethinking, do you think he should go immediately? i think he's right, actually, to say that we need a period of reflection. i think we need to have a serious think about our future direction of travel. we haven't won a majority in the house of commons now since 2005. that is a long time, and these problems started to surface in towns like wigan around that time. we saw years of falling turnouts, we had a dramatic rise in support for ukip in many towns across the country, the north and the midlands, even in towns like this, which have consistently rejected the far right. then we had the vote to leave the european union, and at each moment, we haven't paid
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attention, we haven't understood what people are trying to tell us. and i think, quite honestly, that although, jeremy corbyn was clearly an issue in this general election, just simply saying, we are going to replace the face of the top and think that all of these really difficult long—standing problems are resolved for us isjust not good enough. we need to do better than that. but there are labour mp saying that today. so there is disharmony within the party. i mean, that's yourfirst problem. well, i think it would be unusual, to be honest, to have suffered the scale of defeat that we had and not have people feeling very raw, very angry, and wanting immediate change. change is definitely what we need. we need a change of direction. but we have replaced leader after leader, thinking that we could just fix the problems that way. and, actually, we need a serious rethink. most of all, what we need to do, is stop telling communities like mine what the problem is, and start listening to what they've been telling us for a very very long time. would you ever consider running? to be really honest, i don't know what i'm going to do next. i think that there are definitely things to be said, and i think
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there is a realjob of work to do to go out to lifelong labour voters in towns like mine and convince them that we can bring labour home to them, and to reconcile those very different parts of the country. david lumb's tottenham, and my wiggin, and build ——david lumb's tottenham, and my wigan, and build a sense of trust in both. that is the only way labour ever winds power. and i think we need to think seriously, first of all, about how we do that, and second of all, about who is best place to do that. so, the honest answer is from at this stage, i don't know. still reeling a bit from the sheer scale of what happened last night, and i think we need to go out into communities like mine and have a real think about what people are telling us. but you're not ruling it out? i'm not ruling anything out at this moment. i mean, i never really quite imagined that we would be in this situation, where we had lost constituencies like lee, where my friend, jo platt, was a good mp. she was well—liked, but where people just felt, in the end,
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although they had labour values, theyjust couldn't come out and vote for us. ijust never really believed that it would get that bad, despite how difficult this has been over the last 10—15 years in towns like ours. i think we just need a moment, where we stop and take stock, and think how do we rebuild that trust, and who is best placed to do it? although the liberal democrats increased their vote, it was a dismal night for them, failing to make a number of high—profile gains, and ending up one seat down on their 2017 total. worst of all, their leader jo swinson lost her east dunbartonshire seat to the snp. she's now resigned the leadership that she won just six months ago — today she said she was proud to the first woman to lead the liberal democrats. being myself, whether people attacked my vision or my voice, my ideas, or my earrings, one of the
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realities of smashing glass ceilings is that a lot of broken glass comes down on your head. so i'm proud to have been the first woman to lead the liberal democrats. i'm even more proud that i will not be the last. one seat the liberal democrats had been hoping to take was cheltenham but the conservative's hung on. our correspondent there fiona lamdin has been speaking to voters. here in the regency town of cheltenham, it has always been a two horse race. the liberal democrats and the conservatives. we were here two weeks ago and everyone was telling us the same thing. that they have had so much literature from the liberal democrats through the front door. the liberal democrats working so hard here because cheltenham was number six on their target hit list. now, they were hoping that with a promise to revoke article 50, they might entice traditional conservative voters to switch parties and that is because in 2016, 50 7% of this town voted to remain in the eu.
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——parties and that is because in 2016, 57% of this town voted to remain in the eu. but last night, alex kept his seat. i am just so totally disappointed and gutted about these election results. ijust feel really in despair for my country after having worked my whole career in the nhs, i really hoped that people would want to save it. for the lib dems, i think the fact that they were so, so much on this whole, "we will reject the brexit vote." instead if they said that they put it through a people's vote instead of outright rejection, the may have stood a better chance, maybe. very relieved. i am sure many people will be. i am also scared of what's going to happen now though, because it is not going to be plain sailing. there is going to be a time of unsettling. ——there is going to be a time of settling. i went with the queen things? i wonder what she thinks? i wish you were a fly on the wall. but alex taken a much smaller
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majority, 981 votes. breaking that down, the conservatives got a a8% share of the votes while the liberal democrats got a a6% share. so that means that this town today is very divided and some people are absolutely delighted and others are devastated. miss landon there reporting from cheltenham. more results from the election still to come on bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather forecast. hello there. now it's time for a look at the weatherforecast. hello there. it's been a mixture of sunshine and showers across the uk today. let me showers across the uk today. let me show you the radar picture over the past few hours. there has been some rain across the northeast of scotland, these showers have been all day, affecting northern ireland and northwestern england, and turning wetter in the southwest over the past few hours. that rain will slide its way down across southwestern areas over the next few
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hours. the showers further north adding into southern scotland wintry over the hills. stronger winds for northern ireland, england command wheels, we will see showers continuing overnight. a pretty chilly night as well, especially for the north, where the winds are a bit later, a bit of frost around him and perhaps some icy patches as well. into the beacon, we continue on this theme. some sunshine at times, showers which could be blustery, given the strength of the wind. it also cold enough for some snow over the hills. that's for mid wales and northwards. some showers pushing their way across england and wales on saturday morning. more in the way of sunshine in the afternoon. the winds will be strong and blow away most of the showers were northern ireland, but they will keep going into scotland, particularly in the west, again, sleet and snow over the hills. quite cold here for — 5 degrees, may hit double figures in the southwest, but somewhere wet weather arriving in the evening. as that moves into the colder air that's in the uk, we could find some hills know and wales, and perhaps from and more particularly across northern england by the end of
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saturday night. wet weather coming m, saturday night. wet weather coming in, you can see sleet and snow over the high ground. mind you, more wintry showers continuing into scotland, perhaps northern ireland. quite a showery picture overnights and given that it's still cold, you see the temperature is dropping away, that could lead to some icy patches run on sunday morning early on. and more showers, more widely on sunday for england and wales. some of those could be have become a particularly windy weather in the southwest, gales possible here. we could push some of that wet weather back into northern ireland, southern scotland, later in the day. scotland looks drier and not as windy, but is still cold. temperatures only for having 5 degrees. as we move into the beginning of next week, well, the beginning of next week, well, the winds start to ease down, but we've got the increasing risk of some frost around. some showers in the northwest with that low pressure, and that weather fronts may bring some rain monday into tuesday. we are still in colder air for the first few days of next week, but the signs of mild or, wetter, windier weather are returning from the atlantic from thursday.
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this is bbc news. borisjohnson is beginning a new term as prime minister after the conservatives won their biggest majority since 1987. i'm martine croxall here at downing street just a few hours ago, mrjohnson urged the nation to find closure and let the healing begin after years of brexit wrangling. the conservatives now have a majority of 80 seats of the prime
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minister has thanked those who helped this dramatic victory by voting tory for the first time. thank you for the trust you have placed in us and me and we will work around the clock to repay your trust and to deliver on your priorities with a parliament that works for you. a very different story for labour asjeremy corbyn leads his party to its worst election performance since the 19305. he says he will stand down but not yet. the responsible thing is not to walk away, i won't do that, sensible thing to do is stay here until someone is elected to succeed me, then i will step down at that point. elsewhere, a mixed picture for the other main parties... an extraordinary night for the scottish national party as they take almost all of the seats in scotland raising serious questions about the future of the union.
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given what i fear, a tory government now has in store for scotland that right to choose our own future has never been more important or more urgent. the snp's triumph costs the lib dems their leaderjo swinson loses her seat in east dunbartonshire. good evening and welcome to viewers here in the uk on the bbc news channel and around the globe on bbc world news. the conservative party has secured an overwhelming win in the general election. the prime minister borisjohnson now has a majority of 80 the largest since margaret thatcher in 1987. speaking outside downing street earlier today he said the country "deserves a permanent break from talking about brexit" and that he would deliver a parliament that "works
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for the people". for the labour party it's been bad news losing many seats in their traditional heartlands. jeremy corbyn called the result "disappointing" and said he would not fight a future general election. the liberal democrats had a terrible night as the party leader, jo swinson, lost her seat and quit. but the snp did well, coming close to sweeping the board in scotland. so let's take a look at the results as they stand. the conservatives won 306 to five seats up a7, labour took 203, down 59, the s&p had of a8 mp5, and increase of 13 and liberal democrats only have 11, down one, the dup eight, and sinn fein who don't take their seats, seven. throughout the next couple of hours who will get more reaction to that result and look at what it means for the political parties, the country and for brexit. first though let's catch up with a dramatic day with
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hits from our political editor laura canonsburg. the power of surprise... the power of victory. well, we did it, we did it. we pulled it off, didn't we? the power of a prime minister with authority firmly in his hands. with this mandate and majority, we will at last be able to do what? get brexit done! you paid attention. like myjubilation here they can keep the promise to leave the eu next month. the will we, won't we fundamental tussle of brexit almost atan end. this election means getting brexit done is now the irrefutable, irresistible, unarguable decision of the british people. but it didn't happen just because of traditional tories but because of labour voters going over. the majority he craved, the start of the change. we have won votes and trust from people who have never voted conservative before.
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those people want change. we cannot, must not, must not let them down. and in delivering change, we must change too. let's get brexit done. but first, my friends, let's get breakfast done. thank you all, thank you all very much for coming. thank you all very much. boris, boris! borisjohnson has pulled off what is a genuinely historic victory, notjust because it is the biggest conservative majority since the 805, but because he has had people who have never supported his party to vote for him. i think you have to appeal to the whole country if he gives you the man dead which is what has been
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given tonight. the best week and like a christmas present. we were like, omg, it is going to happen. it is amazing and it did. he has won the right to call this home for five years now. are you going to resign, mr corbyn? forjeremy corbyn, the end of his ambition to move a few short miles to westminster. he is off by the spring if not before. i did everything i could. of course, i put elite might take responsibility for putting the manifesto forward. the manifesto was universally supported throughout our party and movement. as i said in my own result last night, we don't give up on the eternal hopes of a more decent society. our exit poll is suggesting that there will be a conservative majority. from the start, it was obvious what might be coming.
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one of the very first results of blyth valley in northumberland, labour since 1950, turned tory. the new mp almost overwhelmed by the scale of that change. and i would like to thank boris. and through the night, labour's routes appeared to shrivel, whether in yorkshire, the midlands... i'm just sorry we have let people down. or the north—east, seat after seat flipped red to blue. jeremy corbyn's hopes came crashing down. in a fateful moment, just as he took to the stage in islington, sedgefield, the seat of tony blair, held by labourfor all time, broke for borisjohnson too. the foundations of labour‘s victories pass crumbling before our eyes, the party falling more heavily where people voted lee. the lib dems had a crushing night too. just a few weeks ago, jo swinson claimed she could be
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prime minister. in the middle of the night, though, she even lost her own place in parliament. she closed the day neither an mp nor a party leader. all of us who share an alternative vision for society have a responsibility to learn from this result and find new answers. they lost at the hands of the tories and the snp too, who cleaned up. look at the first minister, unable to hide her glee as the results came through. scotland yellow, england now largely blue. the union uneasy, another demand for a vote on independence on the way. i acknowledge that not everyone who voted snp yesterday is ready to support independence. whether or not scotland becomes an independent country must be a matter for the people who live here. the map moved in northern ireland as well. the dup leader at
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westminster, nigel dodds, lost his seat, and for the first time, more nationalists than unionists were chosen by voters, pulling at the union's thread. the brexit party scooped up votes but didn't cross the bar for any seats of their own. we are going to leave the european union now at the end of january. nor did any of those who switched allegiances in the last few torrid years. all these folding pieces created one clear picture — one man securely in charge, even though his journey gave discomfort to many voters. but with this victory, borisjohnson has secured at least a major chapter in the kind of history books he likes to write. he won't be a footnote now. his first task, to finish what they started. with an appeal to the a8 and the 52. to those who did not vote
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for us orfor me, and who wanted and perhaps still want to remain in the eu, and i want you to know that we in this one nation conservative government will never ignore your good and positive feelings of warmth and sympathy towards the other nations of europe. then an unlikely claim, perhaps, a post—election promise of peace and goodwill. this country deserves a break from wrangling, a breakfrom politics, and a permanent break from talking about brexit. thank you all very much, and happy christmas. thank you. yet, this politician has been unafraid to provoke, unafraid to gamble. he now swears he will govern for us all. with five years and a convincing majority, he has time to succeed or to stumble. for today, though,
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he who dared did win. lynn mccluskey who is a close ally ofjeremy corbyn said the result for labour was deeply disappointing. well, it's obviously a deeply, deeply disappointing results, a huge disappointment and it's pretty evident that in attempting to go beyond brexit which was the challenge for labour we failed. u nfortu nately challenge for labour we failed. unfortunately our liberal heartland, working—class art lands in the north and the midlands devoted leave, they undoubtedly felt that labour had let them down, and we were not able to convince them that the other issues and the concerns that they had were only going to be dealt with by a
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labour government. my worst fears have come true. that was always labour‘s achilles' heel, and our message was always come home to labourup, but message was always come home to labour up, but that did not break through and so now we will have to reflect on where we go from here. should jeremy corbyn stand down now? he has artie indicated he will be standing down, of course he should not do it right away. he is going to now preside over reflections, a defeat of this scale will always bring with it an element of unease and possible recriminations. these things happen, but we will now move forward to the election of a new leader. i suspect that will be early in the new year, and we will have to just continue to move forward on the values that labour stands for. are
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there any names in your mind? there's a lot of talented young people that will be coming forward for consideration, lots of talented young women. and so that debate now needs to take place in the right type of atmosphere and with proper discussion and consideration being given. do you think the time has come for a more centrist labour party now? this whole results has been brought about by brexit. boris johnson wanted it to be a brexit election, the media become a right—wing media wanted it to be, it was our challenge to break through that and unfortunately the it hasn't happened. but the manifesto: the radical policies that labour have stood on now for a number of years are hugely popular. remember, jeremy corbyn led us into an election just over two years ago with a radical ma nifesto over two years ago with a radical manifesto it almost came within
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touching distance of power, radical ma nifesto touching distance of power, radical manifesto this time withjeremy still in theatre. the big difference is brexit. i don't see there being any move towards moving away from these policies that are hugely popular. but you have lost so many elections. which is why we need to reflect on where we are. but not from a policy perspective? two years ago labour got a0% of the vote on a radical manifesto. this time around, another radical manifesto, a drop of eight points, and the only difference is brexit. and brexit is distorted a whole host of things. i don't see any need to move away from popular issues that people want to talk about. if we had not had brexit as an issue that i believe labour would have been comfortably elected to power.
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there's been plenty of reaction from round the world — this is what president trump had to say, about the election result. i wanted to congratulate boris johnson on a terrific victory, i think that might be a harbinger of what's to come in our country, it was last time. i'm sure people will be thrilled to hear that, but a lot of people will be actually, very big percentage of people because this was a tremendous victory last night, and it's very interesting, the final votes are being tallied now. he's a friend of mine, it's going to be a great thing for the united states also because it means a lot of trade, tremendous amount of trade, they want to do business with us so badly, under the european they want to do business with us so badly, underthe european union they want to do business with us so badly, under the european union it was very hard for them to do business with us. let's go straight back to downing street and as they celebrate there, the postmortem they're being carried out elsewhere
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and of course on brexit and more clear course ahead. yes, a big mandate and so he should be able to deliver that mandate. get brexit done, that's what we heard boris johnson under at every available opportunity and he's now got the support and hopefully he will think from the back benches so he can see his withdrawal bill through parliament and then move on to that all—important anti—trade discussion. apart from the conservatives, the other big winner of the night was the snp. they took a8 of scotland's 59 seats — and the party's leader nicola sturgeon says borisjohnson now has no right to stand in the way of another scottish independence referendum. our scotland editor sarah smith's been looking at what the snp's victory means for scotland and the united kingdom. posing with some school kids this morning, nicola sturgeon has one clear demand — that their political future be decided by scottish voters. she believes that winning 80% of the seats in scotland means
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she must now be allowed to hold another independence referendum but legally she needs borisjohnson to agree. so, to the prime minister, let me be very clear. this is not simply a demand that i or the snp are making, it is the right of the people of scotland, and you, as the leader of a defeated party in scotland, have no right to stand in the way. the prospect of another independence referendum is not imminent. borisjohnson will refuse permission. but that will put his government on a constitutional collision course with the party that dominates scotland. and that risks further increase in support for scottish independence. the conservative campaign focused almost entirely on rejecting another referendum. but it's the tories who were rejected in over half of their scottish seats. the people who gave us that vote,
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who voted for us last night, did so on the basis that we would stand up for scotland's place in the united kingdom. and i'm simply not prepared to betray the votes of those people for us last night. the lib dem leader, jo swinson, was defeated by the snp landslide. have you lost your seat, ms swinson? will you resign from the party? but scottish labour suffered the greatest humiliation. they were even beaten by a candidate who'd been suspended from the snp. and have only one surviving scottish mp. i'm sick at standing at lecterns during general election campaigns and saying, it's been a difficult night for the labour party. this party must listen, and this party must respond. or this party will die. the entire city of glasgow is now represented by the snp. and ready for another referendum. i definitely think we should be allowed to have an independence referendum, and i think that steps
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should be taken if possible to force them to make this happen, to let this happen. ijust think that... england's going one way, scotland's going another, so we should be able to decide for ourselves. if they are there, obviously, we get the go—ahead from westminster, it will happen again, obviously, we have to make our choice again. i'll be voting no again. a whole new crop of mp5 is a victory for the snp. jo swinson said she was proud to the first woman to lead the liberal democrats. iam i am proud in selection to have thoughts for what we and millions of people believe is the best future
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for our country, remaining in the european union. when 19 labour mp5 help to pass borisjohnson pathetic brexit deal in the house of commons, it was clear we had to act. we forced johnson to request an extension to article 50, but without labour support cannot assemble a majority for a people's vote. leaving a general election as the only chance to remain in the eu. so idid not only chance to remain in the eu. so i did not shirk the debates and the phone ends, and turned up to the interviews and i stood up proudly for our beliefs. i'm proud of the liberal democrats have been the unapologetic voice of remain in the selection. giving people the chance to choose to stop brexit obviously, this has not worked. i like you, and devastated about that but i don't regret trying. trying everything, because the prize look to save our
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future, our children's future in europe where we can work together to tackle the claimant emergency. trade freely to boost our living standards and bea freely to boost our living standards and be a strong beacon for human rights around the world. christine jardine is the lib dem mp for edinburgh west... and shejoins us now. thank and she joins us now. thank you very much forjoining us here on bbc news. why did your party failed to cut through in a way that you had hoped, when seats like cheltenham look like they're yours for the taking only few days ago? we missed a lot of seeds quite narrowly and the moment it's too early to see. i'm not sure what went wrong. she let a very positive campaign a very upbeat campaign and why that did not cut through the older two party
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system. just missed a lot of places. 1.2 million more voted for us this time that in 2017, and we have one seat if you are. i think maybe the lesson is that it's time that we did away with the old first past the post system and look proper system of proportional representative not just for the liberal democrats but for the benefit of the country, that people get the representation that they voted for and notjust people get the representation that they voted for and not just the person who is most popular in their area, so person who is most popular in their area , so everyone person who is most popular in their area, so everyone should have a voice and be represented. it's hard to imagine the conservatives having one as they did will be keen to see the back of the first past the post, isn't it true that it was the wrong leader with the wrong message to say that you were going to overturn brexit, to stop brexit, which was for many people to thwart the will of the voters who had said in 2016
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that they wanted to leave the eu, you were wrong to do that? we set for three and a half years that what we wa nted for three and a half years that what we wanted was a referendum to give the people final say on the deal once we knew the details of it. we said that for three and a half years and labour failed to said that for three and a half years and labourfailed to back us in 17 amendments, and we ended up in a situation where a general election was the only option on the table. we had been the majority government. you know what? as you've seen come up you know what? as you've seen come up wasjust you know what? as you've seen come up was just a step too far and too quickly. a policy i still believe that a referendum giving people the final say of the deal is what we should do regardless and will continue to press for that. we will spend some time now going back over the strategy, the messaging and see where we went wrong, but do i think
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we had the wrong leader? no i don't. i still think we had the right leader. 11 of your mps in westminster, who do you need as your next leader? i have not had time to think about that yet. still getting over the shock and disappointment of not having joe sitting beside us for the next five years. that's what bothers me most. we appreciate you talking to us, i think we've lost the picture there. that was christine jardine, the liberal democrats mp for edinburgh west. the political map for the united kingdom looks very different for scotland and northern ireland. professor colin harvey is an expert in constitutional law and politics at queen 5 university belfast. hejoins me now from belfast. thank you very much forjoining us.
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if you were to come up just talk us through the kind of divisions that you now see and are impossible to ignore? last night the results were a very bad night for unionism in scotland, and in northern ireland. we have to remember that the two constituent parts of the uk voted to remain in the european union, scotla nd remain in the european union, scotland and northern ireland and really seeing now the follow—through of all of that, so i think as many people predicted brexit is raising profound questions about the future of the uk, and that's going to become a priority issue. but here in northern ireland and in scotland in the years ahead. nicola sturgeon has said that boris johnson the years ahead. nicola sturgeon has said that borisjohnson has no right to deny them another referendum on independence, how will he resist that pressure? it was a very good night for the s&p and i think that there was a real risk now for a
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major constitutional crisis and i could get resolved in the courts and while it is possible that scotland co m press while it is possible that scotland compress on it could be much better if this is resolved as in the previous referendum through political agreements and dialogue. in terms of northern ireland, we now see more nationalist mp5 than unionist mp5 for the first time, what does that mean for getting stormont back up and running after this incredibly long break we have seen, and also the relationship between the north and the south of the island ? between the north and the south of the island? i think last night was againa the island? i think last night was again a seismic night, and if you think about what you've just said, nationalism has now in a sense taking over unionism. it was lost in 2017, and we saw two mp5. really
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a seismic evening tonight, but i think next week there will be negotiations starting on the restoration of the power—sharing institutions, but i think the big picture and big story from last night was really a growing conversation on this island about the constitutional future of this island, so i thinkjust like scotla nd island, so i thinkjust like scotland in a sense we are heading into a conversation here about referendums and both bits of this island about the constitutional future north and south. boris johnson has talked about being a one nation conservative government, how then does he hold to the union together? boris johnson really has together? boris johnson really has to wa ke together? boris johnson really has to wake up to the fact that the uk isa to wake up to the fact that the uk is a pluralist entity, is a multinational state in his regions and nations within the uk and it's a
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diverse place. if it's to survive at all borisjohnson needs to very quickly, no matter what size they have, they need to quickly wake up to that reality and that fact. professor: harvey from queens university, thank you very much. huge ramifications for the parties themselves but also the different parts of the united kingdom. thank you, pretty more from you in the coming minutes. the political map has been completely withdrawn. our news correspondent christian fraser has been looking at the results and particularly those dramatic swings from labour to conservative in the north of england. people coming and want to see the final picture, this is it. best performance for the conservatives since 1987, and it gets better, their best since 1979. for labour a horrendous night, lost 59 seats and
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that's worse than michael in 1983. liberal democrats, how did it end? started with such promise a few weeks ago, down from when they were in 2017 and swenson has lost her seat. these are the seats that went from red to blue, the likes of this seat, seat ofjohn mann who did stand out of the selection, a majority of 5000, look at this. the majority of 5000, look at this. the majority now for the conservatives of 1a,000, the sort of figures incidentally, not easily overturned or won election and look at the vote share change, labour collapsing down 2596, share change, labour collapsing down 25%, the swing enormous, quite extraordinary. similar picture in dudley north, ian austin vote conservative he told them, former mayor, now with the majority of 11 and a half thousand. a seat that will knock you back to labour any time soon. said field, the former
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seat of tony blair, 25,000 majority when he came from a... from when he came to power. now in the hands of the conservatives with a four and a half thousand majority. now the rising star in labour, even she has lost her seat to my fairly decent majority and now it's gone to the conservatives and again and take a colla pse conservatives and again and take a collapse in labour vote share and you see this swing, 10%. an extraordinary election and a lot of thinking to do for labour. let's joining me now is stephen lynch, a former adviser to sajid javid when he went up against borisjohnson in the conservatice leadership battle. welcome here to the programme. you we re welcome here to the programme. you were just talking to me as you were watching that of where you wear when the exit poll numbers came, did this even surprise you? it did. it's far surpassed my expectations and people
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involved in the campaign, i was literallyjumping involved in the campaign, i was literally jumping off of involved in the campaign, i was literallyjumping off of this in westminster, speak at the studio when i saw that image i did not quite believe it. it was only from the experience of the last elections was of course such javid said no one needs to worry about a no deal. only a short while ago conservative candidates of another country were saying we would still not take no deal off the table before that trade deal off the table before that trade deal that has to be negotiated in 11 months. so is on the table or off the table now? there is will now. there is increased... boris has more ofa there is increased... boris has more of a mandate now to go and get this agreement through the house of commons and to sit down with the eu 27 negotiators. that bit has not
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changed. that bit has not changed. it has changed in it sergeant javed's assessment of it. it has changed in terms of agriculture, fisheries and the financial services and has more power behind it with those extra seats in the house of commons. so no deal is possible at the end of that period at the end 2020. but there is will on both sides for that to be a free—trade agreement. the think it is still possible? the rules with the uk in the you are pretty much aligned with the you are pretty much aligned with the trouble is as you get closer to negotiating a trade deal with the us, it diverges and that is the problem with the timescale that has been laid out out 11 months. that is a pointand been laid out out 11 months. that is a point and also the eu have a fearsome reputation for being ruthless negotiators. it took them seven ruthless negotiators. it took them seve n yea rs ruthless negotiators. it took them seven years to conclude their trade agreement with canada which is the most eu like country that is out of
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the eu if you like. but look at exa m ples of the eu if you like. but look at examples of america and australia, they have to trade agreements with event two years. so it is possible if both sides, if it is in their interest enough to conclude a deal with in a short timeframe. would you accept that now having a majority of 80, if he was to perhaps just extend that transition period, he now has it within his grip because he has the numbers in terms of seeing all perhaps part of the wings of the party that say actually not? is an interesting point. ironically in the context of borisjohnson with the fa ct context of borisjohnson with the fact that he has this increased majority that you highlighted actually increases the likelihood that we have a softer brakes or at least a trade agreement that we reach with the eu. do you think that is likely that that has changed the dynamic of the sort of it might actually happen. it has increased
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what but maybe not a certainty. boris has increased freedom of movement if i can coin the phrase there. he has increased room for manoeuvre. he is no longer in hock to the dup in particular. the european research group, there will bea european research group, there will be a new intake of mp5 pro brexit mp5 in this recent election, your mark francoise and steve baker and bill have less influence lightly as before. so he more freedom. that is a very interesting assessment in terms of just the a very interesting assessment in terms ofjust the diversity now of the sorts of sees the tories are present. how do you move forward in terms of a unified approach with so much diversity. boris johnson terms of a unified approach with so much diversity. borisjohnson talked about those labour votes he said he welcomed but said could only be lent potentially and set the perhaps there is a need for change in the party. what sort of changes do you think need to be made in the party? there are several changes that can be made in terms of the candidates
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who stand for the party. nothing about the candidates but the approach, what they believe in. they party policy. boris had a clearly good —— clear offered to the country in the manifesto has been criticised for being very short and not being as lengthy as labour's. you can see perhaps in the election results white labour perhaps suited to many policies. what the party has to do is simply to deliver what is said out today. i am not going to reel off the figures that we've all become familiar with. but delivering on crime, education and health and so they do that. just a thought on the type of campaign that the conservatives ran. because of course it has been usually successful but are you proud of the type of campaign that was actually wrong when you look at those occasions where videos were adopted in terms wealthy of the she was saying and the dodgy factory website or when you look at borisjohnson ducking
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forensic interviews? were you proud of the way the campaign was actually run? i think i was proud of the discipline that the people running the campaign showed. with some of these issues. i think... winning at all these issues. i think... winning at a ll cost, these issues. i think... winning at all cost, at any cost? of course the truth is very important and i would just say personally you can make this point probably of a lot of parties in this election, there has been an element of people getting away with not being fully truthful and not telling the truth. and personally i regret that but if we come back to the conservative campaign, they ran a very disciplined campaign focusing on key m essa g es disciplined campaign focusing on key messages and they refuse to be sort of diverted from that and the thrust of diverted from that and the thrust of campaigning and they successfully highlighted labour's weak areas, which were leadership, their convoluted brexit position and their economic policies as well. we have to leave it there but thank you very
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much forjoining me that this evening. talking a little earlier about the sorts of seats the conservatives managed to win. tory mp5 elected in many places previously considered safe labour seats. one of those was bassetlaw ion the east midlands, where brendan clarke—smith became the first conservative mp since the 19305. here's what people had to say about it in worksop today. how are you feeling this morning? so proud. rubbish. wanted to move on. best of a bad bunch unfortunately. so many were thinking with the promises. the develop go your way? i voted conservative. the family has a lwa ys voted conservative. the family has always been labour but it cannot get any worse. that is my opinion. hopefully it goes upwards and get sorted. do you think the best man one? absolutely. good old boris. so
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proud. we are great britain and we always have been and we always will be and we are one of the world leaders. so i think we look forward to working with a country to get the economy up and going and get out of brexit. people of had enough these last three years. with the brexit swea rwo rd. last three years. with the brexit swearword. i think with brexit and everything it is absolute rubbish. causing all that trouble, all that assault and never going to win with jeremy corbyn. so unfortunately...” a lwa ys jeremy corbyn. so unfortunately...” always vote labour because i've a lwa ys always vote labour because i've always been a working lad and i voted thinking we need a change and i think boris had the right ideas. go to the point as yesterday at, i said to my daughter and said i might toss a coin. because jeremy corbyn and dynamic are the things that you have seen, it is not who i want so i voted labour and would hopefully change leader or something. that was kind of what we were hoping but obviously it is conservative so we have to go with it. maybe a big
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change for the best. certainly a big change. brendan clarke—smith joins us now from near worksop, within that bassetlaw constituency. welcome to the programme and congratulations on becoming the mp. what does it feel like because that has been by labour since 1929 thank you very much for inviting me on. we fitted we will be doing well. the reaction has been incredible on the doorstep. the people, especially labour supporters switching to us for the first time. we expect to do well here but we did not expect was the actual size of the majority. obviously it is the biggest sling in the country as well. it was an 1896 swing which is staggering. was it obvious to you that that swing was happening in the weeks and the days before the actual pole and what would you say was the heart of the reason for it? our polling is always
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good and he always took it with a bit of a pinch of salt. because that is always better when you asked them if they voted for you or not and what we found was our polling held up what we found was our polling held up in every single part of the constituency. we actually won every single council ward and we swept across the board. obviously brexit played a big part in that. but it does not tell the whole story. and obviously a majority, a bit more than brexit and other people more concerned about the jeremy corbyn government. that is a message we we re government. that is a message we were getting on the door, even from traditional labour voters in their 905, they're looking for the first time at us. we also focused on local issues as well and i think that was just as important people as well. as we made sure he talked about the nhs, focusing on the local hospital, talking about more police officers in about smart towns and shops. does that reflect also perhaps to change that reflect also perhaps to change that boris johnson that reflect also perhaps to change that borisjohnson was talking about when he was talking about those
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labour voters they had voted for the conservatives for the first time? do you think the party actually has to have a different outlook and approach going forward?” have a different outlook and approach going forward? i think we hear people lending as their votes andi hear people lending as their votes and i think all of that, all voters lend you their votes and never take them for granted. people felt for this initiative truancy. they felt laid out be respected with a referendum when so many voted to leave. they felt the labour party had moved away from the values, especially those that have been in the armed forces were very negative aboutjeremy the armed forces were very negative about jeremy corbyn. the armed forces were very negative aboutjeremy corbyn. a lot of former coal miners who were saying they we re coal miners who were saying they were going to vote for us. it was fairly unprecedented but i think our policies and i think our focus, not necessarily a new thing obviously the people buying council houses is a very old policy for that we are looking at things now such as childcare policies, 30 hours of that for free that is helping working families, low rent tax racial, these are all things and go down very well with blue—collar workers and i think
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this is while they are coming over the conservatives. just hearing there from people in so many of those contributors talking about brexit. you want to say get brexit done virtually every other sentence in the coming days and weeks now but it will be a shock for people if 20/20 ends up being those same issues, those same questions being talked about by politicians when you are there at westminster as you will be. i think having a majority changes that really. we had a hung parliament and i think the premise of the deterministjob to get a deal when they said they would not renegotiate. i think the great thing is every conservative candidate actually set up to the prime minister's deal so there will not be any surprises therefore savea will go through parliament and will get that done as soon as possible and shortly before the 20th —— 21st of january. it is important in a really good negotiating position for the second part which is the most
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important. we shall see. thank you for taking time to speak to us today. let's head back to dentistry and a short while ago you looked at scotla nd short while ago you looked at scotland and turn your attentions to wales now, are you not? labour's heartlands in wales were not safe from the conservatives sweep to power where they gained six seats. the tories took seats that have been red for generations like the industrial town of bridgend, and they also overturned a recent lib dem by—election win in brecon and radnorshire. the town of wrexham had until last night been in labour hands since 1935. from there, our correspondent hywel griffith reports on the results in wales. welcome to a town of first—time tories. wrexham has never returned a conservative mp before. for most of a century, it stuck with labour through thick and thin.
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austerity bit hard here, but it has turned its back on the party and gone from red to blue. for liam, it was all about delivering brexit. get it done. we should be an independent country. we should be moving forward, looking at different things. onwards and upwards, i say! others lacked faith in labour's leader. for pam, he was the reason she voted tory. i really just didn't want jeremy corbyn to be our prime minister. i don't think there was a great deal to choose from, but ijust didn't want him in as the prime minister. you'd rather boris johnson? well, kind of, yeah! wrexham is at the western edge of the so—called red wall — labour seats targeted by the tories. irene lewis was, until a few months ago, vice—chair of the local labour party. but this time, she lent her vote to borisjohnson, and she would consider doing it again. if the policies of the conservatives are more in line with my thinking, then i will vote for them. it may not be a one—off? it may not be a one—off, no.
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this wasn't a tory takeover. labour remains the largest party in wales. but it has been humbled. losing votes on brexit, not connecting through its leader and vitally, failing to persuade voters here on its record after 20 years of running public services in wales. there was little festive cheer for the other parties either. the lib dems lost their only welsh seat. plaid cymru held theirfour. but it will be the conservatives who feel that christmas has come early. hywel griffith, bbc news, wrexham. let's talk to sianjones, a former advisor to the conservative chancellor philip hammond. she's in our cardiff studio. thank you very much forjoining us here on bbc news. the conservatives had their best not in wales since the early 19805. how much did brexit have to do with that. i think it was clearly a huge factor. just that
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filling of paralysis and not being able to move on. that was playing as strongly in wales is everywhere else but i also think it was a lot to do with jeremy corbyn but i also think it was a lot to do withjeremy corbyn not getting good feedback on the doorstep. and i think also that as well the signalling by boris johnson think also that as well the signalling by borisjohnson that he was going to be potentially loosening the purse strings on public spending a little bit. that also made the conservatives electoral offer more appealing in brexit one. -- wales. labour still have their red wall and parts of wales, don't they? how does the party then try to make use of that in future and not let them set in any further? interesting because obvious to the labour party have got a lot of challenges now coming into the next set of welsh assembly elections in 2021. and i think especially they will look very closely at the strategy and how they wa nt to closely at the strategy and how they want to move forward because they have been seen as very closely aligned to jeremy corbyn. have been seen as very closely aligned tojeremy corbyn. in a way that his predecessor was not. we had
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this talk of cleared red water between welsh labour and the national labour party which is not been the case during the selection andi been the case during the selection and i think welsh labour were largely invisible during this campaign and! largely invisible during this campaign and i think perhaps that has not paid offer them so they will have to re—examine their strategy quite carefully moving forward now. whereas for the conservatives now, i think it will be able to put that groundwork of constituencies gained in the northeast because the majority they won while creditable are not huge therefore they are potentially nonreturnable with a dynamic new labour leadership. delay will look to try and show it up as much as they can in the next couple of years. why was this election is so terrible in wells for liberal democrats? i think brexit had a great do with it and i think particularly in brecon and render sure is a brexit supporting part of wales and i think the lib dems were under my housing and some would say undemocratic in simply abandoning brexit all together and i did not go
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down well at all. so they did not make any inroads there target seats and were hoping to have a crack but did not get anywhere. they were hoping to take back one in west wells which is always been a marginal for them wells which is always been a marginalfor them and wells which is always been a marginal for them and plied wells which is always been a marginalfor them and plied company but in fact they lost a majority quite substantially so it was a bad night for them. and why did plaid not cut through as they had hoped?” think it is always difficult election for plaid because they are not going to get the exposure the other parties are going to get. i think as well there brexit message was not necessarily in—line with the national sentiment. they were part of this remain alliance with the lib dems in the green party that did not make any progress. they will be generally not to have been amended to shore up a couple of marginal seats and they held onto another one as well. but they will be disappointed they were not able to
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cut through in a long—held target of there sniff at the conservative candidate was only salted on the last of nominations took the seat without actually having experience there at all. they will do some hard thinking and i think of the next few weeks. people in scotland and northern ireland reassessing their place in the united kingdom. in the union. what sort of movement is there in wales that might mean there are people there who want to reassess to ? are people there who want to reassess to? i don't think the independence movement has got the groundswell that it has in scotland. i think wales is was but a few steps behind scotland in that regard but i think it is fair to say that it is starting to enter the mainstream a lot more. there was a demonstration at her not to want to go in favour of independence which is quite well attended and i think it is talked to quite a bit in the cardiff bay bubble book to what extent it is
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spreading out beyond the plaid heart lands in west wells is hard to say really. i think you will be a wait and see thing. i think obviously if things start to fall with scotland, that i think wales could potentially see them looking to reassess but i think the timeframe for that will be obviously much longer. thank you very much for your time. that is how things are looking in wales and again it was a very good not for the conservatives. thank you very much. international reaction now. brexit has dominated the election. eu leaders have been meeting at a summit in brussels. the european council's new president charles michel says they hope the british parliament will vote quickly on the uk's withdrawal bill from the bloc following the result. we expect as soon as possible the vote by the british parliament on the withdrawal agreement. it's important to have clarity
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as soon as possible. we are ready. the european union will negotiate now that we're close to the future with the uk. the french president emmanuel macron has said even though the uk is leaving the eu, britain will always be part of europe. tranlsation: it is now time to for me telll our british friends something very clear. these elections confirmed the decision in the referendum some three years ago, but you're not leaving europe. you're still by our side, and we're still by yours. our geography, our values mean that we bond beyond ups and downs, difficulties and disappointments, and france in particular is dearly attached to this relationship. and once we have clarity
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from the legal and institutional framework, we very much need to continue to build our common future. some of the latest international reaction. let's get back to the domestic side of things. a huge amount of changes of personnel in the house of commons. the results means sir peter bottomley, who entered the commons in 1975, has now become the father of the house. there have been some unedifying scenes in the house of commons in the past few months, he explained his hopes for how the mood will change. i think the mood will calm down. the erg said some pretty rough thanks to theresa may and i hope they now regret them and i will not list them in detail. i think some of the momentum type people have realised thatjeremy corbyn momentum type people have realised that jeremy corbyn and momentum type people have realised thatjeremy corbyn and momentum is them have lost momentum and they should lose jeremy them have lost momentum and they should losejeremy corbyn. i think he will stand after however they
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stay on for a period of reflection. in my town hall and were think about where both the mp5 did pretty well, isaid where both the mp5 did pretty well, i said that the old—style labour people were good and momentum should leave town. it was pointed momentum started shouting and totally ruin the mood. they just started shouting and totally ruin the mood. theyjust had no self control. i think the present speaker is someone who will have a different approach from the previous speaker. there are many good things to say about jumper, but i there are many good things to say aboutjumper, but i hope there will get they say about the present speaker and i think will with humour and strict control not allow things to drift on the what they did. results are come on through the last 2a hours and the swings in the season so much focus on that and pulling experts. earlier, polling expert professor sirjohn curtice reflected on the challenge the prime minister faces. i think my thick away is that the challenge facing the prime minister now is he indeed going to be able to get out the country in a post brexit
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world chris met this election clearly posting with two challenges. one is how does he persuade remain vote rs one is how does he persuade remain voters to accept brexit burisma equally was trying in his speech outside ten ninety st today. but we have to remember very few remain vote rs have to remember very few remain voters voted for boris johnson yesterday. and second challenge is what is he going to do about the union and in particular the fact that scotland very clearly voted very differently from england and in a direction that suggests the arguments about whether they should be another new independent referendum is going to be alive and kicking for quite some time. that was reflections on the general election. more coming up at 9pm uk time but let's pause and look at the most memorable moments from this event full general election. have a look at this. music. our exit poll is suggesting that there will be
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a conservative majority. at this stage, it does look as though this one nation conservative government has been given a powerful new mandate. applause. i will not lead the party in any future general election campaign. corbyn was a disaster on the doorstep. everyone knew that he couldn't lead the working class out of a paper bag. for me, this is about whether the labour party even has any right to exist. i still believe that we as a country can be warm and generous. the scottish national party, 17,000... applause. # i'm dreaming of a blue christmas... afternoon, everybody.
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i say thank you for the trust you have placed in us and in me. i urge everyone to find closure and to let the healing begin. and happy christmas! hello there, good evening. we've seen some much drier and brighter weather for many parts of the country today. the showers were all or nothing. in sheltered areas such as here in gloucestershire, it was dry with some sunshine. but through the isle of man, for example, we've had shower after shower already earlier on today. now, those showers will tend to move their way northwards up in towards southern scotland to bring some snow over the hills. it'll turn drier in the northeast of mainland scotland, but we'll see lots of showers packing across northern ireland, england and wales. on a fairly strong wind as well, which should on the whole keep the temperatures up.
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but it's touch and go as you had futher north and maybe a touch of frost here and there. as we head into the weekend, it remains quite chilly. it'll probably be cold enough for a bit more snow on the hills as far south as mid—wales. more showers driven on by some very strong winds for england and wales. there will be some sunshine around as well. and those showers will push their way eastwards across england and wales on saturday morning, leaving some drier and sunnier weather in the afternoon. those showers may ease off in northern ireland, continue in scotland, especially in the west with some more sleet and snow in the hills. quite a cold day here, temperatures a—5 degrees. head towards the south west of england, temperatures may get into double figures, but it will turn wetter here during the evening. and as that wet weather comes into england and wales on saturday night, into the cold air, some hill snow mainly across wales and northern england. a couple of centimetres by the morning. you can see that wet weather moving in here. doesn't last too long before it pushes away. the wintry showers continue overnight into scotland and northern ireland as well. and for the northern half of the uk in particular, looks like there will be a touch of frost, and given those showers
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and a covering of snow over the hills of northern england in particular, may well be some icy patches as well. sunday sees more showers more widely for england and wales. some of them heavy. gales picking up perhaps towards the south west of england. not so windy for scotland and northern ireland, southern scotland and northern ireland probably turning wetter later in the day, but for the rest of scotland, it should be a dry day but still on the cold side. as we move into the beginning of next week, well, we see the winds easing down. this area of low pressure will bring showers in the northwest. this weather front perhaps bringing some rain later towards the south east of the uk. but we're still in cold air for the first couple of days of next week. there's milder air waiting in the wings, and that will be accompanied by some wetter, windier whether from thursday onwards.
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this is bbc news — i'm matthew amroliwala — live at westminster where boris johnson is beginning a new term as prime minister after the conservatives won their biggest majority since 1987. i'm martine croxall — here at downing street just a few hours ago, mrjohnson urged the nation to find closure and let the healing begin after years of brexit wrangling. the conservatives now have a majority of 80 seats, and the prime minister has thanked
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those who helped this dramatic victory by voting tory for the first time. thank you for trust you have placed in us and me, we will work round the clock to repay trust and deliver on priorities with a parliament that works for you. a very different story for labour as jeremy corbyn leads his party to its worst election performance since the 19305. he says he will stand down but not yet. the responsible thing is not to walk away, i won't do that, sensible thing to do is stay here until someone is elected to succeed me, then i will step down at that point. i'm nuala mcgovern with our other top stories. the article is agreed to. one step closer to impeaching the president? a committee in the us congress approves two charges against donald trump.
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american stocks rise after the us and china strike a preliminary trade agreement, easing tensions between the world's two biggest economies. hello and welcome from westminster — the heart of british politics from where boris johnson has promised to repay the trust of voters, after leading the conservatives to an extraordinary election victory. the party won an 80—seat commons majority — its biggest since 1987. the prime minister said he hoped his victory would bring "closure" to the brexit debate and "let the healing begin". but it was a very different night for the main opposition. it was the labour party's worst performance since the 19305. jeremy corbyn said he would not
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contest another general election as leader — but he hasn't stood down yet, despite calls for him to do so. the liberal democrats had a terrible night too — their leaderjo swinson lost her seat. in scotland, the snp made major gains, winning a8 of the 59 seats available. it was a night that saw the electoral map redrawn. with all seats declared, this is the state of the parties. the conservatives have won 365 seats — labour 203 — the scottish national party a8 — the liberal democrats 11 — the dup 8 — and other parties 15. let's have a look at a map showing the spread of parties at the last election, in 2017. and this is how the map looks now — showing the conservatives have gained a7 seats, labour have lost 59, the snp gained 13, and the liberal democrats lost one. we'll have reaction
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from across the uk and around the world. we'll be hearing from the voters who helped change the political picture so dramatically and asking what the future now holds. our political editor laura kuenssberg begins our coverage — her report contains flash photography. cheering. the power of surprise... the power of victory. well, we did it, we did it. we pulled it off, didn't we? the power of a prime minister with authority firmly in his hands. with this mandate and majority, we will at last be able to do what? get brexit done! you paid attention. like myjubilation here they can keep the promise to leave the eu next month. the will we, won't we fundamental tussle of brexit almost atan end. this election means getting brexit done is now the irrefutable, irresistible, unarguable decision
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of the british people. but it didn't happen just because of traditional tories but because of labour voters going over. the majority he craved, the start of the change. we have won votes and trust from people who have never voted conservative before. those people want change. we cannot, must not, must not let them down. and in delivering change, we must change too. let's get brexit done. at first, my friends, let's get breakfast done. thank you all, thank you all very much for coming. thank you all very much. boris, boris! borisjohnson has pulled off what is a genuinely historic victory, notjust because it is the biggest conservative majority since the 805, but because he has had people who have never supported his
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party to vote for him. i'm a northerner, so i think you have to appeal to the whole country if he gives you the mandate which is what has been given tonight. it's like a christmas present. we were like, omg, it is going to happen. it is amazing and it did. he has won the right to call this home for five years now. are you going to resign, mr corbyn? forjeremy corbyn, the end of his ambition to move a few short miles to westminster. he is off by the spring if not before. i did everything i could. of course, i put elite might take responsibility for putting the manifesto forward. the manifesto was universally supported throughout our party and movement. as i said in my own result last night, we don't give up on the
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eternal hopes of a more decent society. our exit poll is suggesting that there will be a conservative majority. from the start, it was obvious what might be coming. one of the very first results of blyth valley in northumberland, labour since 1950, turned tory. the new mp almost overwhelmed by the scale of that change. and i would like to thank boris. and through the night, labour's routes appeared to shrivel, whether in yorkshire, the midlands... i'm just sorry we have let people down. or the north—east, seat after seat flipped red to blue. jeremy corbyn's hopes came crashing down. in a fateful moment, just as he took to the stage in islington, sedgefield, the seat of tony blair, held by labourfor all time, broke for borisjohnson too. the foundations
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of labour‘s victories pass crumbling before our eyes, the party falling more heavily where people voted lee. the lib dems had a crushing night too. just a few weeks ago, jo swinson claimed she could be prime minister. in the middle of the night, though, she even lost her own place in parliament. she closed the day neither an mp nor a party leader. all of us who share an alternative vision for society have a responsibility to learn from this result and find new answers. they lost at the hands of the tories and the snp too, who cleaned up. look at the first minister, unable to hide her glee as the results came through. scotland yellow, england now largely blue. the union uneasy, another demand for a vote on independence on the way. i acknowledge that not everyone
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who voted snp yesterday is ready to support independence. whether or not scotland becomes an independent country must be a matter for the people who live here. the map moved in northern ireland as well. the dup leader at westminster, nigel dodds, lost his seat, and for the first time, more nationalists than unionists were chosen by voters, pulling at the union's thread. the brexit party scooped up votes but didn't cross the bar for any seats of their own. we are going to leave the european union now at the end of january. nor did any of those who switched allegiances in the last few torrid years. all these folding pieces created one clear picture — one man securely in charge, even though his journey gave discomfort to many voters. but with this victory, borisjohnson has secured
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at least a major chapter in the kind of history books he likes to write. he won't be a footnote now. his first task, to finish what they started. with an appeal to the a8 and the 52. to those who did not vote for us orfor me, and who wanted and perhaps still want to remain in the eu, and i want you to know that we in this one nation conservative government will never ignore your good and positive feelings of warmth and sympathy towards the other nations of europe. then an unlikely claim, perhaps, a post—election promise of peace and goodwill. this country deserves a break from wrangling, a breakfrom politics, and a permanent break from talking about brexit. thank you all very much, and happy christmas. thank you. yet, this politician has been
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unafraid to provoke, unafraid to gamble. he now swears he will govern for us all. with five years and a convincing majority, he has time to succeed or to stumble. for today, though, he who dared did win. let's talk to the former liberal democrat mp lembit opik. he represented the welsh seat of montgomeryshire from 1997 to 2010 and joins us now from our tunbridge wells studio. welcome, why did it go so wrong for your party last night? had their sights set on so many seats. two problems. one of leadership in one of policy, in terms of leadership, whenever one was a great mp, but not a great leader. do not have the
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qualities and skills to do it. when i was the leader of the welsh mumbled democrats —— liberal democrats. secondly in terms of policy someone in the lib dems came up policy someone in the lib dems came up with the crazy idea that they would simply scrap brexit and that's not even slightly democratic, that would be like me going back to my old seat and saying actually have change my mind and just going to carry on being the mp even though i lost the seat. that's not democratic and itjust lost the seat. that's not democratic and it just was lost the seat. that's not democratic and itjust was incredible. at those things together with some very porky pending decisions and the result was all of these mp5. pending decisions and the result was all of these mps. what are the qualities that the party will need in the next leader? a very clear narrative, i think i was to some extent missing with her, and i'm sad to say is being said privately anyway, but number two inability to
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really reach out and communicate in a way that has got more gravitas to what we saw with her and then thirdly the ability to build a team one of the defeated candidates described jo swinson as living in the metropolitan bubble and these whole mess was avoidable, i've got to agree with that. i read a book about nick and i was ostracized and ignored. a month ago i said that she would lose her seat if she did not focus on what i called the home fires, i was ignored, and once again the result was obvious. the hope i've got now is that people might start listening to somebody with 33 yea rs start listening to somebody with 33 years experience in politics and begin to take a cold hard look on what the liberal democratic core vote is a being built from that. and to be honest and not pull any punches about what went wrong and what we can put right and who should be the next leader. i will come to
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that in a second. went liberal democrats mp has told the bbc that jeremy corbyn has become a must carry some blame for the poor showing, she said in the run—up to the election conservatives who previously said that they would vote for the liberal democrats said no because vote vote for them we will end up with jeremy because vote vote for them we will end up withjeremy corbyn and we can't face that. why do political parties want to lay the blame at others and refuse to take responsibly for their own failings? because it's responsibly for their own failings? because its human nature, they sit on any questions. i suppose in slightly defensive mode. she's in a condition where she won and jo swinson lost. just being gentle, that's human nature. leila is a very gifted politician and i think privately she would recognise we can expect any other party to pull the liberal democrats out of a hole, they have dug for themselves. that has to come from inside, otherwise
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you're just throwing the fortunes of your own party in the hands of somebody else and that's just ridiculous. very briefly, cannot leave everybody hanging, who would you pick as leader? layla moran. all they struck me as the most promising in the current batch. craig libertarian there narrative and she has the capacity to build a team. i have been ignored in the past maybe this time they might listen to someone who has got a track record of giving good advice and if not then in the words of the philosopher friedrich nietzsche those who ignore history are doomed to relive it. thank you very much for talking to us. labour leaderjeremy corbyn said that, despite the party's crushing defeat, he was proud of its manifesto — and defended his record in charge of the party. he said he would stand down — after what he called a "period of reflection" — although some of his mp5 have called on him to resign immediately.
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our deputy political editor john pienaar looks now at labour's future — there are some flashing images in his report. here comes the leader. and there goes the leader. after last night, the media was keen to catchjeremy corbyn's thoughts in defeat. one cameraman — who took a nasty tumble — especially. are you going to say sorry? what about all the mp5 who lost their seats! a lot keener than he was to talk to them. it was a car crash, labour's election, and this trip didn't go too well either. now, mr corbyn's not rushing the next leader's election. what i hope is there will be a period where we can have a good discussion within the party, and i think that's healthy and that's to be very welcome. and i hope those that were inspired by my manifesto will actuallyjoin the party and take part in that discussion. it's up to them to set a programme for when an election will take place. it will be in the early part of next year. jeremy corbyn didn't put it like this, but he failed badly. and now he and his team are looking
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for someone they'd like to carry on, what they've always described as the "socialist struggle." there is no clear sign who that person might be. so, they want time to plan and prepare for the succession. labour's hurt won't heal quickly. remainers and leavers blaming each other, or the leader for pleasing no one. centrists raged at devoted corbyn followers for turning off traditional supporters. corbyn was a disaster on the doorstep. everyone knew that he couldn't lead the working class out of a paper bag. the party's splitting ahead of a new year leadership contest. those who embraced politics the corbyn way, and blame brexit for defeat, and those who say labour and its leader got it wrong. i feel sorry for all those constituents up and down the country in all four corners of this country. they need a labour government, and they've been badly let down by the labour party, and we've delivered a hard right conservative government with the most conservative prime minister in history, and i think we should all reflect on that.
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unfortunately, our labour heartlands, working—class heart lands in the north and the midlands, they voted leave. they, undoubtedly, felt that labour had let them down. so who could join the race to lead labour? there is rebecca long—bailey, but does she want the job? angela rayner‘s been mentioned, perhaps as deputy leader though, kier starmer‘a a heavyweight, a center ground pro—european, which could put some off. emily thornberry is a strong performer, and looks ambitious. then lisa nandi, young, left—leaning, looks like another contender, and jess phillips, outspoken, combative, maybe the wild card of the contest. jeremy corbyn's heading for a quieter life, to his admirers, a heroic loser, to critics, the man who consigned labour to a fourth term out of office. they will all be fighting over labour's future before jeremy corbyn's even out of sight. john pienaar, bbc news. martine and i will be back with more reaction
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from across the uk and around the world shortly — but for a look at the day's other news, here's nuala mcgovern. we move from westminster to washington where democrats in congress have voted to approve articles of impeachment against president trump. the charges by the housejudiciary committee accuse mr trump of abusing his power by trying to obstruct congress in his dealings with ukraine. it clears the way for a full vote in the house of representatives next week on whether to impeach the president. republicans called it a ‘complete waste of time'. the committee chairman, democratjerry nadler said it was a historic and sombre moment. today... today is a solemn and sad day. for the third time in a little over a century and a half, the house judiciary committee has voted articles of impeachment against the president. for abuse of power, and
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obstruction of congress. the house will act expeditiously. thank you. well, president trump denies any wrong doing and during a news conference in the oval office with the priesident of paraguay, mr trump gave this reaction. it is a witchhunt, it's a sham, it's a hoax. nothing was done wrong, zero was done wrong. i think it is a horrible thing to be using the tool of impeachment, which is supposed to be used in an emergency and it would seem many, many, many years apart, to be using this for a perfect phone call, with a president of that country said there was no pressure whatsoever, didn't even know what we were talking about. it was perfect, the relationship is perfect. i have done much more for them than obama did for them. it is a scam, it is something that should not be allowed and it is a very bad thing for our country and you are
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trivialising impeachment. trivializing impeachment. the bbc‘s gary o'donoghue is in washington. good to have you with us. what does this mean, with these approval votes and votes in the house next week, how much closer are we getting to president trump being impeached?” think if your are claiming a flight of stairs to the bottom when this whole thing started, we are now one step from the top of the president being impeached. next week probably wednesday we will have a debate and to votes on these impeachment clauses and the house will most likely pass them, and at that point the president gets impeached. that's not to say anything bad is going to happen to him because there has to bea happen to him because there has to be a trail in the senate after that, and if that trial clears him or does not get the requisite votes which is two thirds, 67 votes in the senate,
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and he is not removed from office. and he is not removed frembifices of
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