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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 25, 2020 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a police officer is shot dead at station in south london by a man who was being detained. it's understood the suspect then turned the gun on himself — he's now in a critical condition. the head of the met police paid tribute to the officer. the met is a family. policing is a family in london and across the united kingdom. today, we police are all morning a great loss. —— in mourning of a great loss. lament release the transcript! two people are injured in a stabbing in paris —— near the former offices of the magazine charlie hebdo, which was attacked in 2015. large numbers of students in scotland are testing
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positive for coronavirus — as universities ban them from going to pubs and parties this weekend. tributes are being paid to the late supreme courtjustice —— female lawmakers lined the steps of the capital as the latejustice ruth gator inspired's often departs. —— ruth bader ginsburg's coffin departs. and the story of this hero rat and how he won himself the animal equivalent of the george cross. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world — and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. an investigation has been launched after a police officer was shot dead at a custody centre in south london in the early hours of the morning. a 23—year—old suspect — who was being processed in croydon after being arrested is believed to have turned
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the weapon on himself. he is in a critical condition in hospital. a minute's silence was held for the sergeant who lost his life. he's not yet been named. but the head of the metropolitan police, cressida dick, said he was much loved. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. examining the scene of the murder of one of their own colleagues. forensics officers working at the croydon custody centre in south london today. a suspect was brought here at around a 2:15am this morning in a police vehicle, but he was carrying a concealed gun and he shot the custody sergeant in the chest before turning the weapon on himself. the met is a family. policing is a family in london and across the united kingdom. today, we police are all mourning a great loss. we are all deeply shocked and very sad. we begin our minute's silence
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for our fallen colleague. this afternoon, the metropolitan police held a minute's silence in tribute to the dead officer. the prime minister sent his deepest condolences to his family. the police federation said the news was, "utterly devastating and heartbreaking." this is a sad day for our country, as once again, we see the tragic killing of a police officer in the line of duty as they are trying to protect us and keep us safe. as well as the metropolitan police's murder investigation, the independent office for police conduct has been called in. it will be looking at the level of experience of the arresting officers, what was previously known about the suspect, whether he was searched and handcuffed and how he was able to conceal a gun until he was inside the custody centre. the suspect is in a critical condition at st george's hospital in tooting after having surgery. it's though at least one special constable was involved in his arrest.
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i think that a police officer can be killed in a police station is a source of huge concern, not just to the police, not just to those of us politicians who are charged with giving the police the tools they need, but everyone. but today, all of those involved in policing are in deep shock. once again, an officer has been killed on duty. once again, they remember the hidden risks they face when they come to work each day. daniel sanford, bbc news, croydon. the lawyer for the family of a black woman killed by police in the american city of louisville has demanded the transcript of the grand jury proceedings in her case be released. he called for transparency if people were to accept the result. on wednesday the authorities said no police officers would be prosecuted for the killing of breonna taylor. the decision triggered anti—racist protests around the country, with two officers shot and injured in louisville. breonna taylor's mother was too emotional to speak at the press conference,
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but her sister — breonna taylor's aunt — read out a statement on her behalf. and i quote, "i never had faith in daniel cameron to begin with. amen. i knew he was too inexperienced to deal with the job of this calibre. i knew had —— he had artie chosen to be on the wrong side of the law. did he make a unilateral decision to put his thumb on the scales of justice to help try exonerate and justify the killing of breonna taylor by these police officers. they murdered breonna taylor! and until those officers are fired from this department, i promise you, i promise you, we will continue to make these streets hot. students caught up in coronavirus outbreaks at universities in scotland have questioned why halls of residence
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were allowed to open at all. in glasgow, at least 172 students have tested positive and hundreds more are having to self—isolate. they've been told it would be illegalfor them to go home. our scotland editor sarah smith has been speaking to some of those affected in glasgow. we been in isolation since monday, we decided to e—mail the university and ask for any essential foods, and they sent us these four bags. glasgow university are supporting some of the 600 students who are having to isolate in their halls of residence. the weekend won't be much fun. all students in scotland have been told not to go into pubs or restau ra nts. i feel like we have restau ra nts. ifeel like we have been robbed of oui’ our first year. i ourfirst year. i think our first year. i think everybody has been to uni and they say, oh, this is amazing. you are going to make friends for life. then we are kind of stuck. as the students arrived here nearly two weeks ago, some parents were concerned about a lack of covid security. there were
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lots of students writing bikes, there was vomit on the stairs that we saw, and people running up and down the stairs and they weren't supposed to be. they were supposed to be sticking to their floors. angry students and their parents are asking why. all of their tuition is online anyway. they suspect they we re online anyway. they suspect they were encouraged to come here so the university could benefit from the rent they pay. now, that's an accusation firmly denied by the authorities who say the students wouldn't get the full university experience if they stayed at home. at the university, they are offering half a days learning on campus a week but not for the 500 students isolating and halls. we wish to have our students on campus for one morning or afternoon a week and most of our students are doing that. obviously, students who are self isolating in a flat with 3-4 are self isolating in a flat with 3—4 other people, are feeling somewhat isolated, and we regret that because it's a measure that
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will be released as soon as we are able to based on the advice of the public health authority. glasgow university didn't expect so many stu d e nts to university didn't expect so many students to break the rules by throwing parties. but that is what freshers do. should the scottish government have stopped them coming from campuses? had we taken a different decision, and it's perfectly legitimate for people to think that we should've takena people to think that we should've taken a different decision, but had we done that, i'm pretty sure that by now, we'd be getting questions about why we were preventing students from being on campus and was that fair and was that an overreaction? student stuck inside for now can expect new advice on when they might be allowed to go home sometime this weekend. sarah smith, bbc news, glasgow. let's talk to some of the students affected. with me is theo lockett, he's a first year student self isolating in glasgow after he and multiple flat mates tested positive for coronavirus. and also i'm joined by tizzie robinson—gordon, who is affected by the new scotland wide rules banning students from pubs and restaurants at the university of edinburgh.
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tell us your situation. hi, nice to talk to. yet, so i arrived to the hole on the 11th and not everyone had moved in then, so it was fairly quiet, but as freshers week it's going to make its busy. so i got a positive test comeback yesterday so now all of my ten flatmates are self isolating with me. we've actually gotan isolating with me. we've actually got an 18th birthday today, so sorry if there is any noise in the background. but, yeah, so we are all self isolating, we plan to do that for a while now. thankfully, we did a little food shop. we haven't had much support from the unique, but i think we know it's there if we do need it. so just to think we know it's there if we do need it. sojust to be think we know it's there if we do need it. so just to be clear, think we know it's there if we do need it. sojust to be clear, you tested positive, there are five of you who have tested positive where you who have tested positive where you are and you are still waiting for test results from the others? yes. so, a few of us got tested before the on—site testing facility was set up. we had to walk for about
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40 was set up. we had to walk for about a0 minutes into the centre of town for that, but now there is the on—site testing facility and everybody is getting tested. we are just waiting for results back. since you arrived in glasgow, what have you arrived in glasgow, what have you been doing? where you thank you may have caught it? it's hard to know. anyone who follows the rules can expect to be in contact with at least a0 people who share a building. going through the same doors, steam stairwell. you are probably being in contact with hundreds of students and members of the public. so it's really hard to say and it's hard to know and i only really knew when my symptoms started that i'd obviously been in contact with someone who had it. by the look of you come you seem to be feeling 0k. what of you come you seem to be feeling ok. what do you feel like though emotionally about the fact that you are all that way away in glasgow and you can't go anywhere now? yeah,
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yeah, it has been taught. this has sort of been the first time living away from home, away from parents, and this was meant to be a real opportunity to make friends, make your own support bubbles in a brand—new city, but it's just annoying that's always been sort of snatched away from us. lets go from glasgow over eastwards towards edinburgh. tell us about your experience. what's going on at the moment with you? good evening. i'm very fortunate, obviously i haven't tested positive so i have been able to enjoy the city a little bit more. i think with in the situation commits very ostracizing, very isolating. you know, a lot of the support we have had has been very ad hoc from the university. there's beena hoc from the university. there's been a lack of direction. it's been very frustrating, especially the weekend approaching, weekends go out and do anything even if we wanted to. so thisjust and do anything even if we wanted to. so this just an and do anything even if we wanted to. so thisjust an of anxiety amongst us all, we are away from
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home for the first time will stop pessimistic for the next few weeks. it's been getting stricter and stricter, yeah, so that was some frustration and anxiety arising within student accommodation. you are not self isolating but you have got one person in your flight of ten who is. you can go out to the shops, but you can do the normal things that students in their first year like to do. no. it's hard. we have got some within two and our accommodation who are locked on for two weeks, but actually, they still continue to share the same kitchen appliances and says, the kitchen is the heart and centre of our flats, if you like. so the rules seem very very mixed. we can continue to live normally, but they are very much confined within their constraints of their room, yeah. to both of you really, now that you are there in glasgow, and you are doing online learning and you can't really do anything else of the moment, do you wish you had actually stayed at home and waited for the worst to be over? i'm fairly 100% about that. the
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university did make it out as if it would be safe, but now 100% of lectures being online, which is such close proximity to each other, the fa ct close proximity to each other, the fact is when we got there, we realised these spaces are not covid secure no matter what you say, 12 stu d e nts secure no matter what you say, 12 students in a flat sharing a kitchen, sharing showers, sharing a toilet, all of this could've been done near my friends at home, near my family at home. do you wish that you could do all of the settlement still at least be with your family? yeah, i literally couldn't agree further. as university approached, we said my markham road, it should be pushed back from it should be pushed back, it shouldn't be happening, and having arrived here, i completely agree hands down. not to be dramatic, but i think within the first few days when we finally received our timetables and on the first day when everything crashed, we realised everything would be online, we were somewhat feeling a
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bit scams, if you like. we felt a little cheated especially as young people, we had been lured in capital to come, told that we would be able to come, told that we would be able to have the full experience and that has been completely and utterly denied. do you feel any sense of comfort that the university itself, to be fairto comfort that the university itself, to be fair to them, they are dealing with something unprecedented as we allare, and with something unprecedented as we all are, and that this could be over soon, it's just temporary to keep you all safe for the first few weeks, and make it better quite soon? i share your optimism that it does get better, hopefully, but i think a lot of us would agree when i say that they have had months to prepare for this. we knew that this was going to be a potential problem. it's the greatest net migration of people our age. they have had time to prepare. sol people our age. they have had time to prepare. so i do support and empathise with the uni there, they are facing unique conditions, but they have had months and there is just a general chaos and disorganization that has underpinned the start of university for me. very briefly, any sympathy for the university authorities?” briefly, any sympathy for the university authorities? i mean, young people will always be hard to
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control. they will probably have parties and bats, but i mean when the university seems to put rent money over student health, i don't thank you can forget that. 0k, we appreciate your time. we hope the rest of the term goes a bit better than to be getting. thanks to you both. a quarter of the uk's population is now under tighter coronavirus restrictions after measures were announced for another swathe of the country. cardiff, leeds and blackpool are on the new list of places where people will be banned from mixing with other households from this weekend. london is now on the covid hotspot watchlist as cases rise sharply in the capital. it comes as new figures suggest that england is seeing a rapid rise in coronavirus cases. our medical editor fergus walsh. the coronavirus numbers are all going the wrong way. infections, hospitaladmissions and deaths are all rising. the latest r number has increased to 1.2 to 1.5, which means every ten infected people will pass the virus
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to between 12—15 others. the office for national statistics infection survey estimates that more than 100,000 people in england had coronavirus in the week ending 19th september. nearly double the previous week. that equates to 9,600 new infections per day — roughly three times the number that we were picking up by testing. it amounts to 1 in 500 people in england being infected, and that doesn't include those in hospitals and care homes. in wales, its estimated that! in 300 people is infected. infection rates are rising fastest in england in the north west, yorkshire and the humber, london and the north east. in leed, 750,000 people will be banned frp, meeting in each other‘s homes and gardens from midnight, bringing the city in line with bradford and other
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parts of west yorkshire. in leeds, there was a mixed reaction. you have to go to work, you have to get through transport, there is still going to be mixing with people, so it doesn't really make any sense, to be honest. i don't really agree with the restrictions. i'm a key worker as well, so i have been working the whole way through it, so i have been seeing a lot of majority of what's going on from you can see some people just don't want to follow the restrictions and stuff as well, and so it's even more frustrating when that happens. the demand for tests remains high, but fewer than one in three people who attend centers like this one in west london get their results within a day. london's mayor says the city is at a tipping point, and he wants a ban on household socialising. and now, as the season's change, even the weather is against us. with the onset of winter, many viruses transmit better. they survive longer in cold and humid conditions. covid—19 may have that same effect. as well as that, because we meet more indoors there's more
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contact with individuals, also increasing transmission of covid—19. it will take at least two weeks before we know if any of the new restrictions will have an impact on the outbreak. for now, the coronavirus numbers may just keep rising. fergus walsh, bbc news. the latest government figures show that in the last few hours, 6000 hundred eighth —— 687a new infections were recorded, 2a0 more than yesterday. it means the average number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 5329. daily hospital admissions have risen slightly with 291 being admitted on average each day over the last week. this number doesn't include scotland in the last 2a hours, 3a deaths were reported of people who died within 28 days of a positive coping 19 test
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for technical reasons that also doesnt‘ include scotland. it means on average in the past week, 29 deaths were announced every day, taking the total number, across the uk, to a1,936. two people have been —— two people have been wounded in a knife attack outside the former offices of the french satirical magazine, charlie hebdo. the victims, a man and a woman who are staff members of a television company, were seriously wounded, although both are reported out of danger. two people have been arrested. our paris correspondent, lucy williamson reports. in central paris today, the familiar scenes of a recurring nightmare, a knife attack that left two people seriously injured at a building once occupied by the satirical magazine, charlie hebdo. the victims are employees of a television production country ——the victims are employees of a television production company with offices there. translation: outside the metro,
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i saw machete with lots of blood and people shouting. it was a bit of a panic. in the passageway that is right next to my work, i saw victim lying there covered in blood. that's when i panicked and people started panicking and shouting. the police arrived and asked us to stay locked up. all in all, on the way, i saw two victims with lots of blood. one man — believed to be the attacker has been has been arrested and a suspected accomplice has also been ta ken into custody. police told the bbc that one of those detained was found with blood on his clothes. the site of police cordoning off the streets will bring back painful memories for france. just around the corner from here, the former offices of the satirical magazine, charlie hebdo, target of a deadly terrorist attack five years ago. those suspected of involvement in that attack are currently standing trial at a court here in paris. the place and timing of this attack has meant prosecutors are treating it as a terrorist inquiry.
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charlie hebdo which now operates from a different location has tweeted its support to the victims. "the entire team offers its support and solidarity to our former "neighbours and colleagues into the people affected "by this attack," it said. arriving after a government crisis meeting, the prime minister said the symbolism of this attack, its location and timing was clear. translation: this is the time for the government of the republic to reiterate its unwavering commitment to freedom of the press, its resolute will by all means to fight against terrorism and to affirm to the nation that we are fully mobilised. france has been reliving the horrific attack on charlie hebdo five years ago as survivors give testimony in the trial of those suspected of involvement. earlier this month, charlie hebdo reprinted the cartoons of mohammed
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that originally made it a target for islamist violence. echoes of an attack that continues to leave its mark on france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. ceremonies have been taking place in washington to honour the us supreme courtjustice ruth bader ginsburg. she is the first american woman to lie in state in the capitol. the equal rights champion is being honoured during a private has been honoured during a private ceremony attended by family members and some officials as well as invited guests, including the democratic presidential nominee, joe biden. thousands of people have already paid tribute to her outside the supreme court building. the us house of representatives speaker nancy pelosi opened the ceremony with a brief address. it is with profound sorrow and deep sympathy to the ginsberg family that i have the high honour to welcome justice ruth bader ginsburg to lie in state in the capital of the united states. she does so on a...built
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for abraham lincoln. may she rest in peace. speaking at the memorial service, rabbi lauren holtzblatt said the latejustice had been a determined defender of people's rights. as a lawyer, she won equality for women and men not in one swift victory but brick by brick, case—by—case through a meticulous, careful lawyering. she changed the course of american law. and even when her views did not prevail, she still fights. ——and even when her views did not prevail, she still fought. speaking forjustice ruth bader ginsburg. his name is magawa. he's a rat. an african giant pouched rat. and he's also a life saving hero. he has just been awarded the animal
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equivalent of the george cross for his work detecting landmines in cambodia. he's the first rat to get one. duncan kennedy tells his story. this is magawa, the mine—clearing, medal—winning, mind—blowing rat. he is actually a giant african pouched rat, capable of clearing an area the size of a tennis court injust 30 minutes. something that would take a human four days to do. and now for the first time in their 103 year history, one of britain's leading animal charities has given him the highest award. magawa is a true hero rat and we're thrilled to celebrate his life saving devotion by awarding him the pdsa gold medal. it took a year to train magawa to work in cambodia. he walks up—and—down sniffing out the chemicals in the mines and gently taps it when he finds one. he's discovered 39 mines and 28 bits of explosive ordnance, making him the most reliable rodent.
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tell me, why is my gala so special? ——tell me, why is magawa so special? magawa, year after year, he searches the biggest amount of square metres, he finds more mines than any other rat. like i said, he is the one that each handler wishes to work with. magawa is one of a5 rats who have cleared enough land in cambodia for one million people to live on. so his handler, says he is due to retire in november but is fit enough to work for another year. a cuddly rat — well, perhaps. an effective one — certainly. magawa, the mega mine clearer. duncan kennedy, bbc news. renowned indian singer s. p. baala—subra—manyam has died at the age of 7a. (pause upsot
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baala—subra—manyam has died at the age of 7a. he sang for many indian film stars including salman khan and in 16 languages. the singer, also known as spb, held a guinness world record holder he had been singing for 50 years. hello. for most of us, the weekend isn't looking too bad. it's still going to be fairly chilly, particularly across eastern areas of the uk — with the wind blowing off the north sea. not a completely dry weekend because there are 1—2 showers in the forecast as well, but for the vast majority of the country, it should be dry. now, this is the more recent satellite picture. here's that nasty low pressure in the southern north sea that sent gale force along the north sea coast. we had gusts up to 67 mph near grimsby. now, the winds will still blow very hard during the course of the evening and night, and, actually, throughout the weekend, not as strong, but still very strong. elsewhere across the uk, the winds will be lighter and in fact, across scotland and northern ireland, light winds here and clearer skies.
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so temperatures will dip down to close to freezing, especially outside of town. so, this is what it looks like on saturday then. the vast majority of the country wakes up to sunshine, pretty chilly conditions, but there is still that breeze blowing out of the north. however, towards the west, the winds will be lighter here, so with temperatures of around 15 in plymouth, it shouldn't feel too bad at all. 13 in belfast, 1a there expected in sunny glasgow. but towards the east, there is still that strong, very strong wind blowing down to the north sea. gales possible at least in exposed areas along that lincolnshire coastline and also the north norfolk coast. here's sunday's weather map. we are in between weather systems, so one in the atlantic here, this is the jet stream driving that area of low pressure with the fronts. some bad weather they are out into the mediterranean. we are in between all of this, so the weather here is actually looking pretty good for many western areas. you will notice there is a change in the wind direction here. it's coming in from the south. so that's a hint that things will be
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warming up a little bit for the second half of the weekend and into next week. in fact, 17 quite possible in cardiff on sunday with some sunshine. now, that should feel pleasant. eventually, next week, we are going to lose that cold air from the north. the milder atlantic westerlies or south westerlies will set in, so it won't feel quite so cold. but, unfortunately, with that also comes more unsettled weather. so, i think sometime next week, certainly from wednesday onwards, it does look as though things are going to wetter and windier for all of us. that's it for me. bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a police officer is shot dead at station in south london by a man who was being detained. it's understood the suspect then turned the gun on himself. he's now in a critical condition. the head of the met police paid tribute to the officer. lawyers for breonna taylor, the woman killed by police in her own home in the united states, call for full transparency over the investigation into her death. large numbers of students in scotland are testing positive for coronavirus, as universities ban them from going to pubs and parties this weekend. tributes are being paid to the late supreme courtjustice ruth bader ginsburg, whose ground—breaking legacy continues even in death.
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thousands more students are heading to universities in england and wales this weekend for the start of term. what is life going to be like for them? twelve universities say they will be carrying out their own testing. our education correspondent dan johnson sent this report from liverpool, a city with a student population of more than 70,000. in liverpool, student heartland, the council has come knocking. we have had reports of a party this week, so we are just really asking young people and students to really be mindful. this is one of the most complained about roads in this area. we have to get this message out. 200 complaints this month across a city which doesn't even have all its students back yet.
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i'm from the council, can we have a quick word? everybody likes a party, but we have to restrain ourselves for a few months, unfortunately for. i can sympathise, but they have to do what is required of them to protect themselves and our communities. these are big households. how many are here? eight. john and jabiru are 30th in a house of seven, facing more online learning. —— ourthird —— our third years. you feel a bit short—changed. you just get onto your computer and sit there in front of a camera and it doesn't feel that productive, what else are you supposed to do? do you think students will get the blame? yeah, like at home, would have been at the pub or whatever, loads of middle aged blokes all mixing with each other, probably more so than young people are doing. it just seems that it's coincided
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with universities going back. they are keeping some face—to—face learning here, alongside online lectures. campus has been transformed to make it safe and we really listened to students, staff and local residents to make sure it's as safe as possible. some people think it's just about you getting the money from students that you need and inevitably they will have to be let down and teaching those online and they face restrictions on their social lives. we are trying to make sure that students are safe, engaged, that they have a fantastic experience within the context of the challenges we face. not everyone is reassured. hugo is about to head across the country to keele university. is like seeing a storm in the distance and decided to drive towards it. where i am currently in surrey has relatively low cases and where i'm going, near stoke—on—trent, has a lot higher, and i don't really want to go somewhere where i
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can't get out of. testing on campus could help keep things moving and might allow students to safely go home but, even if they all stick to every rule, cases already high amongst their age group had more outbreaks will come. danjohnson, dan johnson, bbc news, danjohnson, bbc news, liverpool. well, joining me now to talk about how things are going at his university is professor nishan canagarajah, vice chancellor of the university of leicester. thank you very much forjoining us. what proportion of your students are coming out for the first time? there is about 30% of our students coming back this weekend. we're looking forward to welcoming them and we are taking all the precautions to make sure it's a safe environment. we're also making sure it's safe for our communities as well. you've already got 500 they are. how is it going
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for them? so far, the feedback is very positive because of the extra measures we have put in place. it's not the usual start for the academic year, so we have to battle those measures to make it fully secure. so far, they responded well and i think they're feeling very positive about being in the university. we all make sure that is as rewarding as they expected to be. tell us about the fa ct expected to be. tell us about the fact that you're going to start testing students next week. how will that work? we are enacting funding, so we want to make sure that we can do our own testing. we have a lot of expertise within the university to do so. so we are going to test volunteers, both staff and students. so we can monitor the spread of the infection within the university. if things go well, obviously we can
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read lacks some of our restrictions. we hope by doing this, we don't have to put an actual burden on the nhs —— relax the restrictions. if they are infected, we can do the testing based on the signs we already have. we are hoping this will reassure both of the —— both the community and the students and staff. both of the —— both the community and the students and staffm both of the —— both the community and the students and staff. if you do get significant numbers of positive tests, we've just been speaking to students in scotland. stu d e nts speaking to students in scotland. students who can't leave their accommodation who are effectively locked down. some of the tested positive, and they are saying why did the university let us come here at all? we should have just stayed at all? we should have just stayed at home. we are isolated from families and we are doing online, we could have done that with our families at home, not with strangers, unable to go out the front door. it is a good challenge, but i think what we need to understand is where you are in the
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country, you have social restrictions. what we have tried to do is make this transition to university as safe as possible. they are in smaller learning bubbles and living bubbles, so hopefully they are getting the experience of the university but slightly different. you also want to make sure they get some benefit of the university experience. blended learning, they will get some face—to—face teaching as well as online learning. they will get an opportunity to interact with staff and students. a proportion of what they will be doing is face—to—face learning, they could have got that online at home because there is skepticism that university just want their money. that is not necessarily true, but i understand the concern. normally, there would be a lot of preparations for the start of the academic year, but we have to have a lot more money to make campus covid secure. it is
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not trivial, it takes a lot of time from our staff. as i mentioned, we are investing our own funding for a screening programme. so i think it is costing a lot more money than usual to provide it experience for our students. i understand it is different, but i think we all understand the circumstances we are under. the constraints where you are particularly because leicester is under local restrictions, how much more of an impact does that have on the community? in some areas, we we re the community? in some areas, we were the first city to be in lockdown, so we were able to get measures early on. i understand the community is concerned, and we are working in close partnership with public health england, the city council, and we feel we have robust
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measures in place to ensure that the community and staff and students feel reassured, but clearly, we will moderate under this to make sure we ta ke moderate under this to make sure we take the appropriate steps. ultimately, i want to make sure our stu d e nts ultimately, i want to make sure our students and staff are safe and the community where we are as safe. thank you very much for your time. pleasure. let's give you some updates. we've received a statement from the independent office for com plete from the independent office for complete conduct carry out an investigation into what happened when a police officer was shot dead at court in custody centre. they are saying 23—year—old man remains in critical condition. when a member of the public dies either seriously injured, police custody role is to independently investigate the circumstances surrounding the incident, and they say they have
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obtained cctv from the custody centre and body worn video footage from the officers present. they will be reviewing that over the coming days. they go on to say that they have established that the man in question was arrested for possession of class b drugs with intent to supply and possession of ammunition. he was handcuffed to the rear before being transported to croydon custody suite ina being transported to croydon custody suite in a police vehicle. he remained handcuffed and seated in a holding area in the custody suite. his handcuffs remain in place while officers prepared to search him using a metal detector, and they state it is at that point that shots we re state it is at that point that shots were fired, resulting in the fatal interest theories to the officer and critical industries to the man —— fatal injuries. it appears to be a revolver and has been recovered from the scene. further ballistic work will be required. metropolitan police is conducting a separate
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murder investigation into the death of its officer and working to ensure the investigation does not impact its inquiry. that is the latest statement from the independent office for police conduct. we are expecting a news conference from scotla nd expecting a news conference from scotland at any time now. we will bring you that here on bbc news as soon as bring you that here on bbc news as soon as that happens. it's the rarest of apologies, and it comes from the north korean leader kim jong—un. he's expressed his regret for the killing of a south korean at sea. the official was shot dead by north korean soldiers and his body set on fire, apparently as a precaution against coronavirus. kim jong—un described the incident as "unexpected and disgraceful" according to the seoul presidential office, and it comes as tensions between the two koreas are in the deep freeze. with more, here's our correspondent laura bicker. this is a rare, public and personal apology from the north korean leader, and it comes
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after a a7—year—old south korean government official went missing in north korean waters. now, south korea say that he went missing on monday. the only thing they found on board were his slippers. he appears to have taken a life raft. it is assumed that he was trying to defect to the north, but his family denied this. however it happened, he ended up in north korean waters. he was found by a north korean patrol boat. now, the south said that certainly, they fired upon the man, that he was assassinated in his body was doused in oil and then set on fire. in this message from kim jong—un, the north says that didn't happen, that they only fired warning shots, that when they got closer, they realised that there was a lot of blood in the body was no longer there, that they only set the life raft on fire. whatever the differing accounts, certainly an apology has come from kim jong—un. however, the outrage, the public anger here in south korea will will be difficult to assuage.
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for president moonjae—in to continue any kind of inter—korean relationship. as it is, the presidential palace has released today a number of letters between the two leaders in recent weeks. warm words where kim jong—un expresses his hope that south korea, his southern brethren as he called them, will overcome the covid—19 pandemic. that's laura bicker. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: britain's royal family finances are hit by the pandemic. the smaller number of visitors to royal palaces and galleries is and galleries is likely to leave a 35—million—pound hole. london has been added to the coronavirus watch list as an area of concern. the mayor has criticised the lack of testing available in the capital,
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which he said had been diverted to other parts of the country. the growth rate is four to nine percent, and mayor sadiq khan warned the capital was at a "very worrying tipping point". the prime minister seemed to be aware of some of the concerns that we had, and i explained to him are concerns relating to other indicators that showed the virus is rising in our city. while the test have gone down, as of the numbers of positive cases. we know the cases are going up, infection rates are going up, hospital admissions are going up, hospital admissions are going up, hospital admissions are going up, calls to one—on—one have been going up, blood donors have been going up, blood donors have been going up and wishes to icus have been going up. the government has confirmed today that london is now added in the midst of areas of concern and because the government finally realises there's an issue. what i'm saying to the government as they must urgently increase the
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amount of testing available in our city. it's been an example of the incompetence of this government. still six months after this first came to public attention. the boss of the iceland supermarket chain has warned against panic buying, urging shoppers to "calm down and carry on as normal." richard walker said his supermarket chain was not planning to limit purchases. tesco has placed a three—item limits on some items, including dried pasta, toilet roll and anti—bacterial wipes. it follows a similar move by rivals morrison's. senior directors at the online fashion retailer boohoo knew about "serious issues" over how workers were treated at its supply chain in leicester months before media reports brought the issue to the fore. the review by the company of its own practices found no evidence boohoo had committed any crimes, but the retailer has admitted significant and unacceptable issues in its supply chain.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines... supermarkets have warned that shoppers could face larger food bills next year if the government fails to agree a post brexit trade deal with the european union. the british retail consortium has calculated that if the uk's new global tariffs are applied to eu food and drink imports, it could cost an extra three billion pounds a year. our business correspondent katy austin reports. the vast majority of the uk's imported food comes from eu countries. at the moment, that's not subject to import taxes called tariffs. that could change from january, depending on whether a brexit trade deal can be reached. talks restart on monday, but there is no agreement yet. if there is no trade deal, the uk will apply tariffs to food and drink coming in from the eu. the size of those taxes will depend on the product but, on average, would be more than 20%. let's take one example. this beef mince will attract a tariff of a8%. if all that tax was passed
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on to customers, a pack that now costs £3 could rise to more than £a. but that biggerjump is very unlikely because supermarkets would share some of the cost. however, the organisation representing some major supermarkets has calculated the total cost of importing food and drink from the eu would be £3.1 billion. it says some of that would inevitably be passed on to customers in the form of price rises. don't underestimate this being a few pennies. this could be £100—plus per household, if it was all applied. and on't forget, this also hits those who have the least amount of money because they pay the biggest proportion of their household budget on food. a spokesperson for the government said it was working hard to reach a deal with the eu and the aim was a zero—tariff, zero—quota free trade agreement.
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one trade expert said after the transition period, the government will have more flexibility to lower taxes on food from any country. whether it does that remains to be seen, simply because we will be negotiating trade agreements with other countries, and the more that you reduce your tariffs on goods for everyone, the less sometimes some countries want to do trade deals with you. with just over three months left until the current trading arrangements end, retailers are warning the risk remains of shoppers having to pay more in the new year. katy austin, bbc news. the boss of the clothing store next has warned that thousands of retailjobs could become ‘unviable', because the coronavirus pandemic may lead to a permanent shift to online shopping. lord wolfson welcomed the uk chancellor's newjob support scheme, but he said it was important that businesses eventually learn to live without state support as new figures showed government borrowing hit record levels. here's our business
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editor simonjack. the crieff hydro hotel in perthshire, scotland, a destination for tourists, a venue for weddings and conferences — or at least it was. and here we have our reception today. a beautiful day in scotland... but for the lack of customers. the boss says a new package postponing tax and vat bills will help the business, but wage subsidies for staff working shorter hours won't change employment decisions. we simply can't afford to pay one third of an employee's time just to make that hour up, in order to benefit from the newjob retention scheme. it just doesn't work for us financially. we can't afford it. however, the vat deferral, the reduction deferral, is very, very welcome, as is the repayment of loans, the extension of repayment of vat and tax bills, that is very welcome. thejob support scheme, unveiled yesterday by the chancellor, is less generous than the furlough scheme, which ends at the end of october, but it's
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still expected to cost billions. this morning, we got a reminder ofjust how much money the government is having to borrow. in august alone, to pay for furlough, support for the self—employed, while deferring income from vat and business rates, the government had to borrow £36 billion. that is £30 billion more than the same time last year and, if you look at the bill for the tax year so far, it's 17a billion, the highest number on record. the chancellor is trying to wean the economy off life support without killing it. retail is another sector hit very hard, but some employers think the time is right to face some economic realities. i think it's important that employers begin to pay a little bit more for these schemes, and that employees get a little bit less, because otherwise i think there is a risk that our economy willjust become hooked on it. a lot of people say, with this permanent—looking shift online, a lot of the unviable jobs are in retail. is that right? i think that is right, yes, and i wouldn't want to underestimate
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the difficulty that is going to cause a lot of people who work in retail. i think it's going to be very uncomfortable for a lot of people. exhibitions, trade shows, conferences used to be big business, but event organiser emma carver fears that, without events, there are nojobs, subsidies or not. the announcement from the chancellor yesterday relies on people being able to bring their staff back for a third of their normal hours, but we can't really do that, because the business that we have doesn't exist. the measures to defer bills like vat and rates will help some businesses but, for firms with no customers, it's hard to see how it will stop morejobs disappearing. simon jack, bbc news. the european union says it's apealing a decision by european court which struck down an order that the tech giant apple repay ireland back taxes worth 13 billion euros — that's $15 billion. the eu said the court had made "a number of errors of law".
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apple says it has always complied with the law, and claims the dispute was over where it should pay taxes, rather than how much. a senior cardinal who was ordered to resign by the pope has protested against the way he was dismissed, and rejected the accusations against him. giovanni angelo becciu had pleaded with the pontiff to not let him go. the dismissal is linked to a controversial property deal in london during the cardinal‘s time as the vatican's deputy secretary of state. liberal democrat leader sir ed davey has urged supporters to fight for what people "really need", at the party's annual conference today. the four—day conference is being held online due to covid—19. the party has suffered three poor general elections in a row and sir ed warned that it needed to "listen" more. the income of the royal family has been hit by coronavirus, with a drop in the number of visitors to buckingham palace and windsor castle. the latest palace
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accounts show a potential 35—million—pound shortfall. the figures also show that harry and meghan's final royal visit to southern africa cost nearly a quarter of a million pounds. our royal correspondent sarah campbell has more. cheering the most expensive royal tour of the accounting period was the duke and duchess of sussex's trip to southern africa. along with baby archie, they visited south africa, and harry travelled on to botswana, angola and malawi. it would prove to be their last tour as working royals, and cost almost a quarter of a million pounds. injanuary, unable to secure a last—minute scheduled flight, the prince of wales travelled by charter to oman to offer his condolences after the death of the sultan at a cost of more than £200,000, and sporting patronages proved expensive for both the princess royal and prince andrew. princess anne flew to rome to watch a six nations rugby match cost £16,000, and the duke racked up a similar amount watching the open in portrush, northern ireland.
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in total, the sovereign grant for the year 2019—2020 totalled £82.a million. that's the amount of taxpayers' money used to fund the monarchy, minus things like security. the biggest overall cost was the ongoing refurbishment of buckingham palace which, over the same period, cost £33 million. the coronavirus is expected to impact future accounts, with an expected £20 million shortfall in funds to pay for palace improvements and a £15 million drop in income, with the reduced openings of royal galleries and palaces. addressing the potential shortfall, the keeper of the privy purse, sir michael stevens, said there was no intention of asking for extra funding and they will look to manage the impact of the pandemic through their own efforts and efficiencies. the duke and duchess of sussex now live in los angeles, but as for their uk home, the palace has confirmed that they paid a lump sum to the sovereign grant to cover the £2.a million refurbishment,
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as well as rent at a commercial rate for frogmore cottage in windsor. exactly how much rent they're being charged may, or may not, be revealed in next year's accounts. sarah campbell, bbc news. it has been announced that princess eugenie and her husband jack brooksbank are expecting a baby in early 2021. princess eugenie, who is tenth in line to the throne, has been married to mr brooksbank forjust under two years. the baby will be a ninth great—grandchild for the queen and the duke of edinburgh. rio dejaneiro's carnival parade for next year has been postponed indefinitely because of the pandemic. the carnival, which attracts millions of visitors, was scheduled for the middle of february, but organisers say it can't be staged without a vaccine. more than 138—thousand people in brazil have died with covid—19 — that's one of the world's highest death tolls.
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thanks for watching bbc news. see you later. hello. for most of us, the weekend isn't looking too bad. it's still going to be fairly chilly, particularly across eastern areas of the uk, with the wind blowing off the north sea. not a completely dry weekend because there are 1—2 showers in the forecast as well, but for the vast majority of the country, it should be dry. now, this is the more recent satellite picture. here's that nasty low pressure in the southern north sea that sent gale force winds along the north sea coast. we had gusts up to 67 mph near grimsby. now, the winds will still blow very hard during the course of the evening and night, and, actually, throughout the weekend, not as strong, but still very strong. elsewhere across the uk, the winds will be lighter and in fact, across scotland and northern ireland, light winds here and clearer skies. so temperatures will dip down
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to close to freezing, especially outside of town. so, this is what it looks like on saturday then. the vast majority of the country wakes up to sunshine, pretty chilly conditions, but there is still that breeze blowing out of the north. however, towards the west, the winds will be lighter here, so with temperatures of around 15 in plymouth, it shouldn't feel too bad at all. 13 in belfast, 1a there expected in sunny glasgow. but towards the east, there is still that strong, very strong wind blowing down to the north sea. gales possible at least in exposed areas along that lincolnshire coastline and also the north norfolk coast. here's sunday's weather map. we are in between weather systems, so one in the atlantic here, this is the jet stream driving that area of low pressure with the fronts. some bad weather they are out into the mediterranean. we are in between all of this, so the weather here is actually looking pretty good for many western areas. you will notice there is a change in the wind direction here. it's coming in from the south. so that's a hint that things will be warming up a little bit
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for the second half of the weekend and into next week. in fact, 17 quite possible in cardiff on sunday with some sunshine. now, that should feel pleasant. eventually, next week, we are going to lose that cold air from the north. the milder atlantic westerlies or south westerlies will set in, so it won't feel quite so cold. but, unfortunately, with that also comes more unsettled weather. so, i think sometime next week, certainly from wednesday onwards, it does look as though things are going to wetter and windier for all of us. that's it for me. bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm lewis vaughan jones. we start with the news that the us has now recorded over 7 million coronavirus cases. a police officer is shot dead at station in south london by a man who was being detained. it's understood the suspect then turned the gun on himself. the head of the met police paid tribute to the officer. the met is a family, policing is a family in london and across the united kingdom. and today, we police are all mourning a great loss. release the transcripts! lawyers for breonna taylor — the woman killed by police

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