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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 16, 2020 2:00pm-3:46pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm reeta chakra barti. the headlines... lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. if we don't get to grips with the virus in three weeks‘ time admissions to hospitals in lancashire will be at the height that they were when the peak was at its height. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a "no—deal" trade relationship with the european union at the end of the year. i concluded that we should get ready forjanuary with arrangements that are more like australia's, based on simple principles
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of globalfree trade. wales is facing a limited circuit—breaker lockdown which is expected to be announced in the next few days. and pubs and restaurants in northern ireland prepare to close their doors to sit—in customers as stricter restrictions come into force from six o'clock tonight. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. lancashire has become the latest area in england to be put into the highest coronavirus alert level after the government came to an agreement with local leaders. it becomes the second region after liverpool to face the toughest measures with different households banned from mixing indoors or outdoors in hospitality
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venues or private gardens. it comes amid government criticism of the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, who is resisting efforts to put his area in the highest level, saying he wants more financial support for people affected. london, essex, york and parts of surrey, derbyshire and cumbria will move into the high alert level at midnight, meaning different households are not allowed to mix indoors. here's our political correspondentjessica parker. beautiful beaches, iconic buildings. but blackpool, like all of lancashire, is moving to the highest tier of restrictions from tomorrow. like everybody else in tier three, pubs and bars will close, but we managed to convince government that we've got sufficient measures in place to monitor the performance of leisure centres and gyms, so at this stage they won't be closing but obviously we've got to keep checking on them. for manchester, no destination has been arrived atjust yet. the mayor says plans for the area are flawed.
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the prime minister says... you know, i am, i have to say, concerned about what is happening in manchester, where clearly the levels of infection are rising steeply, the levels of hospitalisation are rising steeply, and we do need to see action and, you know, you say i would much rather not impose things, i would much rather we were able to work out something together. but pressure continues on the prime minister's neighbour, the chancellor, for more financial support. one local leader in greater manchester says talks with the government have been respectful, but... there have not really been negotiations. the government has been very much in the position of saying, "this is what is on offer, take it or we will impose it," basically, and we have had to say, you haven't got evidence that these measures are effective and we have evidence that suggests they won't be there is certainly not enough
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financial compensation for people who have been put out of work, and businesses. downing street wants buy—in from local leaders as it seeks to simplify the system with these local covid alert levels but some of the talks have proved far from smooth so the process of setting new restrictions for some areas has become messier and more complicated. in lancashire leaders say they have extra cash to help businesses. it is targeted action, they want to avoid a national lockdown. but that may provoke comparisons as different areas reach different deals. and jessica joins us now live. that is it, it is a chequered picture that we are getting across the country. yes, what the government is trying to achieve is to do these targeted, local restrictions with this new, local covid alert level and to bear down
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on the virus where the rates are highest. they are really trying to engage, they say, with local leaders, partly to reinforce the public health message. if you have the local mayor and the local council leaders backing the government restrictions they are trying to bring in, you are more likely to see higher levels of compliance. whilst we have been hearing from downing street this insistence they have been dealing with local leaders, some of them are saying they are not really negotiations, they are being told what to do. one of the issues that is being hotly debated in terms of greater manchester is the level of financial support. if they go into the highest tier of restrictions and get that two thirds of wage support, where businesses are forced to close, andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester is saying that is not enough, not enough for people on the minimum wage. he is trying to push the government into supplying some extra cash. those talks have
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not reached a resolution yet. we just heard from borisjohnson, really trying to encourage andy burnham and others in greater manchester to agree to move forward, but the sticking points to remain. many thanks. jessica parker reporting from westminster. and join us for a bbc news special later this afternoon when borisjohnson will be holding a news conference. we'll be bringing you that live on bbc one and the bbc news channel from 3.16. the rapid increase in coronavirus infections across the uk has been mirrored over much of europe. millions of people on the continent have been told to live under strict new measures, with deaths from the virus now exceeding a thousand a day. the world health organisation has warned tough restrictions are "absolutely necessary" to save lives. here's richard galpin. across many parts of europe now cases of coronavirus
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are rising rapidly. the result of a potent second wave of the virus hitting the region. here in france, there has been a big jump in the number of daily cases, which was already high. they have now gone up from around 22,000 a day, to more than 30,000, a new record. with a night—time curfew now in paris and eight other cities coming into force tomorrow, businesses are having to shut down, the situation bleak. translation: with this nine o'clock curfew we cannot afford to do a service. because we start our service at 7:30pm. dinner services usually end at around 10:30pm. so it is impossible for us to tell our clients at 8:30pm, "you have to leave." in spain, it's a similar story. cases hitting more than 13,000 a day, the second highest daily count since late june.
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the evolving epidemiological situation in europe raises great concern. daily numbers of cases are up, hospital admissions are up, and covid is now the fifth leading cause of death, and the bar of 8,000 deaths per day has now been reached. and looking at this party in the netherlands on wednesday night, it is perhaps no surprise cases have been rising in europe, particularly amongst the young. people here determined to socialise in large groups right up to the last minute when measures came into force, closing bars, restaurants and coffee shops, apart from takeaway, and limiting the number of guests allowed in a home. richard galpin, bbc news. let's talk to dr margaret harris from the world health organisation. good afternoon, thank you for
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joining us. doctor harris, looking at that report from our correspondence, across europe countries have been experiencing long periods of lockdown earlier in the year and still the virus is back. people are starting to feel a real sense of fatigue. what can you say to them? i can say i understand because people did experience extraordinary times. it was a very frightening time and people were also extraordinary in themselves because they put up with private asian, not believing and knowing they were right, that they were doing their best to bring numbers down. the problem was the afterwards. instead of realising that we really had to go into this new normal and find a newer and safer way to live during the summer, it was more like i have done my hard work, i have got my gold medal and
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now i get my reward and u nfortu nately we a re now i get my reward and unfortunately we are reaping the reward of a different kind right now. you will be unwilling to criticise government policy, promote governmental policy have driven that slightly as governments naturally looked to open up their again?m slightly as governments naturally looked to open up their again? it is a combination of factors. it was a lovely summer in europe and people felt that they somehow were immune. iam not felt that they somehow were immune. i am not just felt that they somehow were immune. i am notjust talking about the young people, they got beaten up, but it was notjust young people, they got beaten up, but it was not just the young people, they got beaten up, but it was notjust the young people. a lot of the clusters were happening in private gatherings in homes. people got together more than normal, i would homes. people got together more than normal, iwould not homes. people got together more than normal, i would not know, homes. people got together more than normal, iwould not know, i homes. people got together more than normal, i would not know, i don't have the evidence, but people felt they were safe in their family groupings and they forgot all the distancing, the hand hygiene, the not being close together and breathing and talking and chatting and laughing all over each other. u nfortu nately we a re and laughing all over each other. unfortunately we are now seeing an acceleration of transmission. you
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think the restrictions that european countries that the populations are moving into now, that once we come out of those restrictions we will still have to live in a much modified way? yes. we need to really pay attention to the lessons we have learned. it is critical that we try to live and keep our societies as open as possible and keep our business is running and our school is running. but where you have got high transmission and transmission out—of—control those restrictions will have to go in. exactly as you say, when they come off we look at how you can take them off and keep people living but living safely. can i clear people living but living safely. can iclearup people living but living safely. can i clear up something that was debated after one of your colleagues talk about the effectiveness of lockdown. his remarks were interpreted as the who calling into question the effectiveness of
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lockdowns. can you clear that up? where do you stand on that? that came at the weekend with our excellent colleague was saying do not go from zero to the drastic, huge, national lockdowns. again, many countries did impose those in march because they did not have much else in the tool box. at that time, remember, there was very few testing systematically and very few countries had a track and trace system and it was a new virus that had taken many countries and societies by surprise. what he was saying is do not go back to that, do not automatically go back to that, look at where transmission is. you may indeed need to restrict movement, you may indeed need to restrict activities where you have got transmission running rampant, but do not go with a blunt instrument, make it tailored. can you look forward for us a little
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bit? at what stage do you imagine europe might be able to emerge from this? certainly once again when you see the transmission coming down. and we have seen this. countries to bring it down. but particularly when you have got a good idea on who is transmitting to who and how, where your clusters are, and backtrack from the clusters and see where the transmission is potentially being seeded elsewhere. when people understand if they are asked to self—isolate because they are a contact, they really must do it. they must do it because they are saving lives. they may not feel that in any way it affects them, but go out there and be a life—saver by isolating when you are asked to. 0k, very good to talk to you. doctor margaret harris from the world health organization. thank you for your time. is a pleasure. wales faces a limited
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"circuit—breaker lockdown" which is expected to be announced in the next few days. the welsh government says there's a growing consensus that more measures are needed to control the virus. people in parts of the uk with high rates of covid—i9 will be barred from travelling to wales from six o'clock tonight, as tomos morgan reports. this is what we lost in the first lockdown from 23rd of march through until 13th ofjuly. du to yesterday's announcement this is what we have lost so far. we fully expect to lose all this. and at least that. lucy miller's self catering and camping holiday rentals are on anglesey, one of few places in wales that is not in a local lockdown. she says the overwhelming majority of her clients come from the north—west of england, a covid hotspot and from this evening areas with high levels of the virus in other parts of the uk will be banned by law
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from entering wales. the hospitality industry is the lifeblood of north wales. cutting that off is going to have long—term, far—reaching effects on people's livelihoods and businesses. so many companies are going to go bust. those living in places like wrexham, already under local restrictions, are banned from leaving their area and it is illegal to enter another area under lockdown without a valid excuse. the welsh government say the enforcement of this new travel ban will be the same as how they have dealt with local lockdown measures here — fines and sending people home. the welsh government. the first minister has promised extra police patrols on the border. however the police federation and opposition parties say this
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approach is unenforceable. as well as this travel ban that comes into force this evening, the welsh government have begun planning more stringent measures as the number of coronavirus hospital admissions here has risen by almost 50% in a week. the bbc understands that wales is just days away from announcing another potential national lockdown that could last for at least two weeks. the authorities in cardiff have already began talks with industry is about the impact of any further restrictions. this would be a short, sharp, shock to the virus which could turn back the clock, slowing down its spread and buying us more time. it is a prospect being met with mixed views. i think it probably would be a very good thing for a couple of weeks, just to dampen the virus spread. i think we could do other restrictions that would be easier to live with, that maybe wouldn't affect us in such a harsh way. the number of covid hospital admissions have risen by almost 50% in a week,
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so increased measures are looking more certain to be announced next week, but the questions from unions, industries and the public are, how strict will they be, and for how much longer? tomos morgan, bbc news, menai bridge. the headlines on bbc news... lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a "no—deal" trade relationship with the european union at the end of the year. the prime minister has warned the eu that unless it changes its approach to trade talks, the uk will settle for no deal. borisjohnson said there were only ten weeks left to find an agreement
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and businesses should prepare for the possibility of trading in january without one being reached. eu leaders have been meeting in brussels to take stock of negotiations. mrjohnson had previously set the summit as a final deadline for a deal. nick beake reports. europe's leaders gathered once again in person, despite covid, having sent london an ultimatum. you need to give ground first if there is to be a brexit trade deal. this lunchtime, borisjohnson hit back, saying the uk should now prepare for no—deal. given that this summit appears explicitly to rule out a ca nada—style deal, i concluded that we should get ready forjanuary the ist with arrangements that are more like australia's, based on simple principles of global free trade. the prime minister claimed once again that would be a good outcome for britain. after 45 years of membership,
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they are not willing, unless there is some fundamental change of approach, to offer this country the same terms as canada. and so, with high hearts and with complete confidence, we will prepare to embrace the alternative, and we will prosper mightily as an independent, free—trading nation controlling our own borders, ourfisheries, and setting our own laws. back in brussels, eu leaders, who have all been stepping up anti—covid measures at home, will have noted that borisjohnson did not say the uk was walking away from talks. the german leader, speaking before mrjohnson‘s announcement, had spot mrjohnson‘s announcement, had struck a more optimistic note. translation: we have asked the united kingdom to remain open to compromise so that an agreement can be reached. this, of course, means that we, too, will need to make compromises. each side has its red lines.
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dramatic language has often swirled around these brexit talks and, despite the prime minister's latest declaration, eu negotiators say they will be back in london next week, hoping to agree a deal. nick beake, bbc news, brussels. we'll be speaking to nick in a moment, but first, our political correspondent, jonathan blake, and there are words from downing street. the prime minister's spokesman has gone further than the prime minister did this morning. the first thing he said was the trade talks are over and the eu have effectively ended them by saying they do not want to change their negotiating position. he goes on to say ina negotiating position. he goes on to say in a briefing with reporters that there is only any point in michel barnier coming to london next week if he is prepared to address all the issues on the basis of a
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legal text, in what he described as an accelerated way, without the uk required to make all the moves or to discuss the practicalities of travel and haulage. if not, he said, there is no point in coming. while earlier on or asjohnson is no point in coming. while earlier on or as johnson left is no point in coming. while earlier on or asjohnson left the door open to further negotiation and did not say he was walking away from the process , say he was walking away from the process, that the eu would be required to fundamentally change its position if negotiations were to continue, his spokesman has now declared that the talks, as far as downing street are concerned, are over. that does not kill the process dead i don't think. it does still leave the possibility open for further negotiations and it may well be that michel barnier, the eu's chief negotiator, does still come to london as planned this week. but it isa london as planned this week. but it is a very clear signal, even given all the rhetoric involved and the
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gameplaying that we know goes on by both sides throughout these negotiations, very clear signal that street is expecting a shift in the eu's position if it is going to do a deal of any kind here. and it will have to be on one of those key issues and they are, as we know, the issues and they are, as we know, the issue of fishing and access to uk waters by vessels from eu member states, and also state aid, the amount of subsidy that the government can give to businesses and the rules that apply to that. so definitely upping the anti both sides, but downing street putting down a clear marker today that it is, as faras down a clear marker today that it is, as far as they are concerned, the eu that needs to shift. we have had reaction to the prime minister's comments earlier on from rachel reeves, the labour party's shadow cabinet office minister, urging the uk to keep talking. i would urge the government even at this late stage to stop posturing, start negotiating
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properly. it is not too late to get a deal that british business needs, and especially right now when we are facing a deep recession and going through a global pandemic. this is not the time to create further uncertainty, further costs and further bureaucracy for british businesses. this is incredibly damaging and dangerous, the government must step back from the brink. in response to the prime minister's comments earlier in the european commission said as planned the negotiation team will go to london next week to intensify the negotiations. we will have to see what their responses to this further from downing street, at every stage in this process deadlines have come and gone and negotiations have nearly always gone down to the wire. let speak now to the person who can tell us how this is going down in
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brussels, our european correspondent, nick pete. downing street is saying the talks are over. is that how brussels sees them?“ thatis is that how brussels sees them?“ that is the case, that is news to the european union officials here who just a the european union officials here whojust a short the european union officials here who just a short time ago listen to what boris johnson who just a short time ago listen to what borisjohnson was prepared to say publicly. they noted his sentiment that the uk should prepare for the possibility of no brexit trade deal being reached, but they took from that the fact that he dodged the question are the trade talks going to end? but if what jonathan reports, what the number ten spokesperson has said, this does change things. emmanuel macron, the president of france said 20 minutes ago ina president of france said 20 minutes ago in a press conference that he and the other leaders had given michel barnier, the chief negotiator, an extra mandate, they had given him another two weeks to go to london if necessary. but clearly london is saying it is off, it is done and that is a completely different matter because the likes
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of angela merkel of germany had said that they thought despite all the bad blood, some deals could still be reached. so where does this go from here? i think in the next ten minutes or so we will be looking out to see if there is any further comment officially from the european union. we will be asking behind—the—scenes what people making this, the fact that the number ten spokesperson has gone further than the prime minister was prepared to do. if the talks do stay on and continue, they are at a fraught moment. we heard emmanuel macron saying once again that the uk needs a trade deal much more than the eu does. he said it was britain that voted to leave the eu family and so it is on their terms that they are doing this. he also said once again that we know fishing has become a big, vexed issue over the last week and quite simply french fisher men would not be sold out for this, that would not be sold out for this, that
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would not be a solution to try and trade of french fishing access to british waters in the future in exchange for some other sort of deal. we are at a pretty precarious point and time is ticking, sorry to use that awful phrase, but we know at the end of this year if there is no deal the uk and the eu will trade on world trade organisation terms, which basically means there will be ta riffs which basically means there will be tariffs for the first time in more than a0 years, taxes in other words, and restrictions on the number of goods that can be moved from one side to the other. why does that matter? ultimately it will cost more for businesses and for consumers things will become a lot more expensive, we expect. many thanks. today we've heard that lancashire has been placed into the highest level of covid—i9 restrictions. however the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, is resisting efforts to put his area into the highest level, saying he wants more financial support for people affected. we can speak now to councillor sean fielding, the labour leader of oldham council.
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good afternoon, mr fielding. lancashire has gone into this highest level of restrictions. does that make you more minded to think that make you more minded to think that this might be an acceptable solution for greater manchester and oldham? the position of lancashire does not change our demands around the financial package we want to see to support our residents and businesses. and the financial package, which is a watered—down version of what we saw in the full lockdown during the year, is not fairand does lockdown during the year, is not fair and does not make sense. why is it so people can cope with less money in october than they could backin money in october than they could back in march when their businesses we re back in march when their businesses were closed down and they were furloughed? were closed down and they were furloughed ? it does were closed down and they were furloughed? it does not make sense at all and we are holding out for a much more generous financial package that will give us the support we need to safeguard our economy and thejobs need to safeguard our economy and the jobs that will be lost if any further restrictions are imposed.
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lancashire has been given a sum of money to help it through this period, why should that not be the case for you? why should we not be offered a financial package if they can make concessions for lancashire? that is why we will engage proactively with the government because we are in greater manchester putting people's health first. this is about making sure we get the right restrictions and also we get the money we need to mitigate the impact those restrictions will have on the economy and businesses. if they can do it for lancashire, they can do it for us and we expect them to come around the table and negotiate seriously, rather than attempting to put across the message that we go into lockdown whether we like it or not. is it the case greater manchester was offered no financial help? we were offered nothing that was already on the table, £8 per head for each local authority workplaces that went into tier three and a couple of other things we were asking for around a greater enforcement powers and greater enforcement powers and greater control of track and trace locally. those are things we have
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been calling forfor a locally. those are things we have been calling for for a while. but yesterday the government came to the table with nothing that had already been put out in the public domain. when we already said we were unhappy with that offer and for them to track back is completely staggering. you heard the member of sage, professorjeremy farrar, talking about the political wrangling that is going on as being potentially very damaging to public health. how much does that worry you?” very damaging to public health. how much does that worry you? i listen to scientific advisers like professorjeremy farrar and i would advise the government to do so also. we had the deputy chief medical officer in a meeting and he told us that the only solution that would bring down the infection rate in the way the government claims it wants to would be a national circuit breaker lockdown, which is the position of the labour party. but because the prime minister is on record saying they will not be a further national lockdown he feels he cannot backtrack on that. even
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though his advisers are saying it is the only thing to solve the problem, he will not do it because he made a statement before and that is a politics being played here. we worked with the government undertook additional restrictions in the summer additional restrictions in the summerand additional restrictions in the summer and will continue to put public health first. unfortunately, thatis public health first. unfortunately, that is being held up because the prime minister does not want to admit that he will have to go on his word and not to place another lockdown when his advisers are telling him that is what he should do. if you were to go into the highest level of restrictions, businesses and workers would be given two thirds of their salary up toa given two thirds of their salary up to a certain point. under the previous furlough scheme, which is what you are calling for, they would be given 80%, four fifths of their salary. it is not a huge difference between one or the other, is it? it isa it is a huge difference for the people who live hand to mouth which
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we have a great number of in greater manchester. the government think four weeks is a short period and people can cope on these lower incomes in the and if you are on the kind of salaries the government and advisers are on then that might be the case and you can sit tight and go out a bit less and spend less disposable income but for the residents i represent to live hand to mouth and worry about where their next will come from and how to pay energy bills, two thirds of their income is nowhere near sufficient to help them to even stand still, let alone improve their lot in life. thank you very much for your time. the labour leader of oldham council. thank you very much. mostly cloudy, occasional light rain or drizzle in some spots. light showers around northern england, the midlands, parts of wales and northern ireland. southern england
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for the rest of the day seeing the best of the sunny spells. temperatures a few degrees below—average for the time of year. fairly light north—easterly breeze continuing, a lot of cloud across the uk overnight, damp and drizzly, clear spells, westernmost parts of scotland. south wales, south—west england where some spots may end up close to freezing into the morning but most of us underneath the cloud will above freezing. starting the day tomorrow and again with the cloud there will be patchy light rain and drizzle. most likely in the afternoon for parts of scotland and northern ireland. only very limited sunny spells coming through all of this cloud, light wind and temperatures no change on saturday. sunday if anything looks a bit cooler. that is your forecast. hello this is bbc news. the headlines...
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lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a "no—deal" trade relationship with the european union at the end of the year. wales is facing a limited "circuit breaker lockdown" which is expected to be announced in the next few days. and pubs and restaurants in northern ireland prepare to close their doors to sit in customers, as stricter restrictions come into force from six o'clock tonight. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. the premier league returns tomorrow after the international break. manchester united travel to newcastle off the back of their chastening 6—1 defeat to tottenham almost a fortnight ago. the form and fitness of captain harry maguire is one concern for the manager.
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he was sent off in england's defeat to denmark on wednesday night and he also picked up a knock which means he's a doubt for tomorrow. when harry is part of the england team that beats number one ranked belgium, that'sjust a normal day, and then you get the headlines when you get the sending off. that's just football for you. there's so many ups and downs, we have got to deal with it individually and as a group. harry has got great resilience and i know he will bounce back. i know that he wants to play, he wants to just work his way out of the last couple of games that he has been criticised. gareth bale could make his first appearance for spurs since rejoining them on loan from real madrid. bale had six years at tottenham before leaving for spain in 2013.
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the deal to bring him back was one of the standout bits of business in the transfer window. he arrived with a minor knee injury, but is expected to feature against west ham on sunday but the manager is giving very little away. but the manager is giving he but the manager is giving wanted to play since the arrived. he wanted to play since the day he arrived. and was not possible. i'm not going to tell you if he's going to play or not. what i can tell you is that he is working very well. especially this week, the planning of the sessions had a big focus on him and he is in pretty good condition. it's the transfer deadline day for domestic deals involving football league clubs. the window shuts at 5 o'clock. liverpool midfielder harry wilson has secured a season—long loan move to cardiff. the 23—year—old wales international was being chased by a number of championship sides, including derby county where he'd
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previously had a loan spell. it's the challenge cup final tomorrow between leeds rhinos and salford red devils. the rugby football league chairman simon johnson has defended the decision to stage the match at wembley even though it will be played behind closed doors. in the programme notes for tomorrow's match, he says that the sport remains in a "vulnerable state" with fans locked out and that "if, by following government guidance, "we end up risking the survival of our clubs and the future "sustainability of our game, we must look to government to help". they have already received a £16 million loan. england's world cup winning captain eoin morgan will take over as captain of the kolkata knight riders in the indian premier league. he's replacing dinesh karthik who wants to focus on his batting. the team are fourth in the ipl table and face 2nd placed mumbai indians in the next half an hour. commentary on 5live sports extra. the games are being played in the uae.
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this year's vietnam grand prix definely won't take place. a night race on a hanoi street circuit was first scheduled for april, but that was postponed because of the pandemic. it was then excluded from the revised calendar. although local organisers had hoped to stage the race hoped to stage the race next month, they've now given up hope of it taking place this year. that's all the sport for now. approximately one in every 160 people in homes in england had coronavirus in the week up to the 8th of october, according to the latest snapshot from the office for national statistics. that's a rise of approximately 50% on the figure for the previous week. our head of statistics robert cuffe is in west london. yet more evidence that cases are rising? absolutely. that 5096
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yet more evidence that cases are rising? absolutely. that 50% rise yet more evidence that cases are rising? absolutely. that 5096 rise in a week is roughly doubling every fortnight. while that's much lower than the rate in the epidemic back in march when it doubled every couple of days, it still should set expectations of what we will see in a more serious indication like people going into hospital and dying in the couple of weeks. we pay attention to the survey in particular because it gives is a very clear picture of the virus. daily numbers, people test positive, that can arise if more people come forward orfall, if there that can arise if more people come forward or fall, if there are bottlenecks in the system but this survey cuts through that and tells us survey cuts through that and tells us what's going on and gives a picture that's actually quite familiar. most cases in the north of england or in young adults and teenagers, but rising everywhere across england and wales and northern ireland. no data for scotla nd northern ireland. no data for scotland in the survey. in almost every age group as well. and what, that fits with the pattern we have
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seen that fits with the pattern we have seen elsewhere, the number of people going into hospital and dying and deaths involved covid—19, that has doubled every fortnight for the last month. and what the figures today tell us is that even if the actions that happened today stop the virus in its tracks and stop further growth we should still expect to see those hospitalisations and deaths rise because the people infected today a proportion of them will go on to get sick and the proportion of them will go on to die. we have also had some information about the our number edging up. telling is about that. —— number edging up. telling is about that. -- rh. the r number was between 1.2 and 1.5 and now this week they say 1.3 up to 1.5 so and now this week they say 1.3 up to 1.5soa and now this week they say 1.3 up to 1.5 so a slight increase at the bottom range. the scientists who feed into this say you do not want to worry too much about the extra decimal place. you want to focus on
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the bigger than one. is it growing or shrinking and how confident are we it is growing or shrinking and what sage say is that they believe it's pretty reliable and there is widespread growth in the epidemic across the country which is essentially what the infection survey is telling is as well, that we see infections rising. thank you very much. our ireland correspondent, emma vardy has been giving an overview of the new restrictions coming into place tonight in northern ireland. just a few hours left of trading until bars, cafes, restaurants will have to close their doors, some have been trying to get rid of the stock they have, the provisions, a lot of the beer in cellars will go off over this period. here in belfast there are a few
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customers in enjoying a final few drinks and a meal out, before that will all be closed off to people for the next few weeks. 6pm tonight is when those is measures start. as well as pubs and bars, it is also close contact services like hairdressers and beauticians that will also have to close. this is all happening because northern ireland, like many places, is seeing its numbers of confirmed covid—19 cases going up and up. northern ireland has had some of the highest infection rates within the uk. there has been lots of criticism from business groups about this second period of lockdown restrictions. the belfast chamber of commerce saying the support measures don't cut it and they are calling on westminster to be more generous with the funding package that will be available. so, a lot of businesses will be closing their doors, but others, like here have tried to find innovative ways to keep business ticking over during this period. they are setting up a little local
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shop over the period of lockdown, they have got a pizza van to keep some takeaway business ticking over, they hope to keep on their staff over the period but other businesses will not be so fortunate. a british company has cut the price of medical cannabis, meaning it's now cheaper than illegal street cannabis. despite the government allowing prescriptions, they're only given rarely on the nhs, that's because of the high cost, guidelines saying they should only be offered when all other options have been exhausted, and the fact that some of the products don't have a licence. private prescriptions can cost hundreds of pounds, meaning they're too expensive for most patients. but that's now set to change. chris hemmings reports. i started using cannabis around about 2007. i was getting lots of nausea from anxiety, i was not going out at all, i came across cannabis, basically,
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took a couple of puffs and within minutes the nausea i had been getting completely vanished. since december last year, lee has been treating his anxiety with medicinal cannabis oil. he originally went to the nhs but was told it was unlikely he would get a prescription, so went private, which meant like many others, he had to foot the bill. the first product i received from canada cost £300, that lasted about a month, it was just so expensive, really expensive, and at the time i was on benefits, i was on zero—hours contracts, and it wasjust a nightmare trying afford it. for most people, that meant black market cannabis was more affordable, but never british company has produced a product that is cheaper than getting it from dealers. now i use a product that cost £80 and lasts for two months, on the black market i was paying up to £70 a week.
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so what has happened that means lee and others can get this in legal, medicinal form cheaper than ever? until now, medical cannabis distributed in the uk came from various companies at different steps along the supply at each step, cost was added. a british company, emmac, is now the first in the uk at every stage of the process, removing those additional costs. the co—founder is ed mcdermott. we have taken a vertically integrated approach to the business model, meaning we control cultivation, processing, manufacturing and distribution, essentially cutting out middlemen. unfortunately it is still a private market, not publicly funded, which means patients are self— paying. so price is a significant part of that. by bringing the price down and allowing a supply chain to work efficiently and create cost savings, we can pass that on. they grow the flower in portugal and extract the thc in spain, then it is exported to the north—east and turned into medical cannabis oil.
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dr michael platt is a consultant pain specialist the nhs, but he also works for sapphire medical clinic, the first medical cannabis clinic approved by the care quality commission. there are many patients who have managed to start it but had to give it up because it was too expensive. so although it is oked for nhs use, a lot of nhs bodies cannot afford it, so they have not been able to access it, and patients are in a lot of pain because of that. there is no doubt that in the last couple of months, the number of patients coming to us has increased quite dramatically and i think it is the realisation that price has come down so much, right down from well over £1000 a month to about £120 to £150 a month, depending on the medication. if i could sum it up in two words it's the freedom to move on with my life,
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not have to worry about the police, and the safety of buying it off doctors and using something to a pharmaceutical standard, it is massively life changing. dr mark weatherall is consultant neurologist at sapphire medical clinic, which works with medicinal cannabis. hejoins me now. good afternoon. you have been prescribing medicinal cannabis for a year or so now. what do you prescribe it for? patients with neurological problems that come here. initially we saw a lot of young adults and my colleagues with children with particularly nasty epilepsy disorders for which medicinal cannabis is known to be very helpful. things have expanded and we see patients with other neurological conditions such as ms, headache disorders and in other
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areas as well. so it is quite interesting, quite exciting to see these people and many of the patients we treated so far have done very well. how much of an issue has the price of these products been for you when you prescribe them?|j the price of these products been for you when you prescribe them? i think it is always a concern, i think we all remember reports from a couple of years ago of people having to source medicinal cannabis from the continent, paying enormous prices for it and then risking having it confiscated when they came into the country. even a year ago as that was port said, the costs were very high. the more companies will be able produce the product in the country, the more people prescribe, so the prices will continue to fall so that will make a huge difference to the accessibility of medicinal cannabis, evenin accessibility of medicinal cannabis, even in the private sector. but also
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presumably in the nhs? do you think the fact of the prices falling will mean that they are more available on the nhs? i think that will be a factor that will come into play. the other thing is that at sapphire medical clinic, one of the main things of interest for us to collect data and good quality data on the outcomes of people given medicinal cannabis and that will feed into the process. there are specific criteria the nhs use tojudge process. there are specific criteria the nhs use to judge whether medication can be prescribed on the nhs and it's a matter of cost and clinical effectiveness so the more data we can gather, the better the case can be made for the more widespread use of medicinal cannabis on the nhs. is there a slightly grey area when it comes to medicinal cannabis? because the nice guide says it's an unproven medicine. the
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nice guidelines are based on clinical trials and those have been very difficult to do with medicinal cannabis products because they so va ry cannabis products because they so vary and so very few companies have invested the time and money to do trials of the type and nature that nice want to see for use. so there is on the other hand a huge amount of evidence out there. there have been many studies done in israel and europe and america and canada over the last 20 years that demonstrate medicinal cannabis is safe and effective across a wide number of disorders. pain, neurological disorders. pain, neurological disorders and so on, so more data is a lwa ys disorders and so on, so more data is always helpful, more clinical trials would be great, and the overall direction is showing that medicinal cannabis is useful in many areas and that i think eventually well come to bear on nice's decision—making process. are to talk
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. thank you so much. the headlines on bbc news... lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. downing street says trade talks between the eu and uk are over. borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a no—deal trade relationship at the end of the year. the coronavirus pandemic has pushed the care system for older and disabled people even closer to the edge, according to regulators. the care quality commission says some care homes may go out of business, and the need for investment and reform is now urgent. our social affairs correspondent, alison holt has been explaning the struggles in the sector. this is part of the cqc's annual look at how the health
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and care system is going. it praises the professionalism of staff during a pandemic, but says existing inequality has been magnified by these pressures. on adult social care, it says it was fragile before covid, but the underlying problems of the need for long—term reform, better investment and the difficulties of recruiting and keeping staff, have just been exacerbated in recent months. the government has put extra money into the care system, but the report says those providing services are struggling to see its impact on the front line, and the report says many care businesses already operate on wafer thin margins and need money, not in a week or a month, they need it today. in mental health services, the report highlights the poor care that inspectors continue to find in inpatient units for people with learning disabilities
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and autism, and the proportion of the services rated inadequate has risen from a% last year up to 13% this year, and that's not because of the pandemic, that is an indication of the underlying problems within this sort of very complex care. finally in the report, the regulator says so many missed opportunities to see people, operations, investigations and so on, we have to ensure, in their words, that no one is left behind. going out for a walk was a welcome escape for lots of people during the national lockdown, and many of us took the opportunity to explore the great outdoors. but the best and safest routes are often hidden away. now volunteers across the country have stepped in to create slow maps for walkers, as david sillito has been finding out. we're in ledbury, and sue and nina, have, like millions of us, ledbury in herefordshire, and sue and nina, two friends, who, like many of us, have done lots of local walking
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in recent months. and one thing has surprised them. just that there were so many footpaths, really. next to where i live, there is a real, like, networks — like a real net of footpaths. i hadn't realised how expansive it was. the government's official advice at the moment is walk, if you can. but how viable is it? for instance, the first village up the road is a place called wellington heath. and, according to my phone, it's a simple a7—minute walk. can i tempt you to go for a walk then? i can always be tempted on a walk! so yes! and i'm going to choose the route. i will follow it on my phone. oh, my goodness. you sure it is not better to have a map? or am i too old—fashioned? however, let's just say the walk was not a pleasant experience. horn blares. blimey o'reilly! and we were not the only ones trying to make it on foot. i am starting to feel like i have made a terrible decision here. i am really starting to regret my route here.
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i don't think it's really working. i think we need to find a better way to wellington heath. and someone has been working on that. if we just hold back a bit, we have another car coming here. this was a terrible idea. so a slow map? what is it? slow ways is a project to create a network of walking routes that connect all of great britain's town, cities and dozens of villages. all of great britain's town, cities and thousands of villages. this is daniel raven ellison, geographer, walker and the man behind the slow map of britain — an attempt to show the best, direct, safe, pleasant walking route between our towns and villages. surely, it's all on my phone these days? isn't it? well, when a lot of us use the typical navigation platforms we use for driving but for walking instead actually, they can take us down some pretty dodgy and unsavoury routes. you have been doing all of them, have you? well, during lockdown,
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about 700 people came together on the project and created 7,000 routes that stretch for 100,000 kilometres, which is the equivalent of 2.5 laps of the equator. these are your slow ways? exactly. so we've used ordnance survey maps to plot out these beautiful slow ways walking routes. we are here, and you can see this is a jaunt to get ourselves to worcester. so this is the theory that your volunteers have come up with? now it's got to be tested, i'm guessing? yeah, some of these routes just may not work in practice on the ground. so we need to find 10,000 people to help us walk 100,000 kilometres of slow ways routes. which takes us back to sue and nina, and plan b. i took out dan's map and took the new slow route, which took us away from the cars, through a hereford cider orchard. so let's just stop here for a second, shall we? this is the slow route and... better than my first one?
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yes, it is really nice, isn't it? it smells different and it sounds different and it is beautiful. nice underfoot. what did you think of my route? the original route, it would be kinder not to say! a huge improvement. this is what walking is all about for me, being out here in an apple orchard, birdsong — what more do you want? so, route one is a winner. just another 999,998 kilometres to go. david sillito, bbc news, ledbury. now it's time for a look at the weather. wet windy weather next week but until then it's relatively settled. we know there is a lot of cloud around so count yourself lucky if you see much in a way of sunshine and where there are breaks in the cloud. on the cool side for the time of year and where the cloud is thickest there are outbreaks of rain even though its high pressure it is
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far enough away around the area of hybrid bringing cloud of the north—easterly breeze bringing some showers. the breeze direction is why things are quite cool at the moment. most likely to see these showers are patchy rain and drizzle through parts of northern england and midlands pushing into wales, summoned to northern ireland as we go through the rest of the day. parts of northern england brighten up parts of northern england brighten up on the best of the sunshine across southern england. western fringes of scotland, north and east scotla nd fringes of scotland, north and east scotland see light rain or drizzle. rain tonight keeping a lot of cloud, most likely to get a few breaks the further west in scotland, south—western south—west england and here have the lowest temperatures. some spots close to freezing into the morning but most of us and the rain is around a—8. the morning but most of us and the rain is around a—8 . all of this cloud as we start the day tomorrow there will be outbreaks of light rain or drizzle possible about anywhere, most likely into the afternoon affecting parts of northern and eastern scotland are
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northern england. a few showers from the channel islands. any limited sunny spells coming through the cloud tomorrow and temperatures still around 9—13. a few spots in southern england reach 1a and this is how saturday evening looks. quite damp in parts of scotland and northern england. an area of thicker cloud from east anglia and the midlands to worst england starting sunday could have light rain associated with it. north and south of that sunny spells coming through but as we end sunday we're likely to see outbreaks of rain pushing toward northern ireland north—west scotland. sunday looks cooler but into next week temperatures go up a few degrees. low pressure takes over we see rain come in and the rain picking up again. affecting parts of scotla nd picking up again. affecting parts of scotland and northern ireland initially, becoming more widespread through the week and some of the rain heavy at times. brisk winds. that's forecast.
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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines... lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. if we don't get to grips with the virus in three weeks' time, admissions to hospitals in lancashire will be at the height that they were when the peak was at its height. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. downing street says trade talks between the eu and uk are "over". borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a "no—deal" trade relationship at the end of the year. i concluded that we should get ready for january 1st with arrangements that are more like australia's,
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based on simple principles of globalfree trade. wales is facing a limited circuit—breaker lockdown which is expected to be announced in the next few days. and pubs and restaurants in northern ireland prepare to close their doors to sit—in customers as stricter restrictions come into force from six o'clock tonight. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. lancashire has become the latest area in england to be put into the highest coronavirus alert level after the government came to an agreement with local leaders. it becomes the second region after liverpool to face the toughest measures, with different households banned from mixing indoors or outdoors in hospitality venues
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or private gardens. it comes amid government criticism of the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, who is resisting efforts to put his area in the highest level, saying he wants more financial support for people affected. london, essex, york and parts of surrey, derbyshire and cumbria will move into the high alert level at midnight, meaning different households are not allowed to mix indoors. here's our political correspondentjessica parker. beautiful beaches, iconic buildings. but blackpool, like all of lancashire, is moving to the highest tier of restrictions from tomorrow. like everybody else in tier three, pubs and bars will close, but we managed to convince government that we've got sufficient measures in place to monitor the performance of leisure centres and gyms, so at this stage they won't be closing but obviously we've got to keep checking on them. for manchester, no destination has been arrived atjust yet. the mayor says plans for the area are flawed.
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the prime minister says... i am, i have to say, concerned about what is happening in manchester, where clearly the levels of infection are rising steeply, the levels of hospitalisation are rising steeply, and we do need to see action and, you know, you say i would much rather not impose things, i would much rather we were able to work out something together. but pressure continues on the prime minister's neighbour the chancellor for more financial support. one local leader in greater manchester says talks with the government have been respectful, but... they have not really been in negotiations. the government has been very much in the position of saying this is what is on offer, take it or we will impose it, basically, and we have had to say, you haven't got evidence that these measures are effective and we have evidence that suggests they won't be and there is certainly not enough
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financial compensation for people who have been put out of work, and businesses. downing street wants buy in from local leaders as it seeks to simplify the system with these local disease micro—alert levels but the talks have proved far from smooth so the process of setting new restrictions for some areas has become messier and more complicated. and a warning from one leading scientist against taking too piecemeal an approach. what we don't want now is a fragmentation, confusion, one area or region or city pitched against another. i think that would be very, very damaging to public health and the ability of the country to respond. in lancashire leaders say they have extra cash to help businesses. it is targeted action, they want to avoid a national lockdown. that may provike comparisons as different areas which different deals. jessica parker, bbc news. lord o neill, jim o'neill, led a group promoting
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the northern powerhouse and served as a treasury mininster in the david cameron years. let's speak to him now. good afternoon. what do you think about this stand—off between the government and local leaders in the north of england? well, it is a mess and it is very awkward. i would think the government would have to do more lateral thinking that they have done in the past few months because below the surface here is the whole thing that their domestic agenda was based around, so called levelling up. people should remember that the prime minister's first two visits anywhere outside of london if i recall correctly were to manchester and rotherham, where he was talking a lot about levelling up and the importance of the northern powerhouse. and yet this is not an
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isolated incident. if you look at the fiasco over education a few months ago it was northern schoolchildren who were on the verge of suffering more before they reversed course. i can of suffering more before they reversed course. i can understand why many northern areas are saying if you want us to go into tier three, give us the right incentives so we will not immediately force more people to lose their livelihoods and jobs. on that basis i have to say i have some sympathy with them. as you know, lancashire has done a deal with the government and they say they have been given a sum of money to help people who will be affected by these measures and thatis be affected by these measures and that is what people cannot understand. if lancashire can get some money, why not greater manchester? it is only the afternoon, i would manchester? it is only the afternoon, iwould imagine behind—the—scenes or otherwise there are ongoing conversations. if one we re are ongoing conversations. if one were to try and think about this in a bigger picture optimistic sense, maybe this is a reality check about devolution. the government,
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including the one preceding this, talked a lot about these kind of concepts and clearly they have not thought it through. you cannotjust say you are in favour of devolution and then not actually do anything about it. if they really want to encourage the concept, and i am a huge believer in it as part of the northern powerhouse agenda, they should be handing over greater powers and more money, particularly on things like testing and tracing where at the moment it seems at the moment this is part of the bargaining chip. if you go into tier three, you can have more responsibility on test and trace. but if you approached it more strategically you would want to give responsibility locally to stop the regions' infection rates getting to the kind of level in which some of these northern places are currently in. hopefully it will result in a more substantive process and thinking about the whole devolution agenda, if one wanted to be an optimist. do you think the
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government has not been agile enough in adapting and northern powerhouse attitude when it comes to dealing with local leaders over the coronavirus crisis is a mark that maybe it had an idea of the northern powerhouse being about rail lines, for example? i think that is a really good point. on one level it is easy to default to that, including the government that i was pa rt including the government that i was part of temporarily. it is so attractive to think in terms of big, fa ncy attractive to think in terms of big, fancy infrastructure projects. but asi fancy infrastructure projects. but as i often said then and since many times, you can put in place whatever new, shiny railways you want, but u nless new, shiny railways you want, but unless you deal with the skills, technology and education agenda and deal with the basic underlying issues, they will not matter. i do not think the government, certainly not think the government, certainly not all government departments, have thought about this in any serious
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detail whatsoever. as this showing, they need to their attitude. more broadly and for longer term issues about how the country operates, it gives this impression that people in whitehall and westminster just gives this impression that people in whitehall and westminsterjust do not understand local and subtle differences and challenges that we see around the country. they need to change the way they approach these things. go on then, as a former conservative treasury minister, a critical friend, what would you be saying to the government to do now? i would like to emphasise in that regard i did go into that position as an independent minded person, even though i was a minister. as an independent minded person, even though i was a ministerlj stand corrected. it was a conservative government but i was not a member of the conservative party and have not been since or before. i would tell them to stop and pause mentally and think, are you really in favour of the northern
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powerhouse concept? and are you really in favour of devolution? if you are, be serious about it. be serious about making sure the technology is there in parts of this country, or support local areas to haveit country, or support local areas to have it themselves and give them the money to support it. be serious about education and skills and do not just keep making about education and skills and do notjust keep making noises about how much in favour you are without actually introducing the stimulus, and more importantly in this specific incidence, the actual incentives to get local authorities and the mayoral bodies on board. lord o'neill, the independent lord o'neill, many thanks. many thanks. many thanks. let's look more at how the new measures will impact london's hospitality industry. i'm joined byjoe curran who is the landlord of the queen's head pub in soho. good afternoon. so, london tonight
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is going to go into the high alert level of restrictions. what does that mean for your pub? it is another knock to the trade. we are in the middle of soho, so this tier of lockdown means only local residents will go to pubs, it will not be people travelling in from other parts of the country, other parts of london, to come to the pub. it is going to be hard. we have to think about these lockdown restrictions, also we are just starting to see other parts of the country looking at tier three and you get very little time to prepare for these restrictions, change the operation and assess the viability. we are interior two and we have got to start thinking about tier three.
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really, so you are going to prepare for that. what sort of changes have you had to make to the pub for a tiered two and what will you have to do for tier three? two is about making sure that people arrive from the same address, which is difficult. you ask a customer whether they are from the same house and a group of six people all want a drink and your business is suffering. if you do not have the proof, you are responsible and you are liable. you are not allowed to let these people in. that is the difficulty of tier two. tier three is about how many people you will lose. we do not have enough residence in soho to sustain the amount of pubs being open, so you
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will have a lot of empty pubs. going back to what you are saying about asking a group of six people whether they are in the same address. will you be doing that systematically from tonight? yes, that is what we have been told to do, they are the instructions we have been given and thatis instructions we have been given and that is what we will carry out. as eve ryo ne a cross that is what we will carry out. as everyone across the uk has done, we have followed these restrictions. how do you feel about having to police the restrictions? we will do our part to help the national effort. what we want in return for thatis effort. what we want in return for that is a bit of respect, a bit of a heads up when the next announcement will be made. we want a couple of weeks to prepare. when the pubs reopened there was not a lot of time. they reopen on friday and there were knee jerk reactions trying to scramble a changed operation very quickly with few resources to do this. we know this
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isa resources to do this. we know this is a process going through to the other side of this lockdown. we knew the school is reopening and the universities reopening would have an effect. we would have accepted some restrictions to help that effort. if we knew that would happen then we go back to serving hospitality and serving inside ten years. to leave it there. joe curran, the landlord of the primaquine's head in soho in london. and join us for a bbc news special later this afternoon when borisjohnson will be holding a news conference. we'll be bringing you that live on bbc one and the bbc news channel from 3.a5. the rapid increase in coronavirus infections across the uk has been mirrored over much of europe. millions of people on the continent have been told to live under strict new measures, with deaths from the virus now exceeding a thousand a day. the world health organization has warned tough restrictions are "absolutely necessary"
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to save lives. here's richard galpin. across many parts of europe now cases of coronavirus are rising rapidly. the result of a potent second wave of the virus hitting the region. here in france, there has been a big jump in the number of daily cases, which was already high. they have now gone up from around 22,000 a day, to more than 30,000, a new record. with a night—time curfew in paris now and eight other cities, coming into force tomorrow, businesses are having to shut down, the situation bleak. translation: with this nine o'clock curfew we cannot afford to do a service. because we start our service at 7:30pm. dinner services usually end at around 10:30pm. so, so it is impossible for us to tell our clients at 8:30pm, you have to leave. in spain, it's a similar story.
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cases hitting more than 13,000 a day, the second highest daily count since late june. the evolving epidemiological situation in europe raises great concern. daily numbers of cases are up, hospital admissions are up, and covid is now the fifth leading cause of death, and the bar of 8000 deaths per day has now been reached. looking at this party on wednesday night in the netherlands, it is perhaps no surprise cases have been rising in europe, particularly amongst the young. people here determined to socialise in large groups, right up to the last minute when measures came into force, closing bars, restaurants and coffee shops, apart from takeaway, and limiting the number of guests allowed in the home. richard galpin, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news... lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. downing street says trade talks between the eu and uk are "over". borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a "no—deal" trade relationship at the end of the year. downing street has said trade talks with the european union are over and there's no point in them continuing unless there's a fundamental change in the eu's position. this morning, boris johnson said the uk should get ready for a no deal. eu leaders have been meeting in brussels to take stock of negotiations. mrjohnson had previously set the summit as a final
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deadline for a deal. nick beake reports. europe's leaders gathered once again in person, despite covid, having sent london an ultimatum. you need to give ground first if there is to be a brexit trade deal. this lunchtime, borisjohnson hit back, saying the uk should now prepare for no deal. given that this summit appears explicitly to rule out a ca nada—style deal, i concluded that we should get ready forjanuary the 1st with arrangements that are more like australia's, based on simple principles of global free trade. the prime minister claimed once again that would be a good outcome for britain. after a5 years of membership, they are not willing, unless there is some fundamental change of approach, to offer this country the same terms as canada. and so, with high hearts
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and with complete confidence, we will prepare to embrace the alternative, and we will prosper mightily as an independent, free—trading nation controlling our own borders, ourfisheries, and setting our own laws. back in brussels, eu leaders, who have all been stepping up anti—covid measures at home, will have noted that borisjohnson did not say the uk was walking away from talks. the german leader, speaking before mrjohnson's announcement, had spot had struck a more optimistic note. translation: we have asked the united kingdom to remain open to compromise so that an agreement can be reached. this, of course, means that we, too, will need to make compromises. each side has its red lines. dramatic language has often swirled around these brexit talks and, despite the prime minister's latest declaration, eu negotiators say they will be back in london next week, hoping to agree a deal.
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nick beake, bbc news, brussels. our political correspondent jonathan blake has the latest from westminster. the prime minister's spokesman in the last hour has gone further than borisjohnson himself did this morning, saying that the first thing to say is that the trade talks are over. the eu have effectively ended them by saying they do not want to change their negotiating position. and going on to say in a briefing with reporters, that there is only any point in michel barnier coming to london next week, and that is what we had been expecting to happen, if he is prepared to address all the issues on the basis of a legal text in what he described as an accelerated way, without the uk required to make all the moves or to discuss the practicalities of travel and haulage. if not, he said, there is no point in coming. so while earlier on borisjohnson
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is no point in coming. so while earlier on boris johnson left is no point in coming. so while earlier on borisjohnson left the door open to further negotiation and did not say he was walking away from the process, that the eu would be fundamentally required to change its position if negotiations were to continue, his spokesman has now declared that the talks, as far as downing street are concerned at least, are over. now, that does not kill the process that i don't think. it does still leave the possibility open forfurther it does still leave the possibility open for further negotiations and it may well be that michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator, that still come to london as planned this week. but it isa to london as planned this week. but it is a very clear signal even given all the rhetoric involved and the gameplaying that we know goes on by both sides throughout these negotiations, a very clear signal that downing street is expecting a shift in the eu's position if it is going to do a deal of any kind here. and it will have to be on one of those key issues and they are, as we
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know, the issue of fishing and access to uk waters by vessels from eu member states, and also state aid, the amount of subsidy that government can give to businesses and the rules that apply to that. so definitely upping the ante, both sides, but downing street putting down the clear market today that it is, as faras down the clear market today that it is, as far as they are concerned, the eu that needs to shift. we have had reaction to the prime minister's comments earlier on from rachel reeves, the labour party's shadow cabinet office minister, urging the uk to keep talking. i would urge the government even at this late stage to stop posturing, start negotiating properly, it is not too late to get a deal that british business needs, and especially right now when we are facing a deep recession and going through a global pandemic. this is not the time to create further
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uncertainty, further costs and further bureaucracy to british businesses. this is incredibly damaging, incredibly dangerous. the government must step back from the brink. in response to the prime minister's comments earlier in the head of the european commission, ursula von delaine, said as planned the negotiation team will go to london next week to intensify these negotiations. we will have to see what their responses to this further statement from street, but at every stage in this process deadlines have come and gone and negotiations have nearly always gone down to the wire. scotland's first minister, nicola surgeon, was asked for her reaction to the prime ministers comments on the brexit talks. i feel deeply frustrated and depressed at the prospect of no deal at the end of the transition period in december. that said, we have got to be realistic. any deal that is struck right now would be such a bare minimum deal that there is going to be disruption at the end of
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this year. i think that is now inescapable. i find it this year. i think that is now inescapable. ifind it very, very frustrating that at a time when all of us should be seeking to do as much as i can, giving 100% and our energy to covid, the british government, and governments across the uk, are beginning to think about the uk, are beginning to think about the prospects of brexit, where the implications of that are potentially huge. am i confident we can cope? we will do everything we can to deal with the implications of that, but make no mistake, resources are finite and every civil servant and every hour of my time that has to be spent right now thinking of the implications of a no—deal brexit or a bare minimum deal brexit is an hour of my time that is not focused as it should be and try to steer the country through the covid pandemic. i feel deeply depressed about the
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brexit situation and i think that is because it is unavoidable. i am not going into other things, but at the start of this pandemic i, too no doubt the dismay of some people, in my base of supporters, i said the planning i might have been doing for constitutional matters that i support was put on pause and on hold because this had to take all of my time and attention. the uk government could have done that with brexit and said we are asking for an extension to the transition so we do not have to worry about these things until we are out of covid. it did not do that and that is a matter of real frustration and depression, not do that and that is a matter of realfrustration and depression, and not just because i realfrustration and depression, and notjust because i am an opponent of brexit, everybody knows that, it is because we do not need another big thing to be dealing with when all of us should be focusing on the covid priority that lies ahead of us.
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this is what we lost in the first lockdown from 23rd of march through until 13th ofjuly. due to yesterday's announcement this is what we have lost so far. we fully expect to lose all this. and at least that. lucy miller's glamping and self—catering holiday rentals are on anglesey, one of few places in wales that is not in a local lockdown. she says the overwhelming majority of her clients come from the north—west of england, a covid hotspot and from this evening areas with high levels of the virus in other parts of the uk will be banned by law from entering wales. the hospitality industry is the lifeblood of north wales. cutting that off is going to have long—term, far—reaching
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effects on people's livelihoods and businesses. so many companies are going to go bust. those living in places like wrexham, already under local restrictions, are banned from leaving their area and it is illegal to enter another area under lockdown without a valid excuse. the welsh government say the enforcement of this new travel ban will be the same as how they have dealt with those breaking local lockdown measures here — fines and sending people home. and where is home? the first minister has promised extra police patrols on the border. however the police federation and some opposition parties say this approach is unenforceable. it is due to come into force this evening and the welsh government have already been planning more stringent measures as the number of covid—related hospital transmission have risen by almost 50% in a week. the bbc understands that wales
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is just days away from announcing another national lockdown. the first minister has just announced in a press conference that he has begun planning with all the local authorities in wales. this would be a short, sharp, shock to the virus which could turn back the clock, slowing down its spread and buying us more time. it is a prospect being met with mixed views. i think it will probably be a very good thing for a couple of weeks just to dampen down the virus spread. i think we could do other restrictions that perhaps it would be easier to live with, that maybe would not affect us in such a harsh way. the number of covid hospital admissions have risen by almost 50% in a week, so increased measures are looking more certain to be announced next week,
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but the questions from unions, industries and the public are, how strict will they be, and for how much longer? tomos morgan, bbc news, menai bridge. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. mostly cloudy weekend is on the way and it will be on the cool site with light rain or drizzle in some spots. light showers in parts of northern england, the midlands, pushing into wales and northern ireland. southern england seeing the best of the sunny spells. temperatures a few degrees below average for this time of year. a lot of cloud across the uk overnight. damp and drizzly in some places. clear spells in scotland. some places may end up close to freezing in the morning. most of us under the cloud well above freezing. there will be patchy like rain and drizzle, most likely in the
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afternoon for parts of scotland and northern england. only limited sunny spells coming through all of this cloud. light winds and no change in temperatures on saturday. sunday looks a little bit cooler. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans
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on households mixing indoors. if we don't get to grips with the virus in three weeks' time, admissions to hospitals in lancashire will be at the height that they were when the peak was at its height. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and the 8th, new figures suggest. downing street says trade talks between the eu and uk are "over." borisjohnson says the uk must prepare for a "no—deal" trade relationship at the end of the year. i concluded that we should get ready for january 1st with arrangements that are more like australia's, based on simple principles of globalfree trade. wales is facing a limited "circuit breaker lockdown" which is expected to be announced in the next few days. and pubs and restaurants in northern ireland prepare to close their doors to sit
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in customers, as stricter restrictions come into force from six o'clock tonight. a four—week style lockdown comes into force tonight across northern ireland. pubs and restaurants will close for four weeks, with the exception of takeaways and deliveries, whilst schools will shut for two weeks. non—professional sport involving mixing households will be banned, but gyms can remain open for individual training, although no classes are permitted. let's talk now to tina mckenzie, who's the chief executive of the federation of small businesses northern ireland. good afternoon to you. what is your reaction as you face another four weeks partial lockdown?” reaction as you face another four weeks partial lockdown? i think it's really worrying for small business and the small business community here. which takes up most of the economy in northern ireland. more people are employed in small businesses than the whole of the
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public sector and big business put together. small business owners are very worried about the fact that they have taken loans, had grants, spent a lot of money on premises making them safe. and with a couple of days notice they have to close down and unfortunately this support package available just doesn't cut it for them. what is the extent of the support package? very, very little. if you are a small business and you are in premises, then you can get about £800 per week and then it goes up to if you are a large business, £1600 per week and the people employed in those businesses there is nothing for them other than there is nothing for them other than the gss scheme already available, the gss scheme already available, the new furlough scheme, and that really isn't working very well at all for small businesses at the moment. —— jss. all for small businesses at the moment. -- jss. what do you feel the impact might be of this four week
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partial lockdown? listening to members they have used up a lot of their reserves already and were quite positive about the fact coming into the busiest time of the year even though it is a covid—19 year coming up to christmas and i think people are just despondent, feeling left behind, they understand the government have to make some very difficult choices, and are fully supportive around those difficult choices around health but they are absolutely devastated by the lack of financial assistance that has been thought out. we have known for months that could be a second covid—19 increase and it doesn't seem covid—19 increase and it doesn't seem like the politicians have really ta ke n seem like the politicians have really taken the time to really plan out what measures would be in place for businesses, how can we make it clear, how can we communicate with them ina clear, how can we communicate with them in a timely manner? it seems they have been caught on the hoof again. what sort of support package would you like to see being put in place? we need to see a support package that covers people for example that don't have premises, if you think of the tradespeople out
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there and don't have shops and we need to cover people in the supply chain, so we're looking like we will cover those people who are named on a list like hairdressers, pubs and restau ra nts a list like hairdressers, pubs and restaurants but what about the suppliers that are going to be hit by those businesses closing? i think we have got to look the amount of money, i have to say we found 800 million to support the banks when they needed, we need to find much more than what has been offered which is less than what we gave the banks by far, to help our economy stay alive, especially in the time of brexit. it's the case that the furlough scheme which is more generous than the neat newjob support scheme goes on for another couple of weeks. you have the old furlough scheme running off and the new one coming in, but when you think about it, both for the people employed and the employers, the employers can decrease the errors of the time the person is working, but actually they need to pay nearly 50%
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of the costs. —— decrease the hours. that doesn't make business sense. it's like paying somebody to half day for one day and then the individual, i am worried about the amount of people in the country that are going to be asked to work with sometimes less than the minimum wage and we should have a minimum on that, we should be at least paying people the minimum wage through this period. 0k, good to talk to you, thank you very much. thank you. we are waiting on a downing street press co nfe re nce we are waiting on a downing street press conference from the prime minister. we will be guiding you through that from 3:a5pm. in just a few minutes. more now on the news that
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borisjohnson says the uk must now prepare for a no—deal brexit. the prime minister says unless there's a "fundamental change in approach" from the european union, then the uk will go for the "australia solution" from january. he's been speaking in the past hour. since we delivered in the largest democratic mandate we have obeyed eu law, paid fees as a nonvoting member. working on the future relationship we hope to enjoy with our friends relationship we hope to enjoy with ourfriends and relationship we hope to enjoy with our friends and partners from january. from the outset we were totally clear that we wanted nothing more complicated than a canada style relationship, based on friendship and free trade. to judge by the latest eu summit in brussels, that won't work for our eu partners. they want the continued ability to control our legislative freedom,
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our fisheries, in a way that is completely unacceptable to an independent country, and since we have only ten weeks until the end of the transition period on january the 1st, i have to make a judgement about the likely outcome and to get us already. and to get us all ready. and given that they have refused to negotiate seriously for much of the last few months and given that this summit appears explicitly to rule out a canada—style deal, i have concluded that we should get ready forjanuary the 1st with arrangements that are more like australia's, based on simple principles of globalfree trade. and we can do it, because we always knew that there would be change on january the 1st, whatever type of relationship we had, and so now is the time for our businesses to get ready and for our hauliers to get ready, for our travellers to get ready,
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and of course we are willing to discuss the practicalities with our friends where progress has been made for or want to get ready. and of course we are willing to discuss the practically practicalities with our friends on issues such as aviation, nuclear and so on. but for whatever reason, it is clear from the summit that after a5 years of membership they are not willing, unless there is some fundamental change in approach, to offer this country the same terms as canada. and so with high hearts and with complete confidence, we will prepare to embrace the alternative and we will prosper mightily as an independent free—trading nation, controlling our own borders, ourfisheries, and setting our own laws. and, in the meantime, the government will, of course, be focusing on tackling covid and building back better so that 2021 is a year of recovery and renewal. thank you very much.
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couple of questions. you said you would walk away if there was not significant progress by now. it does not sound like that is what you are doing. clarify why you are not walking away? as far as i can see, they have abandoned the idea of a free—trade deal. there does not seem to be any progress coming from brussels so what we're saying them is only come here, come to us if there is some fundamental change of approach. otherwise we are more than happy to talk about the practicalities that i described. social security issues, and so on. u nless social security issues, and so on. unless there is a fundamental change in approach, we are going to go for the australia solution and we should do it with great confidence as i said, high hearts confidence because we can do it. there was always going to be change onjanuary the 1st but it's become clear the eu do not want to do the type of canada deal that, you know, we originally asked for. it does seem curious that after a5
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yea rs of it does seem curious that after a5 years of they can offer canada terms they will not offer us. you say they need to come to you with fresh ideas about negotiations. are you saying you are walking away or not walking away? if there is a fundamental change in approach of course we are a lwa ys change in approach of course we are always willing to listen, but it didn't seem particularly encouraging from the summit in brussels. yesterday and today. en covid-19 are you willing to impose restrictions on places like greater manchester?” would much rather we are able to do things with the help, support, leadership of local authorities and i pay leadership of local authorities and i pay tribute to liverpool, city region, lancashire, that came on board today with the teasing system —— three tier system. you see the
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mayor of london come on board as well and that's very important because clearly if you are going to enforce these measures and do proper local testing and tracing, get a local testing and tracing, get a local bayern and compliance and local bayern and compliance and local leadership is crucial and we wa nt to local leadership is crucial and we want to work with local leaders, but iam,i want to work with local leaders, but iam, i have to want to work with local leaders, but i am, i have to say, concerned about what's happening in manchester. where clearly the levels of infection are rising steeply, the levels of hospitalisation are rising steeply, and we do need to see action. you see, i would much rather not impose things, i would much rather that we were able to work out something together with local authorities, the mayor in manchester but it's up to local leaders to show the kind of leadership that we have seen the kind of leadership that we have seenin the kind of leadership that we have seen in liverpool, in lancashire, and in london. lastly you say it is up and in london. lastly you say it is up to local leaders but you could break the stalemate by offering the money they want which are similar to the financial assistance during the first national lockdown. why don't
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you think it's a reasonable request? asi you think it's a reasonable request? as i say, other local who have come forward and joined in the teasing system showing the leadership that i think is system showing the leadership that necessary. this is about us joining together locally and nationally to get to the r down, these regional restrictions this three tier system work and to save lives and i think everybody in greater manchester and all the areas which are still difficult should think about it.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. i'm jane hill. in the next few minutes we'll bring you the latest coronavirus briefing from the government led by the prime minister. but first the headlines. lancashire becomes the second english region to be put into the highest alert level of coronavirus restrictions, meaning pub closures and bans on households mixing indoors. if we don't get to grips with the virus in three weeks' time, the admissions to hospitals in lancashire will be at the height that they were when the peak was at its height. new coronavirus cases in england jumped by 50% between october 2nd and 8th, new figures suggest.

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