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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 5, 2020 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 5:00... borisjohnson and the president of the european commission speak to try and find a way forward on brexit trade talks. the uk vaccine regulator says the covid—19 vaccine will ‘definitely‘ be ready to go into care homes in the next two weeks. a large—scale coronavirus vaccine rollout begins in russia — a large—scale coronavirus vaccine rollout begins in russia — but the sputnikjab is still undergoing mass testing. it's small business saturday — what's next for the high street as we know it — after the recent collapse of household names? and coming up at 5:45 — a look at those helping people in burnley who are facing severe financial hardship due to the pandemic —
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in poverty and the pandemic: burnley‘s front line. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. boris johnson is speaking to the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, to try to push forward talks about a post—brexit trade deal. negotiations were put on hold last night, because of what were described as "significa nt divergences" between the sides. time is running out for a deal to be reached and ratified before the deadline on new year's eve. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. checking out for now, the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, left his london hotel this morning after talks
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on a future trade deal were put on hold last night. what does that mean for the chances of a deal? any hope for a deal? good morning. we keep calm, as always, and if there is a way, still a way, we will see. "we will see," he said. his parting words as he returned to brussels gave nothing away. but a statement from both sides last night made clear there are still big differences to overcome, significant divergences remain between the two sides, lord frost, the uk's chief negotiator, and michel barnier said. so, it is over to these two, the political masters on both sides of these talks. the prime minister and the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, are due to speak on the
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phone this afternoon to determine whether a deal can be done. it will be decided politically, not in the negotiating chambers. there will be compromises, i suspect, on both sides. what the prime minister will have to protect, the key issues of control, not giving control away to the european union in pursuit of economic outcomes. but there will be, in my view, it is in everybody‘s interest to come a deal. fishing — how much, if any, is allowed by eu countries in uk waters is one of the big remaining sticking points. along with competition rules, often called the level playing field, and thirdly how any deal is enforced. meanwhile, businesses say they are left in limbo. if we have a deal, at least there is some certainty. even if we have a deal, we have to adjust. the government have sent out a letter to every business in the country saying "check, change, go. " well, check what? change what? go where? there will be big changes to the uk's relationship
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with the eu when the current transition period ends. exactly what depends on the progress of talks from here on. that was jonathan blake that wasjonathan blake reporting. jill rutte is from the independent research group, ‘the uk in a changing europe', and has been following the talks. speaking to me earlier, she said the final stages of these talks were always going to go back and forth. i think it was never going to be the case that we would get a deal of this sort of moment, if you like, done between michel barnier and david frost in some sort of grim conference centre belonging to the business department. i think everybody accepted that at some point they would have to go back to the political leadership. that is what we are seeing this afternoon. what we do not know is quite what they do, whether they have been presented with an option that the negotiators do not quite think they have got the authority to sign off,
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that they can bless, in which case, we might actually see things move extraordinarily fast. whether theyjust declare that it is all hopeless, that is also possible. the gaps are unbridgeable. 0r whether they need to do some more consultation, particularly on the eu side. while boris johnson can, with one look behind him at his back benches, decide for the uk. ursula von der leyen is president of the european commission, she ultimately needs to get all her member states on board. that is what we have heard in recent days, some of those are getting concerned that the eu is compromising too much. one of the things the uk has always assumed is that member states will be more pro—deal than the commission, but in some ways it is the other way round, michel barnier is actually more flexible than some, at least, of those member states. that's interesting. so, in the words of michel barnier, is there still away? how much give can either side allow? we do not actually, sitting here,
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know whether the are quite close. whether it is a question of 5% on fish or what, because we do not know what either side's bottom line is. we do not know if they have come up with some new formula on this level playing field or whether it is really stuck and has not moved that much from their earlier positions and they are digging in. we also do not know, really, politically whether boris johnson really wants a deal. he says he wants a deal, a lot of people regard it as a big political failure not to deliver a deal. he has assured us all along he could do. but a lot of backbenchers are chomping at the bit for no deal. he is going to have to have regard to them. france is interesting. we are hearing a lot about them. a bit of a brexit bad cop. emmanuel macron seems to like that title. they are already threatening using their veto, keeping a particularly close eye
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on fishing rights. how much does that access to british waters mean to them? there are industries in the uk that are worth far more, aren't there? fish is a slightly, i am not going to say absurd, but it is a really interesting topic. it has been a big issue of contention all along through these talks. it is economically very insignificant in the uk. it is also economically very insignificant even in france. but clearly it matters a lot. if you are a historic fishing community, the uk's historic fishing communities felt that they have suffered from 40 plus years of membership of the common fisheries policy, denying them access to uk waters. that is what they hope to regain through brexit, at least some of them. the french, northern french fishermen, there are some communities that take a lot of fish out of uk waters, and basically see their livelihoods going to ruin
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if something like this, the existing access does not continue. that is why it is politically so difficult for both sides to give way on this. there are very high expectations. the french have started to roll the pitch a bit, that things have to change. the eu's starting point was that absolutely nothing should change on fish, basically the uk might have gone through brexit but fish would be status quo. they have moved a bit on that, but every time michel barnier has come back to the eu fishing ministers, just eight member states have really cared about access to uk fishing waters. when michel barnier's had those calls with fishing ministers to seek a bit more flexibility, they have always said we told you what we want, go back and get that for us. gps in england will start offering the coronavirus vaccine from the 14th of december. patients aged 80 or over, will be the first to get it. care homes in england are expected to receive the vaccine within weeks — with the first vaccinations in hospitals taking place next week.
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andy moore reports. any allergies that you may have? no. and are you pregnant? nurses in a coventry hospital practising how they will administer the new pfizer vaccine, beginning next week. because the jab comes in large batches at ultra—low temperatures, the initial roll—out will be at 50 hospitals across the uk. but we now know that will be swiftly followed with the vaccinations by groups of gps in england, beginning on monday 1a december. the priority for getting the jab will be the over—80s who can make their own way to the vaccination centre. special freezers will be provided to store the vaccine at —70. gp practices will come together to manage the programme. they've been told it's their top priority, with only urgent care for all other patients. after that, within two weeks, doses of the vaccine will start going out to care homes.
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plans are in place to reduce the boxes containing the vaccine doses to more manageable consignments. all of this will place a huge burden on the nhs, and so the chief medical officers of the four home nations have written to staff, praising them for their hard work, whilst warning that this winter will be especially hard because of the pressures from covid. they warn of a possible surge in cases because of extra socialising over christmas, and they say for the next three months, vaccines will only have a marginal effect on the burden for the nhs. every action counts when it comes to protecting ourselves and our loved ones from coronavirus. that's why the nhs has launched a new public information film comparing the wrong and the right ways we can go about our lives every day to stop the spread of covid. it reminds us that up to a third of people show no symptoms, so they can spread the virus unknowingly. andy moore, bbc news.
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the labour party has revealed that sir keir starmer is self—isolating. a member of his private office staff tested positive for coronavirus, but the labour leader says he's not showing symptoms. in line with the government's guidelines, he'll be out of self—isolation on the 16th december. the mayor of liverpool, joe anderson, has been released on bailfollowing his arrest, as part of a fraud inquiry. he and four other people were detained as part of a year—long investigation into bribery allegations, linked to the awarding of building contracts in the city. in a statement this afternoon, joe anderson says he "will be talking with cabinet colleagues to ensure the challenges our city faces with the covid pandemic continue to receive the focus they deserve." he went on to say, he supported the labour party's decision to suspend him while the investigaion continues.
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three people have been taken to hospital following an explosion at a house in west yorkshire. the extent of their injuries isn't known. the blast happened at a property in illingworth, near halifax, at around 7.30 this morning. an investigation is under way. all hens, turkeys and other captive birds will have to be housed indoors from the 14th of december, to prevent the spread of bird flu. the chief vets for england, scotland and wales made the decision after a number of cases were detected. the government say the risk to humans is "very low" and should "not affect the consumption of poultry products". thousands of people have joined more protests in paris to call for a new security law to be dropped. the government has already backtracked on the law's most controversial provision, which would have effectively banned the filming of police officers. the march began peacefully but this afternoon police have fired tear gas
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and protesters have burned cars and barricades. russia's coronavirus vaccination programme is under way, despite the sputnik vaccine still going through safety and efficacy trials. the firstjabs have been administered in clinics in moscow. it comes as russia is reporting record high numbers of confirmed covid—19 cases. our moscow correspondent, sarah rainsford reports. this is one of the moscow clinics that is now rolling out russia's sputnik vaccine to the population. first of all, doctors, medics generally, health workers, teachers and social workers have been invited to receive the vaccine. now, sputnik v is still in an experimental form, more trials for its safety and its efficacy
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are still under way. but the chief doctor at this clinic has said she is confident it is fine to roll it out now. translation: this vaccine has been officially registered. we have enough research to know that it is 92% effective. and if there is a choice to get sick or have the vaccine, then this is a dangerous disease, the answer is obvious. this is a leaflet that patients are given before they get the jab and it talks about some of the possible side effects, although it sets out that they should be pretty minimal and last maybe one to three days, perhaps some weakness, perhaps some sickness or a fever. and it suggestsjust taking paracetamol. now, some 5000 people have supposedly signed up already to get this vaccination in the mass roll—out, although we have only seen a handful or so he actually getting the jab. translation: we see how sick people get, so we have no doubts
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at all about getting vaccinated. we use protective clothing, of course, and now we are getting the vaccine as early as possible. from the very start, russia's treated this quest for a covid vaccine as something of a race. certainly it declared itself the first country to register a vaccine, sputnik v, back in august, even before the mass trials had begun. now it is moving very quickly to roll the vaccine out for use by the population at large. there are still questions about how much it can actually produce of sputnik v, though. manufacturers unable to quickly scale up their production. president putin has said 2 million doses should be available for people this year. and then next year, russia plans to roll this out much faster, much wider as the number of covid cases in the country continues to grow. the headlines on bbc news...
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borisjohnson and the president of the european commission speak to try and find a way forward on brexit trade talks. the uk vaccine regulator says the covid—i9 vaccine will ‘definitely‘ be ready to go into care homes in the next two weeks. a large—scale coronavirus vaccine rollout begins in russia — but the sputnikjab is still undergoing mass testing. with christmas just three weeks away, it's usually the busiest time of the year for our retailers. nonessential shops have now re—opened in england — but in a week that's seen the collapse of giants including topshop and debenhams, is this the end of the high street as we know it? our business correspondent katie prescott reports. lifting the shutters in bishop auckland. shelves here are stacked and shoppers are out and about once again. it's not as busy as i thought
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it was going to be, to be honest. we came down and didn't think we'd be able to get into any shops, but it's quite nice. it's a pleasure to see people in the street, and hopefully, hopefully, we'll hang on to some of the businesses in this street. it's not the same, online shopping, because you can't see what you're buying, can you? sometimes it's ok but sometimes it's, you know, what you get is not what you wanted. so it's nice to be able to come out and look again. it's more like the small businesses, i'm pleased to see them up and running, because i think, like, obviously the big high street chains, they've kind of held themselves. it's just all these people that have, like, been going for generations and they've had to shut down. it's just, yeah, it's quite scary. it's also scary when you look at the drop in the number of people shopping around the uk. yesterday, uk high streets saw a drop of 39% compared to last year. uk shopping centres, a drop of 29%. retail parks, though, are faring better, down just 4%. overall, there's been a drop of almost a third.
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this pandemic—induced plunge in footfall has been a catastrophe for small shops. trends that have been brewing for years accelerated in the course ofjust a few short months. there's the cost of paying for premises like these, business rates, the high tax on property, and then, of course, the often cheaper and more convenient alternative — online shopping. it's a really tough time to be in retail. to help sweeten the deal for independent retailers like this chocolate—maker, there are calls for the government to redistribute the business rates relief cash that several large supermarkets have given back to the treasury this week. as for so many, christmas is the most important time of year for her business. but this season, she's afraid there'll be fewer parcels to wrap. lockdown has been a roller—coaster, really. a huge amount of self—doubt, huge amount of loneliness, huge amount of, "what am i going to do with our small business now?" you know, we have smaller shoulders — how are we going
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to weather the storm? i have to say that, you know, without the masses of messages of support from my customers, it would have been different. much of that local support has come from lockdowns, meaning people are shopping more in their local areas, to the detriment of cities. people have discovered stores that perhaps they never even shopped in when they were working away a long distance or they were commuting into big cities, so it's a real opportunity for independents. although they're having a massively hard time at the moment, if they can continue to capture that spirit of local, going forwards, then hopefully it will help them to recover quicker. the limited time shops have had to open means december is even more vital than ever, as they face pressure to make up for lost ground in the run—up to christmas. katie prescott, bbc news. climate change remains one of the major issues facing humanity today. the planet continues to warm up — and the dangers facing us all continue to mount.
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in germany a group of activists are trying to combat the destruction of an ancient forest and they had a very special guest to help them. the bbc‘s tim allman explains. so renowned and so respected is this pianist,... he so renowned and so respected is this pianist, . .. he can so renowned and so respected is this pianist,... he can sometimes be found in the studios of the bbc. here he is rehearsing for an appearance on bbc news in 2017. a very different kind of performance taking place in the wilds of central germany. a rendition of danny boy in
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memory of this forest, some of which is being torn down for a new road extension. translation: even though the occasion is very sad, and just now during the rehearsal i had the feeling of playing some sort of swansong for something that leaves us, iam swansong for something that leaves us, i am still thankful, happy and content us, i am still thankful, happy and co nte nt to us, i am still thankful, happy and content to be here with you. protests have been going on here for more than a year. environmental groups trying to preserve the country's habitat. the authorities determined to allow lawful construction work to go ahead. translation: what's happening here is reduced to a conflict between activists and the police. this is an attempt to defend and protect ecosystems and our livelihood so that we can survive. there's something almost deeply poetic about
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it. the presence of a celebrity attracted some attention but the felling of trees continued. for these demonstrators, the day ended ona these demonstrators, the day ended on a sad note. tumbleweed has swamped a suburb of the australian city of melbourne. the grass piled up across streets, front yards, driveways and pools after 70 mile winds swept grass in from countryside paddocks. a resident said it was an unprecedented event. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. we have had a vigorous area of low pressure which has brought wet weather over the last few days and sleet and snow. most significant snowfall of the season so far. that is moving away and for the next few days things will turn settled, drier, remaining cold but also the chance of frost, ice. fog could be
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an issue on sunday morning across the south—east quadrant of the country. bit of low cloud. any rain across the south coast will clear away and showery rain for eastern scotla nd away and showery rain for eastern scotland and north—east england will fizzle out. many places will be dry by the afternoon with variable cloud and some areas are staying grey. will feel cool but temperatures around the seasonal norm. through sunday night it stays dry under clear skies and it is going to turn cold with some frost, fog and some ice developing. into the new week for monday, it looks like we are in between two weather systems but the system over the north sea will impact the weather for tuesday onwards, so it will turn unsettled, thanks to this. certainly for monday it looks like it will be a cold day, frosty start with fog around, low cloud and it could stay cold and grey in some areas all day. bit of sunshine further west and temperatures ranging from freezing to around five or 6 degrees. later
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in the day we will see wind and rain pushing into the east coast of the uk. that means for the rest of the week attends more unsettled with low pressure beginning to take over. this is the picture as we move out of monday into tuesday, there is low over the north sea drift westwards into much of the united kingdom, particularly central and northern areas. could be the south of england which could remain dry but the winds will pick up and it will turn windy across northern areas, bands of rain or showers spinning around this area of low pressure and we could see some snow and sleet over the high ground of the pennines and over the hills of scotland. temperatures between five and may be eight or 9 degrees in the south, given some sunshine here. the low pressure sticks around into wednesday as well but starts to weakening in situ across the country. we will start fairly windy, outbreaks of rain around him many areas but for the
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second part of the day there showery bursts of rain will die down along with the winds. we could see some brightness here and there. stay tuned to the forecast for the details. there's temperatures ranging from six to 8 degrees. the air is chilly. as we move into thursday, we could see this area of low pressure push into the near continent. it could affect southern britain for a while and turn windy again. it could stay unsettled for the rest of the week and into the following weekend as the jet stream will be reinvigorated and taking aim towards the uk, that will stay weather systems towards our shores. friday we could see another system bring some wet and windy weather but there's a chance into the following weekend, we could see dry interludes at times before another area of low pressure will sweeping off the atlantic. it is very changeable for the rest of the new week. we could see drier interludes at times. it could stay on the cold side but in the following week, with the new
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area of low pressure moving in of the atlantic, it could bring u nsettled the atlantic, it could bring unsettled conditions and something a little bit milder.
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with the president of the european commission in an effort to break the deadlock over post—brexit trade talks. borisjohnson and ursula von der leyen are speaking by phone — after negotiators for both sides said there were ‘significant divergences' at the end of a week of intensive talks. the uk has this year followed eu trade rules, but the so—called transition period ends on december 31st. here's chris mason — his report
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contains flash photography. checking out for now. the eu's chief negotiator leaving his hotel in london after talks on a trade deal were paused. so what does this mean for the chances of an agreement? any hope for a deal? good morning. reporters: good morning. any news? we will keep calm as always, and if there is a way, there is still a way, we will see. mr barnier did not give much away as he headed for his train to brussels, but a statement from both sides had already made clear there are big differences to overcome, or significant divergences, as they were described. so it's over to these two, the prime minister and the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen are talking
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about now to try to work out if a deal can be done. it will be decided politically, not in the negotiating chambers. there will be compromises, i suspect, on both sides. what the prime minister will have to protect, the key issues of control, not giving control away to the european union in pursuit of economic outcomes. but there will be, in my view, it's in everybody‘s interest to come to a deal. in the four and a half years since the eu referendum we have all become wearily familiar with loose talk of deadlines. but this time it really is it. the uk left the eu at the end of january and since then has been in a transition period where very little has changed. but that runs out at the end of this month. so if there is going to be a trade deal, it has to be sorted in the coming days. fish, how many, if any, are allowed to be caught by eu countries' boats in uk waters is one of the big remaining disagreements,
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along with competition rules and how any deal is enforced. if we have a deal, at least there is some certainty, even if we have a deal we have to adjust. the government has sent out a letter to every business in the country saying, check, change, go. well, check what? change what? go where? big changes are coming to the uk's relationship with the eu, whether there is a deal or not. this is now the endgame. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let's get the view from brussels now with our correspondent nick beake. nick, what is the mood music there? throughout this process the eu has insisted it does want to trade deal, largely to avoid new tariffs or taxes on goods moving between the two sides coming in onjanuary one, meaning some things like clothes,
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foods, cars would be more expensive for everyone. but there is a feeling here that ursula von der leyen in this phone call has less room for manoeuvre, she has to keep on board 27 leaders of the eu countries and she cannot be seen to undermine their project. boris johnson she cannot be seen to undermine their project. borisjohnson on the other hand will be able to see if there is an outline of a deal there that he believes to be taking back control, or certainly whether he can sell it to the british people as such. we know there are considerable differences between the two sides. i can tell you they started talking about an hour ago and the very latest i've heard is the conversation continues. this is not a quick saturday afternoon chat. this is really crucial stuff. there isa this is really crucial stuff. there is a feeling here it could be done, but also people fear too that it could all fall apart. nick, thanks very much. 0ur correspondent nick beake there in brussels. thousand of doses of coronavirus vaccine have arrived in scotland — ahead of the start this week of its vaccination programme. vaccinations are also expected to begin at 50 hospital hubs
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in england on tuesday. it's hoped that gp—run centres to administer the vaccine will be up and running from mid—december — patients who are over the age of 80 will be invited in first. but the uk nations' four chief medical officers have warned that this winter, the vaccine will have only a "marginal impact" on the numbers admitted to hospital, and so social distancing and other precautions will still be needed. more rapid mass testing is being introduced in areas in the highest tier of restrictions in england, including in wolverhampton. but there are concerns about their accuracy, afterfigures — based on a pilot in liverpool — showed lateral flow tests missed half of all cases. our health correspondent katherine da costa reports. council staff here in wolverhampton are preparing to roll out mass testing from monday. nose and throat swa bs a re testing from monday. nose and throat swabs are ta ken testing from monday. nose and throat swabs are taken but instead of being sent to a lab, lateral flow tests provide results within half an hour. but there is concern they are not as
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accurate as standard pcr tests so more people could be told they are negative when they are not.“ more people could be told they are negative when they are not. if those people then go out and they visit their grandparents,
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1365 people had been admitted to hospital on average each day over the week to last tuesday. 397 deaths we re the week to last tuesday. 397 deaths were reported, people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test and that means on average in the past week, 427 deaths we re average in the past week, 427 deaths were announced each day. it takes the total number of that so far across the uk to 61,014. keir starmer is self isolating. he will work from home until wednesday the 16th of december. the mayor of liverpool, joe anderson, has been released
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on bailfollowing his arrest, as part of a fraud inquiry. he and four other people were detained as part of a year—long investigation into bribery allegations, linked to the awarding of building contracts in the city. in a statement this afternoon, joe anderson says he "will be talking with cabinet colleagues to ensure the challenges our city faces with the covid pandemic continue to receive the government says not, it says the risk to people is very low and that the consumption of poultry products including eggs should not be infected. there are numerous strains of bird flu and most do not affect humans. it is a worry, i think, for farmers, obviously a very busy time of year for
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farmers, obviously a very busy time of yearfor them, the british poultry council warning it could cost farmers millions of pounds, we have had a turkey farm in northallerton in north yorkshire this week having to cull 10,000 turkeys because of an outbreak there. the government insisting supplies of turkeys for christmas will not be affected. incidentally, in terms of free range, as farmers continue to label their products free range as long as these measures don't go on too long, i think it is 12 weeks for meat and 16 weeks for eggs. 0k, thank you very much, jon donnison. sport now, and in rugby union, ireland have beaten scotland in theirfinal game of the autumn nations cup. the home side won 31—16 to finish third in the tournament. it meant scotland continues its decade—long losing streak in dublin, as ben croucher reports. in a year like no other, a familiarfinish. it's been ten months and one pandemic since ireland won this fixture to kick off the six nations. since then, there has been something of a scottish rugby revival.
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it lasted about 30 minutes in dublin. three swings of jaco van der walt‘s boot on debut pushed them ahead. 0ne swing of duncan taylor's arm set them back. deliberate, said the referee. yellow card. scotland one man and soon two points down following the quick reactions of keith earls. fast in mind, fleet of foot, and acrobatic in the air. earls extended the irish lead after time. lead after half time. but for all those fancy on the flanks scotland just went straight through the middle. dth van der merwe rewarding their endeavour with a try. but they'd have little else to shout about as ireland kicked clearfor a 31—16 win. for all that changed in 2020, scotland see it out with a feeling they know all too well. ben croucher, bbc news. and before we go, after a six—year mission, a japanese space probe is due to land back to earth with the first large fragments of rock from an asteroid.
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this footage shows it touching down on the asteroid for the first time to collect a sample from the surface. it's hoped studying the rocks could provide insights into how the solar system was formed. we're back with the late news at 10:05. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye.
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more now on the news that gps in england will start offering the coronavirus vaccine from the 14th of december. patients aged 80 or over, will be the first to get it. earlier i spoke to the chair of the college of gps, professor martin marshall, and he said local doctors were ready for the roll—out
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so exciting, isn't it? it's fantastic news that we have vaccines available, that they got regulatory approval, and now we've got the big challenge of delivery, making sure that they get to the right people in a timely way. general practice is a really important part of that programme, because we have a track record of delivering vaccines, particularly the flu vaccine and childhood vaccines, but also because our local communities trust us, and that's really important for a new vaccine. so, general practice is ready, it is going to be really big challenge but i'm quite sure that general practice is up for it. 0k. just talk us through the challenges and how you've got around those, your gps have got around those. so, the biggest challenge is the first vaccine to get approval is the pfizer vaccine and that's the one that needs to be stored at —70 celsius initially and then has a relatively short life once you unfreeze it and take it out into the community for delivery. it also comes in very large packs as well, so you have to make sure that you have a lot of patients lined up,
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ready to receive it, so those are the challenges but, as i say, general practice is used to having the mechanisms in place in order to deliver it. we are reassured by nhs england that the freezer capacity is available to us. we know how to draw the vaccine up, we know how to dilute it, and we know how to administer it, and all that's going to be done in a safe way with social distancing. now, i understand that the criteria's described as the most high—risk, and does thatjust apply to age or do other people fall into that category, that your gps will be contacting? well, it appears from the evidence that age is the most important criterion by a long way. of course, age is a proxy measure for things like having multiple diseases as well, that's really important, but age is the simplest and probably most valid way of delivering it, and that's why in general practice we're starting with the over 80—year—olds in the first instance and then gradually work down through the age bands. why is it always age, though? because i'm just thinking
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there are people, young people, who are shielding, for example cancer patients, are they not at risk? yes, they are at risk as well, but it's all about relative risk. it's all about prioritisation, and scientists have been looking at the data for a long period of time, looking at those who are most at risk, looking at those who are most likely to benefit from the vaccination, and the conclusion they've come to is that age is the most important factor. that doesn't mean that there aren't other factors as well, 0k, ok, so, have you started already contacting patients? because it is not long now, is it? the 14th of december. so, logistically, what happens? have people been ringing into search of his own as the standard procedure that you have received in terms of guidance of? there will be a standard procedure so we there will be a standard procedure so we onlyjust got the uk for general practice to deliver the pfizer vaccine yesterday evening.
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prior to that, general practice was getting itself prepared to deliver the astrazeneca oxford vaccine which is the one that is easier to deliver in general practice. the reason the pfizer vaccine has been made available to general practices because of these pirated in our ability to access 80—year—olds. so we haven't sent out invitations yet. it will be happening probably next week. patient shouldn't just turn up and they shouldn't try to make appointments. they will be sent appointments. they will be sent appointments from general practice and it is really important that they understand these priority so that we don't end with people lower priority looking on idols trying to get the vaccine because that simply won't happen. i think there are some problems, i think there is evidence that people ignore letters, that's the thing, and of course there is already a reluctance for people to be the first receivers of this vaccine so have are gps tackling this? you say they have trust, people within the community trust by medical centres. that one to one to
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get people to come in, how are you advising gps

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