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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 23, 2020 5:00am-6:01am BST

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welcome to bbc news. our top stories: president trump deploys hundreds more federal officers to us cities, expanding his crackdown on what he calls spiralling violent crime. my vision for america's cities could not be more different from the lawlessness being pushed by the extreme radical left. what was then pauline is that the federal presence is actually making the situation worse and we cannot allow that in new york city or anywhere else in that country. — — what we in new york. even though the us is recording more than 1,000
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coronavirus deaths a day, the president also insists schools must get back to normal. in israel, others take to the streets, demanding the prime minister stepped down to the crisis. and after a wait of 30 yea rs, crisis. and after a wait of 30 years, liveable finally get their hands on the premier league title. —— liverpool. hello to all of you in the uk and around the world. we do not need federal troops, we do not need federal troops, we do not need secret agents, that was the town mare of chicago in response to the president ‘s plans to send extra federal forces to tackle what he says is violent crime, spiralling out of control. there is already controversy about law enforcement officers being sent to portland, oregon, to confront protesters. president
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trump has singled out kansas, albuquerque for the latest campaign, some say he is provoking a constitutional crisis. this is david willetts from north america. this is not your typical la trafficjam, they are waiting for test for covid—i9, coronavirus has been ripping through california whichjust ripping through california which just eclipsed new york for the highest number of confirmed cases in a single state. that was actually about the levels of covid—i9 heading california but other states as well. we will come to back to that in a moment. first of all, let's get, in fact i think we will go straight to speak to jonathan meyer. he is the former deputy general counsel at the department of homeland security and currently a law form partner and noises from washington. thank you for your time —— law firm. you would have had a role in no doubt
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offering advice as to whether this sort of move to send federal forces into other major cities was indeed acceptable. before we get to your view on that though generally speaking, who are these agents going in and would you describe them as i suppose fit for purpose? their roles seem to vary depending on the city? right, so these are department of homeland security offices, officers who are usually doing immigration —related work, border related work or protecting federal buildings. they are not in the business to be the key number are they trained to conduct a normal law enforcement on the street, and this would be a very new sort of task for them to undertake. right, as regards portland, they have had protest day after day, the best part of eight weeks now and the mirror of
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portland isjoining weeks now and the mirror of portland is joining them with some of their protests which tells you a little bit about how he feels about having federal forces how he feels about having federalforces —— how he feels about having federal forces —— mayor. how he feels about having federalforces —— mayor. is this issue about it being constitutional or not, simply about, is it about simply that the city would invite the forces in, is that when it comes down to? that is part of it. in portland, for example, under 0regon law, federal forces may come in but at the invitation of the state. to my understanding, that has not happened. but that is only part of the issue here because another part is whether this is what the department of homeland security is authorised to do. the department was created primarily to be concerned with terrorism, immigration, natural disasters, those sorts of things. it is not in the
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business of controlling violence of the streets on the city. there is certainly an argument to make that it is outside legaljurisdiction. that we're looking at exceptional times and it's true to say for chicago, kansas, albuquerque, whether it is the rate of homicides or simply violent crime, they are all sharply up and the city authorities do not seem to be able to that? whether or not thatis able to that? whether or not that is the case, i mean, that is not a new story. we have had issues, rises and falls in crime over the centuries of history in the united states. those are traditionally addressed by the state and local authorities. it is not a federal issue unless federal law is broken or is there a particular federal interest such as protecting a federal building. well, we wait to see what those forces will do as and when they get there. they have been deployed i am told
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already to kansas. jonathan thank you for your time. jonathan meyer, deformity — former deputy general counsel at the department of homeland security. picking up in other news. 2a hours after it became mandatory to wear masks in melbourne, the state of victorian has recorded five deaths. the australian government recently in a partial lockdown on the state after a spike in cases and that was a state government decision. 0n was a state government decision. on wednesday 403 people became infected, the third—largest daily rises the pandemic started. a red tanker carrying petroleum products has exploded in southern nigeria, killing 20. the incident occurred at a major intersection of eyre highway linking these states and witnesses say a number of the victims were caught up in the fire as they try to skip petrol from the tanker which had crashed. brazil has registered a record number of coronavirus
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cases, more than 67,000 cases the last 24 hours and the health ministry says almost 1300 deaths were reported in that time. brazil has the second worst outbreak after the united states, more than 2,200,000 infected, indigenous groups are increasingly amongst the worst infected. getting back to the situation within the united states and the spread of the coronavirus because president trump has used his latest pest —— press briefing to talk up plans to open up schools across the country noting he would be co mforta ble country noting he would be comfortable sending his son and grandchildren back into the classroom but this comes as california, the most populous state, reported nearly 13,000 new covid—19 infections in a single day, a new record. texas set new daily records for coronavirus death and infections. this is not your
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typical la trafficjam. they are waiting for tests for covid—19. coronavirus has been ripping through california, which arejust ripping through california, which are just eclipsed new york or the highest number of confirmed cases in a single state. in total now, the highest in the nation, not highest in the nation, not highest per capital but not highest per capital but not highest in that respect but nonetheless, a sober reminder of why we are taking things seriously as we. in texas, the state set new daily records for increases in coronavirus death and hospitalisations. healthcare professionals are struggling. we are all trying oui’ struggling. we are all trying our best to keep everyone healthy and alive and when it is out of our hands, it is out of our control, we sometimes or helpless. after california and texas, florida, the nation ‘s third most populous state, with
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roughly 380,000 confirmed cases. teachers here have been fighting back against the governor ‘s plan to reopen schools, saying it is not safe. in florida, we have had well over 23,000 cases of covert among kids under the age of 18 and over20,000 of among kids under the age of 18 and over 20,000 of those have happened in the last month or so “— happened in the last month or so —— covid—19, so we have seen that this rating is going much faster among our students and children under the age of 18. we know we have had increased hospitalisation of kids under the age of 18. president donald trump takes a different view. regarding your family and your son and your children, are you comfortable and you plan to have them back in person in school? i am comfortable with that and we do have a national strategy but ultimately it is up strategy but ultimately it is up to the governors of the states. many governors want the schools open. i would like to see the schools open, especially when easy statistics like this, we have great
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statistics on young people and their safety. in europe, economies have been slowly reopening and daily new cases have been declining but it is a different story in the us. as cases keep rising, many americans are determined to keep driving forward in a fight for their health. alanna petrov, bbc news. taking into israel, the government has passed new laws to give them powers to impose new restrictions and limiting parliamentary oversight. initially it was praised for its rapid introduction of strict measures but israel has seen more than 1000 new infections a day in the last few weeks and the government has been challenged by angry protesters. 0ur corresponded reports from jerusalem.
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more israelis are now demonstrating against the government, accusing it of mismanaging the reopening of the country. joining the crowd is this restaurant owner. there is this restaurant owner. there is no agenda, nothing organised, only chaos. for now, he keeps his business in tel aviv shut. he says it is a financial disaster for him and his employees. we are dying here, people are dying. there isa here, people are dying. there is a big section, the restau ra nts, is a big section, the restaurants, bars, nightlife, tourism. hundreds of thousands of people are living off this work and they just of people are living off this work and theyjust don't give a damn. israel won praise work and theyjust don't give a damn. israelwon praise for its effective tight lockdown and tracking during the first outbreak of covid—19. but as it has lost its edge, the prime minister, he was already on trial for minister, he was already on trialfor corruption, is increasingly under attack. some protesters are keeping up the pressure on the prime minister by campaigning outside his
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house but it is notjust israeli leaders who are facing growing public anger over the handling of this crisis. palestinians are also furious, challenging the latest lockdown. and there are sharp criticism of the palestinian authority. translation: shut down, that is it, the government does not even it, the government does not eve n wa nt it, the government does not even want to negotiate. it does not matter to them if people start, they don't care, they have food and the children are looked after. after 30 years as a chef, this father of six has no work, there is no unemployment benefit is that with the restaurant close, he is broke. translation: i am in debt. is broke. translation: iam in debt. i cannot provide the basics for my family. i cannot borrow money as no—one has it. my family. i cannot borrow money as no-one has it. often, social distancing rules are openly ignored. students partied after their high schools exam results. and large
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weddings. complete with celebratory gunfire have gone ahead in open defiance of a ban. in the west bank and israel, politicians are losing people ‘s trust and that makes it far harder to get them to co—operate with steps to stop the spread of the deadly virus and leaves a growing risk of social unrest. to stay with this, coming up on bbc news, a downturn down under, australia is heading for its first recession in three decades. nasa: can see you coming down the ladder now. it's one small step for man... 0ne giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight for the first crash
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in the 30—year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly. seven, six, five, four... thousands of households across the country are suspiciously quiet this lunchtime as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. you are watching bbc news. the latest headlines. president trump deploys matter —— more
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federal agents to tackle what he calls a spiralling violent climb. hospital admissions in some us states hit new highs, but mrtrump some us states hit new highs, but mr trump insists schools must get back to business as usual. the increasing cost of this pandemic has certainly become clearer in australia. the government is reporting the country's biggest deficit since the second world war. the economy itself is heading into its first recession in three decades, and according to the treasurer, the unemployment rate is forecast to pass 9% by the end of the year. that is also the highest in decades. australia is experiencing a health and economic crisis like nothing we have seen in the last 100 years. these harsh numbers reflect the harsh reality we face. the economic outlook remains very uncertain.
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a stark message. let's get more from our sydney correspondence. if australia is going into recession given the last 30 yea rs of recession given the last 30 years of growth, growth, growth, we can expect much of the world to have to suck it up as well. given australia's covid—19 numbers have been pretty low relative to other countries, we have had about 13,000 confirmed cases, more than 125 people have died. these numbers as we say are low by international standards, yet still the lockdown, the various disease control measures that have seen many businesses closed and hundreds of thousands of people losing theirjobs really thousands of people losing their jobs really has thousands of people losing theirjobs really has inflicted enormous economic damage. if you look at the numbers, they are, as the australian treasurerjosh frydenberg said, truly i watering. in the last financial year the budget deficit here was more than 60 billion us dollars, and in the
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next 12 months, that deficit is expected to more than double, and it is worth noting as well that in the last financial year for the pandemic australia had been forecasting a small surplus. that really tells the story. at the end of it, after, as you say, the best part of three decades, there is a point at which you are going to have to come to terms with a slowing growth in any case. that presumably has had its own impact? i think the australian economy was slowing before all of this chaos was... australia, but the west of the world. australia was having economic wobbles well before this. but the covid—19 pandemic has well and truly put the bulldozer through australia's economic figures. it is in a fiscal blackhole that hasn't been seen since the end of the second world war, so many, many australians, the majority of australians, the majority of australians you would have to
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say have never seen this sort of economic carnage being inflicted was not what it means, many businesses forced to close to stop the spread of the virus operably won't recover. and as we say, a huge number, an army of workers losing theirjobs. the government suspending an awful -- is government suspending an awful —— is spending an awful lot of money to revive the economy. but the next 12 months certainly don't look good. blink would be a fair word. thank you very much indeed for that. —— bleak. you would think this was australia rather than in fact sweden given lots of people in the sunshine on a beachfront there. each country has had to work out its own regime for this coronavirus, and the swedish government's decision to keep a lot of society working as normal during the pandemic certainly raised plenty of eyebrows, especially when they were then suffering one of the highest death toll is in relation to the population in europe. a sharp drop in both deaths and serious cases this month, though, has for some addicts to
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rethink the country's strategy. while many european cities are adjusting to life after lockdown, little has changed here in sweden's capital. markets, shops and bars have stayed open throughout the pandemic. the strategy here is focused on a ban on large gatherings and social distancing guidelines. we in sweden trust the authorities, and if the authorities they stay at home please and work from home, we do that. so they didn't need to say, you have to go on didn't need to say, you have to goona didn't need to say, you have to go on a lockdown. i do think the natural thing would be to shut things down a bit more. i don't understand why we are not being more careful. i don't understand. for months, sweden had one of the most highest death tolls in europe in relation to a population size. there are signs things are improving despite its controversial approach. the swedish public health agency is
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reporting a sharp drop infidelities daily admissions to intensive care units down to single figures. of course it feels good. finally we are where we hoped we would be much earlier on. but now we can see this rapid decline is really hopeful for the one about herd immunity? it wasn't part of the swedish strategy but something you thought would be an outcome and strode very —— spoke very strongly about. 0nly and strode very —— spoke very strongly about. only about 6% of sweden are known to have antibodies. immunity is definitely a lot higher than 6%. it is unclear how high has proven to be surprisingly difficult to measure. protecting the economy wasn't a formal part of sweden's strategy, but there were also hopes of avoiding a lockdown would help. forecasters think sweden is on track to do better than other hard—hit countries like italy and the uk, but that is not the whole story. well, compared to our scandinavian neighbours, we are not doing very much better. sweden, like
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the other nordic countries, is a small open economy, very dependent on trade, so the swedish economy tends to do poorly when the rest of the world is doing poorly. public confidence in sweden's government has fallen, and the prime minister recently announced a commission to look into the country's response to covid—19. after increased national debate about the death rate, especially in care homes. the swedish model is really put under pressure right now. but also, how strong trust in expertise agencies, advising the government rather than the government being able to lead the expertise. and as domestic discussions continue, there are worries about how all this affects sweden's global image as well. although it may still be years before we know which governments had the best strategies for handling covid—19, sweden's unusual approach is testing its
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reputation. now for probably a liverpudlian air in sport. i have your thursday sports briefing. we start with an eight goal thriller at anfield where liverpool beat chelsea 5— three on a night they finally lifted the premier league trail —— trophy. truck the captain, leading the celebrations on the podium. elation after a 30 year wait to win the league. what a contrast to last season when agonisingly finished a point behind manchester city. 0utstanding to be honest. i was afraid i thought if the game is not that good, then i am not that good, and sometimes i carried around. other boys were generous, they gave me an exciting ending, they gave all of us an exciting game. in a situation like that, we are
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already on the beach. playing like this it is exceptional. it makes them so much were the champions. next to italy where into mrmir champions. next to italy where into mr mir suggested a second where they were held to a goalless draw. they dominated the game but squandered a whole host of chances, including this in the later stages of the first half. and then early in the second half, it came off the second half, it came off the post and into the keeper's hands. juventus could be crowned champion on thursday if they win. victory would take nine points clear with three games to go and they have the better
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head record this season. it would be the night in a row. major league baseball returns went to big match ups on thursday with the new york yankees and washington nationals. the san francisco giants at the la dodgers. the season has been shortened to just 60 games and there are a whole host of other measures designed to try and deal with travelling and playing through a pandemic. players have to take their own temperatures twice a day at home in addition to having their attempt has ta ken home in addition to having their attempt has taken twice a day when they are at the ballpark. damages are being taken four times a day. they are going to be undergoing nasal swa bs are going to be undergoing nasal swabs and other tests for covid—19 every other day and they are also going to have to give samples for antibody testing about once a month. is a massive testing effort on behalf of major baseball to try and make sure the coronavirus is not spreading in major
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clubhouses. a big challenge for them as well. i want to take you to portland for a moment because we have live pictures coming from there, and if you just have a look. those cameras are all honed in on the portland mayor with the mask. you can probably just portland mayor with the mask. you can probablyjust see through the arms and the heads and the cameras. he has described the introduction of federal vases into portland as something which is escalating the situation in his city. this is the deployment of federal agents is organised by president trump. he is doing something similar now for kansas, chicago and albuquerque as well. he says it is an effort to deal with the spiralling violent crime in those cities. but here, there have been protests in portland for the last 55 nights, in
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fa ct, for the last 55 nights, in fact, that is since the death of george floyd is a part of the black lives matter movement. that is the very latest live. you saw it here on bbc news. stay with us. business coming up injust a moment. hello there. cloud is thickening up once again from the atlantic. it's set to bring some more rain mainly for the middle third of the uk. some areas stayed cloudy and damp throughout the day on wednesday and, as a result, it was quite cool, as well. we had a temperature of 26 degrees in london, but the sunniest weather, that was in bournemouth — almost 14 hours of sunshine. probably not as much sunshine, though, for thursday. it will be quite a cloudy start to the day with temperatures around 12—14 degrees. and we start with some outbreaks of rain mainly across northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and wales. that's going to be quite heavy for a while. it will gradually turning lighter and more patchy through the day. we get some sunshine more widely across scotland and northern ireland and towards the south—east. perhaps even into the midlands,
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it may well stay dry, but there'll be more clouds around, so it won't be quite as warm — still 23 or 24 degrees. we are looking at some showers to come into the south—west of england, still damp into wales, some more rain across northern england, so quite a cool day here, although the far north of england improving later on. we'll have some sunshine in the afternoon across northern ireland and more widely in scotland, so a warmer day here, 19 or 20 degrees. but still some rather sharp showers in the north—east and up towards the northern isles. those will tend to ease off a bit during the evening. this light and patchy rain by this stage heading down towards the midlands, eventually later on in the night towards the south—east of england. the weather front bringing that is going to be very weak, and as we move into friday, we are in between two wet weather systems — a transient ridge of high pressure before that weather front increases the cloud and brings some rain in from the atlantic. but many places will have a dry day on friday. could be a fair bit of cloud, particularly across southern parts of england and south wales, the odd shower here. one or two showers further north, perhaps into north—east england and scotland.
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then we get later on in the day some rain pushing in from the west across northern ireland. ahead of that, 20 degrees through the central belt of scotland, and we're back up to 25 in the south—east of england. as we head into the weekend, we're dominated by low pressure sitting close to the north of the uk. that weather front will tend to move through, taking some heavy rain away, and then it's showers following on behind. certainly looks like saturday is going to be the wetter day, and those showers could be heavy and thundery. a much drier day on sunday for eastern parts of england with the bulk of the showers in the north and the west of the uk.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world: on a charge — tesla makes a profit for the fourth quarter in a row. has elon musk confounded the sceptics? plus, raising the stakes — china threatens firm countermeasures as the us orders the closure of its consulate in houston on spying claims. we start with electric car—maker tesla. its shares have been soaring as it has seemed to ride out
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the pandemic far better than many of its rivals in the auto industry. on wednesday, it announced its sticking to its goal of delivering half a million vehicles this year, despite coronavirus, and it passed a major milestone on its road to becoming a profitable company. tesla made a profit ofjust over $100 million in the three months to june. that was the fourth quarter in a row tesla has been profitable. it removes a major hurdle to the company joining the s&p 500 index of the biggest us companies and to qualify, a company must be in the black for a whole year. it also has to be worth more than around $8 billion. well, tesla certainly has that covered. its shares have tripled this year, giving it a stock market value of over $300 billion, bigger than jp morgan and on a par with consumer
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giant procter and gamble. daniel ives is managing director of equity research at wedbush securities, in new york. you are using the word already but a paradigm shift for tesla? yeah, i mean it is a paradigm shift especially profitability. that has been a missing piece in the puzzle and besides joining the s&p 500, it shows the trajectory here, combined with delivery, this is a teflon like model and i view it as a game—changer in terms of what we saw from tesla tonight. how much of this advance do you think is at this extraordinary time ofa think is at this extraordinary time of a pandemic, down to the customer base, if you like? because you have to have a few quid or dollars to buy into tesla and buy a car and they are beginning to roll offjust
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like that? this isjust 3% penetrated globally, the market, the electric vehicle market, the electric vehicle market, especially in china. it is worth 400, possibly $500 a share in terms of china and shares, and then extreme demand in europe in a pandemic. so this could be a million deliveries in the next two or three years and i think the stock in bulk cases will go to $2000 and that continues to move forward here. and we have heard from those who are still uncertain about tesla, time and again, yes, it is all very well but profitability as you mentioned is the key. is that now, in your view, mentioned is the key. is that now, in yourview, a mentioned is the key. is that now, in your view, a historical fa ct. now, in your view, a historical fact. that has been in god, it is making money and it will carry on making money?”
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is making money and it will carry on making money? i think them carrying forward is the key. that was the issue with the bear market, there a lot more cost efficiencies and now that they are already in profitability, the g directory is can he get up to $30 and earning power in the next three yea rs earning power in the next three years and you're talking about $1 trillion market and right now in easy market it is the world of tesla and everyone else is paying rent. how valuable will it be to be on the s&p list? significantly. there were some theories they went in profit but they will be fine. thank you very much on that. the latest on the fortu nes that. the latest on the fortunes of tesla which seem to be on the rise and the rise. let's turn now to those rising tensions between the world's two biggest economies. china has threatened to retaliate with ‘firm countermeasures' after the us ordered the closure of its consulate in houston. the americans say china has been using the consulate
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as a centre for its spying operations in the us. how big a concern only the escalating tensions for investors. we a re escalating tensions for investors. we arejoined by escalating tensions for investors. we are joined by a fund manager, joyce, thank you for joining fund manager, joyce, thank you forjoining us and how damaging a moment is this, do you think? again, the trajectory of tension is only one way? absolutely. it has been a year of rising geopolitical tensions and if you remember at the start of the year we had exchanged between iran and the us and over the year, in spite of covid—19, tensions have risen and that has been witnessed today in the chinese relationship. how much further is that likely to go? we are building up to an election and we are hearing about the importance of the chinese market to tesla, at the moment, but there is not a lot of
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ground for optimism, is there? i think the stock market is concerned but what is happening is even more economic stimulus. we have seen so much stimulus going on that the us dollar has been weakening recently and that has been quite good for gold price and commodity prices, food, energy, and it is boosting markets even at a time when tensions arising. so they can override the tension that we seeing with the china us relationship. let's be honest, the trade deal, that is over, isn't it? absolutely. the first stage was implemented to a degree but the chances of a second part of that are remote. of course you have your own problems in the eu, uk relationship where there is tension on that as well. 0verall, tension on that as well. overall, the market does think that the brexit agreement will come into place in due course. we will see how that pans out! to focus one last point on the us and we talked about the
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elections often enough and november is not that far away. how are the markets going to as each day ticks down towards that moment? the interesting thing is that if the democrats to win the presidency and the house what we may see is it can hit companies like tech shares coming under pressure and perhaps more commodity shares, gold price, financials, beginning to recover cmac a pattern in the market later this year, we should be quite an interesting change. —— — and you may see a pattern the market. let's focus on south korea now — its economy has fallen into recession after the worst economic decline in more than two decades. it joins japan, singapore and thailand which are all now in a technical recession, defined as a contraction in gdp for two quarters in a row. sharanjit leyl is following this for us in singapore.
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it is coming across the board in the region. but these are also problems that were waiting to happen, regardless of the pandemic, for south korea? well, actually, much of it has to do with the pandemic. a mid lot of these countries are reeling from the coronavirus and south korea is not least one of them. it fell nearly 3%. it is the steepest decline, as you say, since 1998 that if thatis you say, since 1998 that if that is not bad enough, exports accounting for nearly 40% of their economy, felled by their most since 1963! the reason why south korea matters is that it is asia's fourth largest economy, a major market for ship manufacturing, exports, a real gauge ofjust how badly that sector has been hit globally. the south korean government has so far implemented about $231 billion
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worth of stimulus measures tackling the effects of the pandemic on the economy. however, authorities say they have very little control really over exports ranging from everything from computer memory chips to cars and the finance minister remains optimistic that the economy will recover and he's hoping for a china star rebound in the third quarter as the pandemic slows and activity resumes. remember, china seems the only place that remains impervious and ironically even though the pandemic started, its economy grew 2.8% in the quarter but in or more evidence of how badly the covid—19 has hit exporters, there were eye watering dismal numbers from australia, reporting its biggest budget deficit since the second world war! grim reading everywhere. thank you very much indeed.
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let's stay with those us china tensions but move to hong kong now. international companies have long been drawn there because of its proximity to china, the availability of good talent, and the vibrancy of the city. but china's new national security law threatens to undermine some of the very things which has made it so successful as a global financial centre as our asia business correspondent, karishma vaswani, reports. voices of dissent now muted by a made in china law. blank posters where once there were fiery slogans. businesses here struggled through a year of protests a nd struggled through a year of protests and increasing restrictions from both china and the us, but china has recently imposed national security laws and this may be the final straw. scott came to hong kong to build a start—up and lived to the cosmopolitan life but protests in the coronavirus drew him home with plans to return when he could. when the new regulation past it
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was game over. a lot of investors we we re was game over. a lot of investors we were speaking to you in some of our other friends doing start—ups in hong kong from international investors specifically from the us, they were very wary about investing. now i think with this new law and the changing of the special status, it is basically a no go from international investors. the law criminalises any acts of secession, sensation, terrorism and collusion with outside forces. for the first time, china can now bypass hong kong courts on the implementation of this law. and foreigners are not exempt. the most immediate change this nor law has brought to hong kong's business community is fear and over the yea rs i community is fear and over the years i talked to many about protests, the trade war but this is the first time few have wa nted this is the first time few have wanted to comment on camera. companies are now starting to look elsewhere, places like
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singapore, for instance, as a way out what the ambiguities of this law may mean for them. but for some with a stake in china's economy, the new rules area china's economy, the new rules are a way to on social unrest and protect what hong kong a lwa ys and protect what hong kong always was, a place to make money. if anything, yes, the nature of hong kong business may change but i still feel the lure of everybody wanting to go to do business here and the allure of what i call now is the greatest consumer market on the greatest consumer market on the world. for decades, hong kong has been the gateway between the east and the west, the international face of china, leading it into a globalised world but that balance has changed. hong kong remains a financial hub but increasingly under china's shadow. karishma vaswani, bbc news. let's get some of the day's other news.
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microsoft has seen its revenues jump in the three months tojune as lockdowns around the world boosted demand for remote working and gaming. they were up 13% to $38 billion, led by strong gains in microsoft's cloud computing and x—box divisions. airlines and holiday companies are holding urgent talks with the uk government this week in a bid to bring coronavirus testing to airports. they say testing could end quarantine restrictions and save what's left of the key holiday season. authorities in germany, italy and switzerland have raided the offices of car giant fiat—chrysler and the maker of iveco trucks over claims some engines produced illegal levels of emissions. the action concerns alleged use of software to mask vehicles' diesel pollution during testing so—called defeat devices. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: a new device that could save not one, but two lives.
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scientists show the bbc the ventilator for two. nasa: can see you coming down the ladder now. it's one small step for man... 0ne giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight for the first crash in the 30—year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly. seven, six, five, four... thousands of households across
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the country are suspiciously quiet this lunchtime as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: president trump deploys more cities to technological spiralling violent crime. hospital admissions in some states hit new highs, but president trump also insists schools get back to business as usual. twitter reports second—quarter results in the next few hours before the wall street opening. the social media site has been busy in recent months with the pandemic and the
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black lives matter movement boosting the number of tweets. but that's not been helping advertising spending, and last week, twitter was hit by the worst security incident in its history, with many high—profile accounts hijacked in a bitcoin scam. what does that do for the company? vinny troia is an author on cyber security and ceo of night lion security. thank you very much indeed for joining us. we havejust been talking about tesla turning a profit at last, getting out of the red about —— after all these years. twitter would love to be able to report that, wouldn't they? they would. thank you for having me on. the bottom line is presumably they won't. how do they ever get over that hurdle? i think at this point it is one of those situations where they were actually victim... they didn't necessarily do anything wrong. this is a very co—ordinated social engineering attack. somebody went after employees specifically in the best thing they could do at this point is
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have a really strong response, which i think they are doing honestly. they are getting in front of it, admitting their m ista kes front of it, admitting their mistakes and sharing as much as they can with the public as fast as they can determine it. i think the result probably will not reflect that in any case because it is up tojune. but it is a very important point. for a company struggling to make a profit, which perhaps in an awful lot of what it does is driving political debate which advertisers do not necessarily respond to, then to have a hack of this order on top of that must raise questions about it. maybe not its future, but certainly its ability to turn a coin. they're enough, andi ability to turn a coin. they're enough, and i have only said that twitter is thought of becoming a system of record. you can't really shut it down at this point, especially when you have world leaders tweeting all the time. it becomes a record of what they are saying. and now in my mind what really gets called into question is if an employee has an ability to
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not only see personal messages but send out messages on behalf or somebody else, you really know the messages are originating from the proper person, and from an advertiserperspective or even from a general consumer perspective, you have to question what level of security and controls are in place on twitter. said earlier that you we re twitter. said earlier that you were impressed by the way they responded to this hacking issue. where your sense of confidence come from? issue. where your sense of confidence come from ?|j issue. where your sense of confidence come from? i feel they are being fairly transparent in terms of document based on the reports i have read based on what they are putting out, i haven't seen any holes in their stories, so iam fairly... any holes in their stories, so i am fairly... i am happy with the information they are providing. i think part of it is they are still investigating so they put out the information as they can. that is all you can ask for. thank you very much indeed for your analysis on twitter. results due out in
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a few hours time. floods triggered by torrential monsoon rains have displaced millions of people in india, nepal and bangladesh. they have caused widespread damage as well. these slides are described as the worst in the area in years, killing more than 300 people in that time. forecasters are warning of more rain in some parts of the region, already battling to contain coronavirus. nothing can stand in the way of the mighty brahmaputra. the river has burst its banks in several places in the north—eastern indian state of assam. the result — vast areas are submerged and millions have been affected. floods are an annual event here, but this year, the impact has been devastating. living conditions are basic and the people have lost most of their belongings. translation: the situation is very bad here. everything has been damaged.
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0ur houses have been ruined, the cattles are dying and we are facing difficulty getting food. tens of thousands of people have been moved to safety. the challenge is to provide them with essentials as many roads have been cut off by the floods. the region is already grappling with the coronavirus. both the displaced and the rescuers are at risk. we are facing the dual challenge of covid and floods at this time, and we have to take all the precautions. let us not forget that india personnel also have to protect themselves before they protect others, and in the process, some of them may be infected. many have reluctantly come to these shelters, fearing for the safety of their household items and cattle. the floods have also inundated vast areas of the world —famous kaziranga nature reserve, home to the world's largest population of one—horned rhinos. as their habitats are submerged, the animals rush to higher grounds.
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at least nine rhinos have died so far, along with hundreds of deer and wild buffalos. further downstream in neighbouring bangladesh, officials say almost one—third of the country is underwater. the heavy rains have swollen both the brahmaputra and the ganges. some say these are the worst floods in a decade and they are praying for a respite. in nepal, landslides have caused havoc in the mountainous regions. more than 120 people have been killed in landslides alone in recent weeks, and dozens are still missing. all this happening when the economies of the region have been crippled by the coronavirus lockdowns, adding to the despair of millions of people in this region. anbarasan ethirajan, bbc news. back to issues of coronavirus. ventilators have been a crucial asset during the coronavirus
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pandemic, and now, experts in cambridge have come together to design a new model that helps two people instead of one. designed by royal papworth hospital and the university of cambridge, this machine is still being tested, but it could eventually be used around the world. 0ur science correspondent richard westcott reports. when covid—19 first came, many countries including the uk were worried they will run out of hospital ventilators. they are the life—saving machines that breed for you. a second covid—19 wave could still leave hospital short. which is where this new device comes in. it is one ventilator but for two people. you can see clearly hear what makes this device unique stop imagine these bellows are human lungs. the one closest to me isn't going up one closest to me isn't going up very much at all, so that represents a smaller person with a smaller lung capacity.
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the fire one is going up far more. that is a bigger person with a bigger lung capacity. 0ne ventilator able to cope with two very different people with two very different people with very different needs. it has been designed by doctors from royal pa pworth has been designed by doctors from royal papworth hospital, and engineers from the university of cambridge. this device allows us to instantaneously double the capacity of the ventilators. in international humanitarian disaster situation or vast casual situation we have enough ventilators. but in developing countries, they might struggle with resources. as well as infections like covid at the same time, you can see the potential for a device like this to be used to stabilise. we made it as simple as possible. we wanted it to be something that you could very quickly an emergency situation or disconnect. as we are doing here. now, all of the parts are
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things that you can source around the hospital or very easily around the country. then we also made it very portable, working with cambridge design partnership we came up with ways of making it easy to move around and deliver to wherever it is wonderful that we don't often get a chance to do something like this where you have a real problem that is going to help you straightaway and you have the world was an expert there to tell you what is needed right now. of course, as with everyone, you just want to help so everyone immediately focused on it and delivered. to help so everyone immediately focused on it and deliveredm still needs to years of testing before it can be used in britain but they have put the design online so that other countries can also make it. richard westcott, bbc news. amazing, isn't it? wonders of the latest airline to retire its fleet of boeing seven four sevenths. after 50 its fleet of boeing seven four seve nths. after 50 yea rs, its fleet of boeing seven four sevenths. after 50 years, the lastjumbo
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sevenths. after 50 years, the last jumbo left australia. sevenths. after 50 years, the lastjumbo left australia. the pilots had an idea to mark the occasion. you will see injust a moment, they are tracing the qantas logo of a kangaroo into the sky. hello there. cloud is thickening up once again from the atlantic. it's set to bring some more rain mainly for the middle third of the uk. some areas stayed cloudy and damp throughout the day on wednesday and, as a result, it was quite cool, as well. we had a temperature of 26 degrees in london, but the sunniest weather, that was in bournemouth — almost 14 hours of sunshine. probably not as much sunshine, though, for thursday. it will be quite a cloudy start to the day with temperatures around 12—14 degrees. and we start with some outbreaks of rain mainly across northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and wales. that's going to be quite heavy for a while. it will gradually turn lighter and more patchy through the day. we get some sunshine more widely across scotland and northern ireland and towards the south—east.
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perhaps even into the midlands, it may well stay dry, but there'll be more cloud around, so it won't be quite as warm — still 23 or 24 degrees. we are looking at some showers to come into the south—west of england, still damp into wales, some more rain across northern england, so quite a cool day here, although the far north of england improving later on. we'll have some sunshine in the afternoon across northern ireland and more widely in scotland, so a warmer day here, 19 or 20 degrees. but still some rather sharp showers in the north—east and up towards the northern isles. those will tend to ease off a bit during the evening. this light and patchy rain by this stage heading down towards the midlands, eventually later on in the night towards the south—east of england. the weather front bringing that is going to be very weak, and as we move into friday, we are in between two wet weather systems — a transient ridge of high pressure before that weather front increases the cloud and brings some rain in from the atlantic. but many places will have a dry day on friday. could be a fair bit of cloud, particularly across southern parts of england and south wales, the odd shower here. one or two showers further north, perhaps into north—east england and scotland.
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then we get later on in the day some rain pushing in from the west across northern ireland. ahead of that, 20 degrees through the central belt of scotland, and we're back up to 25 in the south—east of england. as we head into the weekend, we're dominated by low pressure sitting close to the north of the uk. that weather front will tend to move through, taking some heavy rain away, and then it's showers following on behind. certainly looks like saturday is going to be the wetter day, and those showers could be heavy and thundery. a much drier day on sunday for eastern parts of england with the bulk of the showers in the north and the west of the uk.
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will good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: britain could become a "cultural wasteland" after the covid crisis . a group of mps says the government has been too slow to help the entertainment industry. confusion over the rules on face coverings in shops, as guidance is due to be published less than 24 hours before new rules come into force. and demands for pets during lockdown has increased dramatically over the past few weeks. but charities are worrying some of these could be abandoned as the uk
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comes out of lockdown. i have

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