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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  February 7, 2020 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, annita mcveigh — the headlines a british national is confirmed as one of 61 cruise ship passengers who have caught coronavirus. the ship's moored offjapan with almost 4,000 on board. literally every hour something is changing, the biggest being 41 additional passengers being found positive tested for the coronavirus. the teenager who threw a young boy off a balcony in london — regulators investigatie whether warnings were missed prince andrew is deferring an honorary military promotion, which he was due to receive later this month. energy bills set to fall — after regulator 0fgem
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lowers caps on prices. critics say the caps are misleading. an official report says the public are not telling police about some crimes because so many offenders are not brought to justice. and wales got their six nations title defence off to a flying start against italy, but new coach wayne pivac says ireland this weekend will be their biggest test. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9 another 41 people, including one from the uk, have tested positive for the coronavirus on a cruise ship off the coast of japan. the diamond princess is being held
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in quarantine in the port of yokohama for at least two weeks. the checks began after an 80—year—old hong kong man who had been on the ship last month fell ill with the virus. almost 4000 passengers and crew are on board the diamond princess. 3700 is the total number. 78 of the passengers are british. 61 people have been infected with coronavirus — one of those is british. the infected british passenger is believed to be on his honeymoon. david abel is a passenger on the cruise ship, his friend has tested positive for the virus and has been separated from his wife. things are happening literally every hour, something is changing. the biggest, of course, being 41 additional passengers being found positive testing for the coronavirus.
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one of whom is a friend of ours, on honeymoon, who was going to be split from his wife, on honeymoon. he is going to be taken a medical facility and she will have to remain on board. we've also been given in addition to the face masks, we've now been given gloves so if we do go outside, we have to wear the gloves and i think that's a sensible precaution. especially if you are going to be touching handrails on the ship or anything like that. that 30 seconds must be up so let's see what this is doing. oh, dear. can you see that? 36.6. so i'm 0.5 degrees under normal. so what does that mean? i've got a cold heart? i'm not going to worry about that. if it was 38 or 39, then i most certainly would.
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david abel there come on board the diamond princess. in china, there's growing anger over the death of a chinese doctor who tried to warn other medics about the coronavirus in december. li wenliang contracted the illness while treating patients in wuhan. he was investigated for "spreading rumours." there's been an intense outpouring of grief on chinese social media. robin brant is in shanghai. he can provide us with an update. robin, hello. what's the latest about the passengers on board the cruise ship, almost 4000 of them? yes, i think they are halfway through the 14 days of quarantine. as you heard from david, the situation on board is pretty restrictive, they can't really go anywhere, it's essentially sit tight where you are, assess anywhere, it's essentially sit tight where you are, assess your anywhere, it's essentially sit tight where you are, assess your health on a daily basis and just wait it out.
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as you said, there are 78 british passport holders on—boa rd as you said, there are 78 british passport holders on—board amongst passengers and crew. that's out of the total number of 3700 and the number infected is growing. it's up now to 61, small number particularly related to the total number on board but nonetheless, seems to be increasing. it's evidence as well, it would seem, of human to human transmission of this type of the coronavirus. from people who certainly haven't been to wuhan and almost certainly haven't had contact with someone who's been to the chinese mainland but overall, this is the biggest outbreak of the virus as things stand at the moment, outside of mainland china. as things stand at the moment, outside of mainland chinalj as things stand at the moment, outside of mainland china. i don't know if you know the answer to this particular question but you mention that people on board are halfway through their quarantine. if there are further cases of the infection what happens to their quarantine period, does that extend?“
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what happens to their quarantine period, does that extend? if we assume that these people are all in isolation, so they are apart from each other, i think if anybody presents within the symptoms and is then subsequently tested positive for the virus, they are obviously immediately isolated themselves and then they are removed from the ship so the hope would be that because of the measures taken on board that ship, even though it involves a large number of people in a relatively small area, that people are not mingling, are not spreading the virus as things stand. we spoke recently about the reaction of the chinese leadership, possibly trying to place blame on the authorities in wuhan for not handling the situation as should they have in the first instance. and we are seeing some of the anger around that and the outpouring of grief for this young doctor as well, aren't we? yes, there is immense anger and grief and
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expression of that on a huge scale on social media here in china. following the announcement that the young doctor has died. the way in which it was announced, then retracted, then confirmed, caused controversy of course. and lead to further suspicion about the circumstances surrounding it, he was only 34, married with a child and another one on the way, he had been treating people in wuhan in the various early stages of the outbreak. that may be why he contracted it in the way that he did and he warned on december the 30th, two classmates of his, about a virus outbreak. he was seen as one of the first to raise the alarm but at the time, i think, first to raise the alarm but at the time, ithink, as first to raise the alarm but at the time, i think, as you first to raise the alarm but at the time, ithink, as you mentioned, he was punished by the police and forced to sign a letter retracting what he had done. and yet now, six weeks later, he has died from the virus and what it's done, at a time when senior leaders here are talking
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about being on a war footing when senior leaders here are talking about being on a warfooting in terms of trying to win the war against coronavirus, it has reminded eve ryo ne against coronavirus, it has reminded everyone here about the battle the chinese government at the communist party that control this country are co nsta ntly party that control this country are constantly having in terms of truth and honesty and openness with their own people. we heard from the china ambassador to the uk yesterday about openness and transparency, it's something the chinese president has talked about but many people see the death of this young doctor as proof that's not something china and wuhan, certainly, is living up to. robin brant in shanghai, thank you. an investivation by the bbc has uncovered new information about the teenager who tried to kill a six—year—old boy who was thrown from a balcony at london's tate modern art gallery in august last year. jonty bravery, who was 17 at the time, pleaded guilty to attempted murder and will be sentenced in a fortnight. but a recording made by one of his carers shows that he'd given a warning a year before the attack at the tate that he wanted to kill someone by throwing them
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from a tall building. the carer has told the bbc that opportunities were missed to stop jonty bravery from carrying out his threat. our special correspondent lucy manning reports. it was a day out that changed a little boy forever. thrown from the top of the tate. news archive: a 17-year-old boy has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. jonty bravery admitted trying to murder the boy. now the bbc can reveal disturbing new details. the teenager, who has autism, lived in this flat in london, with round the clock care. he confessed to two carers what he was planning, nearly a year before. one was so concerned, he recorded it. this isjonty bravery speaking...
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his carer, who we are calling 0llie, recorded jonty‘s threats. he claimed bravery was at the tate alone. it was a tragedy waiting to happen. people didn't take certain precautions about what he was saying seriously enough. do you think he could and should have been stopped? 100%. ifeel like him being allowed out independently was a risk to the public. the whole situation could have been dealt with very much differently. 0pportunities missed. what happened that day at the tate was exactly as jonty bravery had threatened.
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and 0llie claims he told a more senior colleague and played the recording to someone else involved withjonty‘s care. they both deny this. advert: we're spencer & arlington. we are a care provider for young people and adults with disabilities... spencer & arlington were the company providing carers forjonty bravery. they boast of a highly trained team. they are rated "good" by the care regulator and are used by a number of councils. hammersmith and fulham council had legal responsibility for jonty bravery. spencer & arlington said in a statement... but they say, because of the gravity of the bbc‘s claims, they have reported this to the care regulator and the councils so it can be examined by the serious case review. lucy manning, bbc news. jayne knight is from
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learning disability england. she deals with complex cases like this and works with people like jonty bravery. i'm incredulous that 12 months before, having said and been recorded, so obviously the care worker was concerned, he'd obviously heard that before, so recorded it, it obviously wasn't the first time it had been said, that a system that would usually deal with problems where people start to say that they've got that type of problem, hasn't been put into place. that should have been escalated and people should have been, professional people brought in to assess that situation. it was a rare situation but it could have been prevented if people had actually dealt with that situation from the beginning. most times there is a process in place and it's a very important process so people are trained in the process to recognise when there are problems and if you are a specialist support provider, this young man was actually getting 24—hour care, that is a specialist support
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provider, there is a system there and it's notjust you that makes that decision, more people do that. but there are times, and i'm involved in situations where there are times when things haven't been escalated or taken seriously enough and i think there are people therefore that would fall through the net with that if we're not careful. lucy manning is at the tate modern in central london now. lucy, good morning to you. first of all, his parents call him their little night, how is the little boy so badly injured in this attack doing? i think everyone is interested in the little boy ‘s condition. the family have a fundraising website, they are still trying to raise funds to pay for his recovery and rehabilitation and they post updates on that and it started off in september, they were describing how he couldn't really
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move at all, he couldn't talk but he was able to smile and that was giving them some encouragement. 0ver the months, they've talked about amazing progress that he makes, they say he is a fighter and he started being able to have some movement in his limbs, they said. but that was causing him more pain and then by december he was able to start saying a few words, a few syllables, they said it was hard to understand him but he was able to do that. and then, two weeks ago, they posted an update to say although he still cannot stand or talk he is able to eat a little mash. they are hoping that he can start drinking through a straw and that he still finds things confusing and is having difficulty thinking so it's obviously been a very hard, very painful process but is still ongoing for this boy and his family. lucy, in terms of the issues, the questions raised by your investigation, what happens next?
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well, there is a serious case review being carried out. that will look at the actions of all the people, of the actions of all the people, of the authorities, the companies that we re the authorities, the companies that were involved in the care ofjonty bravery. but experts are saying that review should be even more independent, outside the review of the council. the serious case review, the care company spencer and arlington say because of the gravity of these allegations, they have referred them to be investigated by the serious care review although they deny doing anything wrong. and hammersmith and fulham council who we re hammersmith and fulham council who were in legal control of the boy, of jonty bravery, they say their sympathies go out to the boy ‘s family, the young french boy but they say this is a matter for the serious case review so they will have to take all these allegations and the information that they have gathered to see what sort of failure there was stop loss of sound. and
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apologies for the technical problems at the end of that interview with lucy. prince andrew has asked to delay an honorary navy promotion that he was due to receive when he turns 60 later this month. the duke of york was set to be promoted to admiral but buckingham palace has requested that the ministry of defence defer the promotion. prince andrew stepped back from public duties in november, following scrutiny over his friendship with the disgraced sex offender, jeffrey epstein. john mcmanus reports. following a career in which he famously saw action during the falklands war, the duke of york retired from the navy in 2001. but it is a tradition that senior members of the royal family continue to receive military promotions as they get older, even if, in reality, they were never going to advance to the very highest levels of command. prince andrew was set to follow his siblings charles and anne and become an admiral when he turned 60 on february 19.
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but buckingham palace says the prince has asked the ministry of defence to defer his promotion for now. in a statement, the palace said... it appears that the duke may still intend to accept the promotion in the future, perhaps when or if the backlash against his friendship with the sex offender jeffrey epstein dies down. for now, andrew remains very much a nonworking royal, even though his official website still says he is. but in a further sign of his now diminished status, the government has told local councils that they are not required to fly the union flag on his birthday, as they do for other senior royals.
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westminster abbey says it will still ring the bells to mark his seventh decade. torrential rain across the east coast of australia has extinguished a third of the fires in the region, officals say. a band of heavy downpours is sweeping across new south wales dousing some of the country's most damaging and long—running wildfires and easing a drought. authorities have welcomed rain but have warned about flash flooding. sydney has seen more than 60 millimeters of rain in the past 24 hours. it's 18 minutes past nine. the headlines on bbc news... a briton is one of 61 people to have come down with coronavirus on a quarantined ship. the ship is moored offjapan with nearly 4000 on board. care regulators are investigating whether the teenager who threw a young boy off a balcony in london could have been stopped. a whistle blower says he raised
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concerns before the attack. prince andrew is deferring an honorary military promotion, which he was due to receive later this month. and in sport. nat sciver hits a half—century as england's women beat india in the t20 tri—series in australia. they could face a final against the hosts. for the first time in more than three years, champions st helens fail to win a single point in a super league match. they're beaten 19—0 at warrington. and it's being billed as a world title eliminator — unbeaten british heavyweights daniel dubois and joe joyce will meet in london in april. i'll be back with more on those stories after half—past. president trump has confirmed that united states forces have killed an al-qaeda leader in a counterterrorism operation in yemen. he had claimed responsibility for a shooting at a naval air station in pensacola where three american
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sailers were killed. 0ur north america correspondent, peter bowes reports. qasim al—raymi is a significant figure within al-qaeda globally. he has been involved with the organisation since the early ‘90s, initially in afghanistan with 0sama bin laden, yemen, leading this particular group for the past five years. his predecessor was killed in a us drone attack, he, himself, has evaded capture over the past five years. this group in yemen is considered one of the deadliest, certainly considered that way by washington. so if true, that he has been, to use the words used in the white house statement, if he has been eliminated this will be seen as good news from the perspective of the united states. president trump apparently ordered this operation, this counterterrorism operation, and he is saying in his statement that this group was responsible
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for "unconscionable violence against "civilians in yemen and sought to conduct "and inspire numerous attacks "against the united states and its forces." the president concludes this statement and i suppose this is the message to the american people, the backdrop, the political message, if you like, he says we will continue to protect the american people by tracking down and eliminating terrorists who seek to do us harm. the government has been warned it could run out of prison places in two years time. in a highly critical report, the spending watchdog, the national audit office, says the prison service has failed to provide safe and decentjails across england and wales. joining me now is 0liver lodge, the national audit office director. thank you very much for coming along to talk about this story. the ministry ofjustice says it will a lwa ys ministry ofjustice says it will always have enough prison places but does not stand up to scrutiny? the
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analysis in our report shows based on current projections, and these are highly uncertain projections based on the fact the government plans to recruit 20,000 more police officers, demand could outstrip the current capacity in the prison system by late 2022, early 2023. but what that analysis doesn't take into account as the government commitment last year to build a further 10,000 prison places but it does show that those prisons need to be built pretty soon and based on the government ‘s record of delivering on its last commitment in 2016 build 10,000 prison places, we've raised some risks that it needs to take on board and learn from. yes, the government has promised it is going to have 10,000 more places. but as she raised the point, in 2016 it said it was going to deliver it 10,000 more prison places and it's delivered how many? where we are today, 206. 206, not 10,000.
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correct, further 3360 that will be delivered in a couple of years. in fairness, some of the reasons for the inability of the government to deliver those 10,000 places were beyond their control. so the demand for prison places has been higher, meaning they were unable to close old, unsuitable presence. and financial pressures, delays are green funding, meant the ministry of justice had to take some of the money earmarked for building prisons and use it to plug holes in its wider budget. if we look at i suppose the wider criminaljustice ecosystem, this is why you are raising concerns that actually, the government may run at a prison places because you say, it's recruiting more police officers, therefore i assume you mean by that arrests might go up there for more people might be sentenced to jail terms. and also, you raise the point of tougher, longer sentences. that's quite right and i think what we are pressing for is for the prison service to develop a long—term funded, coherent plan for the
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presence that it is building and maintaining. so we end up with prisons that are safe, secure, decent, meet the needs of the prisoners held within them and also the people that work within them. yes, that's a very important aspect of this report, isn't it? that safe, secure, decent environment for prisoners in which there may be some greater hope of rehabilitation, i guess is what you're getting at? absolutely, the research shows that whilst there are many other factors that affect the behaviour of prisoners, the building does play a role and we are seeing very high levels of violence in prison at the moment, record levels of self—harm, and we are in a position where 40% of prisons are in need of major repair or refurbishment in the next three years. you mentioned mitigating factors as to why the government hasn't delivered on the 10,000 places promised in 2016. but when you take in all the factors you are currently looking at, more police officers leading to more arrests, tougher sentences etc, do
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you think there's any reasonable prospect of delivering on this 10,000 that the government is talking about now? because we don't have a time frame for that, do we? we don't at the moment, business cases are being prepared and approved as we speak but we point out that the government needs to learn the lessons from its previous experience. and what's more important as it moves from a reactive approach into having a long—term, funded plan, so the prison service, working with the treasury, needs to get that long—term picture. and put our prisons in a much better place than they are today. how important is sorting all of this out? this part of the criminal justice system? sorting all of this out? this part of the criminaljustice system? to public confidence in that system?m plays a part. i mean, clearly, the probation system is critical as well, as is the role of the parole board. and the police more widely. but prisons need to be safe, secure and decent to provide the best opportunity to rehabilitate people who have been found guilty. oliver,
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thank you very much for your time today. thank you. well, that report in to prison places, comes as another report concludes that many people have lost faith in the ability of police to investigate crimes such as minor assaults and car crimes. the inspectorate of constabulary says that suspects were charged in less than eight per cent of crimes in england and wales in the year to last march and warns this is having a corrosive effect on the relationship between police and public. joining me now isjohn apter, from the police federation. come morning to you as well. you may have well heard my last question to our guest from the other dolphins, how important is sorting this out to public faith in the criminaljustice system ? public faith in the criminaljustice system? pertinent question for the story as well. absolutely, it's essential. we've got to have the confidence of the public and i think although the report is critical and very damning, i think broadly we do have an awful lot of support from
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the public and certainly for the police, because i think the public com pletely police, because i think the public completely understand that the mess that we are in and that's exactly what it is, at mess, is not at the police ‘s making. this is ten years of austerity, no investment in policing or the wider criminal justice system. which is a com pletely justice system. which is a completely broken system now. and it needs to have considerable investment it if it's to survive. the government is talking about many more thousands of police officers, isn't it? is that going to help the situation? let's put it into context, 20,000 new officers won't even context, 20,000 new officers won't eve n cover context, 20,000 new officers won't even cover the 22,000 that had been stripped from policing over the last ten years. it won't account for the thousands of police staff who have been removed from policing. so it's a start but it certainly won't fix the problem, it's much more complex issue than just the numbers, we the problem, it's much more complex issue thanjust the numbers, we need even more police officers than the ones that have been promised, we
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need more police staff, we need the way we investigate crime to be different, we need our infrastructure to be improved, we need better it structures and we need better it structures and we need a better, more cohesive, wider criminal justice system need a better, more cohesive, wider criminaljustice system which at the moment wejust don't criminaljustice system which at the moment we just don't have. so, give us an moment we just don't have. so, give us an example, we mentioned car crimes, of the types of offences that people aren't even bothering to report now because theyjust feel they won't get anywhere with them? i've been a police officer at 427 yea rs i've been a police officer at 427 years and i represent those officers, 120,000 officers across england and wales, constables, surgeons, inspector, chief inspector, those sorts of people who will be interacting with the public, detectives investigating crime. we didn'tjoin policing detectives investigating crime. we didn't join policing to detectives investigating crime. we didn'tjoin policing to give a bad service but it's all about priority. i think the public would be horrified if they realised just how few police officers were available in their towns and cities to look after them and to respond to calls. so ifa after them and to respond to calls. so if a police officer is deployed to let's say a burglary in progress,
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there is an offender on the premises. but at the same time criminal damage occurs with no known offender, winter has been smashed, which is very upsetting for the victim, but we've only got so few resources , victim, but we've only got so few resources, we've got to send them to thejob resources, we've got to send them to the job that is the priority. i don't like that but that is the reality we been forced to make over the last ten years. we simply don't have the resources to go around. that doesn't make me feel good as a police officer. 0r that doesn't make me feel good as a police officer. or the public getting a great service? no, not always, they are not and i understand their frustration but my collea g u es understand their frustration but my colleagues are as frustrated. yes, it is frustrating for the victims, it's frustrating and disheartening for the officers that you represent, clearly. do you see any prospect of a change in the situation, getting the sorts of numbers, resources, that you've been talking to me about in the last couple of minutes? well i think this new government, they've certainly said that policing and the wider public sector or more of a priority than the previous prime
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minister ever demonstrated it was. so, lots of promises have been made. we have to now see them turned into action but it's much broader stoplight think the royal commission into the criminaljustice system is a good thing to happen. there's also an independent review going on into policing, a need to work together because we need to ask the public what they want from their police. because if what the public expect from the police, we simply cannot do and let's not forget, only about 25% of what a police officer deals with this crime related. the rest is dealing with mental health, missing persons, it's dealing with non—crime related matters, the demand and police officers at the moment is more than it's ever been and we've got fewer resources than we've ever had. so the mathsjust got fewer resources than we've ever had. so the maths just doesn't add up had. so the maths just doesn't add up so we've got to ask the public what they want and if they want more, the public, sorry, the government has got to invest in policing, they've got to. 20,000 officers is a start, but it won't
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even touch the sides. john, from the police federation, thank you for your time today. some breaking news. that's on the coronavirus, we are hearing from singapore it is reporting three more cases of coronavirus. interestingly, they are saying these cases have no links to previous cases or to any travel history to china. so, that is a very interesting development in terms of looking at how this virus is actually reading, singapore reporting three more coronavirus with no links to previous cases or any travel history to china. in a moment we are going to have the weather forecast but first let's find out which one has coming up on the victoria derbyshire programme. thanks it good morning. today, more on the recording obtained by the bbc which reveals that the teenager who threw a six—year—old boy from a balcony at the tate modern had warned a carer he was planning to push someone from a tall building
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almost a year beforehand. and we bring you the story of hazel, the beloved family dog who went missing for nearly three years but has today been reunited with herfamily for nearly three years but has today been reunited with her family after herface been reunited with her family after her face was featured on a beer can. join us at 10am on bbc two, the news channel and online. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas, thoughts of storm ciara this weekend. that's right, things are going to ten very lively as we head through the weekend with storm ciara approaching. today is something of the calm before the storm, mostly dry out there with some frost and locally dense fog patches this morning, particularly through parts of eastern england and into southern scotland. the mist and fog should lift fairly quickly, quite a bit of sunshine and dry weather out there. the cloud will increase from the west later this afternoon with a few showers for northern ireland, down towards the south—west of england. further east, you will stay dry through the day and temperatures range from 5—10 degrees but wind picking up in the north—west. the
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west of scotland could see gusts of up west of scotland could see gusts of up to 50—60 mph this evening and overnight. blustery conditions across the british isles. not as cold as it was last night so most of us cold as it was last night so most of us seeing temperatures in the mid—single figures tomorrow morning. could be double figures towards the south—east. saturday is not a bad day itself but the wind is already picking up in the north—west, particularly for sunday, storm ciara could bring some damaging winds and large waves.
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hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines. a british national is confirmed as one of 61 cruise ship passengers who have caught coronavirus. the ship is moored offjapan with almost 4,000 on board. the teenager who threw a young boy off a balcony in london — regulators investigate whether warnings were missed. prince andrew is deferring an honorary military promotion, which he was due to receive later this month. energy bills set to fall after regulator 0fgem lowers caps on prices. critics say the caps are misleading. an official report says the public are not telling police about some crimes because so many offenders are never brought to justice. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching,
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reading and sharing. well, as we've been reporting, the death of a chinese doctor who tried to warn about the coronavirus outbreak has sparked an unprecedented level of public anger and grief in china. there's been an enormous online reaction to doctor li wenliang's death. it became the most read topic on chinese social media site weibo overnight, with more than 1.5 billion views, and was also heavily discussed in private wechat messaging groups. the top two trending hashtags on the website were "wuhan government owes dr li wenliang an apology" and "we want freedom of speech". both hashtags were quickly censored. when the bbc searched weibo today, hundreds of thousands of comments had been wiped. on twitter, which is blocked by the chinese government for most people in china, the news of the 34 year old doctor's death is also gaining traction. andrew stroehlein from hunan rights watch wrote:.
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and describing dr wenliang's actions, and consequent death, economist steve hanke posted... "chinese censorship kills, literally." while the former australian prime minister kevin rudd wrote, "the death of a good man. dr li wenliang. may his young family be protected and supported. may he rest in peace." another story which is trending this morning comes from australia. the east coast of australia has welcomed its heaviest rains in years, dousing a third of the country's most damaging and long—running wildfires. sydney alone had seen more than 60 millimetres of rain in the past 24 hours and is forecast to receive
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plenty more over the weekend. you can imagine on social media, people have been welcoming the rain. sydney lord mayor clover moore tweeted, "it was fantastic to wake up to much—needed rain this morning!" while shane fitzsimmons, commissioner of new south wales rural fire service wrote... really good to see that news. a light—hearted story here in the uk is proving popular on social media. a fox caused caused chaos in westminster on thursday evening. along with a picture, mp karl turner wrote on twitter, "beautiful fox popped
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into parliament today." you can imagine some of the reactions to that. mary newsome wrote, "probably has more integrity than most of the residents of this place!" let's have a look at what you are reading and watching on the bbc news app. number one most red is the news of the death of dr li wenliang, who identified concerns about coronavirus back in december but was told to retract those and of course, huge reaction on social media in china and around the world, as we been reporting. second is the news of the ship, the diamond princess, moored off the coast of japan, with dozens more people catching coronavirus on board the ship. going down to the most watched, it is a story about electro sensitivity. it tells the stories of the few people
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who say they suffer from electro sensitivity. this, they say, causes them headaches, nausea, pain. they say it is caused by mobile phones, wi—fi and so on. but the world health organization and indeed public health england say there is no medical diagnosis of this condition and they say there is no scientific basis for the symptoms but many people say they are convinced their symptoms are caused by sensitivity to electromagnetic signals. that's it for today's morning briefing. we have some breaking newsjust in the last few seconds, coming to us from the courts. shamima begum, one of the three east london schoolgirls who travelled to syria to join the group calling itself islamic state, has lost the first stage of a legal challenge against the decision by the government to revoke her british
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citizenship. let mejust the government to revoke her british citizenship. let me just repeat that to you, the news coming in the last few seconds, shamima begum, one of the three schoolgirls from east london who went to syria to join so—called islamic state group, has lost the first stage of the legal challenge against the decision by the government to remove her british citizenship. her legal challenge involves a number of other matters, which are being judged on in stages but this is the firstjudgment going against her. she has lost the legal challenge against the decision to revoke her british citizenship. we will bring you more on that developing story. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good morning. we start with cricket. player of the match anya shrubsole said it wasn't one of the prettiest games of cricket we'll ever see,
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but it's another win in the bank, after they beat india by four wickets in the t20 tri—series in australia. after a great display from the bowlers, england were chasing 124 for victory and nat sciver helped them on their way with a half—century, with lauren winfield hitting the winning runs, as they made it with seven balls to spare. if australia beat india tomorrow, we'll have an england—australia final on wednesday. later on, you can follow england's men in their second one—dayer against south africa in durban. there's text commentary on the bbc sport website and app. play starts at 11 o'clock. one of the greatest batsmen of all time, india legend sachin tendulkar, has been explaining why he's in australia for sunday's bushfire relief game "the big appeal" in melbourne. he said he'd been moved by the horrific secenes over the last few months, describing it as "alarming" and "catastrophic". and after spending part of his early career in australia, he just wanted to help. iamso i am so happy that i am here. the
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best possible way to support the cause, to ways money. —— raise money. australia has a ways been dear to me because in 1991 as an 18—year—old, i remember coming here and spent almost four months here. i almost had an aussie accent when i went back to india. but the competitive cricket that i played here at the age of 18 helped me a lot in my career. so i have a special feeling for australia. wales head coach wayne pivac says their six nations game against ireland tomorrow will be the biggest test of his coaching career. they began the defence of their title with a thumping victory over italy, winning 42—0. but wales haven't beaten the irish in dublin in this competition for eight years. it will be a massive step up from what we have had so far, i think we have been very fortunate in that we have been very fortunate in that we
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have the barbarians game to iron out a few things and then we have a good competition match against italy. now we go up against a much sterner challenge in their backyard. i think it has built nicely and this will be a real test of so far to see where we're at and how much work we've got to do to be able to play the game we wa nt to to do to be able to play the game we want to play under pressure. england's head coach appears on most of this morning's back pages talking about the abusive comments he receives on a daily basis. "i can handle the abuse", is the headline in the mail. the times goes with team news, and the decision to drop ben youngs for tomorrow's match against scotland at murrayfield. and there's a startling confession from west ham chairman david gold in the express. he says, "i fear our fans". he's been talking about the attack on the home of manchester united exec ed woodward. gold says he's been targeted four or five times. the date and venue have been confirmed for the british heavyweight title fight between daniel dubois with joe joyce. it'll be at london's 02 arena
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on the 11th of april. both fighters are undefeated. dubois won the title injuly and he's seen as one of british boxing's hottest prospects, with 14 wins, 13 via knockout. and after taking silver at the 2016 rio 0lympics, joyce has reeled off ten straight wins, nine via stoppage. the former england netball international tamsin greenway is the new head coach of scotland, taking over with immediate effect. greenway played for england more than ten years, before becoming director of wasps netball. her firstjob will be taking the scottish thistles into the europe open championship against england, wales and northern ireland in glasgow this august. defending super league champions st helens aren't used to finishing a match without scoring. it hadn't happened in more than three years, until last night, when they were beaten 19—0 at warrington. st helens boss kristian wolff said they were extremely ill—disciplined with the ball, and a bit the same without it.
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it's warrington's first win of the season. ronnie 0'sullivan has been beaten by graeme dott for the first time in nine years. he's out of the world grand prix in cheltenham, after losing 5—3 to dott, who's through to the semifinals. 0'sullivan is in good company, though. world number one judd trump is also out. great britain's men's ice hockey team are a step closer to a place at the winter olympics for the first time since 1948. they're bidding to reach beijing in 2022, and they beat romania 4—3 last night in their first game of the pre—qualfication tournament. they'll also play estonia and hungary over the next three days at the national ice centre in nottingham. there's live tennis later on the bbc sport website and app, with great britain against slovakia in the fed cup. the winners in bratislava will make the finals in april. and join us at 6.30 for sportsday here on bbc news.
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that's all from me. there'll be more sport throughout the day. thank you very much. i thought that was all we were hearing from you for a second. there was a long pause! doctors and sexual health experts are urging the health secretary to investigate what they're calling an "unacceptable" shortage of drugs to treat the menopause. many women have been struggling to access hormone replacement therapy for the past year. more recently, there's also been reported shortages of certain types of contraceptives, which could lead to unplanned pregnancies and abortions. charlotte rose reports. more than a million women in the uk use hormone replacement therapy to relieve symptoms of the menopause but many have faced difficulty getting the specific brand or treatment they are used to, because of disruption to the manufacturing and supply chain. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists and the british menopause society says it is still unclear why
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the shortages began and why they seem to be unique to the uk. they have accused the government of an extremely frustrating lack of transparency. women have been advised to consult their pharmacist over alternative treatments, but the bbc has spoken to a number of women who say they cannot find an effective substitute. at the same time, there have also been reported shortages of certain contraceptives, particularly pills and self—administered injections. the faculty of sexual and reproductive health care has warned increasing the difficulty of accessing birth control could lead to a rise in unplanned pregnancies and abortions. women do not shout out loud, theyjust suffer in silence and that is why it is more important that people like ourselves, organisations like ourselves make everybody aware of what is happening to women. a department of health spokesperson said...
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it is thought the supply of patches used for hormone replacement therapy could start to improve from this month, but without further action, many women could be waiting much longer for medication they rely on. charlotte rose, bbc news. i reminded out of the breaking news for the past few minutes. shamima begum, one of the three girls from east london who travel to syria to join the group calling itself islamic state, has lost the first stage of the legal challenge against the loss of her british citizenship. —— first stage of the appeal against the repeal of her british citizenship. the special appeals commission, which is national—security cases, said the 20—year—old could be stripped of her nationality because she had been
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left stateless. her lawyers were arguing that she had been left stateless but the commission said she had not been because she could turn instead to bangladesh for citizenship. she is of reddish and bangladeshi heritage. —— british bangladeshi. the court also ruled that sajid javid, the home secretary at the time, had not exposed her to human rights abuses by leaving her ina human rights abuses by leaving her in a refugee camp in northern syria. she had travelled with two friends from the uk to syria in 2015. she was found last year in a refugee camp in syria, nine months pregnant. she said she had married a dutch man who had joined is and had had two other children who had died. the baby she was carrying when she was found also died shortly after birth. her lawyers had argued the decision of sajid javid, the then home secretary, had left her stateless
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but the special immigration appeals commission said she had not been left stateless because she could turn instead to bangladesh for citizenship. that is the latest in that court case, just coming to us in the last few minutes. the headlines on bbc news... a briton is one of 61 people to have come down with coronavirus on a quarantined ship. the ship is moored offjapan with nearly 4000 people on board. care regulators are investigating whether the teenager who threw a young boy off a balcony in london could have been stopped. a whistle blower says he raised concerns before the attack. prince andrew is deferring an honorary military promotion, which he was due to receive for his 60th birthday. it follows controversies over his links to convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein.
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the world's finest hotels and pubs employ bartenders who are smartly dressed, experts in what they do, and pay attention to the smallest detail. but are things about to change? this robot injapan is ready to take your order. it was installed because the bar's owners couldn't get any humans to do the job. this particular model can pour you a pint, or mix you a cocktail, inside a minute, and will even make small talk, such as asking you about the weather. it can even read your body language, although it won't ask if you want one more for the road. another picture story that we would like to show you. meet the titanium tabby who was found on the streets of the siberian city of tomsk in the blistering cold, his four paws completely frozen. he would have been the latest victim of siberia's unforgiving winter had he not been found by animal
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protection volunteers and brought to a pioneering russian vet, who's fitted him with prosthetic paws made of titanium. he's clearly still getting used to his new pins! but he looks pretty contented otherwise. glad to see that he was rescued. this sunday, hollywood's finest will be walking down the red carpet at this year's 0scars — some for the very first time. some of them will be brits nominated for awards ranging from best director to best visual effects, as sophie long has been finding out. it's this weekend, hollywood's biggest night of the year, and the buzz is building, but imagine what it feels like to learn you're going to be one of the people to walk or glide up this red carpet on sunday, especially if it's for the very first time. it really was unexpected. i was in a kind of laughing, crying, state , and i hadn't expected to feel quite so emotional about it.
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i am a cynic about it all. the whole thing was crazy. i'm on a plane and i can't go anywhere so i tell the air stewardess and she tells everybody else and it'sjust like madness, and they brought a little plate of food, they wrote congratulations on a note. it was special. i've been grinning ear to ear since last monday when sandy called to let me know i would be nominated, so it's amazing. i'm terrible, i'mjust a child at heart. i love this experience. i've never lost that thrill, oh, my gosh, i'm sitting next to dicaprio, or there is al pacino. lam bringing because he is grinning! —— i am lam bringing because he is grinning! —— lam grinning. it'sjust as exciting as the first time. but the first time is pretty amazing. there is a magic to it. it means so much and it's something that, you know, it's an event in your life, like the world cup or something. and it's notjust the recognition of one's peers. the award, the honour.
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it's the company you get to keep. it would be amazing to meet robert de niro or meet al pacino. these are people i grew up with, as well as any of today's. margot robbie, would be lovely to meet margot robbie. quentin tarantino is a great director, i would love to meet him. brad pitt, iwouldn't mind meeting him! i don't think he's going to want to meet me. i look forward to seeing people i haven't seen for a while, it's really nice. it's a celebration of film and i don't look at it any other way. brad pitt, it's a bit strange because he is like a proper film star. this is the green room where stars will come before going on stage to reveal the winners and present the awards. 0r where the winners might come if they need to take a moment. but how do they prepare? they must‘ve written speeches. rehearsing your 0scar acceptance speech with or without tears is what normal people do when they're bored, right? it's personal, you know. i did actually write something. i've never done it since.
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i know that there are people i have to say thank you to. it's not a long list because you always want to keep those things short. that's the thing. i already told myself there is no chance i will win so whatever happens will be a bonus. my heart is already beating a little faster knowing that i might have to get up on that stage. i kind of think it's just better to be spontaneous and just feel the moment and hopefully don't forget people. i daren't think i will ever have to get up there, i will speak from the heart but it tends to be what i've doing in the last few years, just speak from the heart. whatever they say... ..however they say it... ..anyone who walks away from here with a gold statuette will have their pick of the afterparties. 0scar opens a lot of doors. sophie long, bbc news, hollywood. now it's time for a look at the weather. 0ur—— 0ur —— before we go to the weather,
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some updates from singapore on the corona virus. we mention to you a short while ago that the country is reporting three more coronavirus cases with no links to previous cases with no links to previous cases or travel history to china. a singapore health official has been quoted as saying the case of a british man who contracted coronavirus there is linked to a business meeting at the grand hyatt hotel in singapore. another line from there is that it is raising its alert level for coronavirus to orange, from yellow, which means that the disease is deemed severe and spreads easily from person to person but has not spread widely and has been contained. more on that through the day. now time for the weather with simon. hello. good morning everyone. we have got storm ciara on its way as we head into the weekend. before that, we have had some fog this morning but that is tending to lift up. we have had some sunshine as
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well, actually, a lovely start to the day in felixstowe this morning. but it is all about the storm that is coming. we will see the wind gradually increase and by saturday, scotla nd gradually increase and by saturday, scotland and northern ireland, gusts of 60-70 scotland and northern ireland, gusts of 60—70 mph and by sunday, when the storm will be across us, we can see gusts of 70—80, perhaps more. through the rest of today, you can see we have still got some sunshine across see we have still got some sunshine a cross m ost see we have still got some sunshine across most areas of england and wales and into scotland. the fog will continue to lift and clear away. a bit more clout into northern ireland and a few spots of rain moving its way in later on. maximum temperatures, 5—9 degrees. the breeze will pick up and you will notice it more in western scotland and northern ireland. turning quite gusty year later. through tonight, patchy rain continuing to move gradually eastwards. there will be a lot more cloud around compared to last night. not as cold as it was last night. not as cold as it was last night. not as cold as it was last night. temperatures getting down to about 7—10 degrees but the wind will continue to strengthen. into the weekend, it is all about
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storm ciara. there wind speeds, as i said, peaking during sunday. widespread gales and severe gales, there will be damaging and disruptive winds and power cuts are possible as we go through sunday. this is the pressure chart. you can see one weather system clearing away during the day on saturday and another one moving its way to the north and west. that will bring in some heavy rain across northern ireland and the west of scotland but the wind continuing to strengthen throughout the day. there will be some gales developing here. for much of england and wales, dry with sunshine, and weather—wise, not too bad, some sunshine for eastern scotla nd bad, some sunshine for eastern scotland before the rain in the day. a bit of of snow for higher ground, maximum temperatures 7—9 or 10 degrees. now steal moves in from the atlantic, look at the white lines and how they squeezed together across the uk, bringing those strengthening winds. it will be accompanied by some very heavy rainfall moving its way south and east as the day goes on. the wind is particularly squally on this where the front as it moves south and
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east. showers behind it. temperatures will be up into double figures but it is going to be about the wind. gusts widely of 60—70 mph, in places up to 80 mph, as i mentioned at the start, they are damaging and disruptive. stadiums to the forecast.
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hello, it's friday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling and we're live from new broadcasting house the bbc has obtained a secret recording of the teenager who threw a six—year—old boy from the 10th floor of the tate modern in london speaking about plans to push someone off a high building about a year earlier. we'll talk to an expert who says the case demonstrates a failure in the system which cares for those with complex needs. doctors are warning that a shortage
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of some types of contraception

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