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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  October 15, 2020 5:00am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm david eades with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. europe clamps down — a night—time curfew comes to paris and it's early closing for bars in germany as countries face a resurgence of covid—19. riot police in the thai capital clash with anti—government protesters, as they show their anger towards the monarchy and the prime minister. warming up to cast their vote — could grey power be the x—factor in the presidential election? we report from florida. how many of you just want this election to be over?
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and it's a hit share market debut for the music label of the hugely popular korean pop band, bts. hello and welcome. several countries in europe have stepped up their efforts to halt a sharp rise in coronavirus infections. in france, there will be a night—time curfew for paris and eight other cities. in germany, bars will be forced to close early and there will be limits on people meeting, in areas with rising numbers of cases. chancellor angela merkel made a specific appeal to young people to comply with the rules. in england, more areas may be added to the highest level of restrictions. simonjones reports.
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two leaders with two announcements that will have a big impact on the lives of their citizens. in germany, there is a warning that the disease is growing exponentially. there will be new restrictions in areas with high transmission including more mask wearing, a curfew for bars and limits on people meeting. translation: i'm convinced that what we do and what we don't do in the coming days and weeks will be decisive for the question of how we get through this pandemic, because we can see that the curves on the infection rates are pointing upwards, in parts, quite steeply. germany has recorded more than six and a half thousand cases, a record figure for a single day. translation: we are much closer to a second lockdown than people would like to believe. if we look at how the numbers are developing, then it's high time, maybe not even five to midnight but rather the stroke of midnight, to set the right course.
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in france, a state of emergency has been declared. there's real concern that hospitals and intensive care units will become overwhelmed. to try to stop the spread of the virus, there will be no more late night dining in paris. people there and in eight other major cities will have to stay indoors from 9pm to 6am. the curfew will come into effect from saturday and last for at least four weeks. president macron appeared in front of the cameras with a sobering message accompanied by a rallying cry. translation: we have not lost control, we are in a situation which is worrying and which means we shouldn't remain inactive, but we shouldn't panic. we cannot get through this if everyone doesn't play their part, doesn't do their bit. an example of this in the czech republic, police reading a restau ra nt republic, police reading a restaurant that was supposed to
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be closed, finding the guests had moved to the seller to carry on drinking and partying. across europe daily life is changing. in the netherlands, bars, restaurants and cafe ‘s adventure temporarily. in northern ireland, schools are being closed for two weeks from monday, and in england, more areas are said to be classed as places at very high alert. the boarding is in france continue to rise, more drastic measures may be needed. people in the netherlands may face tough new restrictions, but some of them drank and danced to pumping techno music on wednesday night in the final minutes before all bars, restaurants and cannabis coffee shops closed as part of a partial coronavirus lockdown. anna holligan has more. last orders have actually been called here in the hague, and people are taking the opportunity to spend a few
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final moments inside the bars and final moments inside the bars a nd restau ra nts final moments inside the bars and restaurants before they closed for at least four weeks. we are watching some of the scenes just before, you we are watching some of the scenesjust before, you can we are watching some of the scenes just before, you can see why the government is curbing the hospitality industry even though many feel it is too unfairand though many feel it is too unfair and generic. there are places like this that could suggest it could make all the difference. from tonight, bars, restau ra nts, difference. from tonight, bars, restaurants, cafe ‘s will be closed but they can serve take shops are not allowed to sell alcohol after eight o'clock in the evening, people are advised to work from home, use public transport, only four essential purposes, and the opposition has been more critical than ever of the dutch government's approach, asking why the numbers are rising so rapidly here in the netherlands compared to elsewhere in the world, so if these measures
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don't have the desired effect within two weeks, there will be an assessment and if this is not working, then the dutch health minister has said they are prepared to go to a full lockdown situation. are rowdy scenes are certainly there in the netherlands. riot police in thailand have clashed with a large group of anti—government protesters in bangkok. they moved in to clear the streets shortly after authorities issued an emergency decree banning all gatherings of more than five people. lines of police with riot shields quickly drove people back and cleared the area around government house. thousands had been camping overnight after another day of widespread demonstrations against the monarchy and the prime minister. at least three protest leaders have now been arrested. our correspondentjonathan
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head is in bangkok. pretty tough measures, it has felt like a slow burn, this demonstration over the past few weeks? this is the decisive moment where the government has been ordered to put a stop to the protests, and i think the reason is essentially what was being said openly about the monarchy in very blunt ways that have not been said before. the official reason given is the big protests are always focused on big days, usually one or two a month in specific locations in bangkok, but the big issue yesterday was they we re big issue yesterday was they were in the royal quarter, a place where a lot of protests have taken place, and at the same time, the king is making quite a rare visit to this country, he lives in germany mostly and his motorcade was due to go down the avenue. following the protests yesterday, there was a lot of tension over that, and any perceived slights of the king would be taken very seriously,
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we you by the security forces and royalists gathered on the street as well but in fact the protest leaders move their rally away to avoid any confrontation. there was a brief encounter with the queen's separates motorcade inexplicably went go down a road where there were already protesters, who didn't know that she was coming, and there was a very brief moment of exchange of views and that seems to be the incident that the government is now using to justify these emergency measures, saying that obstructing the motorcade means they must put a stop to the protests, they have been arrested and ta ken protests, they have been arrested and taken outside of bangkok, we don't know how many, there have been continuous arrests during the day, and police are sealing off the central part of bangkok, and we're not seeing them elsewhere but worryingly there area elsewhere but worryingly there are a lot of soldiers including inside the parliament, fully uniformed and helmeted, and what they are doing is not clear, but it does seem as though a message is being sent by the government that they have had enough of protests
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which brought the issue of the monarchy up as issue of discussion there will be no more protests, this emergency decree on top of an existing state of emergency to deal with covid—i9 stipulates specifically no mass gatherings, no publications or content on social media which is deemed to threaten national security so it is something of a suppression, and we will have to see how effective it is. thank you very muchjonathan. donald trump has continued his mission to shore up support in states he won when he was elected in 2016. on wednesday night at a rally in des moines in iowa, he told supporters he would bring most us troops home from afghanistan soon, as part of his bid to halt, as he put it, "endless wars." on thursday he'll be in north carolina and florida. meanwhile joe biden has praised the role of muslim americans. he told a muslim lobby group during a video link that
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if he was elected next month he would overturn president trump's 2017 travel ban that targeted muslim—majority countries. on thursday night mr biden will take part in a town hall event in philadelphia. mr trump has been trying to make up for lost time after being hospitalised with covid—i9. at his rallies this week in florida and pennsylvania, supporters have packed in, with limited regard for the social distancing rules. our north america editor jon sopel reports from florida. donald trump has continued his mission is the morning aqua aerobics class and these leaders are being invited tojoin class and these leaders are being invited to join the trained. but once they get out of the water, it will be the incessant demands to board either the trump train or the biden bandwagon. but they don't seem happy travellers, as i discovered
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at an impromptu focus group. how many of you just want this election to be over? cheering. laughs. they all live at the villages, america's biggest retirement community. and when i say big, i mean humongous. it has a population of 130,000, it covers an area bigger than southampton, and sprawls over five postcodes. the preferred mode of transport — golf carts. and early voting is under way. the grey vote is critical for donald trump's reelection. but not all republicans are seeing it as black and white. i am thinking that biden is going to win. does that make you happy or unhappy? actually i prefer the republican platform, so i am voting for the republican platform is what i'm voting for. not necessarily trump but the platform. this is a very, very important election and i made sure that my democratic joe biden vote got in early and on time. are you confident that he might win? yes. can you be confident with a "might"?
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i'm confident he will! the parties know how these are doing in these postal votes, and democrats have a spring in their step. the votes that have been cast so far are all vote by mail. and the return is higher than ever before. and well over 50% are democratic. and that says to me that the momentum that we felt building to this moment is still there and still growing. four years ago, donald trump won a huge victory here in the villages. but the latest polls suggest thatjoe biden is well ahead amongst the over—65s. and if that turns out to be true on polling day, that could be the difference between success and failure in florida. butjust like four years ago, the republicans are saying don't believe everything you read in the polls. trump is a bombastic personality. there are a lot of people who really appreciate that. a lot of people like it, if you ask somebody a question, you get an answer.
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and donald trump will give you an answer. and i think a lot of people appreciate that. not a blade of grass out of place. it looks genteel but don't be fooled — there is a vicious and unrelenting fight going on that won't stop until november the 3rd. jon sopel, bbc news, florida. let's get some of the day's other news. the president of the european council has said it is in the interests of both sides to have a post—brexit agreement in place before the end of the year, but not, he said, at any price. the uk's prime minister had set a deadline of thursday, but this has been delayed until the european council summit ends on friday. shares in the management agency of the korean pop band bts have more than doubled in price on theirfirst day on seoul's stock exchange. big hit entertainment now has a market value of more than $9 billion. many of the band's loyal fans, known as the army, invested in big hit
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entertainment during the initial public offering. we'll have much more on this in business in around 15 minutes time. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: have you got a head for heights and a sense of adventure? we'll tell you about the staycation fit for a daredevil. parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life, but in the marina area, where most of the damage was done, they are more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he has gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, ripping a hole in the front of the building. this government will not weaken, democracy will prevail. it fills me with humility
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and gratitude to know that i have been chosen as the recipient of this foremost of earthly honours. this catholic nation held its breath for the men they called 'the 33'. and then... bell tolls. ..bells tolled nationwide to announce the first rescue and chile let out an almighty roar. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: europe is clamping down on coronavirus, with a night—time curfew in paris and early closing for bars in germany as countries face a resurgence of covid—19. riot police in the thai capital clash with anti—government protesters, as they show their anger towards the monarchy and the prime minister.
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mr trump doesn't have many fans in germany. the president has repeatedly singled out what was once a close ally for criticism over its defence, trade and foreign policies during his time in office. no wonder, as our berlin correspondentjenny hill reports, germans are watching the run up to the presidential election particularly closely. it's the mightiest political clash in the world, and germany feels every blow. american culture pumps through this country's veins. the race for the white house eagerly watched by the berlin thunderbirds, most of whom have close ties to the states. you just kind of like a bystander and don't have any influence, but in the end, it does influence you, personally. this country has long had a soft spot for america. one president and particular sent pulses racing
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in postwar germany. ich bin ein berliner. for my generation, hooter tells us, born after the war, americans were a great beacon of freedom and democracy. that ended with donald trump. the president once claims he charmed angela merkel. she has never warmed to his style or his politics. at least we have something in common, perhaps. but angela merkel won't be dealing with the white house for much longer. this man is one of the content is hoping to replace her when she stands down next year. we are concerned the prospect of another four years would not only mean that we would not only mean that we would see more of the same, but i'm quite certain we would see
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an acceleration of everything we have experienced, because then president trump would not be under the pressure to be re—elected, he would be unshackled. the countries are supposed to be allies stopping military partners, but they have clashed, not just military partners, but they have clashed, notjust over defence spending and us troops in germany, but over trade, climate change and foreign policy stopping differences which, someone, don't entirely disappear if america votes and a new president. the difficulties that we have experienced over the last three and a half years have indeed also served as a useful wake—up call for germany to begin to reflect about its own responsibilities. germany is looking on with particular angst, that is because, for so long, this country has considered america its teammate. the last four years
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have undermined that trust. what happens next might repair the relationship or simply deepen the division. and as the us thrashes out its future path, germany, perhaps europe, may need to change its gameplan. appropriate pictures to end on there because we're going to get the latest sports news now from sports centre. hello i'm tulsen tollett, and this is your thursday sport briefing where we start with the news that england failed to build on their nations league win over belgium on the weekend, with harry maguire sent off in a 1—0 loss to denmark. the manchester united defender was dismissed for a second bookable offence and shortly after denmark were handed a penalty that christian erikksen scored dropping gareth southgate's side to third in league a group 2. he'll come through it, he'll be a better player and a stronger man for it, and he knows there will be criticism after this
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and you have to accept that, to go down to ten men is costly for the team, but we fully back him, we fully support him, he's been a top player and is a top player for us and he will come through it. elsewhere, poland moved top of league a group 1 as robert lewandowski scored twice in a 3—0 win over bosnia—herzegovina while portugal despite missing cristiano ronaldo after he contracted coronavirus were much too strong for sweden. diogojota scoring twice in a 3—0 win in league a group 3 while kyllian mbappe scored the winner for france in a 2—1 win over croatia in the same group. to tennis now and top seed daniil medvedev booked his place in the second round of the st petersburg open with a three set win over richard gasquet. after dropping the first set, medvedev didn't face a break point for the rest of the match and took apart the frenchman in the deciding set claiming it six—love. the russian looking to win a tournament for the first time
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in a year — and the world number six will face reilly opelka in the second round. european champions bayern munich start the defence of the german cup later on thursday when they travel to amateur side dueren. the match is a delayed first round match due to bayern having been in champions league action and then having to play the super cup with the second round draw to be held in three days time. joao almeida still holds the race leaders pinkjersey heading into stage 12 of the giro d'italia later on thursday. but it was arnaud demare who tightened his grip on first place in the points competition and now leads peter sagan by 36 points with filippo ganna a distant third on 51. there was no significant movement in the general classification after stage 11, with almeida finishing safely in the peloton to keep the malia rosa and his 3a second lead over wilco kelderman. the c] cup gets underway later
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in las vegas without world number one dustin johnson who withdrew after testing positive for coronavirus. the field is still strong though with the likes of this man, world number twojohn rahm along with rory mcilroy and collin morikawa while brooks koepka makes his return from injury. two cliff divers have taken their sport to the extreme by becoming the first people to dive in underground caverns. if you haven't got a head for heights you might want to look away. this is constantin popovici diving into the depths of the salina turda. it's one of the oldest saltmines in the world and 120 metres beneath the ground in north west romania. he was joined by four time cliff diving champion rhiannan iffland from australia. the water is so salty it's 70% denser than the sea.
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you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. but from me tulsen tollett and the rest of the team that is your thursday sport briefing. many britons who have been unable to take their normal holiday abroad this year — due to coronavirus restrictions, are turning to more adventurous domestic options. that's the conclusion of a ‘visit britain' report showing a head for heights and a sense of adventure are among the vacation choices for 2020. tim muffett has more. well, at least you don't have to pitch a tent. this is it then? eddie jung is finding that a lot of people want to try cliff camping. the idea of cliff camping as you come down to the cliff edge, you make sure you got some safety equipment on, then you have a really nice relaxing evening,
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as relaxing as it can be, and leave you to have a good night sleep. everyone has been literally so cooped up for such a long time they want to escape. the tourism industry has been transformed by the pandemic. during the summer there were days when the uk's beaches were packed, foreign travel for many no longer an option. but many went to the seaside on last—minute day trips so hotels and bed and brea kfasts trips so hotels and bed and breakfasts didn't necessarily see the benefit. visit britain's latest forecast is for a 49% decline in domestic tourism spending this year. that's a £16 billion loss to the economy. at the moment, the rules and regulations are changing so frequently, a lot of the outdoor centres have diversified to offering camping, that has been a saving grace for them. this feels so weird! this feels really weird! done a few camping trips before, nothing like that.
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u nless before, nothing like that. unless you are a climber, you don't really get this experience. so, this is where i am supposed to sleep. how do i go to the loo? it's a bit graphic, but can you see this tube? if you do need to go, when you've got to go, then you've got to be very balanced and delicate and you need to aim at into a plastic bag and then put the plastic bag and that sealed unit. what we don't wa nt to that sealed unit. what we don't want to do is have an effect on the environment. i might wait for the cameras to stop. fantastic, yeah. if you would allow me to escape as well... when it comes to camping, this is different. right then, time to get into my sleeping bag. the most socially distanced camping experience you could wish for.
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very nice. now on business at the moment, i might not win you all around with a brexit deadline headline but nonetheless we've also got shakespeare, stimulus, and bts so stay with us. hello there. when you think back to the start of october and just how wet it was, it's probably a good thing, actually, that we are in the midst of quite a quiet spell of weather. for many of us, we will have skies like these, over the next few days — often pretty cloudy, but with some brighter spells at times. high pressure to the north of the uk. low pressure in northern italy. and between these two areas of pressure, we've got north—easterly winds feeding in. and those north—easterly winds are dragging in a lot of cloud from the north sea. thick enough to bring some scattered showers across eastern areas of scotland at the moment. and we've got a few heavy showers just running into north—east england, although these will ease over the coming few hours. temperatures about 5—8 degrees celsius for most, but a bit colder where the skies do manage
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to stay clearest longest. on into thursday, then, and these north—easterly winds will continue to feed the cloud in for many areas. the west is best in terms of any sunshine. but i suspect we will have quite a few showers at times through the morning across the wash area. and then the showers probably break out more widely across east anglia, as you head into the afternoon. all the while, we'll see this line of showers, through most of the day, affecting east kent and running on into the channel islands, where, for some, it could be quite wet. although, for many of us, again, away from those eastern areas, it will be a relatively dry day. brisk north—east winds gusting about 30 mph, around some of the north sea coasts, will make it feel rather cool. now, we still have those north—easterly winds for friday but, if anything, they're a little bit less strong. and again, friday is the day with rather a lot of cloud around, a few bright or sunny spells, and we will continue to see an odd shower or two popping up. the majority of these, again, affecting eastern parts of scotland and eastern areas of england. what about the weekend weather prospects? well, a lot more of that cloudy weather on the horizon, with a few light showers from time to time. now, you'll start to notice
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the winds going round to more of a northerly direction, across the far north of scotland, bringing the showers in here. so a greater chance of seeing some showers for shetland and orkney, where things will start to get a little bit cooler. otherwise, again, a lot of cloud around, some bright or sunny spells and temperatures 11—14 degrees. sunday sees that colder air moving a little bit further southwards across the north of scotland. so temperatures will be dipping away here. again, a lot of cloud, a few brighter spells, but i think a greater chance of seeing showers across the northern half of the country, turning colder in aberdeen — highs of eight on sunday.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. trawler trauma at the brexit talks. can britain and the eu land a last minute deal, or will it slip through the net? plus — d—d—dynamite! k—pop sensation bts score a huge hit with investors, as shares in their label soar on their stock market debut. we start in brussels, where european union leaders
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were supposed to be signing off a post—brexit trade deal with the uk at a summit that starts shortly. ironically, fisheries now looks like the biggest catch to a settlement. prime minister boris johnson said he'd walk away from negotiations if there had been no agreement by today. but there is no trade deal to sign off. the two sides are still deadlocked over the so—called level playing field — whether the uk would be allowed to subsidize its own companies, and what fishing rights european boats would have in uk waters. mrjohnson now says he'll wait until after the summit before taking a decision on ploughing on, pulling the plug. but how much difference will that make? mujtaba rahman from the eurasia group consultancy explains the political issues in the way of a deal. i think the differences between
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paris and berlin are subtle, but they are real and i think they do exist. germany has a lwa ys they do exist. germany has always been focused on the geopolitical consequences of brexit, the french have been a bit more defensive and a bit more driven by their domestic politics and we see that now. in regard to the area of fish where i think emmanuel macron has a key and mobile constituency, putting a lot of pressure on the government not to sell them out as the price of landing a deal with the uk, and we hear about the announcement that have come from emmanuel macron this evening, curfew in paris, the government clearly struggling with the pandemic, emmanuel macron's approval ratings are falling, less room for when you are on this idea. there are three big issues, the first about the end state, to the uk government is now saying to europe there will be a transition period, the experience of french fishermen
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will not change much from the 31st of december, the eu response, we don't care about the flight path, we care about the flight path, we care about the end state. the end agreement, the access that fishermen get in uk waters will be significantly less, but that ultimately means the end of the french fishing community, and thatis french fishing community, and that is one big area. another big area, is the level of predictability, the negotiation between two sides, willoughby every several years, the eu wa nts a every several years, the eu wants a level of predictability on this question and the other thing about distribution and the is implications —— the issueis the is implications —— the issue is when one side gains, the other side loses. a lot of these european countries get less, and the politics are quite difficult at the moment, both within europe but also within the uk. joining me now is allie renison, head of europe and trade policy
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at the institute of directors. just i wonder what you think and we have listened to most others, can this one issue of fisheries scupper the deal do you think? it's certainly not unique, and global multilateral discussions and first breakdown every year so it's not unique to these negotiations but i think it has the potential to undo it, more than a i would argue that other issues would. it reflects the fact that your report mention, the parameters of covid—19 are living other european countries with less manoeuvrability, and it stresses that this will be seen asa stresses that this will be seen as a brand—new set of negotiations, it seems the uk has long seen this in the rea rview has long seen this in the rearview mirror, and this is a top set of negotiations where nobody wants to give a pound of flesh or an edge. you brought
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up flesh or an edge. you brought up the point about the coronavirus, that is also a far bigger economic kit for every country it would seem, and it is distracted, there has not been a lot of emphasis placed on brexit if you are not in the uk, perhaps france or germany, and how much does that play in to the struggle to get a deal? on the one hand, certainly, more so from the uk's perspective, there is the impetus to see that we need a deal, we need these economic payoffs by trying to get our economic recovery. by the same measure because there has been so little coverage of the eu negotiations, it is a significant issue in day—to—day living and other european countries, meeting a lot of people will be seeing negotiations as its only a win if you can grab something, so the big question is and there have been reports about this seeming to be a stronger
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position on fish from the uk than the french, that also goes both ways because the uk in some areas are asking for non—standard access to financial services, and both sides will see how it plays out in the negotiations against each other. i noticed that your equivalent in germany, italy, france, they are all urging the eu to doa france, they are all urging the eu to do a deal. you are urging the british government to do a deal, but where is the greater sort of tension in terms of who is fearing what could be last? i think is fearing what could be last? ithink again, is fearing what could be last? i think again, it goes back to the argument that some people have been taken by surprise, assuming that this relationship negotiation with the eu would be more amicable because we had that radio already and there area that radio already and there are a lot of people who want to keep the trade, but we have seen both sides are not top of the pecking order, sovereignty with respect, and what remains to be seen as we can cut through that. in terms of
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actually reaching an agreement, the argument is you don't need anything to overcomplicate either side was that recovery but the question remains, if there was an arrangement, who would hit worse, and i think some people will contend that the uk, simply because the virtue of it without having to trade with 27 other states, it would be impacted, but it is also important to consider from our point of view, no—one wants to be seen to be letting the deal slip through their fingers and deal with publications of that after. in one line, deal ona that after. in one line, deal on a deal? i think we are heading for a deal, the question is when. to wall street now, and the jitters have returned to us stock markets after treasury secretary stephen mnuchin seemed to dash hopes of a an imminent cash injection for the economy. mr mnuchin said it wasn't likely a deal would be agreed on a new stimulus package before the election on the 3rd of november, with republicans and democrats still far apart on the scope of the bill. investors were further unnerved by surging covid numbers and tightening restrictions
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across europe. swetha ramachandran is investment manager at gam investments. sorry, gam is one word rather than g a m. lets have a look at what steve is saying and whether you would concur with the idea that there could be nothing done on the stimulus package because you did seem to adjust that there is something ready and waiting for the airlines and that has got a bipartisan agreement. with every passing day, and likely with a broad sweeping stimulus
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package before the election is receding and what democrats would have control of and what the house represented was want to avoid is the targeted a2 sectors, they wanted to be part ofa sectors, they wanted to be part of a wider package that also puts cash into consumer ‘s hands, where it is desperately needed. the likelihood of them coming closer to this is actually quite low ahead of the elections. i just actually quite low ahead of the elections. ijust wonder, actually quite low ahead of the elections. i just wonder, from a public perception, whom i ta ke a public perception, whom i take the rap from the. he also said there was something like $130 billion already signed off that could be shipped out. absolutely, but at this point the market and the us electorate is relatively resigned to the fact that they won't be a stimulus deal and people are probably looking past this and what the impact ofa past this and what the impact of a change of government or the existing government might be post—election. the existing government might be post-election. what other markets doing? we hearing time again that they already factoring in essentially a joe
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biden victory, and everything that would bring with it in terms of public spending. that would bring with it in terms of public spendinglj think the performance of the markets in recent weeks has been quite telling. following the first presidential debate on the widening of the lead by the democratic candidates, we have seen markets react quite favourably, despite all that might bring in terms of increased taxes and a reversal of the trump era tax cuts. that is really because they are quite sleepy expectations very wide stimulus package to be cast should democrats take control. was also interesting is there are three elections play here, control the centre, control the presidency as well as the retention of the control of house representatives, that the play and the democrats to enact and their policy agenda. you just wonder whether markets don't learn, in a sense, we have three weeks to go, there isa have three weeks to go, there is a rollercoaster ahead, president trump gradually narrowing the gap in florida
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for example, and who is to say what it will look like on the eve of the election, to the markets may have a pretty bumpy view weeks. i would agreement that. given the circumstances, particularly the overlay of the covid—19 crisis, we should expect to markets relatively choppy for the near term, at least until the uncertainty of the election, and there are still some risks, however minor ofa still some risks, however minor of a contested election, until that passes. thank you very much indeed. let's go to asia now, and k—pop sensation bts. they are used to topping the charts around the world, but today they have also scored a huge hit with investors. shares in their management label have soared on their debut on the south korean stock exchange. we will bring you an update in a moment, but first, here's our asia business correspondent karishma vaswani. and a warning, this report contains some flash photography.
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the faces behind our multibillion dollar company. the korean boy band bts is one of the most recognised groups on the planet right now. their star power is what to entertainment firm big head is what will take it all the way to the bank. one's success rests on its massive fan base. they call themselves the army and they have helped the group layout to full houses across the world. even the pandemic cannot stop its rise. almost! million fans from around the world logged into their most recent one night concert, clocking up more than $40 million in sales, but their fan baseis million in sales, but their fan base is more thanjust million in sales, but their fan base is more than just teenage girls. charlie likes the music and also the prospect of making money from everything bts. he is buying big hit shares. this model works really well, even in this year with the
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coronavirus situation. it is very strong, even better than last year with the strong support from the online ticket sales, and other sales. it is not just a bet sales, and other sales. it is notjust a bet on one band. is a bet on the korean way, the fault cultural phenomenon on taking the world by storm. they make it look easy but trust me, it's not. korean pop culture may have taken on the world stage in the last couple of yea rs stage in the last couple of years but it's been influencing young people out here in asia for decades. from music to film, television, to dance, it has taken on a life of its own. a maestro of the k—pop world, is the co— ceo of be it. he helped to take the group to the top of the charts and is hoping top of the charts and is hoping to repeat that success on the stock market. there is so much risk involved in this because right now essentially big it has only one group bringing in income so the company is expanding and has recently had
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other labels and acts, but it is still risky and still early days. for now, big head rests on the chemistry of this one group, investors must be hoping it won't be big it's only at. "at. it won't be big it's only at. ——at. you just have to look at all of those fans to realise how many investors there may be out there. so how are those shares doing? sharanjit leyl is on bts watch in singapore. investors who have invested must be singing to their number—1 tune of dynamite, because that's what they're stock debut has been today, nothing but a big head. it was priced at 135,000 yuan, about 117 us priced at 135,000 yuan, about !!7 us dollars, soaring to priced at !35,000 yuan, about !!7 us dollars, soaring to $235 at the open, that gives the company an evaluation of over $8 million essentially, just at the opening bell today, and we know it has been a volatile morning again, gains of
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anywhere between 100 to 260%, but still wapping gains nonetheless. they have been described as the beatles of the 21st century, their songs have hit the top of the us billboard charts and this stock debut, the biggest in three years on career‘s exchange, the biggest in three years on ca reer‘s exchange, it the biggest in three years on career‘s exchange, it made big hit‘s teeth a multibillionaire. he is worth about $3.8 million at one point, he has a stake about a third of the firm, and at the listings are remaining today he banked all the fans who always loved and believed in the artist and content. bts band members have also become multibillionaire ‘s, and he gave them eat about 70,000 shares, but just how sustainable is all of this, that the big question. the fact that the big question. the fact that the big question. the fact that the entertainment generates all of its revenue from this one band, and concerns are that the company's greater strength is also its greatest vulnerability, all seven members face military
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conscription, which is mandatory in south korea, the government there is currently debating exemptions for the stars, who have been at the forefront of the korean wave cultural phenomena, and let's face it, k—pop has generated millions for the country's economy, but noticed did meditation have been granted to p0p meditation have been granted to pop and there was a big worry that bts be disbanded when they start their own solo careers afterwards could signal less than dynamite prospects for bts. fan loyalty is a very strange thing, we will see if they stick with that stop you thank you very much indeed. let's get some of the day's other news. investment bank goldman sachs has seen profits almost double thanks to a surging stock market and more share sales, or initial public offerings by companies. goldman made $3.5 billion in the three months to september, up 94% on this time last year. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the bard under the hammer,
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we'll tell you how much this copy of shakespeare's ‘first folio' went for at auction. and now some news from the uk. there have been almost 800 excess deaths in those dying below the age of 65 from heart and circulatory diseases since the covid—19 pandemic began according to an analysis by the british heart foundation. the charity says that delays in people seeking care, coupled with a reduced access to routine tests and treatment during the pandemic, have likely contributed to the rise in excess deaths. covid-19 has covid—19 has created a perfect storm for heart and circulatory patients. we know that having heart and circulatory disease, all its risk factors, obesity, diabetes, hypertension is itself a risk of the more
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severe covid—19 illness and death. but this new data and analysis show that patients are dying in excess of expected with heart and signatory disease itself unrelated to covid-19. for that story and more, breakfast is coming up at six. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: europe is clamping down on coronavirus, with a night—time curfew in paris and early closing for bars in german,y as countries face a resurgence of covid—!9. riot police in the thai capital clash with anti—government protesters, as they show their anger towards the monarchy and the prime minister. the coronavirus pandemic has put millions ofjobs at risk. but as some industries lay staff off — others are finding opportunities in the ‘new normal‘ — their only problem is getting the staff
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they need to expand. in the uk alone there are 1.2 millionjobs advertised for vacant roles. so what if firms with workers they don‘t need could lend them to firms who don‘t have enough? the idea is called an ‘employment bridge‘ and thousands of staff have already been found new temporary positions. joining me now ist townend, chief executive for the uk and ireland at lhh — a human resources consultancy that advises more than 7,000 organisations in 60 countries. thanks very much indeed for joining us. just spell out in simple terms, how this works. as this is like forjobs? how does it work? what we are seeing with an employment bridge is companies that are trying to take employees that would otherwise be made redundant and replacing them
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into companies that are having a surge in demand for employees, and that is really something that they can do, but they want to do it for a short term period, so if you think of companies that are really suffering right now in a short term period like entertainment, hospitality, aviation, travel, they are really seeing that they are really seeing that they are really seeing that they are only expecting six, 12, 18 they are only expecting six, 12, !8 months loss ofjobs. what they would like to do is temporarily shift those over into companies that need a big surge of employees right now like e—commerce, healthcare, et cetera. ok, so the timeframe that they might be loaned out and loaned back is, what? minimum six months, or how does it, what would be your average? we would say a minimum of three months, and usually in europe the maximum is !8 months before you get into some regulatory issues. right, the idea sounds
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very sensible. i imagine the practice of getting this up and running is extremely complicated and you would need a very big network to make it worthwhile. it can be, and it's one of the things that we do for our clients. we are the largest outplacement provider in the uk so we are used to working with companies making redundancies, and helping people to find newjobs. what we‘re doing with companies now is, we taking them out of their existing employment and temporarily placing them with companies that are hiring. right. sorry to interrupt you, just want to, and, if they really enjoy the new placement, they can stay, i guess? they can do. typically the way to contract works is, an employee remains an employee of the original company, but if it works out really well for both, most companies will release that employment contract and
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allow them to move over permanently. so it is a great opportunity for employees to explore another career, another company, another culture without the risks that might be entailed with an actual redundancy before they move on. interesting stuff. thank you very much indeed. money go before, always do lie open. he‘s the best known playwright of all time — so, what price would you pay for one of these — a copy of shakespeare‘s ‘first folio‘? it went under the hammer at the world‘s leading auction house on wednesday, fetching a world auction record for any printed work of literature. tanya dendrinos has the story. an immeasurable impact on english literature and language, this "poor player" will be heard for evermore and, in part, it is thanks of this collection, published in 1623, seven years after shakespeare‘s death. friends of the bard compiled mr william shakespeare‘s comedies, histories
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and tragedies, including 18 plays that had never been published before. this copy is a complete copy. that means it has all of its pages and that is very unusual in that shakespeare was read and read and read and many copies — the vast majority of copies — are imperfect. and this is the first time in a generation that a complete copy has come on the market. it is known as the first folio, and contains 36 of shakespeare‘s plays, including macbeth and julius caesar. lovers of literature the world over would argue it is priceless but the bidding had to start somewhere... they are only five complete copies known in private hands so it is an extraordinary honour for us to be offering this today, here at christie‘s. with that in mind, we must open the bidding at $2,600,000. $2,800,000 now... to be or not to be...
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for the folio here at christie‘s $8,400,000. sold. thank you, fernando. and that was just the hammer price. the total coming in at $9.97 million, a new world auction record for any printed work of literature, far exceeding the previous high of $6.16 million, set in 2001. it was bought by an american private collector and founder of a rare book and photograph shop. a treasured edition, no doubt. as for the rest of us, it‘s beware of the green eyed monster. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. let‘s just recap on our top story. several countries in europe have stepped up their efforts to halt a sharp rise in coronavirus infections. in france, there will be a night—time curfew for paris and eight other cities. in germany, bars will be forced to close early and there will be limits on people meeting, in areas with
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rising numbers of cases. thanks for watching. hello there. when you think back to the start of october and just how wet it was, it‘s probably a good thing, actually, that we are in the midst of quite a quiet spell of weather. for many of us, we will have skies like these, over the next few days — often pretty cloudy, but with some brighter spells at times. high pressure to the north of the uk. low pressure in northern italy. and between these two areas of pressure, we‘ve got north—easterly winds feeding in. and those north—easterly winds are dragging in a lot of cloud from the north sea. thick enough to bring some scattered showers across eastern areas of scotland at the moment. and we‘ve got a few heavy showers just running into north—east england, although these will ease over the coming few hours.
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temperatures about 5—8 degrees celsius for most, but a bit colder where the skies do manage to stay clearest longest. on into thursday, then, and these north—easterly winds will continue to feed the cloud in for many areas. the west is best in terms of any sunshine. but i suspect we will have quite a few showers at times through the morning across the wash area. and then the showers probably break out more widely across east anglia, as you head into the afternoon. all the while, we‘ll see this line of showers, through most of the day, affecting east kent and running on into the channel islands, where, for some, it could be quite wet. although, for many of us, again, away from those eastern areas, it will be a relatively dry day. brisk north—east winds gusting about 30 mph, around some of the north sea coasts, will make it feel rather cool. now, we still have those north—easterly winds for friday but, if anything, they‘re a little bit less strong. and again, friday is the day with rather a lot of cloud around, a few bright or sunny spells, and we will continue to see an odd shower or two popping up. the majority of these, again, affecting eastern parts of scotland and eastern areas of england. what about the weekend weather prospects? well, a lot more of that cloudy weather on the horizon, with a few light showers from time to time.
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now, you‘ll start to notice the winds going round to more of a northerly direction, across the far north of scotland, bringing the showers in here. so a greater chance of seeing some showers for shetland and orkney, where things will start to get a little bit cooler. otherwise, again, a lot of cloud around, some bright or sunny spells and temperatures 11—14 degrees. sunday sees that colder air moving a little bit further southwards across the north of scotland. so temperatures will be dipping away here. again, a lot of cloud, a few brighter spells, but i think a greater chance of seeing showers across the northern half of the country, turning colder in aberdeen — highs of eight on sunday.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: a deepening row over whether to impose tighter restrictions on large parts of northern england as the mayor of greater manchester threatens legal action. a strict new curfew in paris. people won‘t be allowed to leave their home after 9pm in a bid to stem rising infection rates. marcus rashford welcomes moves by the welsh government to provide free meals for the poorest children in the school holidays, and calls for the same in england. government officials meet shop bosses and the police to work out how to encourage us all to wear face coverings inside.

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