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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 28, 2020 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: a major search in the english channel, after a migrant boat heading for the uk sinks killing two adults and two children — the authorities believe more could still be missing. an appeal for clarity on the covid rules for christmas, with just one set of regulations for the whole of the uk. retailers say many of us are preparing unusually early the festive season. some shops are reporting record sales. i will be finding out what we're spending our money on. manchester city may be halfway down the premier league,
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but they're halfway to qualifying for the champions league knock—out stages, with two wins from two. danny dyer and daughter dani join forces to offer useful advice in a new podcast — but how helpful will they be? now the premise of it is, sort of with the dyers, is that we're sort of answering people's problems. but i just want to make it very, very clear today that we're not qualified to do that. good morning from the tower of london. we are going to be talking more ghost stories this morning, seeing the ravens having their brea kfast seeing the ravens having their breakfast about a quarter to eight, and it is a chilly start to the day, not just here and it is a chilly start to the day, notjust here in london. sunshine and showers, blustery conditions and large waves out in the west. details in ten minutes. good morning. it's wednesday, 28th october. our top story... a search operation is expected to continue in the english channel this morning, after a migrant boat sank off the coast of dunkirk yesterday.
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two children aged five and eight were killed, along with two adults. more than a dozen others were taken to hospital, but french authorities believe more could still be missing. andy moore reports. he speaks in french a large rescue operation was launched when the alarm was raised yesterday morning by a passing yacht. there were said to be 19 to 20 people on board the migrant boat when it capsized in choppy waters. at least 1a people were saved. a man and a woman, thought to be from iran, and two children, were confirmed dead. one casualty was found by helicopter, but there are believed to be others unaccounted for. translation: from what i understand there were about five miles from the coast. but i have no idea as to why this boat, which was a day fishing
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type boat, would have turned over. 8,500 migrants have been rescued from the channel since the start of this year. at least two have died, but this was the single biggest loss of life. borisjohnson said: but there are no easy answers to stopping the tragic and desperate people willing to pay large sums to get to the uk. this is an incredibly complex problem in a very high risk area, and the solution is also extremely complex. there are a number of things that we need to do, and we are working very closely with the french to redouble our efforts to end the viability of this route. migrant charities are calling on the french and british governments to do more. they say the english channel must
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not become a graveyard for children. andy moore, bbc news. our correspondent, simonjones, is in dover this morning. we are expecting that a search to continue, aren't we? good morning. good morning. yes, pretty choppy conditions in the english channel this morning. it was a bit like that yesterday morning when a group of 20 people set out from northern france. at least four people have lost their lives, 15 people remain in hospital and a search is going on for others who may still be missing. that was suspended overnight after darkness fell. we understand it will be stepped up again this morning. the reality is after such a long time from this boat capsizing, we are likely to be talking about a recovery operation rather than a rescue operation, if indeed there are people still out there in the english channel. earlier this year,
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during the summer, a couple of times on breakfast we took to the waters to see how dangerous this route is. we went out on a calm day. even then the boats were overloaded. in one case they were people on board bailing the boat out with the plastic container. those people managed to reach the uk safely, but it was calm yesterday in the channel. winds gusting up to 30 mph. politicians on this side of the channel say they will do everything they can to assist the french authorities with the investigation. that place has been made by the prime minister. but if charities say this needs to be a wake—up call to stop more tragedies like this that they have been predicting for a long time now. simon, thank you very much. whether throughout the morning. thank you. the leaders of the uk's four nations are being urged to agree on guidance to allow people to celebrate christmas safely with family and friends. the liberal democrats and the alliance party of northern ireland say
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the governments must accept it is inevitable people will travel during the festive period, including across borders. our political correspondentjessica parker is in westminster for us. good morning, jessica. what is the response to this? yeah, and quite an emotive topic as well because a lot of people will be wondering, what on earth is going to happen this christmas? there are no calls for the four leaders of the four nations to have some kind of summit to agree a plan. how can you get students back home from their universities? how can people travel safely as well? what will be ruled to be in terms of how many people you can have in a household? we have seen the four nations take different approaches on different issues. it does raise the question as to whether they can agree on some sort of plan going forward. in some senses christmas is not that far away, but i suppose in the sense of covid, where time feels a little bit warped at times, it is difficult to
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predict what will happen in the 25th of december. we have heard before from borisjohnson that his ambition is that families can spend christmas together, but he hasn't gone any further than that. but i think something leaders across all four nations will be aware of is a concern perhaps that if there isn't some kind of workable plan, you could see a lot of people potentially in the short—term doing obvious but widespread flouting of the rules because it is an emotional time and people do want to be with theirfamilies, time and people do want to be with their families, and whether that can have a longer term impact on public compliance. jessica, thank you very much for that. we will be speaking to ed davy from the liberal democrats later. baby clothes have been listed as essential items that should go on sale in supermarkets during wales‘ lockdown. the welsh government has updated its list of goods that can be sold by retailers during the firebreak lockdown. they have also said customers should be able to ask for non—essential items in exceptional circumstances. more than 67,000 people have signed a petition calling for a ban on non—essential
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items to be reversed. there's been a second night of violence in philadelphia, after the fatal shooting of a black man by police. residents have been told to avoid the city centre, after reports of mass looting by a mob of up to a thousand people. our north america correspondent, david willis, has the latest. david, what more can you tell us? good morning, louise. yes, another night of violence in philadelphia. hundreds of people have been looting businesses in the downtown part of the city. this after the police shooting of a 27—year—old black man, walter wallace, who was shot 14 times after he refused to drop a knife that he was wielding when officers went to investigate him on monday. mr wallacemy father has said that his son suffered from mental health issues. and that the police
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should have used a taser instead. the police department has said a lack of funding meant that the two officers involved in this incident didn't have access to a stage or a similar equipment. —— it to a taser. democratic contenderjoe biden and kamala harris have issued a statement condemning the death of mr wallace. they said there was no place for violence. he is, they said, wasa place for violence. he is, they said, was a black life that mattered. philadelphia is the largest city in pennsylvania, a key swing state going into next week's presidential election. donald trump has called for a return to law and order in america's inner cities. his rival, joe biden, has called for greater funding rival, joe biden, has called for greaterfunding for rival, joe biden, has called for greater funding for community policing in the inner cities. david willis, thank you. some of the world's longest and tightest covid—i9 restrictions have been lifted, in the australian state of victoria. five million people in melbourne can
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now return to shops, pubs, and restaurants for the first time in nearly four months. in recent days, no new cases have been reported. our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, reports. i now officially declare melbourne restaurant is open for business. cheering it is the moment they've waited months for. i'm so excited to enjoy my first pint of guinness. it's been far too long. it feels really surreal. we're in an uber. yeah, it feels like we're in an uber, but are we allowed to be in an uber? because usually you're not allowed to go anywhere. so this is like, "oh, what are you doing? !" i hope that we can hang onto this feeling that, you know, we're just grateful for even being able to come to our favourite restaurant, our neighbourhood pub again. this was unimaginable just a few weeks ago. customers flooding into shops that have been closed since august.
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what an exciting day to be able to open up to our melbourne customers. we've really been awaiting this today for very long, so a big day for us. but getting here hasn't been easy. this was one of the world's longest and strictest lockdowns. it devastated the local economy, but has been credited for containing the virus. it's not clear when people will be able to travel freely to and from victoria. here in new south wales the premier says the real test is going to be what happens with case numbers now that things are opening up. victoria was the epicentre of australia's second wave, and it will be a while before things get back to normal. for now, people are enjoying the simple pleasures they used to take for granted. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. let's get the weather with carol, who's at a rather spooky tower of london this morning.
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good morning. good morning. i can tell you it is a chilly start to the day if you haven't yet ventured out. look at my view. the tower of london in all its magnificence and splendour. i will have more ghost stories through the morning. yesterday we were at hampton court palace and we were actually talking about the ghost of anne boleyn and catherine howard. they were executed in here. more about that through the morning. it is 2 degrees in northern —— north east scotland at the moment. for many of us today the forecast is going to be one of some rain, some showers and also blustery winds and some big waves as well out towards the west. we are starting off with clear skies in central and eastern areas. there are showers already. as we go through the day some of those will be blown eastwards on the blustery winds. a better chance of seeing some dry
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conditions in the east. through the afternoon some of those showers will merge, especially through the midlands, the southeast and central and southern england. temperatures today ranging from about 11 to about i3 today ranging from about 11 to about 13 or 14 degrees. through this evening and overnight for a time, the showers will pepper up again. hale and thundery, clear skies as well. temperatures will fall away. at the end of the night the rain coming across northern ireland, south—west scotland, through wales and south—west england. through tomorrow that is going to be romping steadily towards the east. behind that, there will be a return to some sunshine and some showers. some of those showers will be heavy and thundery once again and still quite blustery winds. a quick heads up for the weekend. the weekend is looking like it is going to be pretty windy. we got the remnants of another hurricane getting tied up in an area of low pressure in the atlantic.
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also sunday and monday as well. at first there will be gales, even severe gales. so many things i want to ask you. you said ravens for breakfast, what time? having their breakfast! about a quarter to eight. that will be a treat. excellent. i will be a quarter to eight. that will be a treat. excellent. iwill be there for that. thank you very much for that. i am looking forward to more spooky stories. that was the most important question. raven news, there is your revenues. —— raven news. let's take a look at today's papers. tragedy in the channel is the headline for the daily mail, which leads with the news that two young children and two adults have died, after a boat carrying migrants sank off the coast of northern france. the guardian says calls for a national lockdown are growing. the paper also reports that leeds teaching hospitals nhs trust has had to cancel some non—urgent operations, because of an increase in covid hospital admissions.
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the telegraph says a projection, provided by sage advisors, shows deaths peaking at a lower level than in the spring, but then remaining at this level for longer. the paper also reports that the prime minister is under pressure to enforce stricter restrictions. and the sun online are reporting that sir mo farah will be one of the of the contestants in the latest series of i'm a celebrity get me out of here. the show will be set in wales this year. do you know when it is going to be on? idid do you know when it is going to be on? i did see when it started. i didn't see the date. but i saw the properties, the prices of property around the castle in wales, have shut up in the last few days. yes, huge interest. we need a bit of a release. what have you got, louise? i've got a story about katherine jenkins. i do sing at home and my
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children often don't want me to! her voice is loved by millions but she has admitted that her children would rather she kept it to herself. she has got two children who are five and two. the cheeky youngsters a p pa re ntly and two. the cheeky youngsters apparently beg her to pipe down when she burst into song at home. she jokes, there is a lot of singing in oui’ jokes, there is a lot of singing in our house despite my children telling me, no singing today, mummy, it's too loud. she gets told of quite often. she gets told off?! even though you have got a beautiful pipes, louise... do you know the new borat film? a u—turn on the issue of gags. kazakhstan, officially he is from kaza khsta n kazakhstan, officially he is from kazakhstan and his catchphrase is very nice. you might remember the first film with sacha baron cohen was actually banned in the former soviet country because they said it was going to be showing them off in a bad light, joked about the wine
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being horse you're in. and kaza khsta n being horse you're in. and kazakhstan banned the film because they felt it was racist and sexist and shown to be a primitive nation. now they are actually using his phrase in an ad campaign. they actually apologised to him because there was a huge boost in tourism after that. the official kazakhstan tourist board have got various films of people around the country using his very nice catchphrase. they have done a complete u—turn and are embracing the gag and using it to promote kazakhstan. look at this house. this is from the sun. it is about halloween. this is highcroft house of horror, a showcase of skeletons, cobwebs and plans. there are quite a few houses dressed up. one halloween fun has been asked to remove his spooky house decorations because it is too scary for children. also today, and a less scary note, we are asking people to send us pictures of
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autumnal leaves. we are going to show some of your pictures today. and i think ghost story —wise, carol had some beauties yesterday at hampton court. i don't know if she has got any more today but she has got ravens. there's less than a week to go in the us presidential election campaign, but how much has gun control dominated the debate? more than two years ago, a mass shooting at a school in parkland sparked a passionate campaign for tougher gun laws. our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal, has been to meet some of the people who were affected. yo. it's me. a voice from beyond the grave. i've been gone for two years and nothing has changed, bro. joaquin oliver was murdered at his school in parkland. he's been brought to life by virtual reality. vote for people not getting shot, bro. i mean, vote for me because i can't. this is our son, this is his activism, this is his fight. his parents are committed
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to a lifelong campaign, a voice on behalf of their murdered son. we talked about the vegas shooting after it happened and then we talked about the pulse nightclub in orlando shooting. and he was very disappointed about a system that was not able to fix that. and then, a few months later, it happened to him. 17 people died that day in one of the most devastating school shootings in america. but in this election season, if you travel across states like florida and beyond, you find passion about guns and the right to own one still run high. americans own most of the world's civilian weapons. the right to keep and bear arms is protected by the constitution in the second amendment. it's a higher capacity shot gun. and guns are big business. with covid coming about, we had a very, very significant increase of sales.
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then we had the civil unrest, so that increased sales. now we have an election, which kind of keeps fire burning. we enjoy habits like golf and tennis. we spend a lot of money on toys that we play with. we don't necessarily mean any harm. and like the rest of america, president trump and joe biden couldn't be further apart when it comes to gun control. donald trump sastoe biden will take away people's second amendment rights. joe biden says he won't but wants more gun control. what happened here in parkland mobilised a generation in a way that hadn't been seen before. this wasn't the first mass shooting, it wasn't the first school shooting, but it took students here all the way to washington. 20—year—old ryan deitsch survived the parkland shooting and organised a huge protest with other students, calling for tighter gun regulations. as far as the eye could see, just a horde of people. it was a tremendous and amazing scene.
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two years on, there's been little change. this going to take a long, long time. i don't even expect it to come, regardless of who wins this presidency. it is not something to be expected, it is something to be fought for. it is something to be lobbied for, something to be protested for. it's a fight that we are willing to have because it's a fight worth winning. in this deeply divided nation, the issue of gun rights defines which side you're on and, in such a polarising election, it's unlikely any politician will be able to bridge that divide. we've all been valuing our green spaces a little bit more this year, and as autumn gets underway you may have noticed a spectacular array of colours on our trees. i almost go driving just to look at the trees. very sad. it's particularly vivid this year,
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thanks to the sunny weather of the spring and the rain in september. one beautiful display is in stourhead in wiltshire, so we sent breakfast'sjohn maguire to take in the views. at this time of the year the lake at stourhead offers one of the finest views in the whole of the national trust. but we're in search of a different perspective. one from above. so the best way to appreciate the autumn leaves is to get right in amongst them, 100 feet high, up this tulip tree. i've never climbed a tree this way before. the foot extenders go a little bit longer. there is a little buckle on it. well, it's a lot harder than i thought it was going to be. i'm absolutely exhausted. but as with a lot of things in life, the hard work is met with a great reward. the view above the tree tops here is just absolutely stunning. look at that. joe ashman is a tree surgeon and looks after the estate's most precious resource.
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joe, so this is your office, this is where you hang out? it is, yeah. i look after the trees, basically. managing trees and managing the form and the structure of the trees, you can prolong its life considerably really. so as they grow older, they do kind of get too big for themselves. they can start falling apart as they get older. so we can reduce weight here and there. the trust have predicted a spectacular autumn for leaf colour and the trees haven't disappointed. the weather this year, so problematic for so many, has proved golden for leaves. very often it's quite difficult to predict autumn colour, but it tends to be the years when the trees are happy. i mean, it's a strange word to use for trees, but when they have had a lot of sunshine during the summer, there is plenty of water in the soil, so they're not stressed. you get that complex chemistry going on in the leaves, creating all these lovely pigments that we've got around us now. the tree is shutting down for the winter.
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and part of that process is a controlled loss of leaves, and it needs to withdraw some of the valuable chemicals and sugars back into the tree before it loses them. covid has meant a cap on numbers here at stourhead, and at properties and gardens across the trust's estates. it'll mean a fall in revenue of around £200 million. and there is another disease causing major problems. ash dieback is ravaging ash trees throughout the uk. we are climbing again, this time using the 205 steps inside king alfred's tower to give us a bird's eye view of the forest. oh, you can see forever! you can. if we look outside of the tower you can see the effect it is having to the surrounding landscape. i don't think it's going to be particularly devastating to the garden. but where it will make a big difference is on our tenant farms. for the last 30 or a0 years, it's been used as hedgerow planting,
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because it doesn't shade out the crops, so it's been very useful for that. it's going to be as bad as dutch elm, i think. that's what the prediction is going to be. green spaces have been vital in helping so many people to cope with the pandemic. and as some of the green turns golden, or red, there is still so much solace thanks to the beauty of nature. john maguire, bbc news, wiltshire. just lovely. you have been enjoying that. mesmerised by it. throughout that. mesmerised by it. throughout that entire package louise has been going, told you it was nice, look at those pictures! we'll be talking about these beautiful autumn leaves throughout the programme — and we want to see some of your pictures. some of you have already sent in your photos — keep them coming in. that is nice. i knew it was a story! absolutely wonderful. keep them coming in. i have had some in the last few moments. you can email them to
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bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. and i particularly am going to enjoy them. a lot of people agreeing with you, saying they divert their drive to go through wherever the beautiful trees are, look at the colours. there is a particular driver like going on, and there is a walk as well for the beech trees are perfect. maybe we have hit on something today. i think we might be inundated with pictures. you're watching breakfast. coming up in the next half hour... i'm a big dan, obviously. and she's little dan. very simple process. and it works lovely. we'll hear how the dyers have handled lockdown and why they're trying to solve your problems in their new podcast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london. i'm katharine carpenter. the police watchdog has criticised the way in which officers in london carry out stop and search, saying the met must ensure they don't make decisions based on stereotypes or racial bias. the independent office for police conduct investigated five stop and searches involving black men and says poor communication and use of force has damaged confidence in the met. the force has accepted all 11 recommendations and says it's committed to ensuring stop and search is conducted professionally. a mural of a man who died in police custody has been removed, despite a plea from his family. kevin clarke was restrained by officers during a mental health crisis and died in 2018 — his image was painted on hoardings oppostite lewisham police station. mr clarke's mother says she devastated but developer balfour beatty which owns the site says it did consult before removing the work. a stables in teddington is providing comfort to riders with disabilities who've been told
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they can't attend their usual lessons during the coronavirus pandemic. park lane stables is holding covid—secure sessions, where participants can care for its horses and maintain contact with them at a time when they're missing out on other organised activities. we call it wellies and well—being. they help us to take care of the horses and they groom the horses and feed the horses. we're outside and we're able to maintain the social distancing. we don't need to be hands—on with our participants to deliver this, like we would with our riding and carriage driving. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning, apart from minor delays on the district line and severe delays on the piccadilly lines. in westminster, victoria street is closed westbound due to a burst water main, affecting traffic between parliament square and victoria station. it's very slow on the mi coming into london; the motorway is down to one lane beetwenji3 and ji2 due
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to over runnng roadworks now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. generally starting on a dry note this morning across london and the south—east. some early sunshine as well but we've got some showers out towards the west, starting to move towards us through the morning. at first, a lot of dry weather but in the middle part of the afternoon, the showers could well band together to bring longer spells of rain for a time. also they could be heavy and thundery but there will be some dry weather mixed in, too, and some sunshine at times. a blustery old day, top temperature somewhere around 13, 11! celsius. typically it will feel quite cool. this evening and overnight, the showers clear away and then we are dry and clear into the start of tomorrow. but it won't take long before the next wet weather system moves towards us. another frontal band of rain, a longer spell of rain in the middle part of tomorrow just moving across us. behind it though, much, much warmer air for friday. you'll certainly notice it into the start of friday. friday itself, a lot of dry weather
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around with some sunshine as well. make the most of it, it's fairly blustery and wet again the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 06:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... how hard has the pandemic hit heathrow? with results out this morning we'll be speaking to the airport's boss. we'll discuss the best ways to celebrate the festive season as the government faces calls to clarify guidance for christmas. and he's been nicknamed "the flying fish." we'll hear from former paratrooper john bream, who has attempted a new record byjumping a0 metres
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from a helicopter into the sea. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a rescue operation is expected to continue in the english channel this morning, after a migrant boat sank off the coast of dunkirk yesterday. two children aged five and eight were killed, along with two adults. more than a dozen others were taken to hospital, but french authorities believe more could still be missing. the prime minister has pledged the uk will offer "every support" to the investigation. the leaders of the uk's four nations are being urged to agree on guidance to allow people to celebrate christmas safely with family and friends. the liberal democrats and the alliance party of northern ireland say the governments must accept it is inevitable people will travel during the festive period, including across borders. they've called on the nations' leaders to explore workable solutions.
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there's been a second night of violence in philadelphia after the fatal shooting of a black man by police. residents have been told to avoid the city centre after reports of mass looting by a mob of up to a thousand people. police insisted they opened fire on walter wallace when he ignored orders to drop a knife. as the number of coronavirus cases continues to rise, it's more and more important to make sure we're staying as healthy as possible. now a new study says taking vitamin supplements could help with respiratory problems. let's speak to gp rachel ward. good morning to you. lovely to have you on the programme, as ever. i will come to that steady with regards to vitamins but i wanted to talk to you about this story on the daily telegraph is front page. it says downing street is working on the assumption that the second wave
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of covid—i9 will be more deadly than the first and the lockdown will last for months. do you share some of those concerns? morning. look, i think anybody in their situation at the moment, i don't envy them. they we re very the moment, i don't envy them. they were very difficult decisions to be made. there is no right or wrong a nswer made. there is no right or wrong answer specifically on the situation and there is always a very difficult balance to be had. of course, we are looking with real sadness every day at the increase in deaths that are occurring from covid but we have to had —— had to have at the back of oui’ had —— had to have at the back of our minds with debts which happen unintentionally as a result of being in lockdown. —— deaths. cancer
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screening being on hold earlier in the year, the effects of that is not fully understood. it is not a simple situation of, let's go back into lockdown but we have to remember this is never straightforward. interesting about the projections. the death will not be as high but it will maintain for much longer than before. it will be a long and sustained death rate as part of the second wave. it is obviously a concern and something the government is thinking about. any death rate is not acceptable, is it? we do not fully understand. we are modelling at previous diseases, previous pandemics and there are multiple possibilities as to how this will play out. a big impact will be how
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we behave, how we stick to rules, how we keep doing simple things like masks, hand washing in distancing. that will also have a big impact which we need to keep a constant eye on. while all of all of this -- is that all of this is going on, vaccines are being trialled. there isa vaccines are being trialled. there is a new study talking about vitamins like a, d and e helping with respiratory problems. what do we know about that? we have always known having a balanced diet with all the vitamins we need is really important to stay well. going hand in hand with that is it is keeping oui’ in hand with that is it is keeping our immune system working well and keeping us healthy. at the moment, there is lots of attention, looking at all different treatments and
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different things we can use to protect us against coronavirus. a lot of people are talking about vitamin d. we produce that by sunlight hitting our skin. generally it is very important for bone and muscle health. some studies suggest it may give us some protection against coronavirus but at the moment we do not have hard evidence that that is correct. however, what i would say is, the nhs advice is from october to march, actually we should all be taking vitamin d because in the uk, sadly looking outside, we are not getting that much sunlight, so we believe it is a useful supplement to take anyway. whether that will protect against coronavirus, i cannot say it will but it will not do us any harm. to go back to the issue of a vaccine, there are calls for a standardised approach with different vaccines
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being worked on across the world. how likely will it be that will beat the vaccine which is distributed to billions of people? it is so hard to find the right answer at the moment. there is a review that has been released from some of the university of oxford team. what they are saying is there are nine vaccines in phase three trials across the world. that is when many thousands of people are using it and you are looking at safety a nd using it and you are looking at safety and how efficient it is. what that feeling is, we are unlikely to have just one which will have an effect. all of these vaccines are being trialled in very different populations in very different settings in countries with very different health organisations. what we need to ensure is the outcomes, the benefits of them is standardised so the benefits of them is standardised so that we can then apply that benefit and it would have that same effect across the world wherever it
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is used. that is what this with you are saying from the university of oxford. when we are looking at results, we need to look at them in the same way to make sure any vaccine would benefit across the world. as ever, you are across everything for us. pleasure to talk to you. thanks, dan. now the sport with jane. it was a good night for manchester city and liverpool in the champions league, as they both made it two wins from two in europe this season. both top their groups in the competition as andy swiss reports. searching for a spark. manchester city emerged in marseille with their domestic form stuttering and their injury list growing. but if they needed a boost, marseille promptly obliged. a defensive blunder allowing ferran torres to put city ahead. it was the least their early dominance deserved. and after the break, marseille's lingering hopes were snuffed out. ilkay gundogan and then raheem sterling completing a 3—0 victory.
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for city, an impressive night's work. at anfield meanwhile, liverpool were up against midtjylland. who? well, they're danish champions, and they made life tricky for the hosts until diogojota settled their nerves after the break. midtjylland had their chances but gave away a late penalty and mo salah completed a 2—0 win. liverpool far from their best but like city's champions league start, it's played two, won two. northern ireland women had their goalkeeper sent off early in their european championship qualifier but they still beat belarus i—0. they can still make the play—offs, but wales's bid to qualify automatically for their first major tournament suffered a blow with defeat to norway. they lost 1—0 in cardiff, which means they're still second in their group, but wales only have one game left to play, so their fate is out of their hands. scotland had their first loss of the campaign after finland beat them i—0.
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scotland are second in their group with four games left to play. the men's 100m world champion christian coleman has been banned from the sport for two years. the 2a—year—old american, who took gold in doha last year, missed three drugs tests, so he won't be able to compete in next years olympics in tokyo. great britain's hockey teams returned to competitive action after almost nine months away. however, it didn't go exactly to plan. the women's side came from behind to level 1—1 against the netherlands — jo hunter earning them a point with her first goal for the senior team. but they then lost 3—1 in the penalty shoot out. and the men were also beaten by the dutch. they conceeded a goaljust seconds before the half—time interval and couldn't find an equaliser. 1—0 the final score. celebrity chef delia smith has added her voice to the call for spectators to be allowed back into football stadiums. she's the joint majority shareholder
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of championship side norwich — and last night, some fans were allowed into the bar at carrow road, to watch their match at brentford live on a big screen. please, sir, can we have our football back? because, because, stewart, it is just shocking that we can't have our supporters in the stand. we can have them in here that we can't have them out in the fresh air, well—spaced, tested. we did a wonderful sort of trial run and it worked like a dream and we can't understand why we're not allowed to do it. very frustrating for fans and clubs as well. i cannot have supporters in. many are desperate for the funds but they are the rules. that is one thing i had missed, the roar of a crowd. despite the uncertainty over
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the festive celebrations this year, one major retailer says that many of us are planning our christmas shopping earlier than usual. vishala is in wirral for us this morning to find out more. good morning. ifeel as though i have woken up and skipped a couple of months. it is christmas galore ns warehouse. this business has been preparing for christmas sincejuly. he had been here since the early doors putting out stock for the day ahead. —— you have been here. john lewis said today that most of us plan on sorting our christmas shopping in the next few weeks. that is largely because we need something to look forward to. jason is general manager. even though you have seen an increase in demand on the retail side but you have had the ripple effects of hospitality and a restriction, haven't you? normally
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the bar, restaurant and hotel industry would be preparing for the season ahead. they are affected heavily with what is going on with covid at the moment. are you focusing on individuals, at home? yes, absolutely. but we are seeing, and it is a general transparency, is and it is a general transparency, is an increase in the general public spend. hopefully that will counteract against the downturn we're seeing from the bar and re sta u ra nt we're seeing from the bar and restaurant industry. people are looking to have a good christmas this year. what about the broader supply chain? you bring in products from all around world. all the european countries and china as well, we import products from all over the globe. we started early, we wanted to be prepared. we knew there would be problems along the way right through to the festive season. without starting so early, it has
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worked out quite well for us. every year there is a christmas trend, what is this year? a strong winner is candy cane lane. it is a fun and happy theme to go with.|j is candy cane lane. it is a fun and happy theme to go with. i did spot a rather large candy cane. rather shiny, very pretty with tinsel. any request to bring back? everything, to be honest with you. i am so in full it all. particularly this year. i know nobody will be able to come to my house for christmas but it does not mean to say i cannot decorate it. we do not know what will happen. the liberal democrats and the alliance party in northern ireland are calling for a cross nation plan for christmas. something to discuss throughout the day. let us to discuss throughout the day. let us know what you think of that
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throughout the morning. we have had such a great week of weather. carol is at the tower of london this morning. good morning. one of the most famous ghost stories at the tower of london. if i turn around, you can see behind me is the bloody tower. the ghost story relates to a two young princes, edward and richard, who were brothers. they were held here and died in suspicious circumstances. it is said that ghosts can sometimes be seen holding hands in white night dresses, staring ahead and then they fade back into the walls. it was not until 167a that their skeletons were found in this building behind me. this is called the white tower. they died in ia83. it was quite some
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time, 167a, until the skeletons were found. behind me you can see tower green, where many of the executions took place. if you remember, and berlin was one of those who was executed here. how ghost is also said to haunt the tower of london. a bit chillier. —— her ghost. the forecast today is one of sunshine and showers but gusty winds, particularly in the west and the south. low pressure is driving our weather. look at the isobars around it. it tells you it will be a blustery and windy day. because it has been such a deep area of low pressure a cross has been such a deep area of low pressure across the atlantic, we are expecting large waves across the west. we a re expecting large waves across the west. we are starting off with a lot of showers, especially once again in the west and the south. through the day some of them will be heavy,
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potentially with hail and thunder. they will blow through quite quickly. we will see a line of then form across the midlands, east anglia. a bit cooler than yesterday, temperatures about ten to 13 degrees. this evening and overnight, some of these showers will fade but some of these showers will fade but some of these showers will fade but some of them will pep up. there will be clear skies and a cold night. we had heavier rain coming in from the west. under that temperatures will not be as low. in plymouth we are looking at an overnight low of about ten. tomorrow, the band of rain the sweep steadily northwards and eastwards. it will be heavy and persistent. behind it, in the lake district, snowdonia, for example, we are district, snowdonia, for example, we a re left district, snowdonia, for example, we are left with cloud and drizzle and patchy rain as well. still windy, especially in the west. on friday we will start this showery rain in the
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north of scotland which will tend to fade. across england and wales there will also be some rain to start the day which will weaken as it pushes south eastwards. there will be some bright spots but also some cloud. it will be blustery and mild. top temperature could get up to 18 degrees, somewhere in the south. then it is downhill. the weekend is looking pretty wet and windy, even into monday. i know it is very early but are there any beefeaters knocking about yet? we still won earlier. do you know why they are called beefeaters? because they eat beef? they probably do, some of them anyway. in the olden days, part of their salary used to be based, basically, joints of beef. you know everything. i will try to test you out with some tower of london facts
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later. no, don't. thank you so much. we will see you soon. she said the ravens will be having their brea kfast ravens will be having their breakfast later. you are obsessed with the tower of london. we went that week it was incredibly hot in the middle of the summer and it was brilliant. my three children absolutely adored it. they love history. and me. they might be best known as an actor and a reality tv star, but danny and dani dyer have decided it's time to try their hand at something new — problem solving. while they might not seem like the most likely agony aunts, the father and daughter duo have launched a new podcast on spotify where they try to help listeners with their dilemmas. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been catching up with them. well, danny dyer and dani dyer. welcome to bbc breakfast. how did it work in your house, growing up when people shouted, "danny?"
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how did you know who they were wanting? well, i'm big dan. and i'm little dan. she's little dan. yeah. very simple. a very simple process and it works lovely. i think it's so common though, isn't it? i don't know if it was from round canning town, everyone always calls, usually, their first born after their father's name. see you have decided to launch a new podcast, sorted with the dyers. now explain how it came about and what it's all about. since dani came out and she won love island and has become a lot more famous than me, we've had people sort of sniffing round us for ideas. the idea of us sitting in a room together and just talking, which is what a podcast is really, really appealed to us. me and my daughter, dani, have got a new podcast, called sorted with the dyers on spotify, where we sort out your life dramas. you can e—mail us in and we'll help you all solve your problems. happy with that one? yeah, i'm happy. are you happy? my face hurts with the smiling. doesn't suit me.
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we can do it from my gaff. we do it on a sunday, so we have a nice roast after. now the premise of it is, sorted with the dyers, is that we are sort of answering people's problems. but i want to make it very, very clear today that we are not qualified to do that, so really we use people's problems, or their little dilemmas, to go off on our own little anecdotes about how it ties into us really. i don't actually know how they're allowing it, to be honest. well, it's still early days, darling. we could be taken off airany second. growing up, how much did you turn to your dad for advice? you know what? i feel like we've always been there for each other. i feel like we're very lucky. as a family, we've always been very open, you know. i thought... you can't hide anything from our family. they just now. they know if something's up. i feel like it's nice, the fact i've got that relationship with my mum and dad. there they are my mum and dad, we're friends. they had me young, so i've sort of been through everything with them.
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so it'sjust nice to sort of turn to him really. 18. so we sort of, in a way, grew up together. you did. especially me, it took a long time to grow up. you've got to get the fine line between being friends and being father and daughter relationship but it's a learning process being a parent. i've said all this to dani. obviously, she's pregnant herself. there is no book really you can read. you'vejust got to... you've got to learn on the job every single day. it's a revelation being a parent, it really is. and it can be a beautiful thing but it can be one of the most frustrating and irritating things you'll ever do in your life. dani, how's it been being pregnant during lockdown? it has been all right, to be fair. i'm enjoying it. ifeel like i'm nesting, actually. but it is difficult. it is. what is difficult is the fact my mum has not been to a scan yet, something like that. so i feel like that's the only struggle. i had a bit of panic the other day. i thought, my daughter is going to give birth, it's quite a
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traumatic thing. i was worried about the idea of her giving birth and i don't know why. i don't know. ijust had a little nutty half hour thinking about it. 0h, dad. i know it's all going to be fine but it's such a thing, isn't it? it's a miracle, the whole thing. before then we've got christmas. now, little dan, what is the dyer family christmas normally like? it's just always about spending time with the family. we have the most funniest, best chats just sitting around the table, dad, don't we? yeah. my nan is there, my uncle and auntie. if there was a camera in that room, honestly. we just want to spend time together really. and that's why ijust really hope this christmas we can be together. you know, it'sjust a lovely time and that's why it's quite worrying, the idea of not being able to do that this year. i do think that this is the biggest thing to ever happen to mankind, by the way. this has never, ever happened before. you know, the idea of something — this invisible thing that has shut down everything, absolutely globally, all over the world. there's been some horrific things happen to mankind over the years
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with some wars and stuff and, you know, the terrorist attacks, just things in general that do grind things to a halt but the fact that we are all going through it together, it's really hard to compute that in my brain. yeah. i mean it's. .. the idea of, potentially, not being able to sit round a table with my daughter and, you know, my in—laws, it's crazy talk to me. how easy are you finding it to obey the rules? so it's very confusing. it's perfect to break rules really because it's hard to understand what the rules are. just keep them simple and people will abide by it. we want to get out of this as quickly as possible but, as confusing as it is, itjust makes it so difficult. my one rant would be that we must learn now that the people who went to eton can't run this country. 0k. they've done it, they've tried to do it and this little small
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group, who all went to the same school in the same class, it doesn't work. so i feel we need some working—class people, people that have lived a real life, people who are in touch with what is going on in reality to maybe come to the front now and start to get involved in how this country is run. would you ever go into politics full—time? 0h, imagine. no, darling, i'm too busy. i've got a game show on at the moment. i've got another podcast with my daughter and, of course, i'm in the greatest soap that's ever been. so i'm all right for the minute. so let's just watch the government unravel themselves, i think. and let's see what... let's just try and stay safe and try not to catch this thing. on the other side, i'm sure we're all going to be better, stronger, more considerate people for it.
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that was good advice. interesting to hearfamily discussion. that was good advice. interesting to hear family discussion. we are talking about christmas today. the liberal democrats and the alliance party of northern ireland are calling for a uk wide plan for gathering at christmas. i am sure lots of you have your own personal thoughts on that. it is only eight weeks away. right now it would depend on where you live. we are talking about that later on the programme. iam talking about that later on the programme. i am sure talking about that later on the programme. i am sure it is eight weeks. if i have got it wrong, and you are shouting at the television is right now. good morning from bbc london, i'm katharine carpenter. the police watchdog has criticised the way in which officers in london carry out stop and search, saying the met must ensure they don't make decisions based on stereotypes or racial bias. the independent office for police conduct investigated five
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controversial stop and searches involving black men. it found that poor communication and use of force had damaged confidence in the met. the force has accepted all 11 recommendations, and says its committed to ensuring stop and search is conducted professionally. young londoners have been particularly badly hit by the impact of covid—19 on the jobs market, according to research by the campaign group the resolution foundation. it found that about one in five young people in the uk, and a similar proportion of ethnic minority workers who were furloughed during the lockdown, have since lost theirjobs. a mural of a man who died in police custody has been removed despite a plea from his family. kevin clarke was restrained by officers during a mental health crisis and died in 2018. his image was painted on hoardings oppostite lewisham police station. developer balfour beatty says it did consult on removing the work. a stables in teddington is providing comfort to riders with disabilities who've been told they can't have lessons during the coronavirus pandemic. park lane stables is holding covid secure sessions
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focusing on the care of horses, so people don't miss out on contact with the animals. we call it wellies and well—being. they help us to take care of the horses and they groom the horses and feed the horses. we're outside and we're able to maintain the social distancing. we don't need to be hands—on with our participants to deliver this, like we would with our riding and carriage driving. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. in westminster, victoria street is closed westbound due to a burst water main, affecting traffic between parliament square and victoria station. it's very slow northbound coming into the blackwall tunnel through greenwich. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. generally starting on a dry note this morning across london and the south—east. some early sunshine as well but we've got some showers out towards the west, starting to move towards us through the morning. at first, a lot of dry weather but in the middle part of the afternoon, the showers could well band together to bring longer spells
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of rain for a time. also they could be heavy and thundery but there will be some dry weather mixed in, too, and some sunshine at times. a blustery old day, top temperature somewhere around 13, 1a celsius. typically it will feel quite cool. this evening and overnight, the showers clear away and then we are dry and clear into the start of tomorrow. but it won't take long before the next wet weather system moves towards us. another frontal band of rain, a longer spell of rain in the middle part of tomorrow just moving across us. behind it though, much, much warmer air for friday. you'll certainly notice it into the start of friday. friday itself, a lot of dry weather around with some sunshine as well. make the most of it, it's fairly blustery and wet again the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: a major search in the english channel after a migrant boat heading for the uk sinks, killing two adults and two children — the authorites believe more people could be missing.
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growing pressure on the government to impose tougher coronavirus restrictions in the lead up to christmas, after uk deaths hit their highest level for five months. violence overshadows the final days of the us presidential election with clashes in philadelphia over the shooting of a black man by the police. liverpool's injury problems just keep getting worse — victory in the champions league came at a price, with fabinho forced off. jurgen klopp is running out of options in defence. good morning from the tower of london. the building with the flat roof behind me is the chapel of saint michael peter. that is where two of henry viii's's wives were laid to two of henry viii's's wives were la id to rest two of henry viii's's wives were laid to rest after their execution. chile today with blustery showers and large waves towards the west. details on about ten minutes. good morning. it's wednesday, 28th october. our top story.
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a search operation is expected to continue in the english channel this morning, after a migrant boat sank off the coast of dunkirk yesterday. two children aged five and eight were killed, along with two adults. more than a dozen others were taken to hospital, but french authorities believe more could still be missing. andy moore reports. he speaks in french a large rescue operation was launched when the alarm was raised yesterday morning by a passing yacht. there were said to be 19 to 20 people on board the migrant boat when it capsized in choppy waters. at least 1a people were saved. a man and a woman, thought to be from iran, and two children, were confirmed dead. one casualty was found by helicopter, but there are believed to be others unaccounted for. translation: from what i understand they were about five miles from the coast. but i have no idea as to why this
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boat, which was a day fishing type boat, would have turned over. 8,500 migrants have been rescued from the channel since the start of this year. at least two have died, but this was the single biggest loss of life. borisjohnson said: this but there are no easy answers to stopping the tragic and desperate people willing to pay large sums to get to the uk. this is an incredibly complex problem in a very high risk area, and the solution is also extremely complex. there are a number of things that we need to do, and we are working very closely with the french to redouble our efforts to end the viability of this route.
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migrant charities are calling on the french and british governments to do more. they say the english channel must not become a graveyard for children. andy moore, bbc news. simon jones is in dover this morning. good morning, simon. what's the latest? it's very windy conditions in the channel once again this morning. similar conditions to yesterday when at around this time of the boat carrying 20 or so people would have been setting out from northern france. it only got a short way into its journey when it capsized, as we have heard, at least four people have heard, at least four people have died, 15 people remain in hospital and others possibly still missing. the search continued throughout the day. it was stood down at about 5pm uk time when darkness fell. i've just been speaking to the french authorities.
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it isa speaking to the french authorities. it is a bit unclear at the moment what form any search will take today. the reality is we are almost 2a hours now and on from that capsizing. if there are people missing in the channel we are likely to be talking about a recovery rather than a rescue operation this morning. now in terms of what happened, it is not clear why this boat would have set out in such bad conditions yesterday. they were gusts of wind up around 30 mph in the channel. it is possible the boat was overloaded. that would be part of the investigation by the french authorities. during the summer i was in the english channel a number of times seeing how dangerous this route was. that was even on very calm days when you could see how overloaded these boats were. in terms of the reaction on this side of the english channel, we have had the prime minister and the home secretary saying they will give france all the help they need to investigate what happened here. the key thing, according to the british
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government, is to get to the people smugglers who were organising these crossings. one theory is that perhaps yesterday the smugglers are saying to people who want to get across the channel that you'd need to make this journey now, you across the channel that you'd need to make thisjourney now, you need to make thisjourney now, you need to do it before winter sets in and before the end of the brexit transition period because the british government has been keen to talk up the fact it wants to change the asylum system which it thinks is being abused. the clandestinely channel thread commander is going to go over to france today to discuss what can be done with his french counterparts. there is a lot to talk about. because the reality is people have been predicting an incident like this for a long time. now sadly it has happened. simon, thank you very much. you can hear the wind in the channel this morning. in the next few minutes we are going live to dunkirk where that, of course, happened as well. there are growing fears
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of tougher covid restrictions, after uk deaths hit their highest level for five months yesterday. there were 367 deaths linked to the virus recorded, and nearly 23,000 more cases. the liberal democrats are urging all four nations to agree guidance ahead of christmas. our political correspondent jess parker is in westminster. jess, the prime minister is coming under increasing pressure to toughen the rules isn't he? there are questions about the levels of what is going on at the moment. last night of the government described the latest figures as concerning. but as you rightly say, pressure comes at the prime minister from different sides. conservatives have been saying that we are virus rates are relatively low they don't wa nt extra rates are relatively low they don't want extra restrictions. tories from the north of england yesterday said, tell us how we're going to get out of the current extra restrictions. top scientists have said of the highest level of alert is not necessarily going to be enough in some areas. but i think what certainly looks to be the case as we go into winter tackling the virus is
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said to be increasingly challenging. there could be pressure on the prime minister to do more, not less. at the heart of winter you have christmas. you mentioned that they are. the liberal democrats and the alliance party of northern ireland as saying there needs to be some kind of summit between the four nations to agree a consistent way forward. how many people can meet? what are the rules around travel? how do you get students home from university? we have heard before from borisjohnson that his ambition is that families can spend christmas together. but of course an ambition is not the same as an insurance. i think this letter warning that it is inevitable that some people will wa nt to inevitable that some people will want to travel home for christmas. soi want to travel home for christmas. so i think leaders from across the four nations will be worried in that case, that he could see quite a widespread and obvious defiance of the rules by people desperate to see theirfamilies. the rules by people desperate to see their families. yes, thank you. police officers in scotland say they are breaking up hundreds of house parties every week, despite coronavirus restrictions that ban large gatherings indoors. there have been more than 3,000 call—outs since police scotland were granted
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powers to break up large house parties in august. first minister nicola sturgeon said the move was necessary to ensure socialising continued in a safe and responsible way. baby clothes have been listed as essential items that should go on sale in supermarkets during wales' lockdown. the welsh government has updated its list of goods that can be sold by retailers during the firebreak lockdown. they have also said customers should be able to ask for non—essential items in exceptional circumstances. more than 67,000 people have signed a petition calling for a ban on non—essential items to be reversed. there's been a second night of violence in philadelphia after the fatal shooting of a black man by police. residents have been told to avoid the city centre after reports of mass looting by a mob of up to a thousand people. mark lobel reports. on monday afternoon, in the neighbourhood of cobbs creek in west philadelphia, this happened. two officers respond to a report of a man with a weapon.
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he breaks free from his mother after she says she tried to shield him. police say they then tell the 27—year—old to drop his weapon. he was pronounced dead at hospital. philadelphia's mayor, jim kenney, called it a tragic incident, pledging a full investigation. this is not only a matter that is being carefully considered by the head of our special investigations unit and the assigned prosecutor, it's a matter that i am looking at personally and carefully. this office has made clear that we believe in fairness, we believe in an evenhanded justice. we are not out to cover for anybody and we are not out to get anybody. there was visible anger on the streets of philadelphia. hundreds of protesters faced down riot police, injuring several officers and looting multiple businesses. the white house had said they are prepared to deploy federal resources to enforce the law.
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in a statement released on tuesday, joe biden and this kamela harris said, "our hearts are broken for the family of walter wallace jr — another black life in america last. at the same time, they added addressing the looting, no amount of anger at the very real injustices in our society excuses violence. it's above all, another tragic, early end to a black life in america of a father, twin and son, leaving another city on edge. there you go. more on that throughout the morning. loads of interviews coming between now and 9:15am. lots to cram in. and carol, for the third day running, is out and about. today it is the tower of london. good morning. good morning, everyone. it is spectacular here.
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you can see from our aerial shot just how splendid it is. i want to ta ke just how splendid it is. i want to take you over to have a look at the ravens because later on, the next half an hour, they will be having their breakfast. there have always been at least six ravens here at the tower because charles ii been at least six ravens here at the tower because charles i! woke up from a dream where he was warned that the crown and the terror would fall if the ravens left. the ravens have been kept here ever since. they would have had their wings clipped so would have had their wings clipped so they wouldn't fly away too far. but they no longer do that. the younger birds don't have their wings clipped, but they are well fed and well looked after, so they do tend to stay here. it's a chilly start to the day if you haven't yet ventured out. some of us are starting off with dry conditions, some of us already have showers. the forecast for today is one of sunshine and showers. and gusty winds as well. the strongest winds will be with exposure in the west and the south, and some very large waves in the west as well. as high as five,
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possibly ten metres high. a lot of showers from the word go in the west and the south. some of those through the day will be heavy and thundery. on the blustery winds, some will go to the east. the best chance of hanging on to the sunshine longer in the east than you have in the west. through the afternoon some of them will align themselves across part of the midlands, east anglia and the south—east. you can expect some heavier ones. a cooler day than yesterday. temperatures ranging from 11 to 14. yesterday. temperatures ranging from 11 to 1a. this evening and overnight the showers will pick up for a time. clear skies, and all of those clear skies it would be culled. at the end of the night another band of rain coming in across south—west scotland, northern ireland, wales and south—west england. tomorrow that will continue to push north eastwards, reaching most areas through the day and again quite windy conditions, although not quite as many as today in the west. you still will notice it. behind that band of rain we will have a return to some cloud, a little bit of brightness but also some light rain
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and drizzle, especially in snowdonia and drizzle, especially in snowdonia and also the lake district. i am looking forward to the next half an hour because then we are going to see the ravens having their brea kfast. can't wait. thank you so much carol. see you then. "the english channel must not become a graveyard for children" — that's the warning from one charity, after a migrant boat sunk off the coast of northern france yesterday. four people died in the incident, including children aged five and eight. let's get the latest from dunkirk with our correspondent nick beake. nick, what's the response been to this tragedy? we understand there are going to start looking again for people this morning? good morning. yes. it's pretty quiet, certainly compared with the intense activity they had yesterday. this was a major operation involving teams from not just here in france but belgium too, and by airand just here in france but belgium too, and by air and sea they did their very best to try and save the people who had gone into the water, but
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tragically, we know at least four people died. it is not yet clear what exactly the form of today's operation will take, but certainly the local authorities say if there is anything they can do to rescue more people, but the reality is, all this time has passed now, the chances of finding someone alive extremely slim. and very sadly, there has this —— there has been this report that a young baby was also unaccounted for yesterday. that is been spoken about by the local authorities. what is the response been like in france? in a way, it has mirrored some of the words we have been hearing from the uk, from politicians and charities. local officials here in france have called this a very dark day because it is thought to be the deadliest attempt at crossing so far this year. and as we have been hearing, more attempts are being made, particularly in the summer. now it is extremely cold and you can only imagine what was going through the minds of the 19 or 20
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people as they got on this boat yesterday and tried to embark on this perilous journey to the uk. yesterday and tried to embark on this perilousjourney to the uk. we don't quite know what is happening in terms of the criminal investigation because, of course, behind this the prime minister was saying late last night that it is criminal gangs who are exploiting vulnerable people, they take their money but they don't take any of the risk and they put people often on flimsy boats which they know full well are very unlikely to last the full journey. obviously at the moment the weather is worse than in the summer as well. what are they doing in france to try to tackle the problem of people making this perilous journey? the french authorities say they are doing their part, they are patrolling some of the docks here, some of the ports here, some of the blue plaque two they have seen people try to use. if you listen to london, the british politicians, they have accused the french authorities of not doing enoughin french authorities of not doing enough in the past and simply allowing boats to make the journey to the united kingdom, and they have
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been calling for tougher action. we heard the home secretary say in the summer she wanted to make the route to the uk unviable. that has been really, that has been challenged by charities, saying they need to take a much more humane approach. some french politicians are seeing the big problem is that to claim asylum in the uk you need to be on british soil, and so some people are taking desperate risks. nonetheless the government says it is going to act tough on this and actually through taking tougher action it can prevent the sort of tragedy that we saw yesterday. nick beake in dunkirk, thank you very much. beth gardiner—smith is the chief executive of safe passage, a charity calling for safe and legal routes for child refugees. shejoins us now. good morning. really good to speak to youth this morning. i know you have been following this closely very —— this story very closely. what is your reaction to this tragedy? firstly, it'sjust desperately, desperately sad, but also i think there is a lot of anger
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amongst those of us who are working day in, day out with some people in northern france, some of the refugees, and children in particular, because we have been warning that something like this could have happened for a long time now. it was only a matter of time before we saw such a tragic deaths. this is not the first death but it is the first recorded death we know this year of children, and such young children. so we are deeply sad, but also angry. the government's approach is not working. what we find frustrating is that you hear from working. what we find frustrating is that you hearfrom ministers working. what we find frustrating is that you hear from ministers and politicians today and yesterday that they're planning more of the same. more securitisation at the border rather than that compassionate approach that we have been calling for. to your mind, what is at the root of the problem? is it, as our correspondent was touching upon, that you have to be on british soil to claim asylum and that is what is causing people to try desperately to get to the uk? that's certainly a
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large problem. the real issue that we have been talking about for a long time is the lack of safe and legal routes for refugees to access asylu m legal routes for refugees to access asylum claim asylum in the uk. u nfortu nately, asylum claim asylum in the uk. unfortunately, this year we have seen more routes close unfortunately, this year we have seen more routes close down rather than opened up. so for instance, for unaccompanied children, there was a scheme called the dubs scheme, which allowed for unaccompanied children stranded in camps across europe, to be relocated to the uk, some of them, not all of them. that route was closed this year. the result is that we see more children than desperately trying to seek other means. i mean, the government, we are going to speak to george eustice later, they said their plan is to access people in the camps in the first place and explain what the situation is there, to try and prevent them then from coming to the uk. you see that as working at all?
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well, there needs to be more of that as well. unfortunately, what happened is there has been a focus on policing, and clearances of the camps, it is only deterred people in northern france from actually wanting to enter into the system, into the legal system. so i would like to see an army of child protection officers being sent to northern france right now. rather than more barbed wire, more police and more security. because that is the only way that you are going to see people come into the system. but also, we need more safe and legal routes for people with a real reason to wa nt routes for people with a real reason to want to claim asylum in the uk, to want to claim asylum in the uk, to come here. for instance, the family reunion route, which has been operating until now, that is due to close at the end of this year as the uk leaves the eu transition period. and the government is absolutely no plan for what it is going to do when that happens. so ijanuary the 1st, we are going to see many more
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children, many more families, who we re children, many more families, who were able to access that safe and legal route, then taking alternative means, potentially, taking boats across the channel because they have now safe and legal way to come to the uk tojoin now safe and legal way to come to the uk to join their relatives and family. one of the things that priti patel has been talking about is that she wants to stop what she has called callous criminal exploitation of vulnerable people. is that part of vulnerable people. is that part of the answer? of course, but their approach hasn't worked. this is the big failure. what we have seen as more deaths, more people taking greater risks. in fact, the best way to break the business model of the people exploiting these desperate individuals is to actually offer safe and legal alternatives. that is the right approach. to say actually, people don't need to be put into a boat and cross the channel because they can claim asylum in france or access safe and legal route to gain asylu m access safe and legal route to gain asylum in the uk. very good to speak
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to you. thank you for your time. we will be putting some of those points to george eustice in about ten minutes. let's speak now to the liberal democrat leader sir ed davey. we have a couple of things to talk to you about. first of all, your reaction to what happened with regard to the people from dunkirk and what happened in the sea? absolutely heartbreaking. everyone's thoughts will be with their families. and really i agree with your previous speaker. the government has failed time and time again to provide safe routes for people with genuine reasons for wanting to seek asylum in the united kingdom. the liberal democrats have called for a long time for sanctuary. and the government failing to work with other countries, to properly provide those routes, results in people losing their lives as we have seen. another thing i want to talk to you about is that the liberal democrats, with the alliance party of northern ireland, are calling for a uk wide plan for
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family gatherings at christmas. what do you mean? well, 2020 has been such an appalling year for so many families across the united kingdom. people were looking forward to christmas. i think they are seeing, with the r number rising and infections across the whole of the united kingdom, they are worried that christmas will be cancelled. so what the liberal democrats, and the alliance party of northern ireland, are calling for today is for the governments of the four nations to come together in a summit to make a proper christmas coronavirus plan which deals with travel in particular, deals with consistent rules on gatherings, but also makes sure we take action now to make sure that christmas can be as near—normal as possible. so what are you saying with regard to travel and with regard to people travelling, wanting to see their families, that they should be allowed to do that?“ to see their families, that they should be allowed to do that? if we can get the r number down, absolutely. the scientific evidence has to be taken into account. that is what we want the summit to do. if people are going to be able to
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travel and have a near—normal christmas, we might need to see, for example, an expansion of the public transport options so people can travel in a covert secure way. the problem i see at the moment is different rules in different parts of the united kingdom. and while i strongly believe in devolution, i think part of the pandemic response have seen that work well, i think for christmas there has to be a coordinated plan because millions of people normally travel across the united kingdom, cross the four nations to see their families and they need clear guidance. they are trying to plan christmas now and they are not getting the guidance from the government. diwali is well in november. what should be done with regards to that? again, there should be a coordinated plan. if there is a lot of travel connected to diwali, people need to get that advice and guidance. people will be travelling across the different four nations. that is where i think some of the problems are. the coordination across the for
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government two inning then needs to be stepped up. we need to get people working together. and i have been worried for a little while there is too much point scoring between different governments across the united kingdom. we are still eight weeks until christmas. and we are hearing from an internal analysis the predicted course of the second wave, this is from sage. it shows that speaking at a lower level than the springbok remaining at this level for weeks. or even months. given where we are at the moment are you concerned that talking about christmas will make things more dangerous? not at all. what we are trying to do is urge the government to plan ahead. for so much of this pandemic the government have been slow. they haven't planned ahead. what the liberal democrats are desperately urging the government to do is, for god sake, work with other governments across the four nations of the united kingdom and plan ahead. and if you do that, maybe we can get this virus back under
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control. we followed the advice of the sage experts, unlike boris johnson's golf —— government, and argued for a national circuit breaker over the half time because we thought, given what the experts we re we thought, given what the experts were saying, that was the most prudent and cautious and sensible route to take. if that had come together with proper support packages for biz —— people because ‘sjobs and packages for biz —— people because ‘s jobs and for businesses, we could be trying to more effectively get the r number down, but the government is not taking that action now. so the liberal democrat call todayis now. so the liberal democrat call today is to get all the four nations together to see what action can be taken now so that christmas is not cancelled, and also within the context of a proper coronavirus christmas plan. that seems reasonable. families across the uk have suffered so much. they are looking to the government leaders to do that. you have set a couple of times you don't want christmas to be cancelled, but i suppose on the other hand there is a risk of people, if they are in greater numbers in families, mixing generations as well, is that a risk
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you are prepared to take it? the risk is precisely why we have made this initiative today. we don't see boris johnson's this initiative today. we don't see borisjohnson's government this initiative today. we don't see boris johnson's government reaching out across the english regions and the four nations of the united kingdom to plan for christmas. he needs to do that. and if he did that ina way needs to do that. and if he did that in a way which is cracking down on this virus properly, because it's increasingly clear they have lost control, the death rates are rising... they haven't listened to the expert advice. if they could do that now and do that across the four nations, then there is still a chance that we can get this pandemic much better under control, get the r number down so that christmas can be as near—normal as possible. that is what the liberal democrats are pleading with the government to do on behalf of millions of families across the country. we believe it there. thank you very much. we will be asking george eustice about all sorts of things this morning. he would be with us in a
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few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm katharine carpenter. the police watchdog has criticised the way in which officers in london carry out stop and search, saying the met must ensure they don't make decisions based on stereotypes or racial bias. the independent office for police conduct investigated five controversial stop and searches involving black men. it found that poor communication and use of force had damaged confidence in the met. the force has accepted all 11 recommendations and says it's committed to ensuring stop and search is conducted professionally. young londoners have been particularly badly hit by the impact of covid—19 on the jobs market, according to research by the campaign group the resolution foundation. it found that about one—in—five young people in the uk — and a similar proportion of ethnic minority workers — who were furloughed during the lockdown have since lost theirjobs. a mural of a man who died in police
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custody has been removed despite a plea from his family. kevin clarke was restrained by officers during a mental health crisis and died in 2018 — his image was painted on hoardings oppostite lewisham police station. developer balfour beatty says it did consult on removing the work. a stables in teddington is providing comfort to riders with disabilities who've been told they can't have lessons during the coronavirus pandemic. park lane stables is holding covid—secure sessions focusing on the care of horses, so people don't miss out on contact with the animals. we call it wellies and well—being. they help us to take care of the horses and they groom the horses and feed the horses. we're outside and we're able to maintain the social distancing. we don't need to be hands—on with our participants to deliver this, like we would with our riding and carriage driving. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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the a2 in bexleyheath is slow coming into town between black prince and danson, due to an earlier fuel spillage. slow coming into central london on the a13 between dagenham and barking. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. generally starting on a dry note this morning across london and the south—east. some early sunshine as well but we've got some showers out towards the west, starting to move towards us through the morning. at first, a lot of dry weather but in the middle part of the afternoon, the showers could well band together to bring longer spells of rain for a time. also they could be heavy and thundery but there will be some dry weather mixed in, too, and some sunshine at times. a blustery old day, top temperature somewhere around 13, 1a celsius. typically it will feel quite cool. this evening and overnight, the showers clear away and then we are dry and clear into the start of tomorrow. but it won't take long before the next wet weather system moves towards us. another frontal band of rain, a longer spell of rain in the middle part of tomorrow just moving across us. behind it though, much,
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much warmer air for friday. you'll certainly notice it into the start of friday. friday itself, a lot of dry weather around with some sunshine as well. make the most of it, it's fairly blustery and wet again the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. now though it's back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. there are growing fears of tougher covid restrictions after uk deaths hit their highest level for five months yesterday. there were 367 deaths linked to the virus recorded, and nearly 23,000 more cases. we can speak now to the environment secretary george eustice. hejoins us live on bbc he joins us live on bbc breakfast. good morning to you. thank you for
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being with us this morning. i will come to the coronavirus death rate in 80 minutes but i wanted to start by talking about the deadliest day of attempted channel crossings yesterday. the search, we understand, for people, goes on this morning. there is an accusation this was down to a government failure of policy. this is a terrible tragedy and, obviously, our thoughts policy. this is a terrible tragedy and, obviously, ourthoughts and prayers are with the family of those who had been affected. —— families. it is about people making this dangerous being lowered by palace gangs were taking money and sending them off on a dangerous crossing across the channel. there have been across the channel. there have been a number of interceptions. we work very closely with the french. we need to do two things to address it. one is to move the incentive for
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people to try to make this dangerous crossing in the first place, ensuring they are returned if they do come across. secondly, it is intercepting these vessels when they set sail, so that we can try to avoid them putting their lives in danger. the guests that we spoke to said there is obviously a focus on the gangs but the problem for them is there is a lack of safe and legal routes to come to the uk. she pointed to the scheme for unaccompanied children which was closed down earlier this year. the family reunion route will stop from the 1st of january. without those safe and legal routes to come to the uk, we will see more of what many people predicted would happen in these months because people are desperate to get here. the uk, since 2015, has been in the top five countries in the world in terms of
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resettli ng countries in the world in terms of resettling refugees. we have resettled more refugees than any other eu country, some 25,000 have been resettled. when it comes to genuine refugees, who seek to be resettled, we play our part as a country. what is happening, and it is important people understand this, we had criminal gangs that are callously taking money from people, encouraging them to make this crossing. there is not a rationale. they are not in danger. there is no reason to take the crossing. they are being encouraged to do so by gangs taking their money. the british government was accused of lacking an ounce of humanity by not allowing people to claim asylum from outside the uk. now we have had a tragedy that continues to be investigated this morning. on that point, should there be another way of claiming asylum outside the uk?
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there are other ways for genuine refugees, those who had been the victims of torture, who had been displaced, to be resettled in other countries. the uk is playing its part. the principle is that people should claim asylum in the first safe country they arrive at, and thatis safe country they arrive at, and that is generally not the uk. there is not a reason for people to make this highly dangerous crossing, where they are putting their lives at risk. usa this morning it is not at risk. usa this morning it is not a failure of policy that if people are dying in the channel, it is a failure of policy. —— you say. are dying in the channel, it is a failure of policy. -- you say. it is about criminal gangs extorting money. i understand the priority is to stop people but surely it should be to stop deaths as well. it is
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about stopping them coming on the crossing. if they do set sail, it is about making sure they are intercepted and put to safety. that is what the uk and france has been working on. there have been 3000 such journeys intercepted this year and we have been increasing our activity with france, in particular, since the summer because we need to try and make sure these crossings do not happen and they are intercepted before they put their lives in danger. talking about where we are with regards to the pandemic, back in mid—september, around the 21st of september, stage were advising stronger measures. by mid november we will be at the rate of 200 dying a day. we are already way past that number. do you think you should have listened to that advice in september and one of their suggestions, a
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circuit breaker, back then? and one of their suggestions, a circuit breaker, back themm and one of their suggestions, a circuit breaker, back then? it was one suggestion. they provided the government with a range of options, including those we have taken forward with local and regional lockdown is an tougher restrictions in some parts of the country where the disease is highest. they also expressed some doubts as to whether a two week circuit breaker with a cheap what it was intended. we were going into winter rather than in the last lockdown, going into spring and summer. they recognise there will be severe economic consequences from doing so. they set out a range of options. the government has chosen the approach they had taken with these three levels of intervention. yesterday we added warrington to the very high risk area and there are discussions ongoing, for instance, the city like nottingham as well but i think we have struck the right balance in terms of making sure we can keep the economy going. parts of the southwest has a very low incidence of the virus at the moment
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that while taking action to target incidence of the disease. is the policy working? it is 367 deaths yesterday to set you said you implemented plans but if the death rate is far beyond, and some people said it was scaremongering to suggest it would be 200 by the middle of november, and we are beyond that now. we always recognise that winter conditions, cooler, wetter weather is conducive to the spread of the virus and that is why we could ease restrictions over the summer. we always knew there would bea summer. we always knew there would be a growing challenge over the winter months and we have been monitoring it closely and taking timely interventions to tighten restrictions on areas we needed to. we always recognise you could never entirely control this virus. it does
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spread, particularly in the winter. every other country in the world has a similar challenge on its plate. we have to strike the right balance between controlling the spread of the virus, which we are dealing with interventions in those areas, but also keeping the economy moving and having regard for people's mental health and sophos. that was the sage advice. in the papers this morning, the government is working on the assumption the second outbreak will be more deadly than the first. we understand this is on the desk of the prime minister. are you considering something like a circuit breaker now in the build—up to christmas? the prime minister and the health secretary had been clear we do not rule anything out. all options are under review. the virus moves options are under review. the virus m oves very options are under review. the virus moves very quickly and that is why we had to meet and act in a timely way to make the appropriate interventions. at the moment we think we had the right balance with that lower tier for those parts of
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the country that had very low incidence, when i simply need to abide by the rule of six. tougher escalating rules for those with higher rates of the virus. we think we are striking the right balance with that but we are clear not to rule anything out and keeping other options and changes on the table and under review. they are saying the second wave could be far more deadly than the first with a lower peak of deaths but more sustained four weeks, if not months. last week the prime minister hoped there would be some aspects back to normal by christmas. is that right? we want people to have a christmas as close to normal as possible. the prime minister has made that clear. it is too early to say what restrictions will be in place by christmas. it is still a couple of months away. this isa still a couple of months away. this is a dynamic situation, moving very quickly, where we are having to make
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judgments very quickly to an emerging situation. that is what sage is suggesting, action now. we are aware that christmas is eight weeks away. we have been asking for a more coordinated approach across the nations. if the prime minister is right and there is to be any normality at christmas, action is required now. action is happening now. yesterday we added warrington to their very high risk and agreed restrictions there. there are ongoing discussions now with nottingham as well about particular additional measures that might be required. we now have some very tough restrictions in those northwest cities, like liverpool and manchester which have had particular problem. london, last week, was added to the middle tier, where you cannot have two has held is mixing in an indoor environment. we have introduced tough measures in many parts of the country where there is
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a particular problem think it is right for that to remain targeted. in places like the far south—west, the incidence of the disease is very low. we had the clinical director in scotla nd low. we had the clinical director in scotland saying it would be largely a digital christmas. do you think thatis a digital christmas. do you think that is the case? it is too early to be able to tell. christmas is an important time for families and we recognise that. we know about restrictions and emergency restrictions and emergency restrictions we are having to put into place. it starts to impact on peoples well—being and mental health. there will undoubtedly be frustrations about restrictions people are having to abide by that people are having to abide by that people will also understand we have to control the spread of this virus and we all have a role to play in that. i am sure we will be able to have a good christmas and that families will be able to meet but they may not be able to get together in larger groups they normally would. thanked people talking to us
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this morning. —— thank you for talking to us this morning. now for the sport. liverpool managerjurgen klopp said they'd probably have to put one of their young, inexperienced players in defence, after yet another injury last night. with virgil van dijk and joel matip already out, fabinho was forced off with a hamstring problem. they're waiting to find out how serious it is. liverpool still beat fc midtjlland 2—0 in the champions league, thanks to a goal from summer signing diogojota, and a mo salah penalty. it's also two wins from two for manchester city, despite their premier league troubles. they won 3—0 in marseille, raheem sterling with their third. northern ireland women can still make the european championship play—offs after they beat belarus 1—0, despite having their goalkeeper sent off early on. but wales's bid to qualify automatically for their first major tournament is out of their hands now, following a 1—0 defeat to norway in cardiff. they're still second in their group, but wales only have
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one game left to play. scotland lost 1—0 to finland — that's their first defeat of the campaign. they're second in their group with four games left to play. the men's 100m world champion christian coleman has been banned from the sport for two years. coleman took gold in doha last year but he won't be able to compete at next year's olympics in tokyo, after missing three drugs tests by failing to tell the authorities where he was. if you are an elite athlete, you've got all these wonderful opportunities, travelling around the world, competing. you have a few simple things to do. one hour a day, they need to know where you are at. and this is how we combat doping. and it is important. athletics integrity, if they didn't do this, they would be compromised. the lawn tennis association says a third of indoor tennis centres could close permanently,
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without further government funding. they fear that the £100 million recently invested into leisure facilities will be spread too thinly to make a difference and they've questioned the logic of the latest restrictions. at the moment you can have a group exercise class for up to 30 people in one of these indoor tennis centres but two people from different hassles cannot take part ina single different hassles cannot take part in a single tennis activity and that seems ridiculous, given the current climate these facilities are operating in. a lot of sports had these concerns. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. she's at the tower of london, meeting some of the resident ravens. good morning. i'm going to show you an aerial view, first of all. look
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at that stunning picture of the tower of london. we are down with the ravens. i am alsojoined by michael chandler, known to his friends as barney. he is one of the warders. there they go. do you do this every morning at the same time? not at the same time. it depends on the time of year. with the clocks going back, we had been doing it and allah later. they were quite dominant this morning but they are lively now. once i have had my attacker, once i am done for brea kfast, attacker, once i am done for breakfast, i am attacker, once i am done for breakfast, iam raring attacker, once i am done for breakfast, i am raring to go. they are no different. they will come and go throughout the day. that is why we keep the gates open. you feed them but no one else is encouraged to feed them. certainly not. we look after the ravens very well. that is
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the main reason they never leave here. they are looked after very well. temptation is there but we prefer well. temptation is there but we p refer to well. temptation is there but we prefer to monitor what they are fed. we know there is at least six, as legend goes. how many do you have now? we had to have a couple of spare, a couple of substitutes. legend says there is six that we can thank charles ii for that. a couple sparejust in case. is thank charles ii for that. a couple spare just in case. is there a dominant raven? i think at the minute we would say erin. they are all vying for territory. this is merlin. they do not get on, so that is why i am stood here now kite making sure they are kept apart because they really do not like each
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other. that is part of the job, monitoring the maidens and making sure they are kept apart. and they partner for life as well, don't they? —— the ravens. partner for life as well, don't they? -- the ravens. they are one of they? -- the ravens. they are one of the few species that partner for life. thank you for sharing them leaving their home. we had a director called erin and she is a bit like that. good morning from the tower of london where the sky is blue but the forecast is not necessary like that everywhere. today the forecast is of blustery heavy showers and blustery winds. the strongest winds will be in the west and the south. also we are looking at some very large waves in the west, as much as five to potentially ten metres high. we already have showers this morning,
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courtesy of a deep area of low pressure in the atlantic. you can see the isobars wrapped around are indicating it will be windy. the showers we currently have in the west and south will be heavy, some with hail and some blowing towards the east. you have a better chance of staying dry are longer in the eastern areas. temperatures ranging from ten in the north to 13, may be 14 from ten in the north to 13, may be 1a in the south. this evening and overnight, the shallows will pep up for a time ever western scotland. there will be clear skies. —— the showers. by the end of the night will have the next atlantic system coming in, bringing rain. underthat band of cloud and rain, it is not going to be as cold as it is further eased under the clear skies. tomorrow eastern areas will start off on tomorrow eastern areas will start offona tomorrow eastern areas will start off on a relatively bright note that it will not be long before the rain
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in the west will push north and east. that will still be cloud with twiddly bits and pieces and patchy rain. temperature starting to rise a bit, particularly in the south. we will start off with showery rain in the north west of scotland tomorrow morning. in england and wales a couple of weather fronts. bringing rain infrom couple of weather fronts. bringing rain in from the west first thing that cementing throughout the day. the temperature is higher than they should be at this stage of the year. we are looking at 18 degrees in parts of the south. we very much enjoyed seeing erin, the terminating crown. our director today is erin and she is very much enjoying being referred to as the dominant raven.
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heathrow airport says its losses widened to £1.5 billion in the first nine months of the year. passenger numbers between july and september were down by more than 8a% compared with the same period in 2019. we're joined now by the airport's chief executive, john holland—kaye. good morning. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. yourfigures good morning. thank you forjoining us. your figures have good morning. thank you forjoining us. yourfigures havejust come out in the last hour or so. how serious is it? coronavirus has been devastating for the whole aviation sector. we are not expecting passenger numbers to be more than a5% of where they were back in 2019. this really is a devastating impact. we will be able to survive through this but the bigger issue is what it means for the uk economy. so many
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jobs in the uk rely on aviation, where the supply chain. also inbound tourism and education. it supports millions ofjobs in the uk. unless we can get aviation back up and running again safely, we are not going to be able to protect those jobs and more jobs could going to be able to protect those jobs and morejobs could be going to be able to protect those jobs and more jobs could be lost here than there needs to be. it is about testing for people in travel as many other countries have done but the uk government has not yet moved to that point and we will need to if the uk is going to say those jobs. there is some testing for places like italy and hong kong, is it making a difference? it is. we do not yet had testing in place to allow people to come to the uk and reduce the amount of quarantine they had to go through. for the vast majority of countries, you still have to quarantine for 1a days that
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if we can test people before they get onto a flight, to make sure they do not have covid, when they come to the uk they can go about their business without needing quarantine that again we are going to be living with covid for years to come, we need to get the economy back up and running again while keeping people safe. predeparture testing will allow people to do that. led government response, it remains unconvinced that airport testing can detect cases properly. you could test negative on one day and get the virus several days later. that is not what we are calling for. we recognise there needs to be a gap between taking the test and travelling. because of the incubation period. the kind of thing we are looking out for a predeparture testing pilot between london and new york, the busiest route in the world, you take a test
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maybe three days before you fly, keep yourself isolated, he then had a quick test at the airport either on arrival or departure to confirm you do not have covid, and then you can travel with confidence. it is that type of measure that is needed to save millions ofjobs in this country. who would pay for them? the plan is that they be paid for by the individual, the passenger. and it would be done privately. that is what we are working on. there is capacity to do that. we are moving on from the very expensive tests that take 2a hours to get results to cricket test which had a similar level of accuracy that can be delivered in an hour and cost far less tha n delivered in an hour and cost far less than the other test. this will allow the uk economy to get moving
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again. what are the chances of having an air bridge between america and the uk ahead of thanksgiving? we can absolutely do that. there is momentum on the us side. they want to start to open their borders again. there is a preference that the uk should be the first market to open up again. if it is not the uk, it will be france, germany or some other country. that shows we are in competition with some other countries who are more progressive on testing. the french have been testing since june. on testing. the french have been testing sincejune. they recognise aviation is vital to their economy and they had focused on getting that up and they had focused on getting that up and running. that has allowed them for the first time ever for paris charles de gaulle to overtake heathrow has being the busiest airport in europe. as we have left the eu, it is vitalfor the uk
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economy and the future to protect our trading routes, which is increasingly by air, by allowing aviation to restart in a safe way and testing is the answer. you talk about individuals having to pay themselves for the testing, which will add considerably to the amount ofafamily will add considerably to the amount of a family holiday and people going away. do you think the days of cheap air travel and the volume going are gone? i think air travel will remain affordable. prices may well go up in the short—term. the canary islands had just opened up recently. prices shot up because there was a huge demand. the more we can move to these cheap and quick tests, as other countries have not done, to get people going about their normal business safely, the more affordable we can travel. i think that is a way to go. the prime minister talked about this as the moon shot. he wa nted about this as the moon shot. he
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wanted to get this up and running by the end of october. that is where other countries are meeting t. the uk needs to keep up if we are not going to full behind. if it does not happen, how long can heathrow survive with the passenger numbers it has? —— fall behind. survive with the passenger numbers it has? -- fall behind. even if we had no passengers at all, we could survive for 15 months. weather forecast we had, we can survive well into 2023. with the forecasts we have had. if we are going to get the uk economy growing again, we will need heathrow to said uk passengers, helping to get kids across the world and helping to protectjobs here in the uk. -- and helping to protectjobs here in the uk. —— get goods across the world. we've been talking about
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the spectacular autumn colours on our trees this morning. and you've been sending us in your gorgeous pictures. this is the deer park at wollaton hall in nottingham, taken by ian. that is a beauty. shirley has sent this in of wyming brook in south yorkshire. this gorgeous picture was taken byjohn, looking over to blenheim palace. that is a gorgeous picture. so calm. it's notjust the tree canopies looking lovely — leaves on the ground are also beautiful. this is at padley gorge and was sent in by vince. that is around the corner from us. this is beamish woods in durham. thanks for sending this in, joanne. and last but certainly not least, this was the view across the lake at chatsworth house
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on monday, sent in by rachel. we will have a little bit of an explanation as to why it is so beautiful this year. i just explanation as to why it is so beautiful this year. ijust kept saying it and suddenly it appears on the telly. you redirect your walks and drives. there is one walk, the beaches are lovely and they are not right yet. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning... he's been nicknamed "the flying fish" — we'll hear from former paratrooper john bream who has attempted a new record byjumping a0 metres from a helicopter into the sea. he survived and he is going to talk to us about how and why it was. stay with us. headlines coming up.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... mounting pressure on the government to impose tougher coronavirus restrictions in the lead up to christmas but the environment secretary tells us the right measures are in place to give people a good festive season. for a lot of us, christmas cannot come early enough and some shops i think they are reporting record sales already but i'll be finding out what we're spending our money on. a major search in the english channel after a migrant boat heading
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for the uk sinks killing two adults and two children. the authorites believe more people could be missing. violence overshadows the final days of the us presidential election with clashes in philadelphia over the shooting of a black man by the police. danny dyer and daughter dani join forces to offer useful advice in a new podcast, but how helpful will they be? now the premise of it is, sort of with the dyers, is that we're sort of answering people's problems. but i just want to make it very, very clear today that we're not qualified to do that. good morning from the tower of london and in front of the white tower with the ravens by my side, the sky is blue and the forecast is for sunshine and blustery showers and gusty winds. all the details in ten minutes. good morning. it's wednesday 28th october. our top story. there are growing fears of tougher covid restrictions after uk deaths hit their highest level
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for five months yesterday. there were 367 deaths linked to the virus recorded, and 23,000 more cases. the liberal democrats are urging all four nations to agree guidance ahead of christmas. speaking earlier on breakfast, the environment secretary george eustice said the government understands the importance of the festive season. christmas is an important time for families, we recognise that. we know that as the restrictions and emergency litigants are put in place to control the virus, it starts to have an impact on people's well—being and mental health and undoubtedly there will be frustrations about restrictions people have to abide by but i think people have to abide by but i think people also understand we have to control the spread of the virus and we all have a role to play in doing that. i am sure we will be able to have a good christmas and families will be able to meet, but they may not be able to get together in the larger groups they normally would.
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that was the environment secretary talking to us earlier. our political correspondent jess parker is in westminster. good morning, you look at the front pages this morning and there is pressure to tighten up the rules?” think there is a concern obviously about the covid rates at the moment, you talked about the 367 deaths reported yesterday linked to covid although it is worth pointing out you sometimes see a lag in terms of deaths that have not been reported over the weekend. i thought george eustace was quite interesting speaking to you in the last hour, pretty much insisting the current government approach, this three tiered regional restrictions approach in england, is the right one for now, with him saying it is striking the right balance. also interesting that he admitted some sort of curb in terms of a number of people that can meet at christmas looks pretty likely, saying people might not be able to gather in as
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larger groups as they would like to point of this comes as the liberal democrats are calling for the different leaders across the four nations of the uk to come up with a consistent shared plan as to how on earth christmas is going to work. we have heard from the lib dems leader this morning, sir ed davey put it is increasingly clear they have lost control. the death rate is rising, they have not listened to expert advice. if they can do that now and do that across the four nations, there is still a chance we can get this pandemic much better under control, get the r rate down so christmas can be as near— normal as get the r rate down so christmas can be as near—normal as possible, that is what people are pleading for the government to do and on behalf of millions of families across the country. in a sense, christmas is just around the corner and people might be planning what they are going to do but in terms of covid, we have seen things change so fast so we have seen things change so fast so two months seems a long way away in that sense. the government does not appear particularly ready to
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come out with a plan at the moment with george eustice saying it was too early to say earlier. it is a warning the lib dems have made, people will inevitably want to travel and if restrictions are in place, leaders might be worried people could decide to break the rules, a breakdown in public compliance with people desperate to see theirfamilies. compliance with people desperate to see their families. jessica, thank you. a search operation is expected to continue in the english channel this morning, after a migrant boat sank off the coast of dunkirk yesterday. two children aged five and eight died, along with two adults. more than a dozen others were taken to hospital, but french authorities believe more could still be missing. our correspondent simonjones is in dover this morning. we know they will continue the investigation into what happened today? yes, they need to know why this boat capsized, killing at least four people. here in dover it is
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very windy today in the channel again this morning and it was in those type of conditions that this boat set out from northern france yesterday morning with around 20 people on board. a short distance into the journey across the channel, it was spotted sinking by a passing boat. that boat radioed in for help and that prompted a huge search in response involving helicopters and boats from belgium and france. 15 people were taken to hospital but four lives could not be saved and there is a theory that potentially other people are unaccounted for. i have spoken to french authorities this morning. it is a bit unclear what sort of search operation might ta ke what sort of search operation might take place because the reality is that if there are still people missing, almost 2a—hour is on from the boat capsizing, in reality would would be talking about a recovery rather than a rescue operation. simon, thank you. police officers in scotland say they are breaking up hundreds
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of house parties every week, despite coronavirus restrictions that ban large gatherings indoors. there have been more than 3,000 call—outs since police scotland were granted powers to break up large house parties in august. first minister nicola sturgeon said the move was necessary to ensure socialising continued in a safe and responsible way. baby clothes have been listed as essential items that should go on sale in supermarkets during wales' lockdown. the welsh government has updated its list of goods that can be sold by retailers during the firebreak lockdown. they have also said customers should be able to ask for nonessential items in exceptional circumstances. more than 67,000 people have signed a petition calling for a ban on nonessential items to be reversed. there's been a second night of violence in philadelphia after the fatal shooting of a black man by police. residents have been told to avoid the city centre after reports of mass looting by a mob of up to a thousand people. police insisted they opened fire on walter wallace when he ignored orders to drop a knife.
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heathrow airport is no longer the busiest in europe, as passenger numbers tumble because of the pandemic. passenger numbers betweenjuly and september were down by more than 8a% compared with the same period in 2019. the company has blamed the slow recovery on reluctance to introduce airport testing. on monday, we brought you the amazing story of paul harvey, the former music teacher living with dementia, who recorded a composition with the bbc philharmonic orchestra from just four improvised notes. classical music plays. so many of you were really moved by that. 2a hours after being released, the single is already storming the charts. it's in the itunes top 10, and is second on the
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amazon bestseller list. proceeds will be split between the alzheimer's society and music for dementia uk. that is amazing because you could tell there was so much reaction to paul and his son and that wonderful bit of work that there was going to bea bit of work that there was going to be a nice reaction. even hearing a snippet is beautifully karmic. carroll said earlier she had the knowledge when it comes to the tower of london but somebody has sent in a question! you are not far away from the crown jewels so do you know the estimated value of the crown jewels that are in there? i think it is just over £20 billion. how do you know the answer to everything?! carry on! well done! that wasjust luck i think! moving on, i want to show you this,
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you can see the tudor buildings over there a story good is that anne boleyn, the second wife of henry viii, used to come out of that building isa viii, used to come out of that building is a headless figure and drift from there to the chapel of st peter which is the flat roofed building just over there and she would sail down the aisle to the sight of her final burial place under the altar of the chapel because it is also said that she was executed more or less in front of the chapel in that area. i'm glad we're not seeing the ghost this morning! but are feeling a bit cold and not because it goes but the low temperature and not just and not because it goes but the low temperature and notjust here but in many areas and the forecast one of blustery showers with some heavy with hail and thunder and gusty winds, the strongest with exposure in that west and in the english channel and we are expecting some pretty large waves in the west today, as high as five or up to ten metres. dangerous conditions.
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through the day, that showers in the west and south will drift further east, moving quickly on the blustery winds. we will see a line form from the midlands into east anglia and the midlands into east anglia and the south—east and temperatures range from ten in the north to 13 or 14 range from ten in the north to 13 or 1a in the south. this evening at the top showers were packed up in western scotland, some clearer skies put chilly under those skies and by the end of the night, you find the next system will come in from the west bringing rain to northern ireland, south—west scotland, wales and south—west england. after a dry start in the east tomorrow, the rain will romp across all areas with gusty winds, still some cloud behind it and patchy light rain and drizzle. and a warning that into the weekend, it looks to be pretty windy and wet and for some, there will be some severe gales to watch out for. thank you, the queen of all knowledge, well done again! as if!
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this is from someone who hates quizzes! it is 11 minutes past eight. the last few months of the year traditionally bring with them times to celebrate and get together with family and friends. but this year, many cultural and religious celebrations have been hampered by coronavirus restrictions. each november, the city of leicester hosts one of the largest diwali celebrations in the uk. geeta pendse has been to find out how the festival of lights will be different this year. the lights are up, but the hindu, sikh and jain festival of diwali will be very different this year. here in leicester, which is currently in tier 2, no official lights switch—on and no large gatherings. a world away from what the city's golden mile is famous for, usually attracting around a5,000 people for one of the largest celebrations outside of india. from decorations to fireworks, this family business has been going for a0 years, and things are very slow.
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people are scared to come out. and obviously, people that do come out, it's a lot less than it usually was. i mean, compare that to last year, diwali time the last two weeks, you know, we have so many people who have stopped coming in. obviously, this year is far different. you'll see on the road. i think every store here is kind of struggling a little bit in terms of just with the footfall itself. next door, arinda's boutique is also suffering. she says it's notjust about profit, but the way people are feeling. honestly, there is such a buzz on this road at diwali time, and there's now virtually no—one on the roads. so, yeah, it's affecting our business quite a lot. in a cafe close by, three generations enjoying a meal out. normally, this time of year would be a chance to connect with family from all over, but with households not allowed to mix indoors, that's not happening and plans are compromised. well, we're a little bit deflated because we can't do all the things
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that we would normally do and, erm... well, we can still put candles around the house. we could still put candles around the house. the family that are abroad, we had a virtual get—together to celebrate, whereas previously, we've never done that. a lot of families are going virtual celebrations, so maybe a new way of celebrating. it's about spending time with your immediate family. you've just got to adapt and stay safe. so, us mixing and all of that, it's all well and good, but we have to look out for ourselves and be safe and make sure other people don't catch the virus, because that would be devastating. normally, this community centre would be at the heart of the diwali celebrations, showcasing a form of indian artwork known as rangoli, but this year, it's a covid testing centre — a real sign of the times. but despite this, the city council here are trying to keep the diwali spirit alive by encouraging people to take part in a virtual event. this year, we are unable to offer
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diwali as we would have liked. so, therefore, we are offering a virtual diwali — a recorded programme, a one—hour video for the people of leicester, so that they can enjoy diwali in their homes, with theirfamilies. but leicester has brought back the wheel of light, a familiar part of diwali celebrations, now made covid—secure. a much quieterfestival, reflecting the world as we know it now. geeta pendse, bbc news, leicester. of course, it's notjust diwali — many more celebrations in the coming weeks and months will be affected by the pandemic. for lots of families in the uk, winter festivities usually start with halloween, which is this saturday. this year, trick or treating is out of the question in many parts of the uk under tighter restrictions. bonfire night is also looking very different, with organised displays cancelled, or operating as drive—through events. diwali, as we've just been
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hearing, takes place on saturday, 1ath november. as it stands, families in most parts of the uk will be unable to come together to celebrate the hindu festival of lights. in december, millions of people in the uk celebrate christmas and the jewish festival of hanukkah. so, what does the future hold for everybody? what a question! let's speak to virologist dr chris smith, who is in cambridge this morning. thanks, as ever, for talking to us. there are so many things we look forward to at this time of year which involve us all being together in the same place, there have clearly got to be some changes. what do the figures tell you about what needs to be done? i thinkjason leech, scotland's national clinical director, stole the march on this when he said, prepare for your digital christmas. because i think behind the scenes, people suspect the numbers are not looking good, they are not looking rosy enough that we are going to be back to
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anything normal at christmas time so there is really a requirement to keep some kind of restriction in place. the big question is whether there is a listening for the festive period so that at least some of these things can happen, or at least ina limited these things can happen, or at least in a limited way. and that might be one sort of olive branch to the british public who i think are feeling really quite down at the moment about a lot of this. you can understand why people might be feeling down if they are looking at the front pages of the papers this morning, the daily telegraph talking about the second wave forecast which had been put before the prime minister and other government ministers talking about the second wave. the death peak not been as high as the first time round but lasted a lot longer. when you see that and they are calling for more drastic action now, i know lots of people are watching this morning who are thinking, we would love to do something at christmas, but with that in mind, it doesn't look likely, does it? no, i don't think so. likely, does it? no, i don't think so. but at the same time, you can try all you like to put into place
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public health measures, if you don't ta ke public health measures, if you don't take the public with you and there is no buy in, you might as well not bother. so the government know this and the government know you have got to have public support. one way to get some public support would be to say, this is our mission between now and christmas to do the following things, let's get the numbers down, and perhaps over christmas, and i don't know, i am not on the inside, one possibility might be there is a loosening or a slackening of the restrictions over a limited period of time so some degree of christmas could take place. if you did that, you would have to say to people, you have got to use your common sense. if you have vulnerable members of yourfamily, don't if you have vulnerable members of your family, don't invite them if you have vulnerable members of yourfamily, don't invite them over and perhaps do do a jason reach digital christmas for them. people who don't think they are unwell or at high risk if they were to catch it, perhaps there could be a limited gathering. —— jason it, perhaps there could be a limited gathering. ——jason reach. to restore some normality for people, that could be one approach. one
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interesting thing, most of the time, we say to people, i can't believe it is not even hallowe'en yet and the christmas decorations are up in the shops. we normally bemoan the fact christmas seems to come too early. perhaps getting your christmas shopping and earlier this year which would take the pressure off the shops and would mean you could shop in safety, that would be another way to avoid a christmas rush and any kind of mixing a people and increase in density of mixing increases the number of transmissions of the virus. so thinking ahead might be another way to drive the cases down, keep it low in the community and increase the odds we can at least do a limited something or other.m increase the odds we can at least do a limited something or other. it is very interesting you say that. we are talking about that today and it seems people are buying for christmas earlier. it is so difficult, isn't it? but when winnable you know —— when will we know we might be in a position to looseness? a government minister this morning said it is too early.
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it is far too early. and we haven't really got into winter yet and we know as we go further across the autumn and into winter, pressure is on the nhs rise because of the season, the cold weather kills people as well, it brings all the usual seasonal suspects, coughs and colds. if you are a vulnerable old person or somebody with pre—existing conditions, it is notjust coronavirus, those other conditions area big coronavirus, those other conditions are a big headache as well and they increase pressure on the nhs. all of the measures in place are about trying to reduce the pressure on the nhs. it is too early at this stage to know because we don't know what is going to happen as we go further into winter. it is like the deputy chief medical officerjonathan van—tam said recently, there is a headwind we are sailing into, that is winter, so we have all of the pre—existing package to deal with with coronavirus plus winter on top. so we just have to wait and see, there is no crystal ball that tells us there is no crystal ball that tells us by this time it will be less and we will be ok we just don't know. so
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much to think about, chris smith, thank you very much for being with us on thank you very much for being with us on breakfast. whether or not restrictions are lifted, there's no doubt that it's important for people to mark the festivities however they can this year. let's speak to the reverend richard coles, who is in finedon this morning. it is lovely to speak to you, good morning. these are difficult times, what do you say to your parishioners about how to plan at this point? well, like everybody else, we are subject to decisions made at a higher level than we can have any influence over. ourfirst higher level than we can have any influence over. our first priority of courses to keep people safe and that basically means following the rules. sorry about the dark! so many people —— of our people are in the at risk group and we need to take ca re of at risk group and we need to take care of their safety. we work around that, we have been doing services since august and are present regulations continue, we will offer services at christmas, although
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restricting the number, done by invitation or something. we are contacting people in the home safely as we can to make sure christmas comes to them if they can't come to christmas. and also, it is about the home very often, about the family. and for those people who have homes and families which they want to celebrate and feel safe and secure m, celebrate and feel safe and secure in, we do everything we can to support them doing that. and christmas is about, the same with diwali and hanukkah and other religious traditions, it is about light in darkness. we have had a year of living in darkness and everything we can do to kindle the light and remind us this won't last forever and the future will come, thatis forever and the future will come, that is probably a good thing. that is part of it, i think, richard, people are clinging on to something. some people will be watching this morning saying, why are you talking about christmas? the reason is it has been such a hard year for so many people and for many of those, clinging on to what might happen around christmas and getting together with family has been a source of hope for quite a long time? yes, and it is something which
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is very persistent even as religious affiliation falls away and the place of the church moves more to the margin of things. it is still a very powerful thing at christmas to feel that you come together. you remember who you are and you celebrate the relationships are key and fundamental to your life and that is a powerful thing. not for everybody, of course. we offer a service called blue christmas, for people who find christmas difficult. and for lots of people who are bereaved at christmas and find the whole thing a bit of an ordeal. i know you are coming up to an important anniversary as well from your point of view. there will be many people and you have indicated christmas is not necessarily a joyful time of year. no, it is about light in darkness and that means the reality of the darkness, for lots of people including me, my partner david died just before christmas last year so this is my first christmas as a widower and as a bereaved person. i spent enough time around people who
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have experienced the same thing at christmas to know what that is like, but that doesn't mean christmas is a wipe—out, it means you focus ever more closely and intently on that central reality, which is that in the heart of darkness and a cold, bleak midwinter, hope all of a sudden it appears. the hope of a life beyond this life, the hope of transformation. i'm sure many of our viewers will remember, around about this time last year in december, we spoke to a gentleman called terence it was part of a campaign with age uk who spent 20 christmases on his own and the estimation is about 850,000 people, elderly people, spend christmas on their own this year. in addition to what has happened in 2020, that will be a concern for many people in the coming months. yes, it is very tough for some people. throughout lockdown in this community, we have a support team, so we have ensured every household has someone with responsibility for looking out for them so anybody on their own has
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been able to have prescriptions picked up, shopping done and that daily contact. that is something we will sustain throughout christmas as well because it is really important if you can find a way of doing it safely, just do everything you can to ensure your elderly neighbours, your single neighboursjust to ensure your elderly neighbours, your single neighbours just know that you are there and that if they need anything, you are able to help them to connect to whoever can provide that for them. to lovely speak to you, thank you very much andi speak to you, thank you very much and i am sorry the dogs haven't made and i am sorry the dogs haven't made an appearance because they are lovely. hang on, come here, william. how many is it at the moment? two. this is the most photogenic one so i thought i would show you william. was he the one barking? yes, sorry about that. that's all right! we we re about that. that's all right! we were obviously taking too much of your attention. he is gorgeous, thank you very much, it is lovely to speak to you. a day with a dog on breakfast as i was a good day. the dogs are always on twitter.
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one major retailer says that many of us are planning our christmas shopping earlier than usual. vishala is in bromboroughfor us this morning to find out more. imagine fitting this tree through your door, it is huge. this business has been preparing for christmas sincejuly has been preparing for christmas since july and baubles has been preparing for christmas sincejuly and baubles are very popular, selling lots of these. food themed decorations are all the trend as well this year. candy canes, cup ca kes, as well this year. candy canes, cup cakes, sweets and all sorts. the reason we are here is data out today from john lewis the department store say 60% of us plan to sort our christmas shopping in the next few weeks. that might sound a little strange as lots of us are worried about money at the moment, so doctor carl is with us at the moment looking at consumer behaviour. is this a way of getting us to spend
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more money “— this a way of getting us to spend more money —— dr khan. this a way of getting us to spend more money -- dr khan. retailers are trying to manage the shift from bricks and mortar when christmas would traditionally take place to be a shift we have seen after the lockdown. they are trying to flatten the curve and manage the delivery infrastructure to service all of these christmas deliveries they need to do. the uk is not equipped, the delivery system is not equipped to manage this demand, so they are trying to get you to buy earlier so it is much more stable and constant demand for goods. avoiding a mad rush, apparently. will this affect prices? it shouldn't really affect prices? it shouldn't really affect prices if they want things to stay stable. they will try to have promotional activity to manage the demand constantly rather than have la st demand constantly rather than have last demand. if you think about click and collect deliveries, if they are going to be really stretched, you want to avoid a rush, which is in the last week of christmas. we knowjohn lewis have increased their delivery slots from
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44,000 increased their delivery slots from aa,000 which they had last year to 107,000 this year. just between december the 20th on the 24th. which shows you and demonstrate the shift of consumer behaviour and how they are trying to manage it.|j of consumer behaviour and how they are trying to manage it. i love a good bargain, what will this do for sales ? good bargain, what will this do for sales? we know that christmas is different. it is unique and challenging. we have never seen christmas like this in our recent memory. social distancing in stores which will make christmas day, boxing day sales very different, they are not going to be the same. online shopping, we think it will be an online christmas this year. dr amna khan, thank you forjoining us. we have been here a while, all morning, i have been looking around and finally i have found my dress for the christmas party, what you think are quite decent, isn't it?|j thought that was a tray! that is impressive! i will get noticed. thought that was a tray! that is impressive! iwill get noticed. -- thought that was a tray! that is impressive! i will get noticed. -- a tree. you certainly would. that would be a fire hazard. those were the days when we could go
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to christmas parties, remember them? yes, not sure there will be many of those, let's see. eight weeks to go. we could have decorations! time for the news and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm katharine carpenter. the police watchdog has criticised the way in which officers in london carry out stop and search, saying the met must ensure they don't make decisions based on stereotypes or racial bias. the independent office for police conduct investigated five controversial stop and searches involving black men. it found that poor communication and use of force had damaged confidence in the met. the force has accepted all 11 recommendations and says it's committed to ensuring stop and search is conducted professionally. london's mayor has accused the government of "putting lives at risk" by not implementing recommendations by the grenfell tower inquiry quickly enough. sadiq khan accused building owners and the government of "failing" the grenfell community over
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the lack of progress. in september, the home office said fire safety reforms would be introduced in the "fastest possible time". heathrow airport has recorded a loss of £1.5 billion in the first nine months of the year due to the coronavirus pandemic. passenger numbers betweenjuly and september were down by more than 8a% compared with the same period in 2019. a stables in teddington is providing comfort to riders with disabilities who've been told they can't have lessons during the pandemic. park lane stables is holding covid—secure sessions, focusing on the care of horses, so people don't miss out on contact with the animals. we call it wellies and well—being. they help us to take care of the horses and they groom the horses and feed the horses. we're outside and we're able to maintain the social distancing. we don't need to be hands—on with our participants to deliver this, like we would with our riding and carriage driving. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service
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on the tubes this morning. vauxhall bridge remains closed for ongoing roadsworks, for ongoing roadworks, causing delays in the area. the north circular is slow westbound from edmonton to palmers green. now the weather, with sara thornton. good morning to you. generally starting on a dry note this morning across london and the south—east. some early sunshine as well, but we've got some showers out towards the west, starting to move towards us through the morning. at first, a lot of dry weather, but in the middle part of the afternoon, the showers could well band together to bring longer spells of rain for a time. also, they could be heavy and thundery, but there will be some dry weather mixed in too, and some sunshine at times. a blustery old day, top temperature somewhere around 13, 1a celsius. typically, it will feel quite cool. this evening and overnight, the showers clear away and then we are dry and clear into the start of tomorrow. but it won't take long before the next wet weather system moves towards us. another frontal band of rain, a longer spell of rain in the middle part of tomorrow just moving across us. behind it, though, much,
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much warmer air for friday. you'll certainly notice it into the start of friday. friday itself, a lot of dry weather around, with some sunshine as well. make the most of it, it's fairly blustery. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. there has been exciting programming or this week after breakfast. after breakfast on bbc one this morning is morning live with kym and gethin. they're here to tell us what to expect. good morning! morning and thank you, we'll be keeping you company straight after you this morning to get you through the mid week with
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more stories that matter to you. from free school meals and half term hunger to day five of the firebreak in wales, we get to the big topics this week and we want your viewers tojoin in the conversation. this week and we want your viewers to join in the conversation. what is your opinion on this? we all hate waste so what to do about the slice of bread with the tiny bit of mould on it? bin it or eat it? bin it! our resident foodie anna is the answer to that dilemma and i think you might be surprised by some of the incredible tips on how to make everyday food last longer. also, finding the right words to support someone finding the right words to support someone who has lost a loved one is one of the hardest things to do but what should you never say? reverend kate bottley has the answer. send your questions on any of those topics right now by heading to our social media pages or e—mailing us. and if that wasn't enough, we will be filling our lungs with fresh air
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as water watched presenter michaela strachan gives us advice on how the great outdoors can give our mood a natural boost. we will see you at 9:15am. we have already started talking about mouldy food! we are talking about mouldy food! we are talking about mouldy food! we are talking about cheese, we both cut the mould off and carry on! we might be told that is wrong but we are still here! as a former paratrooper, john bream is no stranger to taking on dangerous tasks. but his latest death defying feat was all to raise money and awareness for mental health charities and perhaps even break a world record. after two years of training, he jumped 1a0 feet from a helicopter into the solent without a parachute. still going! it takes a long time! so far he's raised thousands of pounds. after being taken to hospital as a precaution, he's now back at home. we can speak to him now.
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good morning. first question, how are you? hello, fantastic, thank you, really well. second question, why? it wasjust you, really well. second question, why? it was just for veterans really, i wanted to raise the awareness and help prevent veteran suicide. and a stunt like this i thought we could grab the world's attention, the better ones could look at it and think to challenge ourselves and perhaps put smiles on peoples faces. i am sure it put smiles on some people but it was more a face of concern for mine! it took us through the jump, from a helicopter and how far? it was 140 feet. it was to break the world record for the highest jump feet. it was to break the world record for the highestjump into water from record for the highestjump into waterfrom an record for the highestjump into water from an aircraft. luckily come
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we picked up the highestjump into british waters as well. when you are falling like that, what are you thinking? oh my god! when you fall, you go through the motions, the training kicks in and it isjust muscle memory. it is all routine, com plete muscle memory. it is all routine, complete routine. my arms are doing this, i need to brace up at this point and it is an adrenaline state but it's quite magical, it's good. are you desperately trying to make sure your feet hit the water first in that situation? and how were you when you hit the bottom because we sort you are lying motionless for a while so did you black out for a bit? of course, yes, you aim to hit feet first, you must do, that sort of height, if you went head first you would break your neck. or any other position, horizontally for example, it could be catastrophic, it could be fatal so you must go in
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feet first and as a pencil like as you can. i went very deep when i was hit and you can. i went very deep when i was hitandi you can. i went very deep when i was hit and i was very disorientated for a point but the team came over gave mea a point but the team came over gave me a pat on the shoulder and i great, fantastic! you are amazing! did you have a boat or something dealing with the surface of the water or something? of course. i had my safety boat with my crew, or some crew, water professionals, water professional technician, professional technician, professional boat diapers and then another vessel which had a pump which was breaking the surface tension of the water —— professional boat divers. and you don't do this u nless boat divers. and you don't do this unless you have done a serious amount of training so tell us about that. yes, it isn't just amount of training so tell us about that. yes, it isn'tjust some chap going out and jumping from a
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helicopter. it has taken two years of planning and nearly two years of training. there are lots of strength and conditioning, fitness, food preparation, all sorts. you go to the pool and you jump from the ten metre board and that is really tough to master and get it right. then you basically, there are locations you can go to where you can develop slight increments, a metre or two each time so you don't go to severe heights until you have mastered the one below, it's notjust a case of going andjumping off one below, it's notjust a case of going and jumping off a local cliff because you can severely damage yourself, it takes a lot of professional training and advice. when will you find out if you have actually broken these world records? have you got an official confirmation but you need the certificate? yes, we have unofficial confirmation. to gain the record, it couldn't just go through
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confirmation. to gain the record, it couldn'tjust go through guinness, it had to go through the civil aviation authority and they had to grant us permission to actually undertake the event. they can confirm that it is a new world record and i have to send it to guinness, get the evidence and hopefully get the book! we have seen the evidence! the adrenaline rush must be something else? when i got to the edge of the helicopter, this event has taken so much planning and coordination, i have such a wonderful crew that had been with me from the very start one particular individual has been with me from the very start and the planning and effort that has gone into this, for the whole thing to be coordinated and in place, just to get to the edge of the aircraft ready to jump, thejump edge of the aircraft ready to jump, the jump was the easy bit! it was the jump was the easy bit! it was the coordinatorjason the jump was the easy bit! it was the coordinator jason —— the jump was the easy bit! it was the coordinatorjason —— the coordination, the weather window, unbelievably that night before it almost got cancelled because an oil
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tanker had been hijacked! we were just off the isle of wight! luckily the special forces cleared it out in nine minutes so thank you to them! they were clearing the way for your record attempt, obviously! briefly talking numbers, 1a0 feet, about a2 metres, travelling around 80 mph, any idea how deep you go? yes, we had about 11.5 metres of water depth for me and i think i went around 7.5 metres deep which is exceptionally deep. when you go to the pool at the diving centres, it's only about five metres and the cliff divers only have about six metres so to go to that sort of depth, it was a good impact! a good impact! brilliant, suffice to say, don't do this at
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home for all the above reasons! you have been fantastic, thank you very much and we hope you raise loads of money for charity. thank you for talking to us. gosh! thinking about those numbers, 80 mph and going almost eight metres down. they might be best known as an actor and a reality tv star, but danny and dani dyer have decided it's time to try their hand at something new — problem solving. while they might not seem like the most likely agony aunts, the father and daughter duo have launched a new podcast on spotify where they try to help listeners with their dilemmas. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been catching up with them. well, danny dyer and dani dyer. welcome to bbc breakfast. how did it work in your house, growing up, when people shouted, "danny?" how did you know who they were wanting? well, i'm big dan. and i'm little dan. she's little dan. yeah. very simple. a very simple process and it works lovely. i think it's so common
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though, isn't it? i don't know if it was from round canning town, everyone always calls, usually, their first born after their father's name. so you have decided to launch a new podcast, sorted with the dyers. now explain how it came about and what it's all about. since dani came out and she won love island and has become a lot more famous than me, we've had people sort of sniffing round us for ideas. the idea of us sitting in a room together and just talking, which is what a podcast is really, really appealed to us. me and my daughter, dani, have got a new podcast, called sorted with the dyers on spotify, where we sort out your life dramas. you can e—mail us in and we'll help you all solve your problems. happy with that one? yeah, i'm happy. are you happy? my face hurts with the smiling. doesn't suit me. we can do it from my gaff. we do on a sunday, so we have a nice roast after. now the premise of it is, sorted with the dyers,
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is that we are sort of answering people's problems. but i want to make it very, very clear today that we are not qualified to do that, so really we use people's problems, or their little dilemmas, to go off on our own little anecdotes about how it ties into us really. i don't actually know how they're allowing it, to be honest. well, it's still early days, darling. we could be taken off airany second. growing up, how much did you turn to your dad for advice? you know what? i feel like we've always been there for each other. i feel like we're very lucky. as a family, we've always been very open, you know. i thought... you can't hide anything from our family. they just know. they know if something's up. i feel like it's nice, the fact i've got that relationship with my mum and dad. although they are my mum and dad, we're friends. they had me young, so i've sort of been through everything with them. so it'sjust nice to sort of turn to him really. 18. so we sort of, in a way, grew up together. yeah.
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especially me, it took a long time to grow up. you've got to get the fine line between being friends and being father and daughter relationship but it's a learning process being a parent. i've said all this to dani. obviously, she's pregnant herself. there is no book really you can read. you'vejust got to... you've got to learn on the job every single day. it's a revelation, being a parent, it really is. and it can be a beautiful thing but it can be one of the most frustrating and irritating things you'll ever do in your life. dani, how's it been being pregnant during lockdown? it has been all right, to be fair. i'm enjoying it. ifeel like i'm nesting, actually. but it is difficult. it is. what is difficult is the fact my mum has not been to a scan yet, something like that. so i feel like that's the only struggle. i had a bit of panic the other day. i thought, my daughter is going to give birth, it's quite a traumatic thing. i was worried about the idea of her giving birth and i don't know why. i don't know. ijust had a little nutty half hour thinking about it. 0h, dad.
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i know it's all going to be fine but it's such a thing, isn't it? it's a miracle, the whole thing. before then we've got christmas. now, little dan, what is the dyer family christmas normally like? it's just always about spending time with the family. we have the most funniest, best chats just sitting around the table, dad, don't we? yeah. my nan is there, my uncle and auntie. if there was a camera in that room, honestly. we just want to spend time together really. and that's why ijust really hope this christmas we can be together. you know, it'sjust a lovely time and that's why it's quite worrying, the idea of not being able to do that this year. i do think that this is the biggest thing to ever happen to mankind, by the way. this has never, ever happened before. you know, the idea of something — this invisible thing that has shut down everything, absolutely globally, all over the world. there's been some horrific things happen to mankind over the years with some wars and stuff and, you know, the terrorist attacks, just things in general that do grind things to a halt, but the fact that we are all going through it
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together, its really hard to compute that in my brain. yeah. imean, it's... the idea of, potentially, not being able to sit round a table with my daughter and, you know, my in—laws, it's crazy talk to me. how easy are you finding it to obey the rules? so, it's very confusing. it's perfect to break rules really because it's hard to understand what the rules are. just keep them simple and people will abide by it. we want to get out of this as quickly as possible but, as confusing as it is, itjust makes it so difficult. my one rant would be that we must learn now that the people who went to eton can't run this country. 0k. they've done it, they've tried to do it and this little small group, who all went to the same school, in the same class, it doesn't work. so, ifeel we need some working—class people,
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people that have lived a real life, people who are in touch with what is going on in reality to maybe come to the front now and start to get involved in how this country is run. would you ever go into politics full—time? 0h, imagine. no, darling, i'm too busy. i've got a game show on at the moment. i've got another podcast with my daughter and, of course, i'm in the greatest soap that's ever been. so, i'm all right for the minute. so, let's just watch the government unravel themselves, i think. and let's see what... let's just try and stay safe and try not to catch this thing. on the other side, i'm sure we're all going to be better, stronger, more considerate people for it. advice from the dyers, the pub is there. we have been having a lovely morning looking at the tower of london with
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carol, getting as in the mood for hallowe'en. good morning. what a view i have this morning and what a guest! iamjoined by i am joined by chris, you havejust done a 1a hour night shift, you must be exhausted. ijust about survived being watchman for the night, yes. we have been talking spooky stories, have you encountered any yourself round here? funny you should say that, i am round here? funny you should say that, iam perhaps round here? funny you should say that, i am perhaps the least brave young around here and i tend to see lots of different things and i recently wore my previous watchman's duties, i was looking at the tower isado duties, i was looking at the tower isa do at duties, i was looking at the tower is a do at night time sometimes and looking at the middle tower and i could feel something looking at me, somebody looking at me. i thought it was a protection —— reflection from the hotel opposite and did not pay much attention to it. there was still something there and i looked up still something there and i looked up and in the window was a face staring back at me. i looked at it and engaged it for a little while
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and engaged it for a little while and then i looked away and looked back up and it had gone. did it do anything when you engage with it? no, again, i didn't believe what i was seeing. because i didn't believe it, i didn't mention it to anyone else until recently, my last watchman's shift before this, i spoke to another night god and he said, yes, i have seen that before. 0h, said, yes, i have seen that before. oh, my goodness, do not know what it was? no, no idea, we have so many souls, this is the place where souls get lost, people have been imprisoned, executed, murdered here, so imprisoned, executed, murdered here, so it could be one of thousands of people. have you ever had to have anywhere exercised. there is a story about the beaten tower behind me. they used to be people who would report a sensation of somebody trying to push them in the middle of their back down a spiral staircase and this went on for a few years and the numbers of reports got bigger and more and more reports and in the end, they had to go inside and they did a bit of research and they found there was a lost soul who had been
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imprisoned in the beauchamp tower and had watched his friends much tower hill towards their executions and had been left behind and was trapped and didn't know he could leave. he needed somebody in authority to go inside the tower and tell him it was ok to leave so one of the offices in the tower walked up of the offices in the tower walked up there and told him he was free to go and there has been no reports of anybody sense. we love a ghost story here! have you experienced any more yourself? literally, yes, a few weeks ago, i was sat in my front room with my daughter watching something on her laptop, the lights we re something on her laptop, the lights were off and the main tv off and we we re were off and the main tv off and we were having a betterfather and daughter time and the next thing, the main tv came onto a white screen and there was a shadowy figure stood in of it. wow! that freaked me out a bit, but then my daughter said, don't worry, dad, that happened to mea don't worry, dad, that happened to me a new year ‘s eve as well. don't worry, dad, that happened to me a new year 's eve as well. do you know who that was? no, we have no idea, it is something we have to put
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up idea, it is something we have to put up with in the tower of london, we can't move out so what is in your home is in your home, should you believe it. did anybody tell you before you came to work at the tower of london you might encounter ghosts? i think if they did, i perhaps wouldn't be here!|j ghosts? i think if they did, i perhaps wouldn't be here! i don't blame you, neither would i! have you any stories about the ravens? we have been talking about them this morning and they are very cosy. we have been looking at erin and rocky and they have been close together for the duration. there has been a lockdown story. melina used to be alone raven and she didn't get on with the other ravens and she preferred the other ravens and they didn't like her. jubilee tried to court herfor didn't like her. jubilee tried to court her for many weeks to no success. during lockdown, she got closer and closer. and now, jubilee and melina are an item and they share a cage now and she has been brought across to the main body of the ravens and that is the love story of lockdown. chris, i have
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loved your stories, thank you so much. what a brilliant morning it has been at the tower of london and the weather has been kind as well. we still have sunshine and it is dry. but the forecast for today is sunshine and showers. blustery showers and gusty winds especially across the west and the south, gusts in excess of a0 mph. the other thing to watch out for in the west. large waves with low pressure in the atlantic, it has whipped up big waves that could be as high as five or ten metres high. that low pressure is bringing in a lot of showers, we have them in the west and the south and during the day, some winds blow to the east. but you have got a better chance of staying dry in the east. and during the afternoon, some of them merge across parts of wales and the midlands, east anglia and the south—east. temperatures ranging from ten in the
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north to about 13 or 1a in the south. this evening and overnight, showers increase for a time across western scotland, there will be clear skies and this is where we have the lowest temperatures. but by the end of the night, a weather front coming in from the west introduces rain to northern ireland, south—west scotland, wales and south—west scotland, wales and south—west england. under that rain, not as cold as it is going to be under the clear skies where we could see lows in towns and cities down to three or four. see lows in towns and cities down to three orfour. tomorrow, we see lows in towns and cities down to three or four. tomorrow, we start on a bright note in eastern areas, but it won't be long before the rain already in the west moves towards the east and as it clears in western areas, there will be cloud left with patchy rain and some drizzle. and temperatures a little bit higher than today. into friday, we start off with rain across the north west off with rain across the north west of scotland. that petered out during the day. rain across england and wales, that fragments during the day leaving a bit of cloud including in northern ireland. quite blustery
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winds as well, but temperatures up to 18 degrees. that is unusual for this time of year. but that lead to sin toa this time of year. but that lead to sin to a very unsettled weekend, very wet and very windy. carroll, on behalf of us and everybody else, you have done a sterling job this week, mantell cassell, hampton court palace, tower of london, i know you have enjoyed yourself, but you have been brilliant, thank you. ghost stories. thank you very much, much appreciated, but i have a huge crew behind me. it is not about them, carol, it is all about you! we've all been valuing our green spaces a little bit more this year, and as autumn gets under way, you... a lot of people have been telling you about the spectacular trees and a lot of people have noticed. it's particularly vivid this year thanks to the sunny weather of the spring and the rain in september.
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one beautiful display is in stourhead in wiltshire, so we sentjohn maguire to take in the views. at this time of the year, the lake at stourhead offers one of the finest views in the whole of the national trust. but we're in search of a different perspective. one from above. so, the best way to appreciate the autumn leaves is to get right in amongst them, 100 feet high, up this tulip tree. i've never climbed a tree this way before. the foot extenders go a little bit longer. there is a little buckle on it. well, it's a lot harder than i thought it was going to be. i'm absolutely exhausted. but as with a lot of things in life, the hard work is met with a great reward. the view above the tree tops here is just absolutely stunning. look at that. joe ashman is a tree surgeon and looks after the estate's most precious resource. joe, so this is your office, this is where you hang out? it is, yeah. i look after the trees, basically. managing trees and managing
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the form and the structure of the trees, you can prolong its life considerably really. so as they grow older, they do kind of get too big for themselves. they can start falling apart as they get older. so we can reduce weight here and there. the trust had predicted a spectacular autumn for leaf colour and the trees haven't disappointed. the weather this year, so problematic for so many, has proved golden for leaves. very often, it's quite difficult to predict autumn colour, but it tends to be years when the trees are happy. i mean, it's a strange word to use for trees, but when they have had a lot of sunshine during the summer, there is plenty of water in the soil, so they're not stressed. you get that complex chemistry going on in the leaves, creating all these lovely pigments that we've got around us now. the tree is shutting down for the winter. and part of that process is a controlled loss of leaves, and it needs to withdraw some of the valuable chemicals and sugars back into the tree
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before it loses them. covid has meant a cap on numbers here at stourhead, and at properties and gardens across the trust's estates. it'll mean a fall in revenue of around £200 million. and there is another disease causing major problems. ash dieback is ravaging ash trees throughout the uk. we're climbing again — this time, using the 205 steps inside king alfred's tower to give us a bird's eye view of the forest. oh, you can see forever! you can. if we look outside over the tower, you can see the effect it is having to the surrounding landscape. i don't think it's going to be particularly devastating to the garden. but where it will make a big difference is on our tenant farms. for the last 30 or a0 years, it's been used as hedgerow planting, because it doesn't shade out the crops, so it's been very useful for that. it's going to be as bad
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as dutch elm, i think. that's what the prediction is going to be. green spaces have been vital in helping so many people to cope with the pandemic. and as some of the green turns golden, or red, there is still so much solace, thanks to the beauty of nature. john maguire, bbc news, wiltshire. ijust want i just want to go there. it looks amazing, doesn't it? you've been sending us your spectacular pictures of autumn leaves this morning. at louise ‘s request. thank you. look at that. a lot of these are around sheffield. this gorgeous aerial shot is over bamford edge in the peak district. that is one of our favourite places to go. cani to go. can i visit you? i'm not allowed, though. it's not just golds and oranges out there though — rachel sent us this lovely red vibrant tree from kelvingrove park in glasgow. that is a beautiful park as well. if you stop and look up, you might be lucky enough to see something like this. thanks carol in york for that one.
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i would love to know how old that is, that is beautiful. this is lynn's garden in crowthorne this morning — lovely different shades there. and that is just going to get better. one more? no. anyway, thank you for your pictures. i have really appreciated it. it is 8:59am.
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this is bbc news, i'm geeta guru—murthy, the headlines at nine... growing pressure on the government for more clarity on coronavirus restrictions in the lead up to christmas after uk deaths hit their highest level for five months. but the environment secretary says the right measures are in place to give people a good festive season. i am sure we will be able to have a good christmas and families will be able to meet but they may not be able to get together in the sort of larger groups they normally would. leaked warning from government scientific advisors warns that 25,000 people could be in hospital with the virus by the end of november. we'll be speaking to a former chief government scientific advisor

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