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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 23, 2019 12:00pm-12:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm carrie gracie. the headlines at 12: calls for a government inquiry into racism in football, after a premier league match is stopped for the first time because of allegations of abuse from the stands. the message we sent by hosting the london living was tolerance, inclusivity, respect and all those values that i think are the best of us. values that i think are the best of us. eight years ago, a different political context, climate, brexit is part of that. five people are sentenced to death in saudi arabia for the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. the prince of wales visits fishlake in south yorkshire, where hundreds face chrstimas out of their homes after last month's flooding. the former love island presenter caroline flack is appearing in court
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after being charged with assault. as australia's bushfire crisis continues — the country's prime minister defends the coal industry and defies calls for new carbon targets. we need to take action on climate change. you don't run government on sentiment, you run government on fa cts . and later in the programme private eye's editor, ian hislopjoins the bbc‘s media editor amol rajan to look back on a fascinating year of front covers, cartoons and satire. there are calls for a government inquiry into racism within football — after the chelsea player, antonio rudiger, complained of hearing monkey noises from the crowd during yesterday's premier league match at tottenham.
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the professional footballers‘ association said it was "disgusted" by the reports, and insisted urgent action was needed. the referee stopped play during the second half after rudiger complained of hearing monkey noises in the crowd. shortly after the stoppage, an announcement was made over the public address system warning that: "racist behaviour is interfering with the game." after the match the chelsea captain, cesar azpilicueta, explained what happened on the pitch. tony came to me and he told me that he was listening in the crowd monkey noises and obviously myjob as a captain is to come straight to the ref and to report it. now it is under investigation and we have to work together towards eradication of the problem. antonio rudiger gave his reaction on twitter. it is really sad to see racism again at a football match, but i think it's very important
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to talk about it in public. if not, it will be forgotten again in a couple of days as always. and the sports minister nigel adams also took to twitter last night. he said: the professional footballers‘ association released a statement, again on twitter. it said: the pfa calls for a government inquiry into racism within football.
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let's talk now to bobby barnes, the pfa's deputy chief executive. thank you for being there for us this morning. how do you feel about the chances of this government inquiry? well, i would like to think that it inquiry? well, i would like to think thatitis inquiry? well, i would like to think that it is something of great national importance, because let's be clear about this, when we talk about racism in football, that is a very narrow definition. football in itself is not racism and it is not divorced from wider society, people don't come to a football match and become racist. they're bringing those views from the wider community into the stadiums and manifesting themselves in such a way as in any other walk of life they would face very severe criminal action for what is effectively a hate crime. very severe criminal action for what is effectively a hate crimeli very severe criminal action for what is effectively a hate crime. i mean, obviously, there is cctv footage, there are a lot of mobile phone cameras in the crowd, do you think the culprits will be identified and dealt with at an individual level?”
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think with the modern technology that we have and we have cctv, i think it is not a real stretch to identify the people and indeed the clu bs identify the people and indeed the clubs when they're identified, the clu bs clubs when they're identified, the clubs do impose pretty long if not lifetime bans. where it falls down is when they do come out of the football system into the wider justice system, they tend to get sentences which are no more than a slap on the wrist. that heartily serves as a deterrent, you can have all the campaigns you like, but we as the pfa, the premier league, do not have the powers to actually sanction members of public. that responsibility lies with the public authorities. is that why you want the government inquiry, because you wa nt the government inquiry, because you want those sanctions to be beefed 7 want those sanctions to be beefed up? well want those sanctions to be beefed ll very want those sanctions to be beefed up? well very much so, but equally
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we have a situation from football is the national sport. great merit can be had by working together to find solutions, without doubt we within the football world are committed to dealing with this problem and i'm sure the government would equally wa nt to sure the government would equally want to ensure that they protect the national game and also ensure the laws of land are actually respected, because the things that go on in football grounds and in social media are football grounds and in social media a re really football grounds and in social media are really a throw back to times that we thought we had left behind us. by concern is that we are not careful and we if we don't preserve oui’ careful and we if we don't preserve our game as best we can and use whatever tools we can to protect it, we will be a situation where you have parents being turned off the game and they will not want their children to watch games. you're saying that there is a risk that we are going backwards as we enter the third decade of 21st century? are going backwards as we enter the third decade of 215t century?m are going backwards as we enter the third decade of 21st century? it is a frightening view to take, but
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while the battlefields have changed, ican while the battlefields have changed, i can remember back in the 80s when the far right organisations were leaflets football grounds, the landscape has changed and we have seen the advent of social media and without doubt some of the vitriol and abuse you see on social media todayis and abuse you see on social media today is something that really is of great concern to any right—minded person, let alone the individuals that come into the grounds. the fact that come into the grounds. the fact that we had a fantastic match and the chelsea player willian score ed two goals and here we are talking about one or two individual s who due too their disgusting points of view have made the front—pages. thank you. five people have been sentenced to death by a court in saudi arabia for the murder of government criticjamal khashoggi
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in istanbul last year. three more have been given jail sentences totalling 2a years. the prosecutor said saoud al qahtani — an important aide of crown prince mohammed bin salman — had been investigated but not charged and was released. the country faced international condemnation for mr khashoggi's murder in the saudi embassy in turkey last year; saudi arabia blamed it on what they called a ‘rogue operation‘. our middle east correspondent martin patience has been following this story closely and has more details about the trial. well what we have had is from the public prosecutors in saudi arabia, 11 people were put on trial, five have been sentenced to death, three others lengthy jail sentences have been sentenced to death, three others lengthyjail sentences and three released. now importantly what the public prosecutors in the kingdom says is that this wasn‘t a premeditated killing. according to
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their investigations, this interrogation team went to the consulate in turkey to interrogate jamal khashoggi. when they couldn‘t move him to another area, apparently for reasons that still are not clear, apparently they decided to kill him. now, i think many will see this as a white wash of events, why for example did this team have the tools to cut up the body and the body of jamal khashoggi has never been recovered. one version of events is that this killing was ordered from the highest levels in saudi arabia, from crown prince mohammed bin salman, a top official within his court, he was investigated, but as you were saying, the investigators let him off. i think saudi arabia from its point of view, it will want to draw a line under this murder, because it has been deeply damaging to the saudi arabia‘s reputation around the world and it has been its worst
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diplomatic crisis since the 2001 attacks in the united states. martin patience. we will get more on this story with our security correspondent at about 12.30. the former labour leader, ed miliband, is to take part in a review examining the party‘s heavy defeat in the general election. the activist group, labour together, is setting up a commission tasked with mapping out a route back to power. the review will be led by the former shadow education secretary, lucy powell. and lucy powelljoins me now from our salford studio. thank you for talking to us, tell us what you aim to do? we are we are looking to have an objective and inclusive project, taking us into the new year, where we hearfrom members, activists, defeated candidates, pollsters and others and
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we are going to talk to the public in many of the seats that we lost in this election, to work out what are some of the underlying trends, some of the issues that we have faced and how we might seek to address them. so that we can produce ahead of hopefully the ballots for the leadership race, we can produce a really big piece of work that would stand the test of time and help shape and chart that way back for the labour party over the coming yea rs. the labour party over the coming years. one thing i suppose that will puzzle some observers is you have invited a former leader er of the party, who lost an election, have you invited the former leader who w011 you invited the former leader who won several elections?” you invited the former leader who won several elections? i think actually you learn more from doing things badly and wrong orfor making mace takes —— mistakes that you do from learning things. ed miliband is
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a former leader, yes, but he is also a former leader, yes, but he is also a current mp and is very relevant to the debate. he represents one of the seats that is so—called part of red wall, where there was a swing away from labour and me like many other mps and activists has spent many days and hours in the last days and months, knocking on doors and speaking to the electorate. so he is very relevant to today and he has that experience of notjust being pa rt that experience of notjust being part ofan that experience of notjust being part of an election campaign, but from being in the topjob if part of an election campaign, but from being in the top job if you like in the labour party and understanding the pressures of that. sorry, can i interrupt, some would say that a failure to look hard at what went wrong in 2017 and a failure to really face up to m ista kes failure to really face up to mistakes then is one of the things that went wrong in 2019? yes, we have lost four elections in a row and we haven‘t actually taken the
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time to look deeply at what has been going on in those elections. sorry to pursue the point, in which case, why bring on a person who failed to look, why bring ed miliband, if he failed to look hard at what went wrong when he was in charge? we should have looked at 2015 and i‘m sure he would have advocated that as well. but the answers don‘t lie in the past. the answers lie in the future. we have to learn the lessons from the past and everybody‘s got something to contribute in learning those lessons from the past. i suppose what i would say in response, if people think the a nswe rs response, if people think the answers only lie in winning an election 22 years ago, before the globalfinancial election 22 years ago, before the global financial crisis, election 22 years ago, before the globalfinancial crisis, before brexit, before mps expenses, before we had some of the wars and some of humanitarian crisis, they would be as long. the answers lie in the
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future. the electoral coalition that the labour party needs to win back isa the labour party needs to win back is a very different electoral challenge to the one tony blair faced when he was labour leader you could bank on returning dozens of labour mps could bank on returning dozens of labourmps in could bank on returning dozens of labour mps in scotland, where we now have one, and in wales and across the north and the midlands, seat that have been labour for hundreds of year. it is notjust about one particular leader. these are trends that have been coming for a while. u nless we that have been coming for a while. unless we look at those and start to reconnect with some communities that we have lost touch with, it won‘t matter who becomes the next leader of labour party. we are short of time aye and i want to ask you, do you think there is any chance that your party can actually learn from the lessons that it derives and put them into practice, given that,
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well, critics would say it is in the thrall of several last vested interests and sectional interest and will do what is in the interests of those groups. that is one of the thins that we are trying to overcome. we are bringing together people from different traditions and factions, whether your momentum or progress and we want to hear your voice from, local government, trade unions, scotland and wales and everyone. if now is not the moment to put aside factional interests and start to come together, if now after this big defeat is not the time to do that, then i don‘t know when is. we all want, most people in the labour party, we want to see a party that can win and win elections again. we also want to see the a party that is unified and most of all we want to see a party that is rooted in our values. we are going to have to leave it. thank you for
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joining us. the presenter of the itv show love island, caroline flack, has pleaded not guilty to assaulting her boyfriend at herflat in north london. (read on) helena wilkinson is at highbury magistrates in north london. what is happen something caroline flack, when she arrived here in court, she struggled to get into court, she struggled to get into court, because there are dozens of photographers. when she got into the building, he was in tears, had to be supported by someone. she then came into the courtroom, walked past a very packed public gallery, in that public gallery, her boyfriend, lewis burton, who she is accused of assaulting. the allegation is that she assaulted him at her flat on december 13th. she entered the dock. she was tearful at times. she was asked to confirm her name, her age, date of birth and then she was asked
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to enter a plea, whether she pleaded guilty or not guilty and she pleaded not guilty to that one charge of assault by beating against her boyfriend. also during the court case we heard from her defence lawyer, who said that her boyfriend, through his solicitor, had issued a statement saying he didn‘t support the prosecution case and he had strong feelings about the hearing. he said mr burton does not consider himself a victim. the prosecutors stood up and said, that the case against caroline flack would continue, with police video allegedly showing a significant injury to mr burton‘s head after that incident and the prosecution also said they would continue with the case, even though mr burrton would not be co—operating. we know
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that caroline flack will face trial, the date has been set for march 4th. we are expecting her to leave court possibly in the next few minutes and she‘s got bail conditions, which remain the same. one of which is she is not allowed to contact her boyfriend and at that point, when that was mentioned to her in court, caroline flack broke down in tears. so march 11th is when caroline flack will face trial for allegedly assaulting her boyfriend. thank you. the headlines on bbc news: five people are sentenced to death in saudi arabia for the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi calls for a government inquiry into racism in football, after a premier league match is stopped for the first time because of allegations of abuse from the stands. the prince of wales visits fishlake in south yorkshire, where hundreds face chrstimas out of their homes after last month‘s flooding.
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now the sport with jane. good afternoon. the new everton manager carlo ancelotti has said racism must be clamped down upon around the world — notjust in england. ancelotti was speaking after chelsea player antonio rudiger was allegedly racially abused during their match against tottenham yesterday. the pfa has called for a government inquiry. ancelotti was asked what he felt needed to be done. we have to be strong there, the football cannot allow people to abuse racism, so the federation, all the federations around the world has to be really tough and strong against this. this was the first time carlo ancelotti faced the media, since accepting the top job at erton. one of the reasons that
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might have persuaded him was plans for everton‘s new stadium. images of everton‘s final design for their new stadium at bramley moore dock on liverpool‘s waterfront have been made available to fans. the club will submit a detailed planning application for the 52 thousand capacity venue today, which will cost an estimated £500 million. everton hope to move to the new stadium by 2023, and plan to re—develop their current goodison park home for the community. england netball has announced record ticket sales for a new international competition to be hosted in london, nottingham and birmingham next month. the netball nations cup will see the roses play south africa, jamaica and the world champions new zealand. the squad has been announced today and george fisher of saracen‘s mavericks is among them. she says the first match against the world cup winners will be the most challenging but she‘s looking forward to it. really excited obviously, like we played, the last time we played them was at the world cup, so sort of
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like it will be exciting to get on the court and go for it and i‘m sure the court and go for it and i‘m sure the crowd will be there. i don‘t know what else to say, butjust excited and privileged to be given the opportunity. you train hard and to be able to then go to those sort of things, it is like it is beginning to pay off. really good. england bowlersjofra archer, stuart broad and jack leach have all taken part in a net session today ahead of england‘s opening test against south africa. archer and broad bowled five overs each after missing the warm—ups through illness. captainjoe root says england will trust the players to decide if they‘re fit to feature in the first test of four which gets underway at centurion on thursday. at the big bash adelaide strikers beat the perth scorchers. england‘s liam livingstone hit 69 from 26 balls as he puts on 124 withjosh inglis for the scorchers‘ opening wicket. but that impressive start wasn‘t enough to secure victory as adelaide went on to win by 15 runs via the duckworth—lewis method.
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and charles leclerc has confirmed that he will be staying with ferrari. the formula one star tweeted that he had signed a deal to stay forfive more years. leclerc won back—to—back races in belgium and italy and finished fourth in the overall driver standings, ahead of team—mate sebastian vettel. the statue of sweden star zlatan ibrahimovic has been vandalised yet again. this time, malmo fans have sawn off the nose. this is the third time that the statue has been attacked. as you can see the nose is gone with a gaping hole and it‘s been covered in silver paint. vandals previously tried to saw through one of its legs and put a toilet seat around its neck. the statue was unveiled in october, but in november, ibrahimovic announced he had invested in malmo‘s rival team hammarby, angering many fans of his hometown club.
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that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. an update on the saudi arabia story. we have a statement from the foreign secretary, relating to the trial of the murder of jamal khashoggi. secretary, relating to the trial of the murder ofjamal khashoggi. he said the killing was a terrible was a terrible crime and saudi arabia must make sure all those responsible are held to account. he said the uk condemns the use of death penalty in all circumstances, asa death penalty in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. more on that story coming with frank gardner just after half past. now more news here in the uk. police in sussex say that a man arrested on suspicion
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of the murder of two women is in a ‘very unstable‘ condition in hospital. the two women — one aged 32 and the other 76 — were murdered outside a house in crawley down yesterday morning. police say: "a 37—year—old man, who was found seriously injured inside the house in hazel way, is under arrest on suspicion of murder." and that "he is in a very unstable condition at the royal sussex county hospital." a woman has died nearly two weeks after a bus crashed in swansea. 36—year—old jessica jing ren was travelling on the double decker when it crashed in to a bridge on the 12th of december. her family said she was a devoted wife and mother and that she would be deeply missed. eight people were injured in the accident. a 63—year—old man who was arrested in connection with the crash has been released under investigation. australia‘s prime minister, scott morrison, has again defended the coal industry, despite conceding yesterday that climate change has helped fuel
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the country‘s bushfires. he said there was no need to impose new carbon targets. meanwhile, the leader of new south wales says ‘catastrophic‘ fire conditions have almost completely destroyed the community of a small town that‘s home to around four—hundred people. balmoral, south west of sydney, has been engulfed by flames, as emergency crews struggle to contain the situation. from there shaimaa khalil reports: it feels like a deserted war zone, but this is the aftermath of the catastrophic bushfires that have ravaged new south wales. in the village of balmoral, the devastation is every where. russell has been a volunteer firefighter for six years. he was out with his team trying to control the blaze in the village when his own house was burned to the ground. so many of the brigade are tired, that‘s the mental side of it, when you are continually battling
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something you can‘t beat. when you are continually battling something you can't beat. the prime minister, scott morrison, appearing for the first time after criticism of his holiday in hawaii conceded that more needed to be done to tackle global warming, with scientist saying drier conditions brought about by climate change have worsened the effect of bushfires.” know the need to take action on climate change hassen changed and you don't run government on sentiment, you run government on facts and what you need to do protect our environment and our economy. what you run government on and the decisions are based on those important facts and the facts when it comes to addressing climate change and the facts on what it comes to ensuring we have a strong economy, which provides people with the livelihood s they depend on remain the same. the fires have subsided, but the situation is still
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dangerous. the roads remain closed. balmoral was one of the worst hit areas and the community is still very much in shock. many haven't returned to see what happened to their homes and what happened to their homes and what happened to their village. just opposite the road is a very different picture. craig stayed to defend his home during the fires, using up all the water reserves he had. all the fla mes water reserves he had. all the flames like a six or six storey build and roaring all around you. just scared as hell. you don‘t know what to do. australia is bracing itself for a scorching summer and many are wonder where the next big fire is going to hit. it has been wetter here. here is staph. christmas week is looking mixed. we will continue with sunshine and
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showers and some could be heavy with gusty winds on christmas day. a ridge of high pressure will bring plenty of sunshine for the big day before more wet and windy weather on boxing day. low pressure bringing rain to england and wales tonight. most of showers will be in the northern half of the country this afternoon. some wintriness over higher ground. a decent amount of sunshine for england and wales and northern ireland. top temperatures 11 degrees. but chilly in the north. the showers continue tonight across the north and some wintriness on the hills. it is clear in the south before the wetter weather moves up. by before the wetter weather moves up. by the end night some showers moving into the south—west and they will be heavy and thundery with gusty winds.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. calls for a government inquiry into racism in football, after a premier league match is stopped for the first time because of allegations of abuse from the stands. the message we sent by hosting the london olympics was tolerance, inclusivity, respect and all those values that i think are the best of us. eight years ago, a different political context, climate, brexit is part of that. five people are sentenced to death in saudi arabia for the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. the prince of wales visits fishlake in south yorkshire, where hundreds face chrstimas out of their homes after last month‘s flooding. the former love island presenter caroline flack is appearing in court after being charged with assault. let‘s return to the news that
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5 people have been sentenced to death by a court in saudi arabia for the murder of government critic jamal khashoggi in istanbul last year. with me is our security correspondent, frank gardner. an expected outcome from your point of view? it certainly came out of the blue, it wasn‘t preannounced. this is the culmination of an 11 month very secretive trial that has taken place in saudi arabia behind closed doors. journalists were not allowed to attend and already it has been condemned as a bit of a whitewash, a bogus verdict. likewise mac because some of the chief suspects, the people who the real focus of international suspicion bolling have not been convicted. mainly the right hand man to the crown prince, he was investigated, the cia inspected ten two also the head of intelligence was tried but
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released and freed. we don‘t know the confirmation of the ten —— five men sentenced to death. saudi arabia will be hoping it draws a line under the whole business. i don‘t think thatis the whole business. i don‘t think that is the way human rights organisations will think about. governments will probably continue to do business with them and so will big corporations. there has been a reaction... we just had the foreign office and the foreign secretary putting out a statement. what is your reaction to that? the statement said that saudi arabia must hold to account all of those responsible, which is born of those diplomatic speakfor we which is born of those diplomatic speak for we don‘t entirely think this is the end of the story. britain is a very close ally of saudi arabia, things might have gone differently if the election had gone differently, but this government, as indeed previous governments including tony blair and gordon brown is happy very close trade
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relationship with the saudis and have been careful unlike the germans not to upset the saudis diplomatically. they don‘t want to upset the trade, but also intelligence sharing, debut iran is an enemy, so the —— they both view iran as an enemy. the foreign office has been weak in its condemnation, they are hoping it will all go away. that is the stronger statement we can expect from them on this. i do not think this will be the end of it. another key government... what the us does, but some of the points you make about the us —— uk government also applies to america. we haven‘t spoken about the reaction of mr khashoggi‘s family. we haven‘t spoken about the reaction of mr khashoggi's family. yes, i think there will be some pretty urgent consultations going on. whether they knew this verdict was coming or not, they will be under great pressure to accept the verdict. it is possible under saudi
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law that they could be asked if they wa nt to law that they could be asked if they want to receive compensation, blood money. if you remember years ago, about 20 years ago two british nurses were accused of murder in saudi arabia. money was played, the death sentences were lifted. that is a possibility in this case, and if the appeals court against them, they will be offered the chance if they choose to pardon those men. it is perfectly acceptable in saudi culture that that is what happens, money changes hands. there is no confirmation of this, i am just saying that this is a structure that is in place if they choose to go around that route. going back to where we started, the suggestion that some of those who possibly lead this operation have been let off, possibly. it creates a picture almost of a scapegoat operation where those not powerful enough to
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defend themselves are the ones who are kind of put in mind for this. lets be clear on something, i have lived in the gulf for many years, nothing happens without authority from above. there is no such thing asa from above. there is no such thing as a rogue operation, itjust never happened in the gulf states. people do not take the love they don‘t go off on do not take the love they don‘t go offona do not take the love they don‘t go off on a tangent. it is possible, being generous, that somebody could have misinterpreted their orders. but orders would have been given, and there is no question that the authorities, in particular the crown prince, wanted jamal khashoggi to stop his criticism, to the crown prince, quite dangerous criticism of what was happening in saudi arabia. that isn‘t enough to produce a smoking gun, but it is hard to imagine he didn‘t know there was some kind of operation under remember, these through two teams, forensic myth... this was a hit team
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sent, so the idea that it wasn‘t premeditated doesn‘t stand up. and the un special rapporteur on saudi arabia, she thinks not nearly enough is come to light, she wants to see the crown prince investigated. thank you for your analysis, as always. the duke of edinburgh has spent a third night in hospital — receiving treatment for what royal officials have described as a "pre—existing condition". buckingham palace says prince philip, who‘s 98, was admitted on friday as a "precautionary measure" on the advice of his doctor. there are growing indications that the so called islamic state group is re—organising in iraq, two years after losing the last of its territory in the country. kurdish and western intelligence officials have told the bbc that the is presence in iraq is a sophisticated insurgency, and is attacks are increasing. lahur talibany is a kurdish counter terrorism official and director of one of the two intelligence agencies in iraq. he told orla guerin that a different
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kind of is has emerged. the dispute between krg and the central government has left a lot of land unmanned and isis is taking advantage of the situation. this stretches from the iranian border going all the way up to mosul and the syrian border. they have easy access of travel through these areas. we see now the activity increasing and we think that the reorganisation stage is over now. there is a major security vacuum in these no—go areas between the iraqi forces and the peshmerga forces? nobody is dealing with the security threat in these areas? isis is patrolling it, unfortunately. do you think this is the same phase as 2012 when they were starting to rebuild and starting to become a serious threat? i think it is more stronger than 2012, to be honest.
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my main concern is the political instability in baghdad. this will feed into the future of isis. if we have political unrest this is heaven for them, this is christmas come early for isis. do you think it is a new beginning for them? i would say it would be a different type of isis. no longer will they want to control land or cities, i think they will go back to the asymetric warfare of al-qaeda with more experience and techniques and tactics that al-qaeda did not have. i think it is an issue for us to be worried about. not only us, i think the international community should be worried about the re—emergence of isis, because in the past a problem in iraq became a global problem. the kind of rebuilding they have managed to do in the last 12 months, has that been a surprise to you that they have been able to do this so quickly? they have better techniques and tactics and they have a lot more finances at their disposal.
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i don‘t know if this money was money that they saved in the past from the oil trade, but they seem to have a lot more money than al-qaeda had in the old days. they are able to buy vehicles, weaponry, food supplies and equipment. like i said, they are like al-qaeda on steroids. they have picked up a lot of experience in the past three orfour years. technologically they are more savvy, it is more difficult to flush them out or to find them. they are like al-qaeda on steroids, these guys. lahur talabany, the head of the kurdish zanyari intelligence agency speaking to our international correspondent, orla guerin. china‘s foreign ministry has denied allegations that prisoners are being used forforced labour, after tesco suspended production of christmas cards at a factory in shanghai while it investigates claims.
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six—year—old florence widdicombe found a plea for help in one of the cards, apparently written by a foreign prisoner in qingpu prison. the supermarket says it was shocked and would never allow the use of prison labour in its supply chain. william nee is a business and human rights analyst at amnesty international. prison labour is very common in china and that it‘s used, obviously, in prisons, but there is even sometimes where it‘s used in detention facilities, where people haven‘t been sentenced through a court. and also in xinjiang, which is a big region in the northwest of china, you know, three times larger than france. there are many predominantly muslim people, uighurs who are being detained in this area, and many of those people have been in re—education camps and they‘re now coming out of those camps and having to do forced labour, as well. so this is something that
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companies need to be alert about when they‘re looking to do business in china, to ensure that none of their supply chains involve forced labour. so, you know, this is what companies need to be doing. they need to be doing human rights, due diligence. and so, you know, i‘m glad to hear that tesco has stopped and that they‘re going to do an investigation. gerald oppenheim is the chief executive of the fundraising regulator — he said he would work with the charities involved to make sure this doesn‘t happen again. they will be doing that and there are already arrangements in place to make sure that charities in the contracts they have with third party suppliers do make it clear that things have to be produced ethically. tesco will want to satisfy themselves that they were told the truth by the suppliers, that there was no forced labour involved. clearly something has gone very wrong there. tesco, like all retailers producing goods overseas, will do inspections of the places
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where these things are made and they will want to check—up on all of that. the charities will want to know the outcome, as we will. the prince of wales has been visiting communities hit by the floods. during his visit, our reporter dan johnson asked floods. during his visit, our reporter danjohnson asked how prince philip was doing in hospital. sir, can we ask father is? he is being looked after very well in hospital. that‘s all we know at the moment. he has our best wishes. heavy fog and icy roads led to a 69 car pile up in virginia
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in the east of the united states. the crash, about 50 miles east of richmond, closed both sides of the motorway. 51 people were taken to hospital for treatment but no one has been killed. in some spots, vehicles were so squeezed together that firefighters and emergency responders had to step from car to car to pull people out. ecuador says a fuel spill in the galapagos islands is under control. the spill happened after a boat carrying 600 gallons of diesel fuel sank. the barge tipped over after a crane collapsed while it was loading a container onto it. the galapagos islands are a unesco world heritage site and home to one of the most fragile ecosystems on the planet. containment barriers and absorbent cloths are being used to try to reduce the environmental risk. now on bbc news, private eye‘s editor, ian hislopjoins the bbc‘s media editor amol rajan to look
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back on a fascinating year of front covers, cartoons and satire. hello. ian. come in. good to see you. now, you are everywhere. thank you for having us in, thank you so much. how do you come up with a private eye cover like those? well, this was when theresa may, who — do you remember her? she was around at the beginning of the year. um, she used to be prime minister. anyway, she left and we had to think "how can we pay tribute to mrs may?" so i thought "perhaps a blank page will be good" and so we have the theresa may memorial issue — her legacy in full. and a little thing at the bottom, saying "er, thank you". which, again, seems quite cruel, but was quite funny at the time. do you know how each of those — do you ever keep tabs on how each of those sell? yeah. yeah, that was a seller. i‘m afraid that was popular! and nigel farage? nigel farage.
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this is great. he‘s always good. partly because he always does photo opportunities, so having been accused of having a party full of fruitca kes, he does a photo op eating a fruit cake. i mean, it is fantastic. i mean, he does thejoke for us. boris johnson‘s private life has furnished you with ideas and this time you had a pretty busy one withjennifer arcuri. this was a smut special. there was a proper public interest in the story, public money had gone to this women who dances around the lap dancing pole, but essentially the joke was that borisjohnson had been caught out. he is saying, i need technology lessons, and she is saying, floppy disk or hard drive. there is a properjoke here,
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with boris saying to his new girlfriend, i do not lie to women any more, and she says, except the and she says, except the queen. that is not a legal problem. that is the supreme courtjudgment. this is ourjob, reporting. and you sometimes jump on anniversaries, too? yes. this is when boris became prime minister, which many people equate with an event as unlikely as landing on the moon. but he did, and there‘s this brilliant picture of him just going into number 10, so we did it as the loon landing, a souvenir issue — one small step for man and a giant leap in the dark for mankind! and put it in black and white. and in terms of your annual, when you‘ve got a year to get through — you‘ve done many of these annuals, of course — when you‘ve got to curate a year, what you were saying a moment ago is whatjournalism is about, what is your starting point with thinking about how we deal with this? do you just think "let‘s get the bestjokes" or do you think "we really need to reflect the year"? i try and get the bestjokes and if we‘ve been dull

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